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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Issue 28, Volume 125

Dylan Canfield • The Daily Beacon

Knoxville falls to No. 10 in ‘Bible-mindedness’ US survey previously ranked the city at No. 1 in 2013 poll In a 2014 ranking of “Bible-minded” U.S. citStaff Writer ies, an assessment commissioned by the American Hanna Lustig Bible Society, Knoxville News Editor ranked 10th, dropping nine The Bible Belt isn’t merely spots from its 2013 position a nickname. It is a verifiable as No. 1. But, with Chattanooga geographic trend. topping the list instead, Tennessee remained one of the three most heavily represented states on the list, the others being Kentucky and North Carolina. Each of these states contains three cities ranked within the top 20. In addition, all but one city in the list’s top 10 share a border with Tennessee, forming a snake-like belt across the Southeast. Dale E. Jones, secretary-treasurer of the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies, one of the pioneers of the religious census, noted the importance of gathering such data. “Religion is a major sociological phenomenon in any country,” Jones said.

Liz Wood

SEE

INSIDE Robocop remake fails to live up to its 1980’s counterpart

“Whether you’re attending or not attending tells you something about the culture.” Prior to 1950, religious data in the U.S. hadn’t been gathered on the county level. ASARB began conducting religious censuses in 1950 and has since conducted one every decade. Religious data for the census is gathered from more than 100 different religious groups across the country as well as from households at random. Notably, more populous cities were generally found less “Bible-minded.” The ABS’ “Bible mindedness” study was based upon data collected from the 2010 religious census conducted by the ASARB. Criteria for qualifying as a “Bible-minded” person included whether or not the person had read the Bible in the past seven days, as well as the extent to which the person believes its accuracy. In Eastern Tennessee, rises observed between the

2000 and 2010 censuses indicate an increase of 191,000 more people associating with a religious institution of some kind. Despite this growth, Jones said actual commitment levels to specific religious congregations has plateaued over the last decade, at best. “Overall, religious organizations aren’t building up much,” Jones said. “They’re convincing people to become

part of their organizations. Some are gaining; some are losing, but the net is about the same as it was 10 years ago.” Although Kathleen Connelly, senior in philosophy, noted a “national trend” away from religious affiliation, she asserted the inability of this trend to account for the influence of regional culture and tradition. “I think there’s an

important extent to which people in the South, and Appalachian people specifically, feel they need to retain a sense of identity that is distinct from a national American identity,” Connelly said. “An extent to which people feel like their identity is being threatened by the growing secularization of the United States.” See BIBLE MINDED on Page 2

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

Cheers: Knoxville’s own ‘barcade’ finds perfect balance between games and the college nightlife ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

Courtside View: The Vols look to avoid a big night from Georgia’s guards, three straight losses SPORTS >>pg. 6

SGA launches two petitions responding to activity fee bills Hayley Brundige Assistant Photo Editor

Community The Student Government Association launched two online petitions on Feb. 9 in response to Senate Bills 1608 and 2493. Both bills, written by State Sen. Stacey Campfield, R-Knoxville, would alter the way student activity fees are allocated at all public institutions of higher education in Tennessee on the basis that the current process is biased and unequal. SB 1608 would divide and distribute student fees among student organizations based on the membership of the groups requesting funding for speakers and other programming. On

SPORTS >>pg. 6

Staff Writer

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signatures the other hand, SB 2493 would completely prohibit the use of institutional revenues for visiting or guest speakers. The SGA petitions advocate for the retention of the current student fee distribution process, which allows

Hannah Moulton

signatures

students on the University Programs and Services Fee funding board to determine which groups and events recieve money from student fees; currently, 5 percent of student fees are used for programming. One petition is open to

all students and faculty at Tennessee Board of Regents schools, including state universities and community colleges and can be found on the SGA website. An additional petition open to the general public was created on change.org.

Vols sweep Purdue to open 2014 Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor

A confident Simmons may provide the Lady Vols with the spark they need to chase the title

Students

The inclement weather was a nuisance. The schedule changes became complicated. The waiting caused frustration. But despite the countless alterations to Tennessee’s opening weekend itinerary, a negative word was difficult to find amid any postgame dialogue as the Vols finished off a threegame sweep of Purdue with a convincing 8-2 win Monday afternoon at Lindsey Nelson Stadium. A Sunday doubleheader kicked off the series — and the season — with the Vols winning the opener 3-0 and cruising in the nightcap, 20-2. “It was a good weekend for many reasons,” head coach Dave Serrano said. “The sweep

is always good. Got a lot of guys in, got to get a lot of position players in. A lot of pitchers got their feet wet for the first time.” Snowy conditions — both in Knoxville and the Midwest — ultimately changed the 2014 season-opening series from a weekend set to a SundayMonday affair. Once the Vols (3-0) finally took the field, though, the delay hardly seemed to matter. In the three games combined, Serrano’s squad allowed just 15 hits, posted a 1.33 team ERA and hit .388 as a whole. “Longtime coming,” said right fielder Scott Price, who finished the series with a .455 average and six RBI. “It took us a couple extra days to finally get out here, but 3-0 — no matter who you’re playing or what level of competition — is always a

