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Issue 41, Volume 122

Thursday, March 7 , 2013

Future development near campus concerns many Emily DeLanzo Managing Editor The large patch of dirt and concrete beneath the bridge to the Agricultural campus is nothing new to current students. But the future of the previously unused and unknown space is bright with construction of a Walmart, Publix and a parking garage underway. Students will have the opportunity to wander over from Presidential Court and other areas of campus to retrieve groceries and other necessities without the aid of a vehicle. However exciting and productive the future may appear, the site’s past continues to haunt from below ground. Dr. Larry McKay, a professor and the head of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, knows of the site and its extensive and dirty history. The site below the bridge, which is located at the intersection of Cumberland Avenue and Volunteer Boulevard, was previously an industrial site. For more than 100 years, the industrial site was used to create brass bellows by the company Fulton Bellows. The industrial site was eventually shut down in 2005, but its long-term environmental effects remain deep-rooted beneath the soil. The environmental problems specifically lie with subsurface contamination and groundwater contamination. During the duration of its

existence, the Fulton Bellows plant used carbon tetrachlorides, trichloretheylene (TCE) and perchlorethelyne (PCE) to clean and prepare the bellows for painting and production. In turn, some of these dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) ran off the concrete and contaminated the soil. These solvents are particularly hazardous to environmental degradation, because if leaked out of a broken tank, they will sink beneath into the soil. From the soil, the solvents may sink into the water table; because of their density, the chemicals will move lower and into the bedrock leaving a hazardous residue on the soil and rock. “In the early to mid 20th century, these chemicals weren’t really considered hazardous, at least not how we consider them now,” McKay said. Shortly after the discontinuation of the industrial site in 2005, GeoSyntec Consultants, a third party environmental consulting firm from Knoxville, evaluated the site and decided that removing the contamination was not feasible. Considering the deep contamination of the bedrock, all parties involved decided to proceed with a monitored natural attenuation plan. A monitored natural attention plan is where a group monitors the contamination of the groundwater but does not actively try to remove it. “The key is to monitor and make sure it’s not getting worse,” McKay said.

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Construction continues on the plot of land next to Third Creek between the Ag campus and Volunteer Boulevard. The land is supposed to be the home of a future Walmart and Publix. The contamination of the Fulton Bellows site may be problematic to the future Walmart and Publix development. “Some of the challenges that have to be considered in that kind of development is to be very careful not to mobilize contamination that is still under the site,” McKay said. “The goal is to not do anything that will cause contaminants not to start moving

development. Dr. Michael McKinney, a professor and the director of the environmental studies program, sees fault with the future of parking and congestion of the Walmart and Publix. “This development and eventual existence will not help with noise and will make us even less pedestrian-friendly,” McKinney said. McKinney also raised concerns with the future of the

out more rapidly than they are now.” McKay believes that the real issue with the pollution is exposing construction workers to the contaminated soil. The current state of the site is not as much of a threat because the concrete slab was left of the old building, keeping the contaminants relatively contained. Another professor raised alternative concerns with the

Sequestration affects UT students, families

Teaching program encourages minority advancement Claire Dodson Staff Writer In South Carolina, more African-American and Latino men will spend the night in jail than in a college dorm room. Roy Jones, an associate professor at Clemson University, wants that to change. Jones came to the Alumni Memorial Building on Tuesday to talk about “Call Me MISTER,” a program started in Clemson, S.C., that seeks to bring more AfricanAmerican males into the public school system as teachers. “Call Me MISTER” targets low income, disabled and first generation college students and helps fund their education. In return, they do a year of service work in an atrisk area for every year they receive financial assistance in the program. Since 2004, the program has graduated 100 fully certified teachers. “It’s a commitment to equal opportunity and equity,” Jones said. “We want to create a synergy around this issue that will change the climate in our public schools.” The event, sponsored by the Educational Advancement Program, is an annual lecture that the EAP brings to UT to inspire students in

Opinions Associate Editor Preston Peeden defends history and his own path through education

>> See page 4

the program. The EAP, like “MISTER,” aims to encourage and aid first-generation, low-income or disabled college students. Jones, the executive director of the “MISTER” program at Clemson, emphasized the power of knowing one’s personal history in his lecture. “Your story is what shapes you,” Jones said. “You’re sitting here because of a story.” Jones began his own story with a picture of Tillman Hall at Clemson, a building named after “Pitchfork” Ben Tillman, a segregationist former president of the university. He also talked about the fact that Clemson is built on John C. Calhoun’s plantation land. “Calhoun would be rolling over in his grave to see how far African-Americans have come,” Jones said. “We have to begin to understand and appreciate our history, to see how others paved the way for us.” Jones quoted from the National Center for Education Statistics that while there are two million white, female teachers in American public schools, there are only 62,000 black male teachers. Meanwhile, 82 percent of African-American students attend public schools and 60 percent of black males don’t

