Issuu on Google+

Issue 45, Volume 122

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

UT Director passes away suddenly Preston Peeden

Associate Editor Dr. Margaret Morrison, the director of the School of Advertising and Public Relations, passed away at her home yesterday. She was 49. Morrison, who joined the UT staff in 1995 as a teacher, had been director for nine months after filling the position on an interim basis for nearly two years. Her passing was completely unexpected. “Everyone is shocked,” said Dr. Eric Haley, an advertis-

ing professor. “We don’t know any details.” Dr. Michael Wirth, the dean of the College of Communication & Information, expressed equal surprise. “I don’t have any information to share,” Wirth said. “The only thing I know is that Margie passed away, and that she was in her house.” Wirth did not try and underestimate the feeling of grief on campus. “People are shocked and saddened. This was not at

all expected,” Wirth said. “… Words cannot express how sad and unhappy the mood is here.” Morrison’s cause of death is as of yet unknown. For those that knew her, Morrison was a tireless worker, always willing to lend a hand to students who needed it. “She was extremely generous and selfless and truly willing to help,” said Paul Domingo, a graduate student in advertising. “She would bend over backwards to help

you in any capacity that she could.” Domingo, who had worked with Morrison for two years in a mentor capacity, said she was a rare individual who anyone could connect with. “I felt like I could level with her,” Domingo said. “There was something about her that was welcoming, really inviting and really down to earth … Sometimes when you talk with faculty, there is a certain amount of B.S. that you have to maneuver around, but with her that wasn’t the case.”

For Anastasia Barnes, a senior in advertising, Morrison was the kind of teacher that students wanted and needed. “She was not only a great teacher, but she was a great person as well,” Barnes said, who took a first session seminar class from Morrison. “…I looked forward to her class everyday.” Morrison received her B.S. in broadcasting from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, her M.A. in telecommunications from

Ohio University and her Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of Georgia. She was twice awarded the College of Communication’s teaching award, the first in 1996 and the second in 1999. “She has big shoes to fill and I know that it will be hard to go back to class,” Barnes said. The university has released a statement saying that a memorial service is in the works, with information to follow later as her family comes to Knoxville.

Law professor discusses human rights Brooke Turner

Staff Writer To kick off this year’s third annual Human Rights Awareness Week, the UT Amnesty International Chapter hosted former UT professor of law Ndiva KofeleKale to speak on behalf of political prisoner Marafa Hamidou Yaya in hopes of gaining students’ support and interest in fighting against unjust governments. In posters plastered across campus, students have undoubtedly seen the face of Marafa, the political prisoner who claims to be innocent of the crime charged against him. The former Secretary General of Cameroon, Marafa was arrested and imprisoned in April 2012 by the Cameroon government for allegedly embezzling government money into an American bank account. According to Kofele-Kale, his lawyer, Marafa’s human rights have been violated because he has been imprisoned without objective evidence or due process of law. Kofele-Kale is currently a professor at the Dedman School of Law at Southern Methodist University as well as a practicing lawyer in the U.S. and in Cameroon. He spoke on Marafa’s behalf on Monday to rally support from his former colleagues and past Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon students while simultaneously Professor Ndiva Kofele-Kale of SMU Dedman School of Law speaks about Marafa aiming to raise awareness of Hamidou Yaya, a Cameroonian political leader who was convicted in 2012 to 25 human injustice. years in prison for “intellectual complicity” in the misappropriation of public funds. Kofele-Kale pleaded

Dialogue to be held on sports, religion Lauren Kittrell

Sports Editor The worlds of sports and spirituality hold a unique relationship in the hearts of athletes and coaches across the globe. Mind, body and spirit must be equally addressed and balanced to create a whole, steadfast and capable person or athlete, but sports and religion don’t stop with one individual. At the Interfaith Dialogue on Religion and Sport, a panel of capable religious scholars in and around Knoxville will come together to address the matter of religion and spirituality in a world consumed by sports. “The presentation will provide insight into how different faith traditions view the role of sport within their faith,” Dr. Robin Hardin, associate professor of the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation and Sport Studies, said. “It will provide the campus community an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the differences and similarities in these faith traditions. It will also enable people to see just how intertwined religion and sport — and how important — both are in this region of the country.” The panel, some of whom met for a similar discussion only one year ago, will be comprised of Father Charlie Donahue, pastor at Blessed John XXIII Parish;

Rabbi Alon C. Ferency of Heska Amuna Synagogue; Chaplain Abdel Rahman Murphy, director of the Roots Program at Muslim Community of Knoxville; and UT’s own Chaplain Roger Woods of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and UTK Athletics. While Ashleigh M. Huffman, assistant director of the Center for Sport, Peace and Society at UT, was invited to join the panel, there was a last minute change to her schedule and she will be be unable to participate. The panel will address everything from the holistic care of athletes to the effect sports can have in worldwide peacemaking. “When we think about athletes and keeping them fit, we take care of the cognitive side, everybody’s in a degree program. We take care of the physical side, we keep them well; we take care of the dietary side ... but there’s a hole inside the individual that often goes untended to and that’s the spiritual side,” Dr. Waller, associate professor of sports management said. As a part of the Center for Sports, Peace and Society, Dr. Waller said they have been looking at trends in athletic departments and across the globe to help in their study of religion in the world of sports. While the panel addresses religion from several different perspectives,

Waller said they will address how religion and sports work together in society and how to care for an individual athlete from a Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, Islamic, and so on, point of view. “They’re going to sit down and talk about the interface between religion and sport from an interfaith perspective,” Waller said. Dr. Waller said this is a great event for students to join in by coming, listening to and engaging in the discussion, but he is highly invested in the topic as well. He said the topic is something that should speak to a wide range of people, as so many have a vested interest in sports and are heavily influenced and invested in religion and spirituality. “I think for me the fascination will be (the panelists’) unique perspectives on sport through the lens of faith,” he said. “We take it pretty seriously here in the Western world and it is a serious thing, but also I think when you look at how faith can drive sports or buttresses sports, it makes for a pretty interesting conversation. I think the faith perspectives are going to be very interesting to hear and to process.” The event will be held in Room 235 of the Health and Physical Education building at 12:40 p.m. today.