A Band Eat Band world: Local music competition takes stage

good way to start.” In Game One, the pitching staff stifled the Purdue offense all afternoon, limiting the Boilermakers (0-3) to just six total base runners and only one hit. Freshman Hunter Martin, senior Nick Williams (1-0) and sophomore Drake Owenby combined for the shutout in the opener as the trio didn’t allow a Boilermaker into scoring position after the second inning. Williams, who was originally scheduled to start this weekend, was particularly dominant in relief, tossing five no-hit innings with two strikeouts. “Whenever Hunter was going to quit throwing, I had the ball,” Williams said on Sunday. “I was getting a lot of first pitch swings, so that was the big thing that was working

for me, being able to establish a strike first pitch and them swinging at it.” With the Purdue bats incheck, UT needed just a sliver of offense and found such in the third inning. A pair of Farragut High School alums jump-started the attack as freshman Nick Senzel’s RBI double brought home shortstop A.J. Simcox for the first run of the season. David Houser followed with a run-scoring single, and the Vols suddenly had a two-run cushion, more than enough to support the strong work of the UT hurlers. Serrano’s squad would tack on an insurance run in the seventh as sophomore outfielder Christin Stewart’s first hit of the season brought home Price. See BASEBALL on Page 5

Scruffy City’s Band Eat Band competition will take place at the Preservation Pub this Tuesday starting at 10 p.m. The competition, which is sponsored by i105, Blank Newspaper, Rock Snob Recording and Preservation Pub, showcases the talents of local bands ranging from a handful of different styles. The competition, which began in January and ends in April, is held every Tuesday. The competition’s semi-finals and the final will be held in June in the center of Market Square. Two bands play each night and a coin is flipped to determine the order. The bands will then play two 30-minute sets. The rules for the competition are laid back; bring a crowd, be original, be cool and be the best band live. The “cool” requirements for the competition accurately portray the easygoing atmosphere that the competition has grown to be known for. Andrew Sayne, whose band – Grandpa’s Stash – won last year’s competition, said the Band Eat Band competition differed from most he had participated in before. See BAND EAT BAND on Page 3

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

@DailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

“... As commitment to traditional group values – such as the family unit, friendship or community – continues to change, the implications will not go unchecked.” OPINIONS >>pg. 4

News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

Florida professor to speak on religion, nature at UC Samantha Smoak Online Editor Bron Taylor, a professor of religion, nature and environmental ethics at the University of Florida, will speak on Thursday at the University Center from 7-9 p.m. Sponsored by the Issues Committee, Taylor will present a lecture titled “Spirituality After Darwin: Dark Green Nature Religion As a New, Global Religious Movement,” which will explore the intersection of religion, nature, and environmentalism.

Blaire Hamilton, graphic design director for the Issues Committee, proposed Taylor after noticing a trend in divinity on campus. “I’ve heard so many of my friends say things like, ‘Nature is my religion,’ or ‘I’m spiritual but not religious,’” said Hamilton, a senior in religious studies. “Dr. Taylor really addresses these topics, and I think it will be something lots of students will enjoy.” Already an uncommon choice of programming for the hosting committee, Taylor’s lecture marries two typically disparate topics. “Religion is not something that issues events touch on

very often, especially when paired with environmentalism,” said Thomas Carpenter, social media director for the Issues Committee and sophomore in classics. “So it brings a great deal of diversity to our event lineup and offers a lot for different groups of students.” Taylor is also a Caron Fellow of the Rachel Carson Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Muchen, and an Affiliated Scholar with the Center for Environment and Development at Oslo University in Oslo, Norway. He earned his Ph.D. in social and religious ethics from the University of Southern California.

Beacon Flashbacks Feb. 18, 1972 In the 84rd issue of its 7th volume, The Daily Beacon reported on the addition of the new human services major. The major was added to the department of social work and represented a new concept in education. The interdisciplinary major was designed to represent psychology, philosophy, zoology and sociology according to the then-Director of Human Services, Robert Kronick. UT announced this year that starting in the fall of 2014, UT students will be able to major in cinema studies in addition to the minor created in the 80s. Also an interdisciplinary major, the program will include classes in the College of Communication and Information and the College of Arts and Sciences. In other news, the Beacon also reported on the Moot Court at UT’s College of Law, the goal of which was not to test their knowledge of law but their ability to apply facts in a case and build an argument. Today, UT Mock Trial and UT Speech and Debate Society offer similar preparation and enhancement of students’ critical thinking and debate skills. This Beacon Flashback was compiled by Online Editor Samantha Smoak.

BIBLE MINDED continued from Page 1 Citizens of Appalachian Tennessee, like Chattanooga and Knoxville, Conelly suggested, “see religion as such an integral part of their identity in a way that people in the rest of the country might not.” This disparity, she proposed, could account for Tennessee’s overall high ranking. “Despite the fact that nationally there is a trend toward secularization, I think locally there could be a trend in the reverse direction,” Conelly said. “Because people are kind of clinging to this identity that they feel might be threatened.

The study, however, cannot account for the exact extent to which personal accounts align with truth. Across denominations, Christian devotees invest faith in the Bible to varying degrees. A 2007 Gallup Poll reported a third of Americans believe the Bible to be literally true. That is, they believe the Bible to be “absolutely accurate and should be taken literally word for word.” Of those claiming to attend church every week, 54 percent considered the Bible “the actual word of God.” Church attendance was also highest in the South. “It’s important to recognize that some people say they’re Christian and go to church,”

Jones said. “But when we ask the church, they don’t know about them.” Conelly mentioned a recent investigation of New York’s higher-than-expected ranking on the list that likely “distorted” results. Researchers, during their calls to subjects, did not make a distinction between the Torah and variations of scripture, thus skewing statistics. With a large Jewish population, New York ranked artificially high on the list. But not all assumptions about America’s cities align with collected data. Contrary to its name, Providence, R.I., was ranked the least “Bibleminded” city in America.