Arts & Culture

The sequestration has officially arrived. President Obama announced last Friday that the federal government will be making across-the-board agency budget cuts amounting to $1.2 trillion over a 10-year period, with approximately $85 billion in cuts per year. The plan was enacted to reverse the national debt, which currently stands at more than $16 trillion. Obama admitted that the cuts will cause a “ripple effect” throughout the economy, and though effects will not be felt right away, there will be “pain,” and many individuals will experience pay cuts and furloughs. Molly Schroer, spokesperson in the Public Affairs Office of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, said that in light of the sequester, park staff will make reductions. “Every unit in the National Park Service will lose five percent of its annual budget and have only seven months to absorb the loss,” Schroer said. “We are now in the process of formalizing actual plans and reviewing park programs and park needs ...The park knows there will be impacts

prepare those kids once they get to college. As the director of one of the nation’s biggest organizations for low income, first generation college and disabled students, Ronald McFadden understands the importance of teaching, even in an increasingly technological age. See LECTURE on Page 3

Arts & Culture

Check out this Assistant Arts & weeks Daily Beacon Culture Editor Melodi Weekender including Erdogan explains how shows from Bela Fleck, movie watching is an Bex Marshall and The art form Mutations with Crys and Vacation Club >> See page 6

Deborah Ince Staff Writer

• Photo courtesy of Clemson University

finish high school on time. For Jones, these two issues are distinctly related. “In America, teaching is not considered a prized position, so the number of males that want to teach is decreasing,” Jones said. “To add to that, our schools aren’t preparing these kids to succeed or go to college.” The EAP at UT seeks to

>> See page 5

Fulton Bellows site, imploring UT students to do the same. “The campus community should care because this we are trying to make our campus a leader in environmental stewardship and sustainability,” McKinney said. “More automobile traffic, congestion and putting large supermarkets on a highly contaminated site does not exactly send that kind of message or set that kind of example.”

Sports Starting first baseman and JUCO transfer Scott Price talks about his career from high school to Rocky Top

>>See page 8

felt by park visitors due to the sequestration, but we are attempting to look at all park programs and operations to see where we would have the least impact on the millions of visitors who come to the park each year.” Many UT students and their families are also being affected by sequestration. Brandon Carpenter, undecided freshman, said sequestration has already begun affecting his military family, as his father is a retired military officer and current Medical Examination Board counselor at Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Georgia. “We knew (the sequester) was coming,” Carpenter said. “We knew something big was going to happen. We just didn’t know it was going to be quite as extensive as sequestration is, which, if you’ve read any of the details, it’s kind of scary ... So we’ll make it, but it’s stressful.” Carpenter said that because of the sequestration, Eisenhower Army Medical Center is already making cuts to hospital staff and reducing hours at the hospital. Carpenter’s father and those working directly under him were supposed to be moved to a new office at the hospital. Now because of sequestration, that move has been canceled. See SEQUESTRATION on Page 3

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 7, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Scottish Rite Temple peaks curiosity Brooke Turner

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Joanna Cooper studies electric pulses in brain tissue on Feb. 20.

Staff Writer The unadorned building stands between Laurel and Volunteer residence halls, and more than one student has wondered what exactly happens in the Scottish Rite Temple. Some admit they are a bit perturbed by the whole thing. Informational pamphlets inside the lobby explain that the Scottish Rites are “a fraternity of good fellows, engaged in the benevolent practices of friendship and relief,” one of several appendant groups of the international fraternity, Freemasonry. Mack Suits, a junior in communication studies and psychology, found the organization to be rather lacking in benevolence on a recent exploratory visit to the 16th street landmark. “I thought it was very interesting, because when I walked up to it, the doors were locked and I had to press a button to get in,” Suits said. “And then, once I got in, there was not really anyone there … I went in to the office, no one would speak to me … I had to speak up to one of the ladies — she wasn’t very excited to see me.” After admitting his purpose was purely curiosity to the woman, Suits said he was denied access to any sort of temple tour. “I think my lack of interest in becoming a Mason is what made her want me to leave,” Suits said. It seems fitting that the Scottish Rite came to Knoxville in 1945, joining a community that already boasted several fraternal chapters at the time. After purchasing land adjacent to the university, they began construction on the

temple in 1953. In the years since, campus has expanded into the neighborhood surrounding the structure. Karleigh Bloomer, a junior in biological sciences, said it gives her an eerie vibe. “I guess it’s just kind of different and weird because it is such a mystery … the fact that it’s near the middle of campus yet not many people know what it is and you don’t really hear about it that much, it’s really odd,” Bloomer said. “It’s definitely odd because it is so secretive and so mysterious. It’s not out in the open, like some other organizations are.” She shared that, for the most part, she thinks the temple is disconnected from campus and does not affect campus life because many students are not involved in Freemasonry. The group is exclusive to adult men. Jake Darlington, junior in bu siness analytics with a collateral in marketing, had a greatgrandfather who was a Freemason. “He didn’t really talk that much about it, and I only knew him until I was nine years old; but I do remember my mom talking to me about it,” Darlington said. Despite the best efforts of blockbuster films like 2004’s “National Treasure,” Darlington suspects the organization is more or less harmless. “You know, with every secret society … you get the stories of grandeur, because conspiracy lives in secrecy,” he said. “While the (Masons) could be all that pop culture has tatted them up to be, and more, I would just say that the masons are most likely a goodhearted fraternal order that keeps its meetings secret for the sake of tradition, but really they haven’t been the cause of everything we think they have been the cause of.”