Marafa’s case and urged the involvement and interest of any American college students on the grounds that everyone shares a common humanity. “As students you all are the repository of ideas,” KofeleKale said. “You, more so than the adults, understand what I mean when I say, ‘We all share a common humanity.’ If one person’s human rights are being assaulted, then yours and mine are also under attack.” Kofele-Kale explained that student support in the U.S. could get more people concerned with more than just themselves. As the current president of UT’s Amnesty International, Ashley Charest, senior in biological sciences, agreed with Kofele-Kale. “I do support his reasoning for wanting to gain students’ interest, because one thing people don’t really realize is that students really do have a voice,” Charest said. “People, especially in college, really do have a lot of ways to communicate with each other and with the world. So they can be very effective in doing the things he wants them to do, like sign the petitions, emailing them out to each other, tweeting and Facebooking.” Charest agreed that Marafa’s case is a direct violation of universal human rights laws, citing petitions, e-mails and social media as possible vehicles for support of the prisoner. “The president of Cameroon is basically acting

upon his own whims and not upon the laws that are universal and international between different countries as stated by the UN and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” Charest said. “Every single person has the right to a trial by due process of law and Marafa is not getting that.” Erik Rutledge, freshman in computer science, said he supported the case. He sees this case affecting other future human rights cases, perhaps in the U.S., where the government may try to rob people of their inalienable rights. “I would say I support more on a grander scale than just specifically on this one case,” Rutledge said. “I understand his advocacy for this individual, however I think the issue is on a grander scale of course, even here in the United States.” Despite maintaining a more general focus on human rights, Rutledge echoed Kofele-Kale and Charest in urging individuals to consider involvement, even if the issues seem distant from their own lives. Kofele-Kale implored the university to make noise, whether for this particular issue of Marafa’s human rights or any other issues where human’s rights are violated. He also offered his e-mail address – nkofele@smu.edu – to any student interested in human rights activism. “Make noise,” he urged. “… the more noise we make, the more we attract attention.”

Around Rocky Top

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Junior Colton Norton returns a tough shot during the Murray State match at Goodfriend Tennis Center on Jan. 21.


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

Writer reaches beyond gender to tell story Claire Dodson

Copy Editor Author T Cooper tackled a difficult subject matter through a variety of media, including music, graphic novel, short video and interview, last night as he read from his nonfiction book, “Real Man Adventures,” in the Hodges Library Auditorium. The event was part of UT’s “Writers in the Library” series that brings diverse authors to speak and read their work on campus. “Real Man Adventures” is, according to the author, a “meditation on masculinity with autobiographical elements, and also kind of a love story.” While the book deals with perceptions of masculinity in the world today, it is centered around Cooper’s own history: the writer is transgender. Of the writers this year, Cooper is the only one who seemed reluctant to talk about the autobio-

graphical elements of his story. “I’m talking about a book that I don’t like talking about, which is sad for you,” Cooper laughed. “But that’s why I bring a whole row of people to tell it for me.” This row of people included UT faculty member Elizabeth Henderson, Magpies Bakery owner Peggy Hambright and Cooper’s other Knoxville-based friends. Henderson acted the female parts of some of the scripted parts of the book, while Hambright played several accordion interludes to accompany the six-word memories that Cooper intersperses through his book. His reluctance on the subject of his past was explained in the beginning of his book. “I don’t really want to write about my ‘thing’ … the thing that defines most of us, whether determined by others or ourselves … but I think I might have to to stop it from being a thing,” Cooper read. “One’s candor and the resultant exposure can end up

hanging around for people to pick through.” Instead of his ‘thing,’ Cooper’s reading included interviews with exotic dancers, dialogue between himself and his wife, and a column addressing Shiloh Jolie-Pitt’s clothing choices. Cooper said that he sometimes finds it easier and more comfortable to be around people who don’t know of his past – the car salesman, the cashier. For Emma Russell, sophomore in women’s studies, Cooper’s hesitancy is understandable. “He didn’t seem particularly happy with sharing,” Russell said. “I liked it. When people have issues or histories like this, people expect you to just share everything about yourself. But that’s unrealistic.” This seems to be the reason for the diversity and non-linearity of “Adventures.” “I wanted this book to have a lot of different voices interacting and weighing in,” Cooper said. “Even though I look it, I am not the authority on masculinity.” He might not be the authority, but he can speak to the myths and comments he receives from people about being transgender as

well as the importance of identity. “‘Nobody would ever suspect’ is the go-to generous compliment non-trans people always give us. ‘I never would have known that you weren’t born male, or female, or poor, or born in another country,’” Cooper said. “But it’s not about what others think you are, it’s about what you think you are … what you fear, what you project consciously or unconsciously.” Stephanie Phillips, senior in English, emphasized the ease of relating to Cooper in his storytelling. “He doesn’t claim to be the expert, he just expresses his thoughts about how our society is about masculinity,” Phillips said. “It helps to break down stereotypes and stop people from being afraid of making choices if they want a different life.” For Cooper, these effects were probably unintended; he stressed the personal importance in simply telling his story and getting it out of his system. “It was definitely something I struggled with to write for a long Tara Sripunvoraskul •The Daily Beacon time,” Cooper said. “It’s not like ‘eat pray trans,’ it’s not meant to Author T Cooper reads an excerpt from his book ‘Real be inspirational. It’s just my tiny Man Adventures,’ during the ‘Writers in the Library’ event little take on my tiny little life.” in Hodges Library Auditorium at 7 p.m. on March 12.

Cheek leads town hall in UC David Cobb

Assistant News Editor From UT’s goal to be climate neutral by 2061 to the predictable topic of his stance on benefits for domestic partners, Chancellor Jimmy Cheek fielded questions on a myriad of topics during a town hall meeting at the UC’s Shiloh Room on Monday evening. Perhaps the item most relevant to current students was Cheek’s support of legislation that would adjust the HOPE Scholarship to benefit the

state’s more ambitious students. Doug Overbey, a state senator from Maryville, is proposing legislation that would cap HOPE Scholarship reception at eight semesters rather than its current limit of 120 hours. Under the present system, a student who wishes to pursue a double major can have their HOPE Scholarship run out if they exceed the 120-hour limit despite accumulating the hours in four years or less. “We shouldn’t have a disincentive for students doing that in an eight semester period of time,” Cheek said. “I realize you’ve got to limit HOPE because the money is not unlimited. But if we have a limit I think it needs to

be eight semesters, not 120 hours.” Cheek said he plans to discuss the issue with Overbey when he visits the Tennessee General Assembly today. “We’ve got a lot of students that are going to graduate in eight semesters, but they’ve got 132 hours or 140 hours,” Cheek said. Student Government Association representatives lobbied for the change Overbey is proposing when they attended the State of the State address in January. “That was a good thing that we expressed to them, that they really understood and heard, that I think they’re going to act upon,” SGA president Adam Roddy told The

Daily Beacon after returning from Nashville. Monday’s town hall was a part of SGA’s Government Affairs Committee’s Advocacy Week, aimed at giving students a forum to voice concerns directly to Cheek. Some of the other issues that garnered discussion were Cheek’s stance on fracking, the university’s communication with the City of Knoxville regarding future renovations to Cumberland Avenue and the best way to contact Board of Trustees members. On the issue of wages for UT employees, the chancellor conceded that UT needs to make progress to catch up with comparable institutions. “If you were to look at campus salaries and compare them to other universities across the country, what you would find is our salaries are below where they should be, and that’s across the board wherever you want to start,” Cheek said after his decision to accept a raise was questioned. “For us to be competitive and attract the kind of faculty and staff we want on this campus, we’ve had to address that issue,” Cheek said. “We’ve given two five percent raises in the last two years and our plan is to give another raise next year.” The town hall meeting lasted about an hour. “This is a great way to face-to-face ask Chancellor Cheek questions that we may have,” Colin Thompson, a sophomore in political science and history, said.