After UAW defeat, can GOP fulfill promise of more jobs? Associated Press CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Republicans fighting a yearslong unionization effort at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee painted a grim picture in the days leading up to last week’s vote. They said if Chattanooga employees joined the United Auto Workers, jobs would go elsewhere and incentives for the company would disappear. Now that workers have rejected the UAW in a close vote, attention turns to whether the GOP can fulfill its promises that keeping the union out means more jobs will come rolling in, the next great chapter in the flourishing of foreign auto makers in the South. Regardless of what political consequences, if any, Republicans would face if that fails to happen, the Volkswagen vote established a playbook for denying the UAW its goal of expanding into foreign-owned plants in the region, which the union itself has called the key

to its long-term future. On the first of three days of voting at the Chattanooga plant, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker all but guaranteed the German automaker would announce within two weeks of a union rejection that it would build a new midsized sport utility vehicle at its only U.S. factory instead of sending the work to Mexico. “What they wanted me to know, unsolicited, that if the vote goes negative, they’re going to announce immediately that they’re going to build a second line,” Corker told The Associated Press of his conversations with unnamed Volkswagen officials. The company reiterated its longstanding position that the union vote would not factor into the decision, and Corker acknowledged that he had no information on whether the company would also expand if the union won. But the implication was clear, and union leaders said after the vote that the senator’s statements — coming in

concert with threats from state lawmakers to torpedo state incentives if the UAW won — played a key role in the vote. The UAW was defeated in a 712-626 vote Friday night. UAW President Bob King called it unprecedented for Corker and other elected officials to have “threatened the company with no incentives, threatened workers with a loss of product.” “It’s outrageous,” King said. Corker, who had originally announced he would refrain from making public comments during the election, changed course last week after he said the union tried to use his silence to chastise other critics. Corker said after the vote that he was happy he joined the fray. “I have no idea what effect we may or may not have had,” Corker said. “But I think I would have forever felt tremendous remorse if ... I had not re-engaged and made sure that people understand other arguments that needed to be put forth.”


Tuesday, February 18, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

‘Robocop’ reboot proves mediocre Eyes on Knoxville Fort Sanders Yacht Club: The Strip’s ‘Cheers’ bar Mark Schelstrate Contributor

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Chelsea Faulkner Contributor Good friends, great beer and classic arcade games: What more could you want on a Friday night? Lovingly known as the Strip’s only “barcade,” Fort Sanders Yacht Club is a hidden gem of UT nightlife, offering a wide variety of decently priced craft, domestic and import beers, alongside a full wall of 25-cent arcade games and take-and-play board games. FSYC also features a large flat screen gaming television complete with a Wii, Xbox, original Nintendo and more. “You can just come here to relax and have a good time,” said first-time patron Tyler Vittatoe, a senior in music education. “It isn’t too loud, and it’s really low key.” FSYC celebrated its sixth year of business this month with new owners and plans for renovation and expansion in the works. Dillon Luttrell and Jason Elcan acquired ownership of the club this past fall after founder Jon Haas, a former instructor in the School of Architecture and Design, passed away. “We really like the place. It’s been around for a long time,” Luttrell said. “It’s got a lot of history and we don’t want to change that. We just want to open the bar up to campus a little more.” If all goes accordingly, the bar will start a three-month expansion project in March, adding an indoor/outdoor second floor and an open-air third floor. Spearheading the expansion project, Luttrell and Elcan have recently transformed Fort Sanders Yacht club into a coffee shop during daytime hours. “We provide fresh, made to order coffee,” Luttrell said. “We have French presses, pour overs and an espresso

BAND EAT BAND continued from Page 1 “What I like about the Band Eat Band competition is that it was really, really friendly last year,” Sayne said. “It was good at getting everybody to do the best about our music scene and appreciate all the different people. “It wasn’t just cutthroat.” The winner of the competition needs to be “original as a Polaroid and cool as a fan,” according to the Scruffy City Band Eat Band Facebook page. “Overall, I think they’re looking for a band that’s tight but also knows how to have a good time,” Sayne said, “and is kind of willing to get loose on stage. That’s what they’re

Dan Hood, a junior in art, spends his time in at the Fort Sanders Yacht Club in between classes to unwind and catch up on school work on Monday. “I’ve been coming to the Yacht Club for a couple of years,” Hood said, “and it’s been great.” machine.” Open from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. during the week, the coffee shop also offers waffles, breakfast burritos and cereal along with a variety of other menu options. “We want to be that ‘Cheers’ bar down the street where everyone wants to come to hang out,” Luttrell said. Although Luttrell had been a patron at FSYC since it opened in early 2008, it wasn’t until recently that he learned how it gained its unusual name. “On the wall, close to the ceiling, you’ll notice there is a missing brick,” Luttrell said. “When Jon was renovating the place, he found a full can of 1930’s ‘Yacht Club’ beer sitting in that hole, I guess left over from when it was originally constructed. He decided to leave the can there, and it’s been called Fort Sanders Yacht Club ever since.” With Jon’s passing, Luttrell and Elcan have many great things planned for the future, including giving the bar more

advertising exposure and acquiring a liquor license. “We just want to open up our arms to anyone that wants to come,” Luttrell said. FSYC has a definitive grassroots feel: come by any night of the week and bartender Mike Scott will make you feel right at home. You might even find the owner, Dillon Luttrell there, spinning records or playing his favorite arcade game, NBA Showtime. “We’ve seen so many businesses come and go on the Strip over the years,” Luttrell said. “We’re obviously doing something right.” Every Monday night, the club hosts a raffle for an $80 gift certificate to Cumberland Glassworks. Other specialty nights include Wednesday Hookah Nights, Thursday “Bring Your Own Record” Nights and “Free Music” Fridays. To find operating hours, upcoming events and specials, check out Fort Sanders Yacht Club on Facebook.