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon


Thursday, March 7, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS SEQUESTRATION continued from Page 1 “For us, it’s concerning,” Carpenter said. “He works, as I said, as an MEB counselor, so he meets tons of people that, you know, if you’re enlisted, that’s all you’ve got. If you’re a private, you make enough to qualify for food stamps. And it’s scary. Until you start thinking about how broad the complications are from it, it doesn’t hit you. But when it does, it’s a weight.” Carpenter continued, expressing concern for those who rely on veterans’ benefits for income and to support their families. A different concern was voiced by Chase Griffin, a sophomore in history and cadet in UT’s Army ROTC division. Griffin pointed out that the sequestration will have a negative impact on ROTC at UT. “You’ll see our funding go lower for acquisitions and different training operations ...

those budgets will go down,” he said. “Also, the number of scholarships we’re allowed to give out is going to be going down.” Because ROTC members sign legally binding contracts with the federal government, enlistees will not see their paychecks affected by sequestration, and their educational costs will still be covered. However, Griffin said their commanders try to keep him and his fellow cadets informed of any new developments. “They’re really trying to preserve ROTC, so I’ve heard from our command,” Griffin said. “Like sometimes they’ll come out in front of formation. They’ll talk to us and say like, ‘Hey, we’ve got this money coming in. They’re cutting these other programs, but we’re still good.” Both Carpenter and Griffin stress the importance of students staying informed about sequestration, as both men have made sure to keep themselves up to date on the plan’s effects.

LECTURE continued from Page 1 “I’m supportive of technology, but not everyone can work in that,” McFadden said. “You still have to have teaching. We need more people that have the ability to show a positive image to these students.” Even with the amount of people that receive support from this program, McFadden said there is still a stigma attached to these issues. He said that no matter what you do, pride poses obstacles. “People never want to come in thinking that they are broken,” McFadden said. “But you’re not by yourself with these backgrounds.” McFadden thinks that Clemson’s “Call Me MISTER” program would fit in well at UT. He hopes the school embraces and institutionalizes the program, pointing out that the problem

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

“Regardless of your political position, regardless of whatever stance you have, you need to know this,” Carpenter said. “You need to learn more about this. And it affects you no matter what walk of life you’re in ... It’s coming, and it’s here. It’s about to hit. We haven’t felt it, we’re not gonna really notice anything for the first week or two, but you’ll start looking around and going ‘what’s the deal?’... It’s coming, and you need to know why, you need to know how it’s going to affect you.” The United States’ road to economic recovery will be long and hard, but the president said his administration is working diligently to ensure the best decisions are being made. “You know, the good news is the American people are strong and they’re resilient,” Obama said. “They fought hard to recover from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression and we will get through this as well.”

Ellyn Fulton • The Daily Beacon exists here as well. Daphne Turnage, sophomore in English, UT students engage in a scrum against Kentucky during a home rugby match on shared similar sentiments. She explained that March 1. black male teachers represent more than just a role model to some students. “They give students hope, especially ones with lacking father figures at home,” she said. “... It puts hope back into the community.” The visiting Jones has written a book about his program titled “Call Me MISTER: the Re-Emergence of African American Male Teachers in South Carolina.” The cover shows three young black men standing in front of an old schoolhouse built by African-American community members in the early 1900s. “Those schoolhouses were the result of fundraising and construction by black communities that came together,” Jones said. “The young men are teachers and principals. “The cover illustrates the history and the future coming together to change the world.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 7, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Going

Somewhere...Hopefully

View of past justifies life choices Preston Peeden Associate Editor “Preston Peeden is a senior in history.” Those seven words have been my sign-off for two years. They’ve concluded my every argument, wrapped up my random rants and put the icing on my cake of pseudointelligentsia. But why am I that? Why am I a history major? I get asked that last question a lot. It doesn’t matter if they’re teachers, friends or even my neighbors in class, people like to weigh in their opinion on my life choices, throwing their two cents in at almost any time. It’s almost as if every person that decides to question attended the same “How To” lecture on the Socratic method as they seem to bombard me with a litany of questions in the hopes of stimulating a eureka moment that will lead me to switching my major to either a hard science or business, where I would at least have career opportunities. So once and for all, I am prepared to defend my major and the choices I made. Usually, (as if following some college intervention script) people will ask me the same three questions in some form or another: “You know that you’re never going to make any money?” “Are your parents cool with you being a history major?” and, “So you’re going to be a teacher?” To answer these simply, yes, yes and yes (at least for the immediate future). It might surprise many to hear this, but I didn’t become a history major for the money — though the groupies are a plus. I decided to spend hours in the library because I love what I’m studying. I love history, and that love is why my parents more than fully support my

decision to major in history. And as for being a teacher, well that seems pretty obvious: I’m a history major, what else am I going to be hired to do? For a lot of my friends, history is just a list of dates and dead guys, while for Aristotle it was merely a record of what was true. I think that people have a bad view of history because they misunderstand it, and with this misunderstanding they have decided to condemn it (or at least view it as an inferior major selection). Think about it, there are very few positive images about history anymore. It’s a subject reserved either for the leather-bound libraries of stuffy academia, or for the whackjobs on the History Channel, who seem to only spend time discussing Nazis or aliens. Those images aren’t history. To me, at least, they’re the opposite (I will have to eat these words, however, if a space ship lands and out goose-steps an Aryan alien, but I’ll take my chances). People like to paint history as old news. It’s the past, so what meaning can it really have that hasn’t already been learned? History isn’t static, nor is it just a list of the greatest accomplishments of dead men. Rather, history is the perception of those accomplishments, the story between them and how that story is viewed in changing times and context. That’s what history is to me. It is the conflict between one group’s perception of a figure or event in contrast to another. It is a dialectic; it’s an inquiry to find out not what is merely true, but what we believe to be true, and what that perception says about its holder. History is a collection of stories. It is a record of what life was like and what we think life was like. It is the shirking of objectives and preconceived notions in the hope of finding the subjectivity of it all. So that’s what history is to me, and that’s why I study it. Any more questions? — Preston Peeden is a senior in history. He can be reached at ppeeden@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR • Jacob Hobson