Wednesday, March 13, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE Professor ties nature to architecture architecture, was excited to see Waldman and learn more about how his work has affected her own. The contrasting tones “Professor Waldman of the tragic yet majestic teaches at UVA and my painting “The Death of thesis advisor, Brian Marat” lit the expectant Ambroziak, also studied at faces of architecture stuUVA and Princeton, so he’s dents and faculty alike as definitely an influence on Peter Waldman began his my thesis advilecture. sor,” Cagle said. The William R. “Learning that Kenan Jr., profesparticular school sor of architecture of theory is really at the University interesting to me of Virginia School and is pertinent of Architecture, to my current Waldman used the work in my themethods of artists sis.” such as Jacque-Lois Waldman said David to illustrate he draws from to the audience how the passion of his one frames the form former mentors of nature, emulating when he encourthe order and dualiages students ties presented to to make a conexpress the region’s nection with all natural culture. He their past works emphasized that by in each of their being in tune with projects. the preconditions of “My influences the land, architects were my teachcan form a national ers like Michael identity through couGraves who pling agriculture and went to Rome architecture. and discovered Waldman’s lecideas that were ture, “The Word powerful there Made Flesh: On and took them Specifications for Construction,” • Photo courtesy of arch.virginia.edu back to America served as the spring Professor Peter Waldman of the University of Virginia School of to share with installment of the Architecture spoke to students during a design lecture on March 11. his students,” Waldman said. Robert B. Church III Memorial Lecture director of the School of thing he had always been “I want (students) to begin Series. Held each semester Architecture, was especial- doing was part of a truly to think that ideas come in honor of its namesake, ly delighted to introduce sustainable practice of not from somewhere. I can say the second dean of the UT Waldman. Wall was former- architecture but practice of that they come from the sun and the moon, gravity inhabitation.” School of Architecture, ly Waldman’s student. Waldman’s influence is and the beautiful layout of “Peter has been a menthe Church Lecture Series hosted Waldman as its third tor for me for 27 years and spreading across genera- gardens. I try real hard now he has supported our fac- tions of students, beyond for (students) to say yes lecturer of 2013. “I love history and I love ulty at UT in a variety of teachers and into the lives of these are not just aesthetic, the fact that a lot of issues ways,” Wall said. “He has students. Elizabeth Cagle, a but they come from ideas are recurrent,” Waldman been great to our faculty fifth year undergraduate in that might be eternal.”

Savannah Gilman Contributor

said. “Architecture helps people see things will come again and again. Nowadays in this age of information, nothing is the same worldwide. Architecture is some way to stabilize us in a world where everything seems to be changing.” Dr. Scott Wall, the

because he does the stuff he does, not because he wants the fame, but because he is passionate about what comes out of that. Peter’s perspective on the poetry of rational design is really amazing. He went from an abstract kind of storytelling to realizing that every-

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Country singer pleases fans with new album Miles Carter

Staff Writer Nashville’s up and coming country/folk/rock singer, Caitlin Rose, had her first taste of success with her debut album, “Own Side Now,” in 2011. Two years later, she is back for more with her sophomore effort, “The Stand-In.” “The Stand-In” features a mixture of old-timey melodic vocals, mellow instrumentation and catchy lyrics. The style of this album is not like that of current country music artists like Taylor Swift or Carrie Underwood, but of country/folk music that came out of Nashville in the 1950s and 1960s. With comparisons to artists like Loretta Lynn and Patsy Cline, Rose has been steadily inserting a very particular style into current country music. Led by a banjo and a pedal steel, the lead single “I Was Cruel” (originally done by The Deep Vibration) is a groovy country/rock ballad about unknowingly being the bad guy/girl in a relationship. Although it is about a fairly melancholy concept, “I Was Cruel” is fairly upbeat and really does not come off as a depressing ballad like one would expect from the title. One thing Rose does really well is presenting the typical love song or break up tune, but doing so without all of the melodrama everyone is so accustomed to hearing from most popular artists. “Only a Clown” is another relaxing summertime song that has a deeper meaning. Clearly the concept of the song has something to do with a past relationship. Although it seems a little negative with the first verse, the negativity is cured by a very san-

guine hook about putting one’s music on, enjoying it and moving on from the past. “Pink Champagne” is a sultry love song that showcases the talent level of Rose’s band as well as her storytelling ability. The song is inspired by a Joan Didion short essay about the desperate and short-lived romance of a Las Vegas wedding. “Pink Champagne” has a lengthy guitar solo that makes the listener want to start plucking the nearest stringed instrument they can find. The power of this solo is not to be underestimated. In this day and age, one would never hear a lengthy guitar solo on any popular female country artist’s record. “Silver Sings” is a very upbeat song telling of how a girl named Silver sings beautifully. This could be a metaphor for the church bells that ring at a wedding or it could also genuinely be about someone named Silver. No matter what “Silver Sings” is about, it’s still a jolly song that will make anyone’s head bobble. On top of that, Rose’s beautiful vocals will leave listeners thinking they just received an ear massage. While Rose is certainly not the only artist with a style that is drawn from a much older form of music, she is one of the few doing it in the country music scene. Her groovy, 1960s gospel/ folk inspired feel is very original. Rose has the total package: a lovely voice, strong lyrics and a very organic style. With a strong debut and sophomore album, Rose has an endless ceiling in the country/folk/pop music scene. “The Stand-In” was released on Feb. 25 and is available for purchase on iTunes and additionally can be listened to for free on Spotify.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Letter Editor to the