looking for: the dynamic of having a good time but also performing really well.” The winners of the final in June will receive one week in Rock Snobs Recording Studios, one hour on-air interview with i105 FM, an interview with Blank Newspaper, $300 in band merchandise from Label Thirteen and $3,000. Deadbeat Scoundrels and Fatstacks and The Fun Guy, the two bands competing in this week’s round of the competition, seem to share the same laid back mentality about competing despite differing in musical style. “We don’t really worry about (the competition). … We just get up there and play our best,” Stewart McNealy, bass player of Deadbeat Scoundrels, said.

“Everybody’s out there making music, trying to do the same thing, so you definitely have to respect that,” Jason Perry, guitarist and vocalist in Fatstacks and The Fun Guy, added. Each year a wide variety of known and unknown bands enter the competition, hoping to put themselves out there and expand their audience. Deadbeat Scoundrels is no different. “Even if we don’t win, (the audience) might like our music and come back and see us,” McNealy said. The competition also gives bands a chance to get to know fellow musicians. “It provides other bands a chance to hear bands they may not even listen to, (and) may not even know were out there,” Perry said.

Remakes are all the rage. Hollywood loves to hedge its bets by retooling old tales that have a preordained audience. If the tale involves science fiction, so much the better; there are all kinds of new toys for directors to play with these days. Sometimes the results are winners (think “War of the Worlds”), and sometimes they are losers (think “Rollerball”). “Robocop” falls somewhere in between. Joshua Zetumer wrote the screenplay, and while he took the concept from the original, he took little else. The storyline is updated to fit the times with enough current political statements to keep any good liberal happy. Overall, the narrative hits all the right notes for an action film aspiring to have a message with a few awkward moments that I’m sure Zetumer would like to have another shot at. “Robocop” is director José Padilha’s first big budget Hollywood production, having previously directed less than a handful of films in his native Brazil. Padilha displays an overall wit that keeps the movie fun when it could get bogged down but then also overuses some techniques that come across

like a recent film school graduate showing off. One example is his use of handheld cameras during action scenes which are way too abrupt and don’t contrast well with the rest of the film. The effect is more dizzying than thrilling. The editors for the film, Daniel Rezende and Peter McNulty, could have put the movie together in a more seamless fashion. Editing isn’t something typically even considered while watching a film, and that’s the way it should be. Some of the abrupt cuts and shifting perspectives in “Robocop” may have been an artistic choice but they were not necessarily a good one. Joel Kinnaman, from Netflix’s “The Killing,” is cast as the title character. Putting a $130 million production in the hands of a little -known television actor was a risky move, but Kinnaman fits the role well. The actor has a stoic countenance and delivery that is very “Robocop” but also is able to show emotion when called for using only his face because well, that’s about all he has to work with. Samuel Jackson does a turn as the host of “The Novak Report,” a television show with a political agenda. Jackson, in a hairstyle robbed from the late James Brown, is a real hoot in the role and chews up the

scenery when he’s on screen. He even managed to sneak in his favorite “m” word although it was censored in a nod to the film’s PG-13 rating. Gary Oldman always brings integrity to every role he’s cast in; the pro never phones one in. This is true for his performance as a conflicted doctor with shifting morals. The award-winning actor brings some nice dramatic touches to the film as he flirts with the dark side. Speaking of the dark side, mention has to be made about one the film’s gadgets, which bears a striking resemblance to the Imperial Walkers from “Star Wars.” The designer must be a big fan of the classic series. Michael Keaton is adequately evil as the head of the corporation stirring up all the ruckus. There wasn’t much depth to the character, however, and Keaton never really commits to the part. Playing evil is so much fun, and the actor missed an opportunity here. Detroit gets a bad rap in this reboot just as it did in the original. Poor Detroit. “Robocop” is a fun action movie with all the required effects and thrills of its genre. There are some laughs and a few tears and enough relevancy to be kind of smart. To expect anything more is to court disappointment.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Individualism blinds us from true beauty of community Turn of Phrase by

