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Friday, February 21, 2014

Issue 31, Volume 125

Bonnaroo lineup ‘party’ builds excitement for festival Jenna Butz Staff Writer For a few hours, Knoxvillians became Bonnaroovians again Wednesday night as the Disc Exchange hosted an official Bonnaroo Lineup Announcement Megathon party. The Disc Exchange was one of the few record stores across the country where Bonnaroo sponsored an official B.L.A.M. party to announce its 2014

lineup. Further, it was among one of the elite few who were giving away an Xbox One and a ticket to the festival in June. Free T-shirts were also provided by Gap as well as posters and beer samples. Savory and Sweet Food Truck provided refreshments. The 2014 lineup includes acts ranging from Elton John and Vampire Weekend to Knoxville’s own Americana band, The Black Lillies. Allan Miller, president and

owner of the Disc Exchange, while at first was nervous about putting on a technologyheavy event, was pleased with the turnout and the energy that filled the store. “It looks great. I’m really glad we’ve got this many people here,” Miller said. “It’s kind of risky pulling this thing off because of technical stuff. This our first time doing this sort of thing. But we were willing to give it a shot.” David Brown, a senior in

environmental science, saw the party as a chance to interact with the Bonnaroo community in a way that they may have normally been unable to meet. “You know why everybody was there, and it’s because they love Roo. It was a fun atmosphere to find out the official lineup,” Brown said. “It definitely adds to the hype. Everyone there is making speculations and hoping certain bands are there, but it was just a bonding experience sort of.”

The official lineup announcement was scheduled for 9 p.m. To keep excitement up for the two hours before, Bonnaroo streamed past performances from the festival. The Lumineers, Kings of Leon, Tenacious D and the world premiere of last year’s rock Superjam with Billy Idol and R. Kelly among others were projected in the store where there was no way to miss the notable performances. Miller said he believed the

“party” atmosphere made this announcement special and different than a simple release on a website. “I think people like going to a party,” Miller said. “And we’ve got a party here tonight. We have all these giveaways, and you’re not going to get that in someone’s apartment. It’s not the same feeling. It’s going to be a totally different experience. This is the place to do it and watch it.” See BLAM on Page 3

SUPER SIMMONS Samantha Smoak • The Daily Beacon

SEE

INSIDE Peep show brings Coney Island-like flare to Knoxville ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

Senior guard Meighan Simmons drives to the basket in the Lady Vols’ 93-63 victory against the Auburn Tigers in Thompson-Boling Arena on Thursday.

Lady Vols blow past Auburn, 93-63 Opinion: Campfield’s latest policies an ‘insult to the higher education system’ NEWS >>pg. 5

In today’s Crime Log: money theft at the TRECS and multiple citations of marijuana possession NEWS >>pg. 5

The Diamond Vols look to showcase their improvement against the UNLV Rebels SPORTS >>pg. 6

Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer Once again, the No. 10 Lady Vols bounced back from a loss and took care of business on their home court Thursday night as they defeated the Auburn Tigers, 93-63. Second-year head coach Holly Warlick’s team has yet to lose back-to-back games all season long, as they are now 6-0 in contests following a loss.

Senior guard Meighan Simmons provided the difference for Tennessee (21-5, 9-3 SEC), notching her second-highest scoring output of the season with 26 points to go along with six rebounds and five assists. After her sixth game of reaching the 20-point plateau in her past nine contests, she has now passed former Lady Vol Shekinna Stricklen on the alltime Lady Vol scoring list and now sits in seventh place with 1,891 points.

“When the ball was leaving her hand, I thought it was going in every time,” Warlick said of Simmons, who shot 10-of22 from the field and 4-of-9 from beyond the arc. “I don’t see her taking bad shots right now. She had five assists and six rebounds, which I’m probably more proud of. “If she continues to take good looks, she will keep shooting a high percentage and be this team’s leading scorer.” While all five starters scored

Music stopped with a ‘Ruckus’ in 2009 Katelyn Hadder Contributor Please don’t stop the music. In 2007, UT partnered with Ruckus Network to provide a free music downloading service for students. Ruckus offered more than three million free songs for download, as well as a platform for students to share music. After a month of operation, UT students had downloaded two million songs through Ruckus. But, shortly thereafter, the site disappeared. Carlye Hunsucker, sophomore in social work, said she would have benefited from such a service. “If the university had the

at least six points in the first half, it was Simmons who separated her team from the Tigers (1412, 5-8). In Auburn’s previous four games, it held its opponents to 53 points per game; part of the defensive results stemmed from the team’s success in the turnover department, where the Tigers rank 15th in the nation in steals per game. However, Auburn had no answer to contain Simmons, who imposed her will and high-

-Carlye Hunsucker ability to provide such an amenity for students, why would they ever get rid of it?” Hunsucker said. “I now have no choice but to buy my music from iTunes, pay for Spotify premium, or even sometimes resort to illegal downloading through YouTube.” Based in Herndon, Va., Ruckus was backed by venture capitalists Battery Ventures and Shelter Capital. Officially

launching in 2004, Northern Illinois University served as the first pilot school. Ruckus became the first free downloading site to work exclusively with college campuses. By December 2008, Ruckus had signed partnerships with 215 schools and drawn users from more than a thousand schools nationwide. See DOWNLOAD on Page 5