Scottish Rite portrayal off mark Brooke Turner’s piece (”Scottish Rite Temple piques curiosity” from Thursday, March 7, 2013) about the Scottish Rite Temple, a branch of Freemasons in our community, located on 16th street was a great disservice to this organization. The members of the Scottish Rite Temple live by this creed: “Human progress is our cause, Liberty of thought our supreme wish, Freedom of conscience our mission and the Guarantee of equal rights to all people everywhere our ultimate goal.” Among the many good works the members accomplish in our area is providing shoes for needy children and medical equipment for those in need. The Temple membership provides a number of college scholarships. Additionally, they assist families in providing for corrective therapy for speech impaired preschool children, including using the services of the Hearing and Speech Center located on our campus. The members of this community organization have, for nearly 45 years, hosted the choirs of the UT School of Music in their annual Memorial Service, which is open to the public. In this nonsectarian service of poetic readings and music, the

lives of those members who have passed away in the previous year are beautifully remembered and celebrated. After the service, the Scottish Rite Temple members always provide a sumptuous meal for our students. Additionally, for our contribution to the Memorial Service, the members have established a fund that provides critical funding for strategic needs related to the mission, operation and function of the Choral Activities in the School of Music. We have always found the members of the Scottish Rite Temple to be friendly, open, generous and uncommonly kind. The experience of those quoted in Ms. Turner’s article bear no resemblance to the way our students have been treated by the members. The UT School of Music Choral Area cherishes the relationship with the Scottish Rite Temple and their wonderful members. This is a prime example of how the university and community should work together. Dr. Angela L. Batey School of Music Director of Choral Activities abatey@utk.edu

THE GREAT MASH-UP • Liz Newnam

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... •Katie Dison-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Horror films today lack nuance The Maple Kind by

Hunter Tipton I’m a guy who likes a good horror film. Call it weird, but I enjoy a good scaring that will keep me up at night for a little bit. However, one thing I don’t enjoy is the uniformity of so many horror films in today’s society. For example, take a look at some of the more hyped horror films coming up. A new “Evil Dead” is about to be released with new characters and a new plotline. After watching the trailer and reading a bit about it, I’ve discovered that it’s essentially about some people in a cabin in the woods somewhere being killed by a demon-zombie girl. Within 15 seconds of starting the trailer I had decided that the movie was a more serious version of “Cabin in the Woods” without the weird side plot. Essentially, we’ve reached a point where writers find it hard to make horror movies that don’t involve little demon-zombie girls killing people. It’s a cheap and easy plot fix that lacks creativity, yet somehow it still sells. Another common plot line is the whole “something, most likely a demon, is living inside of me and making me be creepy.” I think the best example of this right now is probably “The Last Exorcism II,” which essentially looks like a remake of roughly fifty movies over the last five years. Haven’t we kind of “been there, done that” with movies like “The Last Exorcism of Emily Rose,” “The Last Exorcism” and all four of the exactly-the-same “Paranormal

Activity” films? The success of one movie drives other writers to copy an idea and run it into the ground. Obviously there will always be room for improving an old idea. Movies like “The Thing” and its remake proved this was true. The show “The Walking Dead” proves that you can continue to draw massive viewers every week using the same horrific zombie makeup. However, these films simply use repeated themes (in this case aliens and zombies) to supplement the true appeal of the pictures, not replace it. “The Thing” simply uses aliens to achieve the psychological thrill of not knowing who you trust in an inescapable environment. “The Walking Dead” explores who we really are as individuals when social barriers and restrictions break down. These have defined plots where the horror device is simply a means of achieving a higher goal. They aren’t one of the “Saw” movies where the appeal was as basic and thoughtless as people getting cut up. When I get scared, I want to think about why I’m scared. I want to think about what primal, carnal instinct is being pulled out of me. I want my characters to make reasonable decisions so that I can put myself in the situation and know I would be equally helpless. Unfortunately, so many movies lack that today. The result is zombie girls murdering stupid college students and demons making people crawl up walls and jump out at the camera. It will scare me, yes, but you won’t build a lasting movie off of it. — Hunter Tipton is a senior in microbiology. He can be reached at jtipto10@ utk.edu.

Relationships thrive when built on trust All Things Dark and Twisty by

Sammantha Warchol EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

MANAGING EDITOR Emily DeLanzo ASSOCIATE EDITOR Preston Peeden CHIEF COPY EDITOR Eric Nalley DESIGN EDITORS Alex Cline Caroline Gompers PHOTO EDITORS Tia Patron Tara Sripunvoraskul NEWS EDITOR RJ Vogt ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR David Cobb ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Victoria Wright ASSISTANT ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Melodi Erdogan SPORTS EDITOR Lauren Kittrell ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Austin Bornheim COPY EDITORS Hannah Bloomfield Claire Dodson Jacob Hobson Justin Joo Troy Provost-Heron Samantha Smoak

ADVERTISING MANAGER Alison Embry beaconads@utdailybeacon.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Casey Lawrence Andi Overby Sookie Park ADVERTISING PRODUCTION ARTISTS Will Jellicorse Ryan McPherson EDITORIAL PRODUCTION ARTISTS Brittany Coggins Kristi Frazier Taylor Presley Katrina Roberts CLASSIFIED ADVISER Savannah Pickard orderad@utdailybeacon.com

To report a news item, please e-mail editor.news@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-2348 To submit a press release, please e-mail pressreleases@utdailybeacon.com To place an ad, please e-mail beaconads@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-5206 To place a classified ad, please e-mail orderad@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-4931 To submit a Letter to the Editor, please e-mail letters@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-4931 If you think something has been reported incorrectly, please contact the managing editor at 974-2348. Advertising: (865) 974-5206 Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 Managing Editor: (865) 974-2348 Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 Fax: (865) 974-5569

The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

If the female student body had a dime for every time they heard a guy say, “why should I go out with her if she’s not putting out?,” we’d all be rich. Relax, male student body. I’m not going to write about how no one should have sexual relations before marriage. I’m a realist. I am going to talk about real relationships. The ones that survive the test of time, not the ones that succumb to time. So there’s a girl you just met, she’s beautiful and she thinks you’re hot. It has only taken one longish look and all of ten minutes for her to be schmoozed into the back seat of your car or your dorm room. Do you trust her? Does she trust you? I think you both have the same issue at the end of the day or evening, that’s lots of questions. Her question should be, how many other girls has he schmoozed into your dorm room? The guy’s questions should be close to the same. How many guys have longingly looked at her and schmoozed her into their dorm room? This new couple will never trust each other. That is where it begins and ends, in a back seat or dorm room. Now you may still see that person again, but the relationship is probably doomed from the beginning. Lasting relationships begin and end with trust, simple as that. Now imagine a new scenario, there’s this girl (or guy) in your class. She’s cute,