Sarah Hagaman

The rain came down in sheets, unrelenting and somewhat obscure. Normally, I enjoyed the occasional drizzly day, and in May of 2010 the downpour seemed no different. But this rain continued, rarely pausing during the day or night. The end of the school year quickly approached, and the usual busyness — mostly studying for AP exams — seemed impenetrable, even by the rain. Yet the rain continued, and the weather report predicted something we’d already begun to see; the rivers were rising, and the water kept coming. My neighborhood rests on a floodplain; our basement had to be cleared of all furniture as the waters rose. Prior to the Nashville flood, I’d never experienced a true natural disaster. As I watched my own community threatened in ways utterly beyond our control, another force — no less powerful, but still unfamiliar to me — came forward with an equal strength. The rain finally subsided, and the water stopped its steady advance; my family ventured into the streets to survey the damage. Our neighbors also trickled out of their houses; I met people I’d lived next to for years but never spoken with before. House facades became paired with faces; the sense of cooperation, empathy and communication increased exponentially in an instant. As we mingled with new acquaintances and walked the streets, giving and receiving aid for water damage, I couldn’t help but feel startled at the sudden surge of support. The sense felt strange, but the unusual situation demanded a cohesion that has perhaps become increasingly foreign to the culture and tone of the United States. The prevailing psychology driving behind Western culture centers on individualism: the idea that each person must fully self-actualize and harness his or her inner strength and gifts. Countless psychological studies center on the individualistic mentality; the force compels one to be the best individual possible at any cost. The effects of such a mindset can be somewhat difficult to quantify due to the ambiguity of social trends and thought; however, the breadth of research and observation have pointed out some distinct differences between the normal life of a typical western nation versus the collectivist mentality of an eastern country. Americans from a young age learn to identify with one’s emotions, dreams and other personal goals in life. Working harmoniously in a group has its merits, but we are often expected to place our goals above the group. Subjective morality and relativism allow each person to determine one’s own version of reality regardless of its impact or implication for others; explanations for one’s actions can be easily explained through euphemisms like “following your heart” or “being true to yourself.” The Nashville flood made me profoundly aware of my own obsession with my personal agenda. My routine consisted mostly of self-preparation; my biggest responsibility to society, it seemed, was through my own personal empowerment, which to a degree may be true. However, as I watched the new interactions and wave of volunteerism rising all around me, I couldn’t help but wonder if our own commitment to individualism has somehow alienated us from the power found in community. Eastern cultures contrast sharply with the west in this regard; individualism and collectivism come with unique sets of benefits and deficiencies. In a broad social comparison, however, since the 1960s the United States has experienced “a 560 percent increase in violent crimes, a 419 percent increase in illegitimate births, a 400 percent increase in divorce rates, a 300 percent increase in children living in single parent homes,” according to T.R. Reid’s book, “Confucious Lives Next Door.” The social implications of this are still long-debated by politicians, but it’s very likely that the shift has occurred internally with increases in individualism. Some of our greatest strengths can be found internally, but as commitment to traditional group values — such as the family unit, friendship or community — continue to change, the implications will not go unchecked. Valuing individual strengths has largely attributed to the creative opportunistic aura of the U.S.; yet statistics indicate that civic engagement, family units and community involvement have begun to decay. A natural disaster or tragedy should not alone teach the importance of the group; sacrificing for greater good does not diffuse the spirit of individualism, but rather empowers it to create cohesion and cooperation in powerful ways. Sarah Hagaman is a sophomore in English. She can be reached at shagama1@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Valentine’s Day consumerism leaves love lost in translation Cullenary Arts by

Cullen Hamlin How did you spend your Valentine’s Day? Did you spend it taking a new girl or guy on a date filled with awkward obligation? Did you shuffle through your damaged remnant of a financial budget from Christmas in attempt to find some gift for your significant other? Maybe you spent it with a friend, going out or by yourself, but regardless you spent it doing something. Why do we celebrate this day, and what does it mean to be someone’s Valentine? Well, as we look to define the indefinable, we must go to the source where any 10-year old with Google capabilities can get information: the media. Let’s look at the typical Valentine’s love movie, full of those ooeygooey moments that supposedly perpetuate the perfect relationship. Love isn’t physical right? What a coincidence that the main characters are always attractive and always have the physique of someone with a physical trainer. Hmm. In the real world of dollar hamburgers and addictive TV shows that will magnetize you

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

But this date is the last hint that Valentine’s Day may be able to offer me on my conquest to find love. Originally celebrating a Christian Saint Valentinus, the date has history that goes back to the Middle Ages. As it celebrates this Christian saint’s support of Christian marriages during Roman oppression, one can see how this day became important. However, my eyes wander to other holidays. Christmas, Easter and Independence Day all celebrate definitive endings, beginnings and events. But is love definitive? Isn’t the truth of love one that you celebrate just as well every single other day? I have lost the battle in attempt to define love, as Valentine’s Day poses no help for me. However, there is something to be acknowledged. Maybe the perfect relationship is not something that can be defined or quantified. It’s quite possible that people care in different ways and have just as much love in their relationship as some couple completely different from them. All I can say for sure is that love isn’t $100 in jewelry, or periodic or judged by physical appearance; it is not as cliché as it is illustrated in the movies. It can be as simple as your favorite color, as long as it always is. Cullen Hamelin is a junior in chemistry. He can be reached chamelin@utk.edu.

Standing up for others can save a life, including yours Lost in

Communication by

Jan Urbano While searching on YouTube for videos to help alleviate boredom during study breaks for exams, I came across a series titled “What would you do?” This TV show creates scenarios of conflict with actors playing the main roles while in the public. However, the main purpose of the show is to see how bystanders react to the situations that are occurring before their eyes. These encompass a wide variety of controversial subjects, spanning from illegal immigration, stereotyping and bullying of certain races and those with diseases, such as Down syndrome and Autism. One of the most touching moments, however, occurred when a man, dressed in his army uniform, came into a diner to order a sandwich. However, the man in front of him, an actor, began to throw slur words and exhibit heavy prejudice towards another actor, a Muslim man working as a cashier. As I watched the video, I noticed the awkward and uncomfortable silence between all the customers in the shop as more insults were hurled towards him. No one was doing anything, even though their faces showed how wrong they thought it was, too. The soldier, however, took action. In a powerful rebuttal to the man’s refusal to being served