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

History holds value beyond academia Commitee of Infractions by

Greg Bearringer One thing that binds all of us who either are or aspire to be professional historians is that all of us are sure that historians are useful, and that removing them (by way of cutting funding) from universities would be a very bad thing. And even though I think this is very much correct, the other thing that binds us in this field is attempts to explain the importance of historians is never more than mostly satisfactory. Sure, history is fundamentally about the origins of our society, or even what it is to be human. Historians matter, though, simply because people are curious about how people used to live and experience so much more. For all the value that people claim chemistry, medicine or engineering have, few people outside of those fields ever buy a book about chemistry and read it on the beach. I guarantee that 80 percent of the people reading this could talk for a much longer period of time about the American Civil War than they could about the limbic system. Science, to speak in broad terms, requires a combination of technology, worldview, and money to happen. It is not a natural act. History, however, has been “done” as far back as extant monuments and writings allow us to look. For example, when events happen like, say a pope resigning, people become vaguely curious. People know to look for the white puffs of smoke coming out of the Vatican. And even though in reality that tradition is not more than a couple of centuries old, people just enjoy knowing these things. I have been asked at least a dozen times in the last few weeks, “Has that ever happened

before?” Armed and ready, I feel obligated to inform them that the last time it happened, Pope Gregory XII did it to end a schism in the church. People go visit the Vatican not just because of its religious significance, or even the visceral beauty of its artwork. They go there because it’s old, because other people have gone there to visit, because it holds so much history, from the bones of popes to a library whose contents are almost wholly inaccessible to people that would want to visit. A perfectly preserved 101-year-old baseball card can be worth millions of dollars because … well, because it’s history. A rumor that the same card has been altered can cause unreasonable anger. I think these things interest us because everybody ultimately wants to know where they came from, they want to tie their identity biologically back to its origins. And since we haven’t raised the dead yet, we want to look at the Sistine Chapel ceiling (despite an angry Italian pleading with us not to take pictures) with the same awe that our ancestors may have had. So even though the language surrounding why history is important may be fuzzy, historians are charged with the task of figuring out just what it was to be in the past. History as a profession is charged with being honest with and about that past. It is only very recently that Western society thought that life was always getting better. I think history matters all the more now because everything is always new, and what we are able to do now hardly seems amazing. I typed this whole column by speaking into a microphone. History offers us not only a way to access that feeling of fresh awe, but also a defiant sense that “we are still here,” and that it matters that we are. — Greg Bearringer is a graduate student in history. He may be reached at gbearrin@ utk.edu.

Big Fatty’s food soothes soul Urban Landscape by

Lindsay Lee EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

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In Knoxville, there are tons of diverse restaurants with amazing southern, feel-good food, but for me one sticks out above all the rest: Big Fatty’s on Kingston Pike. Big Fatty’s from the outside doesn’t look that special. It is in an inconspicuous building without much color, and the parking lot is small. Despite a big mural on a fence outside the restaurant, it is actually extremely easy to miss as you are driving along. But once you find it, your life will be changed forever. Inside the restaurant, walls are all different colors and covered with cute pop art. There is a bar with bar stools that look straight out of the 1950s, much like most of the other décor. The design of the menu reflects the feel of the room: colorful, yet simple. But the color and the art make a big, cozy impression. The menu has a whole variety of food to choose from. They of course have barbeque and fried chicken and burgers, but they also shrimp and crab cake po’boys, chicken salad, fish and chips, and Greek chicken. They also have lots vegetarian options including salads, veggie sandwiches and black bean burgers. Most of their sides are vegetarian as well. Absolutely anything you try will be amazing. I have enjoyed the fried chicken, roast beef sandwich, burger, scalloped potatoes, green beans, spinach maria and fried okra. Shakespeare would have written sonnets to the fried okra. Hundreds of them. “How do

I love thee? Let me count the ways.” The food at Big Fatty’s is the kind of food that you just have to have after a long day. It’s the kind of food that quiets a tormented soul and heals a broken heart. It’s the kind of food that could end decades-long international disputes. It’s the kind of food that could convince Ahmadinejad to shut down Iran’s nuclear program and turn Ann Coulter into a bleeding-heart liberal. It will change your life, though it may also change your pants size. On top of the amazing food, the service is great as well. Our waiters have always been really nice, funny and easy-going, reflecting the feel of the entire restaurant. The plates don’t match, the soup and beans are served in random mugs, and it doesn’t matter. Life doesn’t have to match. Time slows down a bit inside Big Fatty’s, and people just have a good time. Facilitating that good time are drink specials including the one for beer, which lasts, according to the menu, “until someone pees.” You can tell the owner has a sense of humor, especially when you read the statuses she posts for the restaurant on Facebook. One of the more tame examples from last month: “Suga where did ya get those moves? why ya got 2 be so disrespectful? it ain’t the playa but the game-now get yo a** 2 work! talkn all that smack ... its called a job! chicken n dumplins 4 the justified-lil wayne is a hater.” Big Fatty’s is one of the best little pieces of Knoxville charm, and everyone must go. Support a local business that supports good food and good times. But clear your schedule, because after you go, you will have to nap for the rest of the day. — Lindsay Lee is a junior in mathematics. She can be reached at llee26@utk.edu.