See GAME RECAP on Page 6

‘No tour is exactly the same,’ UT Ambassadors say

“I f the university had the ability to provide such an amenity for students, why would they ever get rid of it? ”

lighted a 19-0 run that lasted 5:06 in which she scored 10 points. The 5-foot-9 guard showcased her shooting ability by knocking down four straight field goals and capped the run by connecting on a 3-pointer from the top left of the key off an assist from Andraya Carter to put the Lady Vols up 32-11 with 8:35 left to play in the first half.

McCord Pagan Copy Editor “A lot of responsibility.” This is what Joseph Harkins, junior in accounting, feels when he introduces prospective students to Big Orange Country. As a UT Ambassador, Harkins works year-round to showcase campus to prospective Volunteers. When leading a tour, Harkins and Ambassador partner, Zach Wooten, sophomore in kinesiology, take prospective students on a specific route through TRECS, Presidential Court and Hodges Library, touting educational opportunities and the highlights of on-campus living. For Harkins, no tour is exactly the same. The Ambassadors try

to gauge the interests of each group, adjusting their tour slightly to accommodate their leanings. “The less amount of people you have in your group, the different, more personal experience the people on the tour get,” Harkins said. To prepare for questions, guides meet weekly to stay updated on campus policies and construction developments. Wooten said events like the Open House, held twice each semester, offer high school students another glimpse of campus and a chance to talk with their tour guide again. “If they get a little bit of insight into your own life, that kind of helps them,” Wooten said. See TOUR GUIDE on Page 5

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

“Let’s stop sweeping in under the rug and just start listening for once.” @utkDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

Arts & Culture Opinions News Sports

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THE DAILY BEACON • 2

Friday, February 21, 2014


Friday, February 21, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Kendall Thompson Contributor Coney Island is a time capsule, filled with age-old circus and sideshow acts that have defied belief and imagination for years. Though many haven’t had the opportunity to experience the wonder in the flesh, the Pretty Things Peepshow will bring the magic to Knoxville on Saturday, Feb. 22 at the Relix Variety Theatre. The Pretty Things Peepshow, based in New York City, was founded by burlesque dancer “Go-Go Amy,” who longed to make the jump from a part-time gig to a full-time one. “There’s not a ton of shows around for what I do. I thought, ‘I want a full job, and one doesn’t exist, so I’ll just make one,’” Amy said in a phone interview with The Daily Beacon. She shared her vision with fellow performer and Coney Island veteran “Donny Vomit,” a professional block-head, who thought her idea hit the nail on the head. “When I was 24, I moved to New York with a dream,” Vomit said in a performance video on the company’s website. “The first thing I did was jump on a subway and went to a little place called Coney Island. That’s the people’s playground, right there, the birth of the sideshow.” Armed with their sparkly costumes and hammer and nail, the duo recruited “Brianna Belladonna” as their sword swallower and “Frankie Sin” for her impressive burlesque and belly dancing skills. There have been others featured as guest performers, but the guests are switched

out in order to keep the act fresh, according to the Peepshow’s website. In January of 2009, the group jumped in their trailer and started their journey. The result: a steamy show teeming with pin-up style burlesque and amazing sideshow performances that has performed at Ozzfest 2010 with Ozzy Osbourne, sung happy birthday to Rob Halford and even traveled as far as Australia for the Wintersun Nostalgia Festival. “We love Australia,” Amy said. “For the festival, we had to do all these public appearances while were there because we were the headlining act, so there was a different classic car to drive us around every day.” Go-Go Amy went on to point out the difficulty in picking one memorable moment in the nearly 700 shows the group has performed over the years. Each theater they go to retains a memory of the last time they were there, according to the burlesque dancer. One mention of Knoxville, and she was back in the Relix Variety Theatre again. “We love coming to Knoxville, it’s been way too long since we were there,” she said. “I do remember that I love the theater. It’s a really nice place to play, nice stage, big sightline; we always worry about that because we’re such a visual show.” However, it’s not just the theater that draws the group to Knoxville. “I think my favorite thing about Knoxville is that we have so many friends there. There’s a tattoo and piercing shop, Born This Way, that we are really good friends with. They’re actually

BLAM continued from Page 1 While some attendees saw the event as excessive for a festival lineup announcement, Brown said he saw the reasoning behind Bonnaroo’s announcement party. “It seemed like a fun way to tell people and a smart way to generate hype,” Brown said. “Plus, you only get to announce the lineup once a year, so why not make a production out of it?”