and she thinks you are adorable. You look over her way every day and she does the same. Clearly you both like each other. Finally, you get up the nerve to ask her on a date. The date goes great, you talk, get to know each other. You even figure out that not only is she (or he) cute, but also smart and funny. Maybe you don’t have everything in common, but you at least you share a passion or values; most of all you enjoy being together. A relationship would be pretty boring if the two of you were exactly the same. At the end of the evening, you both decide to go on another date. Now, in this interlude, both parties walk away not with questions of trust, but questions of what will I find out about her next. Relationships should be built one block at a time, not one back seat at a time. Nowadays no one wants to build anything. You want to put in half efforts and think you should become the CEO at some corporation. We just expect we shouldn’t have to work at anything, not even our relationships. Somehow, we are entitled to start at the top. The only problem with that is, the only way to go from there is down. Relationships can only stand the test of time as long as the two people involved are committed to build the trust, communication and feelings together. If you really want a good relationship, build it together. Start slow and work on it. Nothing should come easy if it’s worth having. — Samantha Warchol is a sophomore in psychology. She can be reached at swarchol@utk.edu.


Wednesday, March 13, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Jones promotes Volunteer pride

Miller reflects on path to UT Troy Provost-Heron Staff Writer

There have been many great stories that Tennessee athletes have given the public as to what enticed them to become a Volunteer, and there will continue to be great stories in the years to come. It is unlikely, however, that another story will ever have the same weight as senior forward Dwight Miller’s. As a child growing up in Nassau, Bahamas, Miller did not play basketball until his teenage years and did not play organized basketball until his freshman year in the U.S. at the age of 14. “I came over here to the states (on) Dec. 31, 2004, so that’s when I started playing basketball in America,� Miller said. “That’s when I really got a real introduction to it.� After four years at St. Pius X High School in Houston, Miller went from being a player who had never really played the game before to one of the most highly touted recruits in the country. Ranked as the No. 65 recruit in the nation, Miller chose to sign with the Pittsburgh Panthers where he would have to deal with the struggle of being redshirted his freshman year. “It was tough,� Miller said. “Especially since I worked so hard to get from not even playing basketball, not even having any skills, I couldn’t dribble, I couldn’t shoot or anything like that until my freshman year, and to end up being 65th and end up getting a bunch of awards and then going to Pitt and having to redshirt. It was tough at first. It was something that I really didn’t want to do at first because I felt I had so much to prove.� But for Miller, the struggles did not end there. His redshirt freshman year at Pitt did not fare any better for the young forward as he barely saw the court, averaging 5.3 minutes a game. With a logjam of potential NBA players on the roster consisting of Sam Young and DeJuan Blair in front of him and a few highly ranked recruits on the way, Miller decided to leave Pitt and transfer to

TUTORING 7(6735(3(;3(576 *5(*0$7/6$7 )RU RYHU  \HDUV 0L FKDHO.6PLWK3K'DQG KLVWHDFKHUVKDYHKHOSHG 87VWXGHQWVSUHSDUHIRU WKH *5( *0$7 /6$7 2XUSURJUDPVRIIHULQGL YLGXDO WXWRULQJ SUDFWLFH WHVWVDQGFRPSXWHUDG DSWLYH VWUDWHJLHV DW D UHDVRQDEOH SULFH 3UR JUDPV FDQ EH GHVLJQHG DURXQG \RXU VFKHGXOH ZHHNGD\VZHHNQLJKWVRU ZHHNHQGV &RQYHQLHQWO\ ORFDWHG DW  6RXWK 3HWHUV 5G &DOO     IRU PRUH LQIRUPD WLRQ

EMPLOYMENT $GYHUWLVLQJ356RFLDO 0H GLDLQWHUQVKLS6XPPHU DQG IROORZLQJ VFKRRO \HDU 3DLG )OH[LEOH KRXUV 'LUHFW DGYHUWLVLQJEXGJHWFRRUGLQ DWH SXEOLF UHODWLRQV DQG GULYH VRFLDO PHGLD UHVXOWV 0RUH LQIRUPDWLRQ DW WKHFXPEHUODQGFRPSDQLHVF RP )LUVW%DSWLVW&RQFRUG:HVW /DNH)737SRVLWLRQVDYDLO DEOH 7HDFKHU 7HDFKHU DV VLVWDQWIORDWHU3URIHVVLRQ DO&KULVWLDQZRUNLQJHQYLURQ PHQW)OH[LEOHVFKHGXOH&DOO  RUHPDLOZHVW ODNHZHH#IEFRQFRUGRUJ 5($' 7+('$,/<%($&21 &/$66,),('6

Midland College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized before I left Pittsburgh that the thing that I really needed to do was play, so I went to junior college to go back and play and find that love and that hunger that I was missing,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a lot of offers but ultimately what it came down to was doing whatever made me happy, so I did.â&#x20AC;? The 6-foot-8 forward had an impressive sophomore year at Midland, averaging 8.2 points and 5.4 rebounds while shooting around 61 percent, all while leading his team to the NJCAA National Championship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a lot of success and I learned a lot from Midland. I think the biggest thing I learned was to stay hungry,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. After such a great season, Miller found himself rated as the No. 10 JUCO player in the country, and decided that he would play the rest of his collegiate career at UT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really tried to take my time instead of rushing into a school or going somewhere, but coming to Tennessee just felt right to me,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt like I had something to prove, especially on a big D-I stage.â&#x20AC;? In his junior year, Miller played an important role on the Volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team with big games against teams like Ole Miss (10 points, seven rebounds) and then-No. 8 Memphis (eight points and four rebounds). â&#x20AC;&#x153;The amount of success I had was nowhere close to the amount of hard work I put in,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially last year, because I wanted to play.â&#x20AC;? Just as soon as it seemed like things were on the rise for the Tennessee forward, bad luck struck as he suffered a knee injury that would sideline him for the entire 2012-13 season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A part of me is happy that I got to still be here at Tennessee, but most of me ... just wants to be out there on the floor with my teammates,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even put it into words how tough it is, but I always try to keep a smile on my face, never let people see me down and I hope people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mistake that for me being satisfied because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not what it is. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just really tough, but things happen for a reason and you have to make the best out of whatever you are given so right now that is what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to do.â&#x20AC;? One of the toughest moments for Miller

Thomas Duggins Staff Writer

FIle Photo â&#x20AC;˘ The Daily Beacon

Dwight Miller waits for a call against Austin Peay on Dec. 12, 2011. in his career was Saturday on Senior Night, where he said he was happy to go out on a win with his teammates, but it was difficult to not be out there playing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was tough,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just one of those moments of me trying to be strong but it really hit me like a brick, especially in an atmosphere like that, you just want to play in front of all those fans, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the last game of the year and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not the way you imagined youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be going out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was glad that I got to be with Tennessee students and my teammates, cheering them on and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m even more excited that we got the victory, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really the only thing that matters so I was happy that I at least got to go out on a win.â&#x20AC;? While Dwight never stepped foot on the court this year, his impact on the team as a senior leader cannot be underestimated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dwight is just a big leader for us,â&#x20AC;? guard Trae Golden said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He always knows the right things to say and I think his opinion is very valued.â&#x20AC;? With his time here coming to a close (Miller cannot be given a medical redshirt because the Vols have no more scholarships), Miller hopes that the fans remember that he was a competitor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest thing is just winning basketball games and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that I love to do,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just hope people saw that I was a competitor while I was here.â&#x20AC;?