Thursday, March 7, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Appreciating movies as art Cooking demonstration

Melodi Erdogan

thought I knew, about films has changed, goes to show how differently I understand and appreciate them now. I admit to not frequenting the theaters. I believe in being patient and renting a film for a dollar a day, rather than paying $10 just to see it right when it releases. Of course, there are exceptions. During the Academy Award season last month I succumbed to my movie itch and bought tickets for both “Les Miserables� and “Silver Linings Playbook.� Ultimately, I just prefer watching films in the comfort of my own home. When watching a film at home, a person has the power to get a snack without paying a fortune for it, go to the bathroom without having to miss a whole part and disrupt a theater, pause the film whenever needed and rewind and move forward also if desired. Additionally, real clothing is not required; pajamas and birthday suits are recommended. Cinema studies has me more inclined to watch films at home so I have more time and freedom to study them as I please. Since the beginning of the semester, I have found myself noting various things throughout films that require me to pause it, write it down, go over it in my head and just take it all in. It’s not

uncommon for viewers to want to see a film they enjoyed more than once; the same goes for listening to music and reading books. Every time you watch/ hear/read something more than once, you’re guaranteed to gain something new from it. You just can’t get that in a movie theater. Sure, theaters are aesthetically pleasing and provide the ultimate movie watching high and the atmosphere can’t be recreated, but it doesn’t provide for the type of movie watching I’m now conditioned to practice. I’m glad that now I have knowledge for what actually makes a film and what actually makes it good, but going to the movie theater and having to deal with noisy and rambunctious people does not get me excited in any way. Even if it is a movie where I know I’m going to be seeing Channing Tatum half-naked. Movie watching is an art form. It really is more complicated than I ever thought it would be, but so much more gratifying. I wouldn’t consider myself the most knowledgeable person about film. Ultimately, I’m just glad that I’m experiencing films rather than just watching them.

brings Trinidadian food to campus Molly Loftus Staff Writer

The International House hosted a Caribbean cooking demonstration as part of “Caribbean Culture Weekâ€? on Within my first few months Tuesday night and provided taking the introduction to a cinema studies course, I have gained students free Trinidadian deliso much newfound knowledge cacy as well as knowledge of on the stories that come alive on Caribbean culture. screen. Before, I used to watch Kamella Carmino, Trinidad the film and get caught up on native and coordinator of the emotions and the plotline the event, said that she was encompassing the story and as the credits rolled I would think pleased with the execution of about it but not in depth. Like the event. any normal person, I had just “I love sharing my culture,â€? watched a movie. Now, I watch Carmino said, who also is a a film, but instead of just paygraduate teaching assistant in ing attention to the plot, I was considering character constellachild and family studies. tion and mise-en-scene and how Tomato choka was the feaclassical Hollywood cinema was tured meal, which Carmino shaping the story. said was “a quick, cheap meal It’s okay. I didn’t know what ‌ healthy ‌ delicious ‌ somethose terms meant until two — Melodi Erdogan is a fresh- thing they can make quickly months ago. The fact that in man in journalism and elec- and easily.â€? just that small amount of time tronic media. She can be my whole knowledge, or what I Cherelle Thompson, reached at merdogan@utk.edu. Trinidad native and sophomore in kinesiology, said the food was reminiscent of her home. “(It) tastes like something that would come out of a kitchen in Trinidad,â€? Thompson said. International and local students alike enjoyed the benefits of the Caribbean cooking demo. “I think it benefits local students a lot because they Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon get to experience a different The Hot 8 Brass Band performs at the Carousel Theatre on Feb. 25 as part of Black culture without putting out an History Month. Assistan Arts & Culture Editor

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tions of familiar songs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margaritavilleâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Can See Clearly Now (The Rain Is Gone).â&#x20AC;? Accompanying the music was a typical Caribbean dance, performed by Kamella Carmino, known as the Tobago Jig. Attendees were offered several tips throughout the demonstration ranging from cooking well while adhering to a stringent budget to the best cookware to invest in. Glennise Myer-Schlinger, volunteer cook for the demo, said the cost of the meal was lowered by substituting oil for water. Kamella Carmino shook her head in playful disapproval. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a believer,â&#x20AC;? MyerSchlinger said jokingly. After patiently waiting for Amigo Carmino to complete the dish, students indulged in the sautĂŠed tomato mixture encased in golden brown, fried dough pockets. Amigo Carmino took note of the audienceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stares and responded with a Trinidadian phrase which means â&#x20AC;&#x153;to be hungry.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid. If you have a plate, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let anything go to waste,â&#x20AC;? Amigo Carmino said. He encouraged the remaining few to wipe all remnants of the dish with the freshly made fry bake. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now, we liminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (hanging out),â&#x20AC;? Kamella Carmino said.