• Photo Courtesy of Ryan Armbrust

Peep show pops into the Relix Theatre

Go Go Amy, right, assists Lil Miss Firefly. Pretty Things Peepshow demonstrates a risque act as one of their performances. The group is based out of New York and will be performing at the Relix Theatre on Saturday. sponsoring the show,” Amy said. She went on to add that the shop has donated a $250 gift card to give away during the show. Bryan Thomas, owner of Born This Way, was first introduced to the group in Coney Island. “I’ve attended some of their shows in the past when they’ve come through here,” he said, “so we just contacted them when we found out they were coming through Knoxville again about sponsorship opportunities.” Don’t let worries of the risqué keep you away. After touring the world, the Pretty Things Peepshow is accustomed to adapting their act to the local culture.

Garrett McCullough, a freshman in business management, also attended the event and admitted he is excited to see A$AP Ferg this summer. He enjoyed the “great record store atmosphere” despite thinking the two hours before the announcement “seemed a little overdone.” “Seeing a group of people, all matching my anticipation, got me even more excited for Bonnaroo than I was beforehand,” McCullough said. “It made it feel more like a true preview for Bonnaroo.”

Copy Editor Greek mythology, dancing aquatic life and more than 80 ballerina slippers. These are just a few factors that have gone into GO! Contemporary Dance Works’ ballet production of “The Search for Persephone,” to be premiered Feb. 22 and 23 at the Bijou Theatre. Known for “blending contemporary ballet and modern dance with daring athleticism,” according to their website, the dance company will present an aesthetically rich representation of the rescue of Persephone, daughter of Demeter, the ancient Greek goddess of agriculture, from her abduction into the underworld. Darby O’Connor, who has been dancing with GO! since their 2004 founding, believes the production has gone to great lengths to authentically portray its mythological roots. “This ballet is quite true to traditional Greek myths, told in a more visual and sometimes abstract way,” O’Connor said. “The costumes and set are very elaborate and ornate, which makes the scenes come to life.” Designed by director Lisa Hall McKee and her team of choreographers, costumes and scenery include depictions of both

forest and underwater settings, complete with dancing flowers, pearls, and starfish. All designs were actualized by a volunteer group comprised mainly of the dancers’ relatives. Given the size of the cast, this added up to a large-scale creative coalition. “We have a huge cast, which can sometimes be a challenge,” said Laura Patterson, a Knoxville Catholic High School sophomore who has danced with GO! for three years. “We have about 45 dancers in the show, but our choreographers handled the numbers very well and created a massive and powerful show.” Despite the complications posed by fitting such an extravagant production onto a smaller-scale stage like that of the Bijou, the dancers are ultimately pleased with the venue space, which is booked by GO! on an at least-annual basis. “I have performed many times at the Bijou with GO! and it is one of my favorite venues in town,” O’Connor, who will dance the roles of Gaea, Hades, and a pomegranate, said. “The best part is all of the history that lives there. I am constantly inspired by the energy of past performers that still resides in the space.” An aspect of the production probably not experienced by performers of yore is the incor-

Jenna Butz Staff Writer

“To facilitate working all the time, we have to be able to do the show, at times, in a PG fashion,” Amy said. “There are some shows where you need to tone it down a little bit, and some where we can get a little more wild, and so I need all my performers, even the burlesque ones, to be able to perform in a variety of different venues. Hard to find, but once you get them, you keep them.” Tickets for the 8 p.m. show range from $10 to $15 and can buy purchased via a link on the Relix Variety Theatre’s website. More information on the Pretty Things Peepshow can be found on its website or Facebook page.

As the lineup was announced, cheers erupted whenever fans saw their favorites listed on the screen. However, the Bonnaroo lineup is still incomplete with more acts being added in the months leading to June, and Brown said he still has one last prediction. “I’m pretty sure they’ll be doing something with the Muppets ‘cause there were like 10 references in the B.L.A.M.,” Brown said. “I’m hoping I’m right with that, and they have them come out with like Albarn or The Flaming Lips.”

Bijou ‘searches for Persephone’ with ballet Liv McConnell

Bonnaroo lineup strong despite pricey headliners

poration of contemporary aerial dancing. “We have a lot of aerial work, which can be dangerous if careful precautions are not set,” Patterson, who plays the respective roles of flower, gatekeeper of hell, dolphin and deep sea creature, said. “It’s always safe though, thanks to our responsible cast and crew.” O’Connor, who says the cast has been rehearsing since early December for sometimes as long as eight hours straight, thinks the aerial aspects make the story more authentic. “The aerial dance really sets

us apart from other shows and allows us to tell the story in a more real way by suspending dancers in the air,” she said. “This company blurs the lines of ballet and contemporary dance, making it feel more accessible to me. I’m confident our audience will feel that same sense of accessibility.” Performances begin at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22 and 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23. Advance tickets, which can be purchased on the Bijou’s website, are $17 for students, $22 for adults, and $22 and $25 at the door.