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

FOR RENT

+DQG\ SHUVRQ WR GR OLJKW FRQVWUXFWLRQDQG\DUGZRUN  WR  KUVZN )OH[LEOH VFKHGXOH  PLOHV IURP 87  RU 

:HVW.QR[DIWHUVFKRROFDUH ORRNLQJ IRU HQHUJHWLF SHU VRQWRZRUNZLWKFKLOGUHQ0 )0867EHDYDLODEOH7XHV GD\ DQG 7KXUVGD\ DIWHU QRRQV&DOO5REHUW 

5HQW87.FRP %5&21'26 :DONWRFODVVUHQWDOVLQWKH )RUW (YLDQ7RZHU)RXQWDLQ 3ODFH 5HQDLVVDQFH 8QL YHUVLW\7RZHU SOXV 6XOOLQ V5LGJH .LQJVWRQ3ODFH :RRGODQGVDQG5LYHU7RZQH 5REHUW +ROPHV 2 Z Q H U  $ J H Q W  5HQW87.FRP

-LPP\ -RKQ V QRZ KLULQJ GULYHUVDQGLQVWRUHKHOSIRU DOO VKLIWV RQ WKH VWULS DQG 7XUNH\&UHHNORFDWLRQ&DOO   3DUWWLPH)XOOWLPH-RE2S SRUWXQLW\ ZLWK ORFDO ODQG VFDSHFRPSDQ\0XVWKDYH YDOLG7HQQHVVHH'ULYHUp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

UNFURN APTS DQG%5$SWV87DUHDDQG :HVW.QR[DUHD&DOOIRUDS SRLQWPHQW   6RXWK.QR[YLOOH87GRZQ WRZQ%5DSWV0RYHLQVSH FLDO IRU WKLV PRQWK   

FOR RENT WK3/$&($3$570(176 EORFNVIURP87/DZ 6FKRRO +LJKODQG $YH %5DQG%5DSWVRQO\ %ULFNH[WHULRUFDUSHWODXQ GU\IDFLOLW\RQILUVWIORRU *XDUDQWHHGDQGVHFXUHG SDUNLQJKRXUPDLQWHQ DQFH1RGRJVRUFDWVUG \HDULQ)RUW6DQGHUV ZZZVL[WHHQWKSODFHFRP EULWKRZDUG#VL[WHHQWKSODFH FRP   %5DQGVWXGLRDSDUWPHQWV DQG%5KRXVHV:DONLQJGLV WDQFHWR87/HDVHUHTXLUHG &DOO :$/. 72 &$0386 *UHDW 6SHFLDOV  %5 $SDUW PHQWV$YDLODEOH1RVHFXU LW\GHSRVLWV3ULPH&DPSXV +RXVLQJ    SULPHFDPSXVKRXVLQJWQFRP

Coming off a disappointing 5-7 season in 2012, the Tennessee Volunteers have begun spring practice with their third coaching staff in four years. Even though head coach Butch Jones and his staff have only been on the job since December, their drive to succeed leaves no room for excuses. They are using spring to push the team to practice as hard as they play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The big thing with this football team is they have to understand every time we step on the football field there has to be a great sense of urgency,â&#x20AC;? Jones said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The big thing is we need to be a physical football team, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be born in practice.â&#x20AC;? Jones has embraced the tradition of Tennessee football and wants his players to do the same. To do this, Jones invited former Tennessee players to come to practice. Jones wants each player to learn the names and history of Tennessee players that wore the current playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number before them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pride of who we are, a pride of who weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re representing,â&#x20AC;? Jones said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And this is one of the most storied college football programs in the country. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to protect our tradition and build upon that tradition. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a standard of excellence when you come to (UT) and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s those players understanding that. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the standard expectation in this football program and we will not compromise.â&#x20AC;? A major part of the Volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; struggles in 2012 was a defense that ranked last in the SEC in yards allowed per game (471.3) and points against per game (35.7). Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secondary also allowed the second most passing yards in the SEC (3,390). A major goal for improving the team in Butch Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first year is improving that defense. The Volsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; secondary returns many members that saw playing time during last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign including juniors Eric Gordon and Byron Moore, sophomores Justin Coleman and Brian Randolph, and freshmen LaDarrell McNeil and Daniel Gray. Randolph, who was a SEC Coaches All Freshman selection in 2011, is excited to get back on the field after tearing his ACL against Florida in the third game of the Volsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2012 season. The injury also hurt him in that he had to watch the defense struggle without him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That hurt me a lot,â&#x20AC;? Randolph said of watching the defense struggle last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just sitting at home watching the games, it was the worst feeling ever. I just wished I was out there helping them.â&#x20AC;? Gordon said that experience, combined with the new coaching staff, will pay dividends for the 2013 season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buying in,â&#x20AC;? Gordon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t settling for 5-7, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not us as a defense, as an offense and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure not Tennessee as a team. We got guys that just know football, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just excited to keep going and (getting) better every day.â&#x20AC;?