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expense,â&#x20AC;? Kamella said. Sai Keerthana, first year Ph.D. student in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, said she enjoyed exploring another culture within a local setting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go around the world to visit new cultures so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to have this platform,â&#x20AC;? Keerthana said. Despite the diverse audience, the event provided a sense of community. Everyone was welcomed and embraced regardless of origin, which may be a reflection of the Trinidad and Tobago culture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forty percept Indian, forty percent African and a bit of everybody else in Trinidad and Tobago,â&#x20AC;? Kamella said. Each table was provided with three tomatoes, a clove of garlic and ginger to prepare the dish. It was a completely hands-on experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anybody need to wash their hands? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get dirty,â&#x20AC;? Carmino said. Amigo Carmino, Kamella Carminoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, sautĂŠed the remaining tomato choka while Kamella Carmino engaged the audience in the fry bake demo, which is a flour, baking powder, salt and water mixture that is fried and stuffed with the tomato choka. During this time Vere Henry, steel pan player, Antigua native and UT graduate, serenaded the crowd with rendi-

31 Tetley products

1

1 Toon/live action film of 1996

32 Twit

9 Typewriterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spot

35 Taoism, e.g.: Abbr.

16

36 Technical work requirement

18

13 Tool for the scatterbrained 15 Thereafter 16 Tragedy-stricken

37 Total

44 Tsars and others

19 Trademarked Intel chip

45 Tideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ebb, e.g.

25 Told to come 26 Trippâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rank on â&#x20AC;&#x153;CSI: Miamiâ&#x20AC;?: Abbr.

5

7

8

9 14

10

11

12

15 17

19 22

20

23

24 26

25

27

28

31

29 33

39

40

42

44

51 Text you might R.S.V.P. to

48

52 Thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highly explosive

51

52

56

57

57 Treating all fairly 58 Toboggan

W O N B I G P I E D E L E

S K O A N L A C B R L E A D E L I E I T H E

B M A J

R E F O R O M R G O A J N A M I U S O I J C O

I N A J A M G A R R

O R C A

S O A B L I

47

53

54

50

55

59

14 Third way, maybe

39 Treated for preservation, maybe

2 Theorem work

15 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The House of the Seven Gablesâ&#x20AC;? locale

40 Touchdowns : football :: ___ : rugby

3 Titan booster

20 Towering tree

41 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrible!â&#x20AC;?

4 The CafĂŠ Carlyle and others

22 Tadpoleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s later form, perhaps

43 Tec group in old France

5 Times to start new calendarios

23 This puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme

46 Terri with the 1980 country hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Knockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

DOWN

E U R O P A

46 49

59 Taxed

S J E N I M O R N O O A X P T L E M A D A Y Y P E O E G V L W E L A H R O C O M A K E M I S I D

43

45

58

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

37

41

49 Texas holdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;em action

30 Tear up

34

36

38

56 Trig functions

30

32

35

48 Threaded across and down

28 True: Ger.

Q U A D E F R O D O C T H A C C E B O O M E L L A L E T M B G O G O A V A D I S C D E C O E D A M D O P E

6

38 Tense, maybe

18 Torpedo detector

24 Telegraph suffix

4

21

42 TV channel with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Style Reportâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beauty Reportâ&#x20AC;?

23 Take

3

13

34 Tigerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bagful

17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three Sistersâ&#x20AC;? playwright Chekhov

21 â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Little Girl of Mineâ&#x20AC;? country singer ___ Young

2

1 Tosses, as seeds

6 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ___ is up!â&#x20AC;?

12 Ted and others

26 Turn a blind eye, say

7 Type of dye

27 Turkey or chicken dish served cold

8 Target audience of Maxim

29 Taste authority

50 Took (out)

9 Ten-spots and such

31 Toned quality

53 Test figs.

10 Taken

33 Tunnel effect

54 Tough ___

11 Traveled by Vespa

34 Trumpet blares

55 Theater head: Abbr.

47 Tenor standard â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Mioâ&#x20AC;?


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 7, 2013 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Thursday, March 7

Saturday, March 9

Who: Bela Fleck and Marcus Roberts

Who: Bex Marshall with Steve Forbert Where: WDVX – Knoxville Welcome

Trio

Where: Bijou Theatre When: 7:30 p.m. Price: $5 for students, $10 for faculty/

Center

When: 12 p.m. Price: Free Melodi’s Take: Had a rough week? Now

staff, $15 for general public

Victoria’s Take: You know that feel-

ing when your body shivers when you’re listening to a really, really good song? Yeah, that’s dopamine leaving your brain, and your noggin will get an overdose when it hears to the cool and beautiful music of Bela Fleck. This guy’s fingers are wicked fast, and you’ll even forget you’re hearing him play the banjo. Go to the show and treat yourself to something different.