Rap/Hip-Hop: I have an obsession with rappers using pretty voices to accompany their hard rap, and Danny Brown definitely does that. His raps are gritty with unexpected beats and collaborations to back him up with an early 90s rapper flair. While lower on the lineup, make the time to see at least one song. Second, there is A$AP Ferg. A breakout member of Harlem’s A$AP Mob, his appearance was highly anticipated, and rap fans are sure to be pleased. Pass up Wiz Khalifa though. He has like two songs that fans actually care about, and other than that, the only slightly entertaining aspect of him is his creepy laugh. Rock: This year, Bonnaroo’s lineup is packed with incredible rock acts that I can hardly stand the wait for. The genres range from indie to alternative to folk to whatever James Blake considers himself. Make sure you go see The Flaming Lips and Vampire Weekend though. Both are near the top of the lineup and for good reason. Vampire Weekend had one of the most celebrated albums of the year, and their show will without a doubt be insanely fun. Then, The Flaming Lips are alt-rock royalty. With unexpected twists and turns, The Flaming Lips are infamous for their energetic and trippy shows: the two pillars of Bonnaroo. I’m going to say it though – skip Phoenix. At this point in their career, we should expect something more from them as opposed to the high school electro-pop rock they continually produce. Baby Acts: One of the best things about Bonnaroo is its ability to introduce up-and-coming acts to large crowds, and even without a large portion of the local Tennessee bands they are sure to have unannounced, who they have so far is a testament to the growing quality of music lately. To get a genuine feel of this musical growth, see Okkervil River with their folk-tinged rock, St. Paul & the Broken Bones’ modern take on soul and Blank Range’s alternative indie rock. These three will likely have early day shows, so they won’t conflict with larger acts you probably want to see. Since it is impossible to sleep in with the heat, get up and discover.

After watching the lineup announcement at the Disc Exchange Wednesday night, my friend said, “This lineup is made for you,” and nothing has ever been truer. So many bands that I have been obsessing over are gracing Bonnaroo stages this year, and as I delve into more acts that I have yet to discover that will be in Manchester this June, I can hardly wait the four months until we’re all back at the Farm. Let’s break it down, shall we? Headliners: Honestly, the headliners are a slight disappointment. First, there’s Lionel Richie and Elton John. It has become a trend among festivals to bring in superstar, older artists which seriously seems to be just for money. Second, we have to deal with Kanye. In 2008, he was two hours late to his show then bashed the festival on his blog. Hope for the best here, Bonnaroovians. There is a light at the end of the tunnel though: Jack White. The man found Alabama Shakes, revived vinyl and allowed classic artists such as Loretta Lynn to return to the spotlight. Not to mention, he personifies rock. If anything, go to his set to support the Record Store Day Ambassador in his musical crusade. EDM: Some people say they are over Skrillex, but that did not stop the wave of excitement when he was announced as part of the B.L.A.M. party. His announcement was a surprise when nearly everyone was sure this year’s big EDM act would be Bassnectar. However, Skrillex is worth seeing if for nothing more than being able to dance all night. There is also Disclosure to see. Mixing smooth pop vocals with EDM beats, it is on the fence if they are fully EDM, but their sound is spacey and captivating. Completely worth going to see. Yet, even though he is high up on the lineup, Kaskade can be skipped. His music sounds Jenna Butz is a freshman like something that would just be played on repeat at a in journalism and electronic club and not a large act at a media. She can be reached at jkw546@utk.edu. music festival.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, February 21, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

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Mental illness a sickness, not a crime Fifty Shades of Wade by

Wade Scofield If you’ve ever watched any sort of Batman film or program, you know Arkham Asylum. Unstable villains are ushered through empty hallways where they are under lock and key. The asylum is for the “criminally insane.” Unfortunately, the word “insane” is tossed around like the remote control in our living rooms and is even transliterated into “crazy” to describe people who are suffering from mental illness. It can be surprising to people that mental health facilities hardly resemble Arkham Asylum. People imagine these places as ones of schizophrenic peculiarities. And we possess a daunting stigma about mental health, where we assume that everyone can take care of themselves, that mental illness is something self-contracted and exaggerated. We assume that all people, especially those in college, can just “get over it.” It doesn’t exactly work that way, but why do we see it that way? At its core, that reason lies somewhere between the dismantled American mental health system and societal expectations of strength and control. It has been estimated that about 26.2 percent of all adults over the age of 18 struggle with some sort of mental illness. That’s one in four Americans. This means we know many people who suffer from mental illness, yet we still consider it a foreign and undiscovered topic. It seems that every time someone checks into a mental health institute for depression and suicidal thoughts, they are received as “crazy.” It’s true that these institutes treat more uncommon illnesses like schizophrenia, phobias and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Depression arises in a combination of genetic, psychological, and environmental factors. The stigma that depression is a self-choice for attention is not only irresponsible but immature and ignorant of science. Another reason this stigma exists is that people often don’t know how to help. But what makes this mold dangerous is that up to 30 percent of college students report symptoms of depression each year. Our brains are not wired to easily adjust to the complexities of modern society. In 1880, the average age of death was 40. Now, it’s close to 80. Surely our brains have hardly evolved since then. In 1880, self-actualization was the last thing on people’s minds. Survival was priority No. 1. Is ardent survival a prime burden for modern Americans? No. We worry about the future incessantly. Where will we be in 20 years? In 40? In 60? We assume we will live to about 80 years old. We worry about our legacies, of society’s expectations in an unstable world where instant judgment is rendered by technology. Not only is it problematic the way culture addresses mental illness, our government hasn’t done the issue any favors. In the 1980s, President Reagan signed a bill that caused hundreds of thousands of the mentally ill to lose insurance. During the recession, some states saw their mental health spending cut up to 30 percent. This is not to mention that even though only about 6 percent of Americans suffer from severe mental illness, nearly 25 percent of homeless Americans, people who are often over-looked, do. And because of this, prisons have emerged as the de facto safety net for mentally ill homeless people. Not everyone suffering from a mental illness needs institutionalized care or even clinical therapy. But it is obvious that even the best mental health facilities are overburdened and many people don’t know whether or not they are eligible for mental health care . And we consider people we know who are suffering from mental illness to be losers, weak, emotional leeches who are inferior. If the state of mental health in the United States is going to get better, part of it has to start with us. We need to be open to a discussion about mental health issues and barricades to treatment, to acceptance. Next time someone tells you they have suffered from a mental illness, take the time to listen, to understand. Let’s stop sweeping it under the rug and just start listening for once. Wade Scofield is a senior in religious studies. He can be reached at wade@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Hoffman’s death reminds us of film’s ability to impact Crossing Cues by