9,&725,$1+286($376 (VWDEOLVKHG  EORFNV EHKLQG 87 /DZ 6FKRRO   DQG %5 DSDUW PHQWV 9(5< /$5*( $1' 1(:/< 5(129$7(' 723 72 %27720 +DUGZRRG IORRUVKLJKFHLOLQJVSRUFKHV %5 V KDYH :' FRQQHF WLRQVIXOOEDWKVGLVKZDVK HUV *XDUDQWHHG DQG VH FXUHGSDUNLQJKUPDLQ WHQDQFH 1R GRJV RU FDWV ZZZVL[WHHQWKSODFHFRP EULWKRZDUG#VL[WHHQWKSODFH FRP  

HOUSES FOR RENT %5KRXVHVLQ)RUW 6DQGHUV VKRZLQJ QRZ IRU $XJXVW  1HZO\ UH PRGHOHG:'+9$&SDUN LQJODUJHEHGURRPVZDONWR FDPSXV %HVW KRXVHV JR TXLFNO\  RU 9ROUHQWDOVFRP

&DOOWRGD\E\SP DQG\RXUDG FDQVWDUW WRPRUURZ 

HOUSES FOR RENT

+RXVHVLQWKH)RUW$YDLO DEOHIRU)DOODQG %5LQFOXGHVDSSOLDQFHV DQGLQWHUQHW6RPHZLWK IURQW \DUG DQG SDUNLQJ &DOO 

7RSRIWK6WDW/DXUHO /DUJH%5EULFNKRXVH %$ 5HQW QHJRWLDEOH +DUG ZRRGIORRULQJFHQWUDOKHDW DYDLODEOH QRZ DQGRU -XQH $OVRDYDLODEOHDQG%5 KRXVHV1RSHWV'HWDLOV 

CONDOS FOR RENT CONDOS FOR SALE &21'26)25/($6( 2187&$0386 1RZOHDVLQJIRUIDOODW /DXUHO6WDWLRQ6W&KULVWRSK HU DQG )UDQNOLQ 6WDWLRQ ,Q FOXGHVZDWHUFDEOHDQGLQ WHUQHW 8QLYHUVLW\ 5HDO (V WDWHDQG3URSHUW\0DQDJH PHQW //&  WK 6WUHHW .QR[YLOOH  ZZZXUHKRXVLQJFRP RU UHQWDOV#XUHKRXVLQJFRP

%5 DW 5HQDLVVDQFH ,,,  )RXQWDLQ 3ODFH  6XOOLQV 5LGJH  DQG /DNH 7HUUDFH )RUDOLVWRIFRQGRV IRU VDOH HPDLO PKDUWV#DROFRPRUFDOO 0DUW\+DUWVHOO ZLWK 5HDOW\ ,QYHVWRUV  &HGDU %OXII RIILFH  

6SDFLRXV %5  FDU JDUDJH ODXQGU\URRPSULYDWHQHLJK ERUKRRGSRROSHU%5 &DOO  6HHSLFV VLWHVJRRJOHFRPVLWHFRO OHJHUHQW

5HQDLVVDQFH,,%5%$)RU 6DOH%\2ZQHU&DOO RU WH[W  &/ 6WUHHWOHYHODQG VHFXUHJDWHGDFFHVVSDUNLQJ )URQWSRUFKZLWKVPDOO\DUG 3HW)ULHQGO\

5($' 7+('$,/<%($&21 &/$66,),('6

5($' 7+('$,/<%($&21 &/$66,),('6

CONDOS FOR SALE 5REHUW+ROPHV5HDOWRUFRP /DNH3OD]D%5SUHPL XPFRQGRIRU6DOHN 6XOOLQV 5LGJH  N 5REHUW +ROPHV 5(0$; 5HDO(VWDWH7HQ&RPPHUFLDO 

HOMES FOR SALE /LYHIRU)5((,QFRPHIURP UHQWLQJ URRPV SD\V PRUW JDJHDQGELOOVZLWKVRPHOHIW RYHU ,GHDO WR VKDUH Z  IULHQGV%5IXOO%$/5  .LWFKHQV  FDU JDUDJH  ILUHSODFHVGLQLQJURRPDQG SDUW\ GHFN   PLQV IURP FDPSXV  6RXWK &LUFOH RII $OFRD +Z\ &DOO +HUE +HOWRQ   

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Espousing crime? 7 Custard need 10 Michigan college or its town 14 Baby attire with crotch snaps 15 Pistol PAC-ers? 16 Luau handouts 17 Respiratory woe 18 1/sec, in trig 19 Green sci. 20 Graduation requirement, perhaps 23 Some â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Vette roofs 24 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wizâ&#x20AC;? director 25 Org. that negotiates with G.M. 28 Matures 30 Athlete Jim whose Native American name was Wa-ThoHuk 32 High-pitched cry from an ump? 36 Scarf down 37 Signs to heed

38 Cooked, as Swiss steak 40 FiancĂŠe of Napoleon 42 Singer Eydie 43 ___ Lanka 44 Anastasiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father was one 45 Hullabaloo 47 Island off the coast of Scotland 49 Napoleonic marshal Michel 50 Dance for two 52 Big shot 57 Result of not following through (of which there are four examples in this puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grid) 60 Part of 39-Down 62 â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ had it!â&#x20AC;? 63 â&#x20AC;&#x153;FĂźr Eliseâ&#x20AC;? key 64 Sportscaster Albert 65 Finalized 66 Model BĂźndchen 67 Portend 68 Shop window posting: Abbr.

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A P P E A L

G L O O M Y

N E R E I D

G I B E T B R A B E L T H E R I N Y E S

E S A T T L Y E D S T I A S N I N G E E R Y S L O C A S U N O B D E D

S I A M

C L U B

A S T A

S P R A T

H E L G A

H A Y D N

S E R A

U L A N

A L T A

M A A B L H O R I R G O E R O I E M M T H A S P I C O L L A D A S N A R L R Y P R I L A B Y E A

R C U R T Y C A A S R K E G E E Z E R

E D S E L S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

23

24 28

32

33

34

35

38

29

30

40

42 46

57 60

27

54

55

56

44

47

48 52

53

59 62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

69 Sonnetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finish

13 Nonverbal communication syst. 21 Seek mercy, say 22 Guiding beliefs 26 Sleep problem 27 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pied Piper of Hamelinâ&#x20AC;? river 29 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that!â&#x20AC;? 31 Exclude 32 Toy you can â&#x20AC;&#x153;put somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye outâ&#x20AC;? with 33 Soap-on-___ (bath buy) 34 Last Celtic to wear #33 35 Brideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride 39 1954-77 defense grp.