• Photo courtesy of Bela Fleck

Friday, March 8 Who: The Defibulators Where: Boyd’s Jig and Reel When: 9 p.m. Price: Free Victoria’s Take: Hailing all the way from Brooklyn, N.Y., this alternative country band uses old school

that midterms and finally all over and spring break is just around the corner, chill out with some British electric blues provided by Bex Marshall and Steve Forbert. Marshall (think a jazz version of Adele) has a set of pipes that are sure to vibrate the walls of the welcome center. Forbert, more of a folksy artist, will compliment Marshall and give attendants a full set of melodious music. This free concert is definitely worth seeing, and if you can’t make it, opt for listening on WDVX’s station, 89.9 FM, where the concert will be broadcast live.

• Photo courtesy of Bex Marshall

Sunday, March 10

influences paired with some new and quirky sounds (I see you cello man). Their lyrics are fun and the music is safe enough to appeal to country lovers and still win the hearts of others. Still not convinced? Check out their song, “Get What’s Coming,” on YouTube, where they sing about a two-timin’ no good guy who broke this girl’s heart by getting with her sister. Ouch!

• Photo courtesy of The Mutations

Who: The Mutations with Crys and Vacation Club Where: Pilot Light When: 10 p.m. Price: $5 Melodi’s Take: Pilot Light always hosts the most interesting bands that are always sure to impress.

The Mutations with Cry and Vacation Club will fit right in on Sunday night. The concert’s price is cheap, and the Old City is super cool and chill and sure to be a great backdrop for Sunday night. Although, the venue is notorious for starting concerts hours late, so don’t come early. Chill the day before classes with these three up and coming bands for a cool Sunday you won’t forget. • Photo courtesy of The Defibulators


Thursday, March 7, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Lady Vols chase conference tournament title David Cobb Assistant News Editor Wednesday, March 6 The S outheastern Conference helped the Lady Vols stock their already illustrious trophy case with some nice hardware when the league’s annual awards were handed out Tuesday. But there’s one honor that has yet to be handed out. The league’s tournament champion won’t be crowned until after Sunday’s 6:00 p.m. game between whichever teams can survive the rigors of the five-day affair in Duluth, Ga. A tournament championship for No. 1 seeded UT would be its fourth consecutive, a streak dating back to Bashaara Graves’ sophomore year of high school. “Awards don’t matter,” said Graves, a 6-foot-3 forward, who was named SEC Freshman of The Year. “I think we just need to come in and play as a team. Individual awards have nothing to do with how we’re going to play.” In 2012 it was the effort of Graves’ predecessor in the UT frontcourt, Glory Johnson, that played a defining role in the Lady Vols’ three day run through the tournament. Johnson was named the tournament’s MVP after falling an opening game rebound shy of posting a double-double in each of her team’s three double digit victories. With Johnson graduated and UT suffering from a case of the injury bug that has center Isabelle Harrison listed as doubtful for the tournament, the Lady Vols will need Graves to avoid the foul trouble that plagued her in UT’s 78-65 loss at Kentucky on Sunday. “We don’t have that many posts to back me or Cierra (Burdick) up so I’ve just got to keep my breath, not get in foul trouble, be ready to play 40 minutes if I have to,” said Graves, who averages 14.3 points and 8.5 rebounds a game. One remedy for the short bench could be to work little-used freshmen Jasmine Phillips and Nia Moore into the lineup. Neither Phillips, a guard, nor Moore, a center, saw action in any of UT’s final three regular season contests. “I think they’re going to be valuable for us to try to sneak them in for a few minutes,” head coach Holly Warlick said Wednesday. “I think it goes back to who we’re playing and the tempo, what the situation is at the time of the game.” First up for the Lady Vols,

Thursday, March 7

Friday, March 8

Saturday, March 9

Sunday, March 10

Note: Ole Miss self-imposed ban, therefore the No. 11 seed will get automatic by to Thursday.

• Graphic courtesy of Austin Bornheim and Troy Provost-Heron

who have a bye until the quarterfinals, will be the winner of Thursday’s No. 8 Arkansas vs. No. 9 Florida game. UT will tip off against either the Gators or Razorbacks at noon Friday with the winner advancing to Saturday’s semifinals where they’ll likely be pitted against Texas A&M. The Lady Vols (23-6, 14-2 SEC) slipped by both in the regular season, needing overtime to corral the Gators (1710, 6-10 SEC). “We can’t look at Saturday and Sunday if we don’t take care of Friday,” Warlick said. “So I think that’s our goal, to focus on either Florida and Arkansas and then we’ll move on, and that’s the most important thing for us, because this team cannot look ahead, cannot prepare ahead.” If the bracket plays out with the top two seeds advancing to Sunday’s finale, UT would meet Kentucky for a second time in a week, with the chance to avenge Sunday’s loss which helped the Wildcats jump the Lady Vols in the polls. “We moved on from that game, so if we end up playing them it’s just another game,” Graves said. “It’ll be the championship game, but we’re going to play our hearts out. “And that game we played against Kentucky last time, it won’t happen again.”