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

to your sofa, I have to say that is the first hint that maybe this movie is a dream and not a reality. Nevertheless, let’s move on to the timing of the relationship. Most of these movies only cover the first couple months of people meeting and falling in love, followed by an inconclusive “they live happily ever after.” Oh! How convincing. I have seen and experienced what I like to call the obsessive stage of any relationship. “He is so cool, she is so cool, she totally understands me, etc. etc.” But that doesn’t define love does it? I refuse to accept love as an ephemeral glimpse of the apple of your eye, so I must persist. To continue, however, it becomes obvious that the cinema and the media is not the place for this answer, so where to next? The obligations. The chocolates, the flowers, the sweet tart necklaces that range from cute to extremely forward messages: these are all parts of how America defines Valentine’s Day. Sad is the day where the general public believes that $20 and a trip to Kroger’s flower section will buy you love. Let’s not even get into how competitive this money spending can get and how it imposes judgment on the quality of your relationship. Getting presents to celebrate your appreciation of another is fantastic but should not be necessary just because it happens to be the 14th day of February.

by a Muslim, he stated that he “has a choice to shop anywhere, just like he has a choice to practice his religion anywhere. That’s the reason I wear the uniform, so anyone can live free in this country.” When asked afterwards if his actions were heroic, the soldier replied, “Heroes come in many shapes and sizes. That wasn’t heroic at all. I was just being a person.” Hearing such sincere and strong-willed words made me feel very empathetic. After all, I’ve lived with people from many different backgrounds, and I agree completely with what he said. We are all people – why do we have to focus so much on our differences when we have so much in common? However, it goes further than that. It shows that each and every one of us can do the right thing and stand up for what we believe in. In our society today, we laud those who illustrate such upstanding bravery and knightly-qualities. The problem, though, is that it seems we’re too quick to show how amazing these other people are without actually improving our own ability to stand up not just for others but for ourselves and what we believe in. Though there are many other good bystanders who helped out the man at the register and many other actors in other difficult situations, in many of the scenarios of the TV show people usually watched from afar, showing pity but not taking action. This apathy towards injustices is baffling. Worse still, some onlookers took the side of the antagonists in the scenarios. The reason for people’s lack of action? It’s none of my business.

Everything in this world is interlocked, blanketed by invisible chains that attach each person, strangers or family, to each other. That abusive situation where you saw a mother abusing her kids, or a mother being abused by her kids will inevitably come back to bite someone, if not you. That man who was denied service because of his race while you turned away too embarrassed to do anything – it will come back to haunt you. It tears at my heart to see people bear such painful injustices, be it racism, ageism or due to disabilities. In my mind, that one simple act of standing up for others shows that a person feels cared for, and that even a complete stranger acknowledges his or her existence – believe me, you will not be forgotten for helping them in that time of need. I have found myself at the lowest points of my life, when it seems that world is rallying to pound you down into the dust from whence you came, but thanks to the help of friends and strangers, I’ve come back stronger and more thankful for what I have today. When you help someone, you help yourself. Just one act can quickly become a chain reaction of hope and care for many others down the line and in the future. If you see someone who needs help, extend a helping hand. Life is too short for people to feel abandoned and left alone. In doing so, you’ll have saved someone’s life and possibly yours too. Jan Urbano is senior in biological sciences. He can be reached at jurbano@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

continued from Page 1 “The first game was a well-pitched game,� Serrano said, “and we scrapped out enough runs off their starting pitcher.� No scrapping was needed however in the nightcap. What was supposed to be a contest that centered primarily on the debut of highlytouted freshman hurler Kyle Serrano, soon turned into a well-lit stage for the UT lumber. The Vols scored more than three times in four different frames, batted around in two separate innings and produced their highest run total since May 8, 2010 (25 runs at Georgia). “We’re a tough offense,� Dave Serrano said. “I had to deal with it all fall and in the winter before we started. “We’re going to make some teams pay. Good pitching is always going to shut down good hitting a lot, but we’re going to make some teams pay if they can’t keep running arms out there.� Stewart (4-for-5, five RBI) and Houser (3-for-4, four RBI) led the offensive charge in the nightcap, providing more than sufficient help for the first-year pitcher. In five innings of work, Kyle Serrano (1-0) gave up just two runs on four hits while striking out two and walking three. As for the final grade?

Senior outfielder Scott Price slides safely into home in the Vols’ 20-2 victory over the Purdue Boilermakers in the second game of their doubleheader at Lindsey Nelson Stadium on Sunday. “Not good enough,� Kyle Serrano said after Sunday’s games. “I definitely got to throw more strikes. I got to keep my emotions under control. I warmed up really good just when I went out there had a little too much adrenaline in me. “But it was definitely nice to get that first one out of the way.� A highly-anticipated pitching debut was also the theme of the series finale as sophomore Andrew Lee made his first collegiate start Monday afternoon. The Morristown, Tenn., native, who hadn’t pitched since high school because of Tommy John surgery, was effective in his UT debut, surrendering only four hits and one walk in five innings of work. When asked if the extend-

ed rehab process and unexpected waiting was all worth it in the end, Lee (1-0) was rather definitive. “Most definitely,� Lee said with a smile. “I wouldn’t trade that feeling for anything. Just being on that mound, being able to play with those guys, you can beat it. You realize when you’re gone for that long that every game is a blessing.� The UT bats again provided the early thump as a seven-run second inning severed any Boilermaker hopes of salvaging Game Three. “I think we have a lot of confidence in our offense that one through nine we’re just as good as really anyone in the country,� Price said. “We’ve got speed. We’ve got power. We’ve got all the tools this year to have a very, very successful offense.�

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Lady Vols rebound from loss with ‘lights out’ performance Jonathan Toye Contributor After a tough loss to Georgia Tech on Saturday afternoon, Tennessee women’s tennis head coach Mike Patrick said his team needed to start converting and making plays. The women’s tennis team responded to their coach’s postmatch remarks by having a lights-out performance Sunday. Both figuratively and literally. After suffering a 5-2 defeat at the hands of Georgia Tech on Saturday, the Lady Vols dominated Belmont 4-0 and overcame a power outage that delayed the match to sweep Chattanooga 7-0 on Sunday at the Goodfriend Tennis Center. While the match on Saturday against Georgia Tech was grueling, the Lady Vols won their two matches on Sunday with relative ease as the power outage was seemingly the only thing to slow Tennessee down. “That was interesting, that has never happened before,� junior Joanna Henderson said with a chuckle. “It made me more relaxed if anything.� The match against Georgia

Tech was anything but relaxing. The match involved multiple tiebreakers as the Lady Vols continually put themselves in position to win sets but failed to convert. Despite the loss, co-head coach Mike Patrick said he believes there were several important lessons his team could learn from the loss to the Yellow Jackets. “We had a lot of tough matches; that is a good team in Georgia Tech,� Patrick said. “It shows we can play with them, but it shows how much tougher we need to be to convert those matches. We need to turn to two or three of those around and we would be in good shape.� Tennessee did not need any tie-breakers for its matches on Sunday, however. In what has been a season of learning for UT, the Lady Vols managed to pick up their first double points of the season on Sunday, helping them record their first shutout victories of the season. “Getting the doubles point is such a huge momentum shift, and that is something that we have been struggling with,� Henderson said. “It makes the singles a lot easier because you

only have to do is win three out of six. For the whole team, it definitely helps to get that point.� One player that had impressive performances both Saturday and Sunday was Eve Repic. The freshman went 3-0 in her matches this weekend, recording a tough victory over Georgia Tech’s Kendal Woodard 7-6 (4), 6-1 and dominating her matches against Belmont and Chattanooga Sunday 6-0, 6-0 and 6-4, 6-2. “Every match Eve is going to play at 1 is going to be really tough,� Patrick said. “She is fighting. She is going to win some, lose some, (and) as long as she competes like that, it is a good thing.� The wins on Sunday also gave coach Patrick his 499th and 500th win in his coaching career, making him only the 10th coach to win 500 games. Patrick said the achievement wouldn’t have been possible without exceptional play from his players on the court over the years. “You don’t get 500 wins without having good players,� Patrick said. “We are happy to have these guys here.�

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Simmons hitting stride during final stretch run as Lady Vol Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer With only four games left in the regular season for the No. 10 Lady Vols, one player in particular is taking it all in and gearing up for the final stretch of her collegiate career. Lone senior Meighan Simmons realizes that her playing days are numbered at Tennessee, but that will not get in the way of her being able to have fun and give her best effort in order to try and help her team win yet another SEC title and UT’s ninth championship. “I’m trying to take it all day by day,� Simmons said. “I’m enjoying every game as much as I can and not taking anything for granted. “I want to do everything I can to make myself better for the betterment of the team. The final stretch is going to be fun.� While Simmons leads the team in scoring this year at 15.1 points per game and is shooting a career-high percentage from the field (.439), it took her a while to get into a groove this season. Through the Lady Vols’ first 17 games of the season, she only reached the 20-point plateau once and shot more than 40 percent seven times. “I put a lot of pressure on myself at the start of the season because I knew there were going to be a lot of expectations to be upheld,� Simmons said. “My teammates were there with me through the struggles to help back me up.� Now in her last eight games, in which her team has gone 6-1 in conference play, she has averaged 19 points per game, shot .514 percent from the field and scored more than 20 points on five different occasions. “I think Meighan is really focused right now and understands it’s a team effort,� head

15 16 17

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Tennessee senior guard Meighan Simmons attempts a layup in the Lady Volsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 75-71 loss to the Kentucky Wildcats at Thompson-Boling Arena on Sunday. coach Holly Warlick said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the beginning of the year she felt the weight of the team on her. I think sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s moved past that. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking great shots and playing within our offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing with a lot of confidence and our players have a lot of confidence in her.â&#x20AC;? The Cibolo, Texas, native has had great success scoring the ball throughout her career, as she ranks eighth on the all-time scoring list in Lady Vols history with 1,865 points and is just 17 points behind Shekinna Stricklen for seventh place. Out of all the stretches in her career she said she believes this scoring stretch has been her best. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it has been my most consistent stretch,â&#x20AC;? Simmons said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had spurts, but I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve turned into an all-around player. At this point and time as a senior itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect time to have a long stretch and play with a lot of confidence.â&#x20AC;? Junior forward Cierra Burdick is one teammate who has seen that confidence shine in UTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

senior leader. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the best shooters in the country, no doubt about that,â&#x20AC;? Burdick said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have some great plays to get her the ball. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been doing a great job of creating shots for herself.â&#x20AC;? While the Lady Vols have notched their 39th season with 20 or more wins, Simmons admitted the team realizes it still has a long way to go if the Lady Vols want to defend their SEC title and potentially bring home a national championship to Knoxville for the first time since 2008. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The coaches keep telling us to keep pushing and keep our pedal to the metal,â&#x20AC;? Simmons said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a standard now that we have to meet. Now we know what we are capable of and now we know what it means to play Tennessee Lady Vol basketball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we go out there and play that type of basketball; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much fun and nothing can stop us if we play the type of basketball we are capable of.â&#x20AC;?