Marianela D’Aprile Two Sundays ago, upon hearing the news of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death, one of the first images that came to my mind was of Hoffman in the 1999 film “Flawless.” In it, Hoffman plays a melodramatic drag queen who gives singing lessons to a stereotypically “tough” New York City cop re-learning to speak after a stroke. Hoffman’s character, Rusty, has a persona with the capacity to overwhelm; he’s erratic, rash, sometimes too vulnerable. Hoffman so perfectly embodies the role and so fully captures attention that it wasn’t until after the movie’s end, as I watched the credits, that I realized that the cop character was portrayed by none other than Robert De Niro. “Flawless” is one of the first films that ever made an impression on me. The thoughts and emotions that it evoked in me seven years ago have stayed with me because Hoffman’s execution of his craft – so poignant, so well-honed – touched me on a level more profound than any other film performance I had ever seen. So, when Hoffman passed, I felt like I had lost a piece of something that had a direct

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

But there’s something about films that requires more than simple consumption. Films ask us to really pay attention; they don’t bait us with action perfectly timed to shake the screen every 60 seconds; they don’t cue our amusement with a laugh track. Some of the most celebrated films barely have dialogue. Others barely have a score. The best films challenge us to pay attention, to move outside our own bodies and live someone else’s life for two hours. They engage nearly all of our senses, and, especially if watched in a dark theater, they let us forget that anything else exists beyond the movie screen. The best films have the capacity to awe, to make us understand something about ourselves we didn’t understand before. They challenge us; they make us feel uncomfortable, sad, angry, overwhelmed. Sometimes, if a film is good enough, if its actors are convincing enough, if we see it at the right time in our lives, it stays with us – maybe forever. Philip Seymour Hoffman made “Flawless” stay with me. And while he has passed, the power of film probably never will. Every time we cry at a movie theater, every time we gather around our television to watch a comedy with our friends, we get a chance to preserve it. Marianela D’Aprile is a fourth year in architecture. She can be reached at mdaprile@utk.edu.

Mom was right: Organizing and cleaning can lead to success Working Out Happiness by

Andrew Fleming When your parents tell you that something is good for you, it’s usually good for you. That being said, when my parents tell me something is good for me, I’m usually good at doing the opposite of said thing, wandering blindly in confusion until I collapse in a heap of “I should have listened.” Though this pattern has surfaced in many facets of my life, there is one example that stands head and shoulders above the rest – the dreaded conversation every parent has had with every child, the biggest privacy invasions known to man. I’m talking about organization. What can seem like nothing more than a mere inconvenience to all of the non-type-A humans out there, organization is actually crucial to the way we function. Apart from the self-explanatory reasons for maintaining a visible floor, organization can be broken down in a bidirectional manner. I’m of the opinion that the state of our surroundings can not only act as a physical manifestation of our current mindset, but can also actually affect the way we feel and act.

Allow me to elaborate. Looking at a lack of organization as a symptom is fairly straightforward. My lack of organization typically stems from some general feeling of apathy. This feeling of apathy is usually due to a deeper issue of some sort, whether I realize it or not. That being said, my surroundings have a habit of reflecting how I am feeling. When I’m incredibly motivated, happy and immersed in hard work, my apartment is spotless. It’s like a well-oiled machine. My kitchen is always clean enough to cook for Gordon Ramsey. My desk has enough thinking room for thoughts of Einsteinian proportions. There’s a place for everything and everything is in its place, so to speak. This is all because I feel that way on the inside as well. It’s like my apartment is an inhabitable mood ring. Depression leads to piles of dishes quickly; happiness has me remembering to water my plants. When I feel like pursuing my goals, I surround myself with a conducive environment. On the flip side of that, organization – or a lack thereof – can have dramatic effects on our lives as well. Piles of dishes lead to less home-cooked meals, as well as strange growths in your sink. A disorganized desk leads to less study time that, in turn, leads to either poorer grades or less free time. Not doing your laundry will make you slowly become smellier and smellier until you have no friends (it happens). Neurologically speaking, disorganiza-