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, March 7, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Lady Vols honored, focused on tournament Troy Provost-Heron Staff Writer For a team that was predicted to finish fifth by the coaches of the SEC, the Tennessee Lady Volunteers (23-6, 14-2 SEC) have had quite the season to this point. The Lady Vols locked up their 17th SEC regular season championship on Feb. 28 against Texas A&M, and following the release of the SEC awards on Tuesday, this team has that much more to be proud of. The award with arguably the most notoriety was given to junior guard Meighan Simmons, who was named Co-SEC Player of the Year along with Kentucky guard A’dia Mathies. Simmons, who was also named to the All-SEC First Team, said that while the award means a lot her focus is on trying to help the team get better. “It means a lot,” Simmons said. “I try not to focus on the accolades too much because I know that there is so much work that I have to do. There are so many more games to play, but I just take it one day at a time and thank God for blessing me with the opportunity to be player of the year. I just want to continue to help the team get better and better each and every day.” While Simmons’ award is a big one, the award that will mean the most to the team is head coach Holly Warlick being named SEC Coach of the Year. While Warlick is thrilled about the honor and believes it is a great thing for the program, she said she’d really want three more conference wins en route to a tournament championship. “Don’t get me wrong, I’m thrilled and excited about it,” Warlick said. “I’m just doing

what I’ve been taught to do and these young ladies and staff have responded. It’s exciting and it’s great for the program, and it’s nice and I appreciate it, but I’ll take three wins for the SEC Tournament.” She would later give all the credit of winning the award to her players. “To get the honor I got, you have to have great players,” Warlick said. “There are great coaches out there that don’t even get considered because of their win-loss record, and they are still good coaches, but when you have great players it makes a big difference.” Freshman forward Bashaara Graves was honored by being named to the All-Freshman Team, as well as the All-SEC First Team. Graves is the first Lady Vol freshman to be named to the All-SEC First Team since Candace Parker in 2006. Graves, who found out the news unexpectedly while on the way back from Lexington, Ky., said that the accolades should give her confidence going into the SEC Tournament. “I heard it over Twitter actually,” Graves said. “It just made me happy. I was on the bus and I just couldn’t help but smile. It gives me a lot of confidence coming into the SEC Tournament.” As Graves said, these awards should give the team a good amount of confidence going into SEC Tournament on Thursday, where they will look to accomplish the doubledouble (SEC regular-season and tournament championships) and win their 17th SEC Tournament. Tennessee has the privilege of being off until the third round of the tournament and will square off against the winner of No. 8 Arkansas and No. 9 Florida at noon on Friday.

Tia Patron • The Daily Beacon

Junior Scott Price fields a ground ball at first base against ETSU on Feb. 26.

Diamond Vols’ Price lives out dream Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor It hasn’t been the easiest road for Tennessee junior Scott Price. From receiving only one offer out of high school — University of South Carolina Sumter Junior College — to the starting first baseman of the Volunteers, Price has clung to one thing through the years: his dream. “It’s always been a dream of mine to play in the pros,” Price said. “I can only take advantage of the opportunities given to me and this was my best opportunity. I want to take full advantage of it.” Price graduated from BatesburgLeesville High School in South Carolina “way out in the country” with just over 100 students. The first baseman wanted to continue his career and an offer from Junior College start-up USC Sumter was the only one on the table. “Coach (Tom) Fleenor gave me a chance,” he said. “I wasn’t recruited out of high school except for him and he gave me a chance to come in and play right away. I did and it was two of the best years of my life.” During Price’s time playing for the Fire Ants, the team captured a regular season regional championship his first season and finished runner-ups in the regional tournament in the next.

“They’ve really turned that place into something special. We won, we won a lot there,” he said of his time at Sumter. After his first season playing for Fleenor, the coach started pitching Price’s name around to larger universities. Bill Mosiello, assistant coach and recruiting coordinator for Tennessee, was one of the coaches contacted. “He (Mosiello) was sold on him (Price) the first time he saw him,” head coach Dave Serrano said. But the prospective transfer still had obstacles to overcome and decisions to make. Though Tennessee was the most highprofile program to approach him, UT didn’t have a scholarship to offer. With offers from Richmond and Virginia Tech on the table, Price chose to be a recruited walk-on for Serrano and his young program. “It is a great story and a tribute to he and his family,” Serrano said. “He didn’t receive a scholarship and he committed to us in the early signing period in November. Then, he went out and had probably his best season of his career and won a lot of awards in junior college and stood to his guns that he was coming to Tennessee. He was able to pay his own way and I think that is just a tribute to him and the type of person he is.” Being part of the rebuilding process under Serrano was a big influence on Price

and his decision to come to Tennessee. “I want to be part of that process that gets this program back on the map and back to where it should be,” he said. Price was rewarded for his commitment to the Volunteers by being named the starting first baseman for UT opening day against UNLV. And he didn’t disappoint. The first baseman went 5-for-5 in his first game at Tennessee and, according to Serrano, might have set the bar too high. “It might have been the worst thing he could have done,” Serrano joked. “By setting the bar at 5-for-5 the only place to really go is down. But in all seriousness, I like what I have seen from him at the plate and he has, and will continue to be, a big part of our lineup.” The transfer has started all 11 games for UT and been in the middle of the lineup. “I think he is a very good first baseman,” Serrano said. “He’s really saved some of our young infielders with some of their throws because he has done a good job around the bag. He’s been a run producer for us.” Though Price continues to work everyday, he took the time to step back and reflect on his path to Rocky Top. “Coach Mo (Mosiello) gave me a chance up here and now it’s real,” Price said. “My dream has come true.”

The Daily Beacon  

The editorially independnet student newspaper of the University of Tennessee.