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz 1 5 9 14

TUTORING

Matthew DeMaria â&#x20AC;˘ The Daily Beacon

Matthew DeMaria â&#x20AC;˘ The Daily Beacon

BASEBALL

ACROSS Nonsense Nonsense Nonsense â&#x20AC;&#x153;California ___ Allesâ&#x20AC;? (classic punk rock song) James who wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Death in the Familyâ&#x20AC;? Car with a stylized caliper in its logo Target of NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rover mission B&Bs Clear of vermin Ă  la the Pied Piper Nonsense Nonsense Near-prime seating Overseer of N.Y.C. subways Nonsense â&#x20AC;&#x153;Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you leave out something â&#x20AC;Ś?â&#x20AC;? Emulates Jay Z and Master P Score before a service break, maybe Windshield material ___ King Cole

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

msoutha1@utk.edu

After back-to-back losses, Vols trying to ‘focus on next game’ Steven Cook Copy Editor Tennessee enters tonight’s Super Tuesday game against Georgia aiming to end a trio of two-game losing streaks that would help to keep it on the bubble of the NCAA Tournament. The Vols have lost two straight to the Bulldogs, while the visiting Georgia squad has also won two in a row in ThompsonBoling Arena over the past two seasons. But of most dire implication today is the two-game skid that UT brings into Tuesday. The Vols entered the stretch with chances to win against No. 3 Florida and at Missouri but came up short in both, marking just the second two-game losing streak all season and the first in SEC play. With a short turnaround for Tuesday’s game set to tip at 9 p.m. and nationally televised on ESPNU, having the right mentality is key for head coach Cuonzo Martin and the Vols. “The one thing I always try to do as a coach is not dwell on the past,” Martin said during Monday’s press luncheon. “We watched film on the last game, walked through some things yesterday because when you’re talking about an 18-game season in league play, a lot of things happen.

“But you try to focus on the next game, which is easier said than done.” That could be an understatement. Tennessee (15-10, 6-6 SEC) desperately needed at least one win last week, as was showcased by the Vols battling down to the wire in both. As a result, the team was left win-less and inched closer to having its NCAA bubble popped. Georgia’s recent hot streak proves that another orange-clad letdown might ensue Tuesday night. The Bulldogs (14-10) have won four straight en route to a surprising 8-4 SEC record that includes wins over then-No. 21 Mizzou, LSU and Ole Miss. Fifth-year Bulldogs’ coach Mark Fox’s duo of sophomore guards leads the way. Charles Mann leads the team with 13.9 points per game, while Kenny Gaines is right behind with 12 points per contest. Both guards have stepped into a wide open backcourt after 2013 SEC Player of the Year Kentavious Caldwell-Pope bolted for the NBA, but Gaines has caught Martin’s eye the most as a potential future star. “I think Kenny Gaines,” Martin said, “he’s probably not the level of Caldwell-Pope, but he’s a very talented player. And he probably could be that in the next couple of years.

How they match up Texas A&M

Tennessee junior guard Josh Richardson shoots a jumpshot from the top of the key in the Vols’ 67-58 loss to the Florida Gators at Thompson-Boling Arena on Feb. 11. Richardson will be tasked with defending one half of Georgia’s dynamic backcourt duo in the when the Bulldogs visit Knoxville on Tuesday at 9 p.m.

Who to watch for

Tennessee

69.8

Scoring Offense

72.4

67.5

Scoring Defense

63.8

.442

Field Goal %

.445

.333

3-Point %

.346

+5.6

Rebound Margin

+8.3

10.3

Assists Per Game

12.6

4.8

Blocks Per Game

4.9

5.0

Steals Per Game

5.0

-2.5

Turnover Margin

+0.1

The other guys have all returned, Charles Mann is playing really well and getting to the basket.” The Bulldogs’ ability to get to the charity stripe is perhaps their most underrated skill. They rank 14th in the nation and second in the SEC in free throws attempted (28.6) per game. “They’re doing a great job of getting to the free throw line,” Martin said, “so I think that really helps their team.” UT’s woes against Georgia helped lead to another NCAA Tournament absence in 2012-13, as the Bulldogs swept the season series. This year, it could do the same. With a weak schedule down the stretch, the Vols might fall out of Big Dance contention for good with a third straight loss. Martin has broken down the film from those defeats but played down the thought that it will loom large in his scouting report. “I just watched film when we played them last year both times and found some things we need to correct or look in on and be conscious of on both ends of the floor,” Martin said. “But I don’t say this team has beat us this many times, unless it’s something that is pertinent to what we’re doing with our scouting report and the game plan.”

PPG

RPG

APG

FG%

#4 G Charles Mann

13.9

3.7

3.0

.421

#12 G Kenny Gaines

12.0

2.5

1.2

.410

#2 F Marcus Thornton

7.6

6.1

0.5

.416

Last Meeting March 2, 2013 in Athens, Ga. Bulldogs, 78-68


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