tion most definitely affects the way we perceive our surroundings. You see, our brains are wired for contrast, for differences, for movement. We’re best at picking out what’s actually important. Organization has a way of not only letting us remember where we put things but leaving things where they are easily discerned from the background. When our lives become a beige layer of clothes, wrappers and notebooks, we’re putting ourselves at a physiological disadvantage – one that has a habit of leading to tardiness. It really does turn into a losing battle. So, whether you want to look at the situation in a symptomatic manner or as a stimulus, the message remains the same: Clean your room. Just do it. Clean everything. Organize the icons on your desktop. Arrange your sock drawer by the year each pair of socks was woven. Go a little over the top. In the end, it only helps you with everything else you want to do with your life. Maybe you won’t forget to grab that one grade-determining lab report because you laid it nicely in the tray on your desk. Maybe you won’t be late to the first date because your second flip flop has taken up residence under your couch. Find a system that works for you and stick to it. Andrew Fleming is a junior in neuroscience. He can be reached at aflemin8@ utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

role in shaping my taste in film and, through that, my view of the world. Because that’s what film does: it creates representations and alterations of the reality in which we live so that we may better understand them. Some people have complained, particularly through social and popular media, about the amount of attention this particular heroin-related death has received, asking why we only take note when it’s someone famous that dies, why we don’t remember everyone that dies of a heroin overdose in the same way, why Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death is “special.” They wonder why we mourn his death instead of recognizing that it came at a time when heroin use and trafficking is on the rise. Hoffman was just another person – another lover, another father, another son – whose death will be greatly suffered by those who survive him. But the impact of his life extended beyond this immediate circle of people. Hoffman’s death impacted us because, through his movies, we had let him into our homes. He was part of the family of anyone who had ever seen one of his films. Most often we turn to films for entertainment. Thanks to Netflix streaming, watching a movie is as easy as opening an Internet browser. We don’t even have to leave our rooms anymore. In fact, most people don’t. We’re tempted to consume film the same way that we consume television: marathons of episodes for hours on end, with 15 Netflixdesignated seconds between each one.

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Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for pub-

lication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Editor, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314.

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Friday, February 21, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Around Rocky Top

An open letter to Stacey Campfield dents that start organizations to open dialogue about issues that people just don’t want to face. Your continued ignorance of your constituents makes Knoxville look bad. You present an image of Knoxville that appears cowardly and backwards, an image that does not at all reflect the innovation and creativity going on at UT. You have to know somewhere in the back of your mind that you won’t win this one. Maybe it’s me being idealistic, but I believe that if enough people think something is wrong, government will be forced to listen. SB1608 and SB2493 are wrong. They attempt to limit the whole point of college: exploring and learning and preparing to enter a world that could use a little more understanding, a little more compassion, a little more exposure to ways of thinking that are not our own. In the grand scheme of American politics, Sen. Campfield, you are insignificant. And yet, your ignorant thinking may just serve as the catalyst to propel Tennessee forward into a new era, an era not defined by the ignorance of a small-time politician, but by a people willing to challenge their preconceived ideas for the greater good of the university, the state and the country as a whole. Enjoy your Friday night. Best,

Claire Dodson Arts & Culture Editor

Sen. Campfield, To put it quite frankly, you are an insult to the higher education system. It’s entertaining to watch Gov. Haslam fight for a more educated Tennessee only for you to defy this mission at every turn. I’m not even talking about your views on sex education. Government exists to help people. Period. There is no other purpose. You committed to a speaking engagement at the University of Tennessee this Friday, and then you cowardly canceled because you couldn’t filter the questions so that they would positively reflect your political agenda. This event was sponsored by the College Democrats and Republicans, a truly bipartisan effort meant to educate students about Tennessee government. In light of our country’s extreme political polarization, this was a great step forward. Really, the fact that college students Claire Dodson is a junior in were willing to engage in discourse English . She can be reached at pdodwith you speaks to the intellect and open-mindedness of UT students, stu- son@utk.edu.

Students participate in “Priciples & Priorities,� a budget simulation put on by the UT Econ Club and the Concord Coalition inside the Howard Baker Center on Wednesday.

TOUR GUIDE continued from Page 1 When the UT Alert system was questioned during a tour, Harkins and Wooten mentioned past incidents, like a bear roaming campus and snow day mischief. In a follow-up interview with The Daily Beacon, the guides were asked to explain their hesitance to disclose criminal activity in areas surrounding campus. “When it comes down to safety, we just want to make it as optimistic as pos-

sible,� Harkins said. “Our campus is the safest place in Knoxville. “The things that occur off campus are sporadic, are random, completely out of control with anything UT can deal with.� Ambassadors, Wooten admitted, primarily mention alerts taking place on campus. “A lot of the UT Alerts are so far off campus they don’t apply as much to us,� Wooten said. Harkins credits the program with furthering his professional development, specifically with regard to public speaking.