DOWN 1 Toot oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horn 2 Cartographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blowup 3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ___ respect!â&#x20AC;? 4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I saw ___ a-sailing â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 5 Brunch libation 6 Classic car datum 7 Coat, in a way 8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I doâ&#x20AC;? sayer 9 Pilot light, e.g. 10 Baldwin of â&#x20AC;&#x153;30 Rockâ&#x20AC;? 11 Some college staff 12 See 55-Down

26

41

51

58

61

25 31

43

50

13

37

39

49

12

22

36

45

11

40 41 43 46 48 51 53 54 55 56 58 59 60 61

Lose tautness Austrian â&#x20AC;&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;? Official seals Jaunty in appearance Societal breakdown â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over my dead body!â&#x20AC;? Out of kilter I.Q. test pioneer With 12-Down, classic Neapolitan tune Army Rangerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topper All-night bash Threadbare threads U.N. figure: Abbr. Saint, in Rio


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols hill-top WKU, 4-0 Lady Vols recover with Andy Vaughan

of the first inning. Jeff Moberg started the inning with a walk, followed with a single by Will The first inning was all Maddox, who extended his the Diamond Vols needed on hitting-streak to 10 games. Tuesday. An error by WKU shortThe Tennessee Volunteers stop Steve Hodgins cost the (8-7) earned their fourth Hilltoppers a double play consecutive win and second and loaded the bases for shutout in as many games. The Vols picked up three first inning runs and added one in the eighth to secure the 4-0 win against Western Kentucky (7-8). “You want to score every run but you’re not gonna be perfect,” head coach Dave Serrano said. “We strive to be perfect but we know we’re gonna come up short of that … We just want our guys to give us quality at bats in every situation, especially when runners are in scoring position.” Trevor Bettencourt earned the win in his first start for the Vols. The freshman right-hander pitched around trouble in the top of the first • Photo courtesy of Wade Rackley/ Tennessee Athletics with help from catcher David Houser, who threw out a base Freshman A.J. Simcox runner trying to steal third. rounds third, headed for Bettencourt allowed zero runs home against Alcorn State on six hits and recorded three on March 10. strikeouts in three and 2/3 innings. Dalton Saberhagen, Tennessee. After back-toDrake Owenby and Eric back strikeouts, freshman Martin added five and a third right fielder Christin Stewart scoreless innings, with junior forced in a run with a walk, Nick Williams finishing the and sophomore left fielder game in the ninth. Parker Wormsley cracked a “At the start, I felt like I two-run single into right field was throwing right at the guys to put the Vols up 3-0 after aggressively,” Bettencourt one. said. “Then I started losing it “I just always take advana little bit, but I just went out tage of my opportunities, there trying to throw strikes.” whether it’s late in the game The bulk of the offense for or I get a start, I just try to the Vols came in the bottom Staff Writer

play as hard as I can every pitch, win every pitch for the team and just take pride in that,” Wormsley said. Serrano said he thought the climax of the game came as early as the first inning. “I thought the back-breaker of the game was they get the first two guys on in the first inning and we come out of it unscathed,” he said. “Then we load the bases, we get two punch-outs against us and then we get a run and Parker Wormsley comes up with a big base hit. Those are backbreakers.” Wormsley would finish the day with three of Tennessee’s four RBIs. The sophomore added the Vols’ fourth and final run in the bottom of the eighth on a sacrifice squeeze play that scored freshman center fielder Pierce Bily. Western Kentucky outhit the Vols nine to six and despite hitting the ball hard, the Tennessee pitching and defense held strong. The Hilltoppers’ pitching staff came into the game averaging over 10 strikeouts per game. While Tennessee’s offense struggled in the middle inning, it was able to put the ball in play and struck out just six times. “Their guys made some quality pitches and it’s gonna happen throughout the course of a game, but as we say we always try to win innings,” said Serrano. The Vols and Hilltoppers will play game two of the series Wednesday at 4 p.m. at Lindsey Nelson Stadium.

shutout over Winthrop Lauren Kittrell

Sports Editor For the No. 6 Lady Vols softball team, a matchup with the Winthrop Eagles meant a chance for redemption. While their meeting last year ended in a 2-1 loss for Tennessee (22-4), on Tuesday evening, everything went right in their 8-0 shutout victory. Co-head coach Karen Weekly said that midweek games can be a trap between big SEC series like No. 4 Alabama and No. 3 Florida. She said she is always a little concerned that the team is looking ahead, but she was pleased with the way they came out and took care of business against Winthrop. “They got a quick reminder last year when Winthrop snuck up on them and handed them a loss that we think proved to be critical at the end of the season in our seeding,” she said. “We talk a lot about that, that you have to take all the games seriously and we talk about playing our best self. Don’t play to the scoreboard, it’s not about, ‘do you have five runs on the board’, it’s about, ‘are you having a good at bat, are you taking it one pitch at a time, are you trying to get better with every pitch out here?’ As long as we can keep that kind of a mindset, we’ll be okay.” In the bottom of the first, senior infielder Lauren Gibson hit a two-run homer to put the team’s first runs on the board, but the scoring did not stop there. Junior Madison Shipman followed Gibson’s at-bat with home run of her own, making the score 3-0 heading into the second inning. “I like to swing it a lot and I was just seeing the ball really well today and I went after it,”

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

Raven Chavanne bunts the ball down the middle against East Tennessee State University on Feb. 15. Shipman said. “I was so pumped. Half the team was still giving Lauren a high fives when they were walking in and they turned around and were like, ‘oh my gosh, did she hit one too?’ It’s a great feeling to go back to back and we don’t get to do that very often.” Shipman’s night was far from over though. The junior hit another home run in her next plate appearance and a double in her final at bat. Going into the game, Shipman said she had no expectations for the night, especially after the team’s recent loss to Alabama on Sunday. “We try not to dwell over those losses too long because we do have such a quick turnaround,” she said. “So, we were just coming out here just ready to get after it today and try not look forward to this weekend or look back at last weekend and just focus on getting a win today.” Karen Weekly said she was not surprised at all by Shipman’s performance. “She’s been working very

hard on her timing and just making sure that she’s getting into a good hitting position early enough so that she can make good decisions,” she said. “Today, I think she saw three pitches and hit two home runs and a double. That’s the thing that makes Maddie such a good hitter is she doesn’t stand in there and take good pitches. Today when she saw a strike, she jumped on them.” But Shipman is not the only Lady Vol deserving of credit. Seniors Raven Chavanne and Ivy Renfroe also played large roles, as Chavanne scored three runs and Renfroe picked her her ninth win of the year in addition to being named Louisville Slugger/NFCA National Player of the Week and USA Softball National Collegiate Player of the Week on Tuesday. “I’m just giving all the glory to the Lord for blessing me with abilities given,” Renfroe said. The Lady Vols head to Florida on Friday to face the No. 3 Florida Gators. The game is set for 6:00 p.m.

It’s “Bonnaroo or Bust” Time in Tennessee! Stay tuned to 90.3 The Rock to be one of 90 final qualifiers for a pair of festival tickets and parking passes!

3 WAYS 1. ~ TO ~ 2. QUALIFY: 3.

Be caller #7 when you hear the “Bonnarooooooo...” shout-out on 90.3 The Rock! Like the WUTK Facebook page and sign up for the WUTK E-Blast Register at one of our sponsor locations to be announced, soon!

Streaming 24.7.365 at WUTKRADIO.COM or listen on your

smart phone and iPad app.


The Daily Beacon