The art of “making small talk,� Harkins said, is crucial skill in making touring students feel welcome. But if students spot Harkins on duty, they shouldn’t hesitate to give him a shout – specifically, a spirited “Go Vols� or “Big Orange Country.� Such gestures demonstrate solidarity despite a population 21,000 strong. That unity, he said, draws students. “It makes it feel like it’s smaller than it is,� Harkins said. For more information, visit http:// admissions.utk.edu/visit/here/volcorpsstudent-recruiter-program/.

DOWNLOAD continued from Page 1 Yet, the end of Ruckus was a decision beyond UT’s jurisdiction. That month, Ruckus stopped updating their music library, advertising a site makeover. “Ruckus shut down in 2009, at first for ‘periodic maintenance’ and then for good,� said Rose Parker, assistant director for the Office of Information Technology. “After

Ruckus shut down their system, the administration chose not to pursue another downloading, free-based service, despite the high number of users.� Parker was not able to comment on whether the university has pursued a replacement for the service. But Hunsucker found the possibility appealing. “If the university had a means by which to provide me with a legal sharing site,� Hunsucker said, “I would take advantage of it in a heartbeat.�

CRIME LOG Feb. 6 4:32 p.m.: As reported in last week’s Crime Log, UTPD responded to a call at the Delta Zeta house in Sorority Village and discovered “contraband in several of the rooms.� In a report released Thursday, the contraband was revealed to be empty alcohol containers, and in one girl’s room, a small amount of marijuana and a digital scale. The evidence was confiscated and a case card was issued.

coming from Room 356. Two subjects were cited a misdemeanor for simple possession.

Feb. 17 1:04 p.m.: Victim reported the theft of money from his bag at the TRECS. Victim stated that he left the bag unattended on the bleachers as he played basketball. 8:36 p.m.: Officers responded to a call at Clement Hall for the odor of a marijuana

Crime Logs are compiled from records of the University of Tennessee and Knoxville Police departments. People with names similar or identical to those listed may not be those identified in reports. All persons arrested are presumed innocent until proved guilty in a court of law.

Feb. 18 1:24 a.m.: Officer conducted a traffic stop of a green Toyota for failure to have working tail lights. Further investigation led to the discovery of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. Two misdemeanor citations were issued and all parties were released.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, February 21, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS GAME RECAP continued from Page 1 Simmons also scored seven points in UT’s 9-3 run to end the first half with a 54-33 Tennessee lead. By the break, Simmons already had 19 of her 26 points. “There’s really no explanation for it,” Simmons said of her trend of success against Auburn, whom she has averaged 18.5 points per game against in her career. “I just try to come out and play hard. It’s never really about me. “I just want to do whatever it takes to come out and help us win.” The turnover issues from Sunday’s 75-71 home loss to Kentucky were also stifled Thursday; UT only had 15 turnovers against the Tigers. “When you don’t turn the ball over 22 times, it usually helps,” Warlick said. “I think we handled the full court pressure really well. “I don’t think we turned it over against their press, but there’s always room to get bet-

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

ter.” The biggest lead in the game for the Lady Vols was 38 points, capped by junior forward Cierra Burdick’s two free throws that put her the team up 91-53 with 6:01 left to play. Burdick finished with 17 points and was 7-for-8 from the free throw line. UT, as a team, shot 49.3 percent from the field (33-of-67). “When you see those couple of shots go in, your momentum gets going,” Burdick said. “We love getting hype and chest bumping. We love to play with passion.” The Lady Vols next matchup will be on the road against Missouri this Sunday, a team that defeated UT last year at Thompson-Boling Arena, 80-63. “First and foremost we are focused on us,” Burdick said. “Obviously we see what is going on in our conference, but we need to focus on our next game, which is Missouri. They have some good shooters, some of the best in the SEC. “We just have to continue to play Lady Vol basketball.”

SOFTBALL

Cali road trip a homecoming of sorts for UT Garrett Ahmad Contributor For many members of the undefeated No. 3 Lady Vols softball team, their upcoming trip to California will be somewhat of a homecoming. Nine current Lady Vols will be returning to their home state for the Mary Nutter Collegiate Classic in Cathedral City, Calif., and the San Diego Classic with a game at Cal State Fullerton in between. Even those not from California will be in familiar territory. “I know so many girls out in Cali from being out there,” sophomore Rainey Gaffin, a Thornton, Colo., native, said at Wednesday’s media availability. “I’m just kind of excited to go against them. Kind of almost back like in summer ball. I just think we are ready and definitely we’re just ready for this competi-

tion and to prove that we are still Tennessee.” Tennessee will face its toughest competition so far this season in the team’s opening game of the Mary Nutter Collegiate Classic when it faces No. 12 Nebraska on Feb. 22. The Lady Vols will also face Oregon State in the nightcap of a doubleheader on Saturday. The following day, the Lady Vols will face No. 11 Stanford and Fresno State in another doubleheader. “Nebraska is a World Series team that returns their entire pitching staff,” co-head coach Karen Weekly said. “Stanford, in my opinion, isn’t ranked as highly as they should be. I think they’re a top 10 team, maybe even a top five team.” Two members of the team will also reach career milestones against Nebraska. Co-head coach Ralph Weekly will be taking part in his 1,500th

game in his 28-year career as a coach. His stops during that time have included Pacific Lutheran, Chattanooga and Tennessee. Senior pitcher Ellen Renfroe is sitting on 799 career strikeouts, which is second in Tennessee history, behind legendary pitcher Monica Abbott (2004-07) who holds the NCAA record with 2,440 strikeouts. Tennessee will then take on Cal State Fullerton Feb. 25. While UT’s other opponents may not be as strong on paper, Weekly said Tennessee knows as well as anyone how talented West Coast teams are. “They’re loaded with West Coast kids,” Karen Weekly said, “and those players out there are talented and they know how to play the game. And all of those schools can beat you if you don’t bring your ‘A’ game.” Tennessee will wrap up its road trip in the San Diego Classic

beginning Feb. 27. “We’re going to be tested every single game we play on this nine day swing out west,” Karen Weekly continued. “It’s going to be by far the toughest competition we face day in and day out.” For the coaches, this will not only be an opportunity to face difficult opponents, but also a chance to recruit. “Well (the trip is) certainly important in recruiting,” Karen Weekly said. “If we’re going to continue to go out to California and bring talented players here to Tennessee, which we will, we need to go out there and play in front of their families, and that’s important to our girls, and they’re very excited about going out there. “All that’s important to me as a coach and to our players, is we get better every day and we go out and try to win every ball game.”

BASEBALL

63 Auburn

Tennessee 93

Knoxville, Tenn. // Thompson-Boling Arena // 10,111

Vols facing ‘big test’ in UNLV series

22-61 (.361)

Field Goals

33-67 (.493)

3-11 (.273)

3-pointers

6-14 (.429)

Assistant Sports Editor

16-21 (.762)

Free Throws

21-29 (.724)

33-11

Rebounds-Off

47-16

18

Turnovers

15

25

Fouls

16

-

Largest Lead

38

In a seesawing four-game series that produced offensive outbursts, an extra-inning showdown and three one-run contests, Tennessee and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas each kicked off their 2013 campaigns in exhilarating fashion. A little more than a year later, it’s time to cue the bell for round two. In the second leg of a homeand-home series, UT (4-0) will welcome the Rebels to Lindsey Nelson Stadium for a three-game weekend series beginning today at 5 p.m. “This is absolutely a big test,” head coach Dave Serrano said. “We had really good games with

Individual Leaders Ty. Tanner 15

Points

M. Simmons 26

Tr. Tanner 10

Rebounds

I. Harrison 11

M. Tucker 4

Assists

M. Simmons 5

H. Muhammad 3

Steals

J. Jones 3

Ty. Tanner 2

Blocks

I. Harrison 3

Dargan Southard

them over there last year. We lost three one-run games, so I’m glad we have them in our ballpark.” When Tennessee made last season’s western trek to Las Vegas, the third-year head coach had 18 freshmen on his roster at the time. Most of those players are back as sophomores, and Serrano is anxious to see just how much growth has accumulated between then and now. “A lot of these guys were freshman last year,” Serrano said. “(The UNLV series) was the first time they were Division I baseball players. So a lot of them have grown up, and we’ll see how much they have grown up (this weekend).” Like the Vols, UNLV enters the weekend set with an unblemished record. On Sunday, they finished off an opening-series sweep

of Central Michigan, and just one day later, the Rebels (4-0) cracked the Collegiate Baseball News top 30 poll at No. 29. “UNLV’s a good baseball team,” Serrano said. “They’ve got really good pitching. The guy we’re going to see Friday night is going to be a top round – maybe a first round – draft pick.” The recipient of Serrano’s high praise is Rebel starting pitcher Erick Fedde (1-0, 0.00 ERA), who is currently ranked as the 17th best overall prospect according to Baseball America. The junior hurler, who took home Mountain West Pitcher of the Week honors after striking out a career-high 11 batters in his season debut, will start opposite UT righty Nick Williams (1-0, 0.00 ERA) in tonight’s series opener.

The Vols will trot out freshman Kyle Serrano (1-0, 3.60 ERA) in the second game on Saturday, and sophomore lefty Andrew Lee (1-0 1.80 ERA) will close out the weekend on Sunday. Both contests are scheduled to start at 1 p.m. UT began the week with a three-game sweep of Purdue and followed it up with a 5-3 win over Appalachian State on Wednesday afternoon. For the Vols, the plan moving forward is rather simple. “All we can do is control what we can control and let the games give us what it wants to,” right fielder Scott Price said, “because I know that we can stand toe-totoe with any other team in the country. “We’ll never be outmanned talent-wise, ever.”


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