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Sink or Swim

Vols swim past records in first three days of championships Taylor Crombie Contributor

With the first three days of the SEC Championship meet in the books, both the men’s and women’s team have put themselves in good positions. Tennessee’s men’s team is sixth place with 409.5 points and two medals, while the women are in fourth with 454 points and six medals. Junior Liam Stone took the gold in the men’s 1-meter in the first night of finals, setting a new SEC record with a score of 468.30 and beating LSU freshman Juan Hernandez by a single point. He struggled in his first two dives in the 3-meter on Thursday night, but ultimately finished third with a score of 442.90. Texas A&M’s Tyler Henschel (478.40) and LSU’s Hernandez (469.95) both surpassed the previous SEC record of 463.50, set by Stone in 2015. While diving coach Dave Parrington’s goal is always to take first, he was very pleased with how Stone maintained his composure and came back to win the bronze. “We’re watching some world-class — even though these guys are making mistakes — world-class divers just flat out competing,” Parrington said. “To scrap and fight and claw back into the competition when he could have just hung his head low and figured, ‘Well, that’s it,’ showed an immense amount of character from him.” Freshman Meghan Small and sophomore Madeline Banic won back-to-back events on Wednesday night, picking up two gold medals for the women’s team. Small broke the school record once in the preliminary round of the 200 individual medley and again in the finals to set the program record at 1:53.31. Banic took the 50 freestyle in 21.54, upsetting Georgia’s (Top row) Liam Stone during the SEC championships men’s 1m diving finals Olivia Smoliga and setting both a new (Middle row) Madeline Banic, Kira Toussaint and teammates celebrating after the school record and a new best time in the SEC Championships 50 free finals at Allan Jones Aquatic Center on Feb. 15, 2017. country this year. (Bottom row) Meghan Small at the SEC Championships 200 IM finals Small and Banic both secured their secAll photos by Adrien Terricabras • The Daily Beacon

Volume 133 Issue 23

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ond medals of the meet Thursday night. Small finished third in the 400 individual medley, setting another school record with 4:04.93. Banic earned another bronze for the Volunteer women in the 100 butterfly, finishing in 51.50 behind Texas A&M’s Sarah Gibson (50.71) and Georgia’s Chelsea Britt (50.93). Gibson’s time was good for the new SEC record. The women’s 200 medley relay team of Kira Toussaint, Colleen Callahan, Erika Brown and Banic and the 200 free relay team of Toussaint, Brown, Small and Banic took third in both events. Their 1:35.45 finish on Tuesday in the 200 medley was a season best, while their 1:27.96 finish on Wednesday in the 200 freestyle is the new fourth fastest time in program history. With three days of the meet now under wraps, Tennessee head coach Matt Kredich has been happy with the way the Volunteers have competed through all of the heats. “We had really good representation, I think, in every event,” Kredich said. “We had an A finalist in every event except for the women’s 200 free, but we had a B and a C finalist there. The most impressive thing to me is either every swimmer got faster or moved up, so we’re just competing really well.” He also does not see any signs of them slowing down in the final two days of the championships. “I’m thrilled with the energy level of our team,” Kredich said. “I think we’re competing with a lot of heart, but also using skills that we’ve been practicing all year and winning races with them.” At the end of day three, Florida’s men’s team leads with 759.5 points, while Texas A&M’s women’s team leads with 729. Friday’s action starts at 10 a.m., with preliminaries for the 200 butterfly, 100 backstroke and 100 breaststroke. Women’s platform preliminaries begin at 1 p.m., followed by the finals for the 200 fly, 100 back, 100 breast, women’s platform and 400 medley relay at 6.

Friday, February 17, 2017


2

INSHORT

The Daily Beacon • Friday, February 17, 2017

THE DAILY BEACON STAFF

EDITORIAL

Editor-in-Chief: Bradi Musil Managing Editor: Megan Patterson Chief Copy Editor: Hannah Moulton News Editor: Chris Salvemini Asst. News Editor: Alex Holcomb Sports Editor: Trenton Duffer Asst. Sports Editor: Rob Harvey Engagement Editor: Millie Tunnel Digital Producer: Altaf Nanavati Opinions Editor: Presley Smith Special Projects Editor: Jenna Butz Photo Editors: Laura Altawil, Adrien Terricabras Design Editors: Lauren Ratliff, Caroline Norris Production Artists: Laurel Cooper, Rachel Incorvati, Hannah Jones, Oliva Litcherman, Jenna Mangalindan, Lauren Mayo

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DISPATCHES 1. 2. 3. Acosta named new labor secretary nominee

Jets Revis being investigated by Pittsburgh police

Coming one day after the former nominee, Anthony Puzder, withdrew his nomination, President Trump announced Alexander Acosta as his new nominee for labor secretary. Acosta is the current dean for the Florida International University School of Law and was a member of the National Labor Relations Board during the Bush administration. The nomination received praise from committee chairman Lamar Alexander from Tennessee, stating, “he has an impressive work and academic background.” Acosta is expected to garner support from the majority of senate republicans, which would ensure his confirmation as the next United States Secretary of Labor.

New York Jets player Darrell Revis may be in trouble with the law. Revis, 31, is being investigated by Pittsburgh police because of a physical altercation he may have been involved in. An officer saw Revis early Monday morning speaking to two men, however, when the officer circled back around, both men were knocked out, and Revis was missing from the scene. The victims claim they attempted to take a video of Revis when he grabbed the phone and tried to delete the video. Both men were transported to the hospital with one victim suffering broken bones around his eye.

Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: Letters to the Editor must be exclusive to The Daily Beacon and cannot have been submitted to or published by other media. Letters should not exceed 400 words and can be edited or shortened for space. Letters can also be edited for grammar and typographical errors, and Letters that contain excessive grammatical errors can be rejected for this reason. Anonymous Letters will not be published. Authors should include their full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address for verification purposes. Letters submitted without this information will not be published. The preferred method to submit a Letter to the Editor is to email the Editor-in-Chief at editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com . CORRECTIONS POLICY: It is the Daily Beacon’s policy to quickly correct any factual errors and clarify any potentially misleading information. Errors brought to our attention by readers or staff members will be corrected and printed on page two of our publication. To report an error please send as much information as possible about where and when the error occurred to managingeditor@utdailybeacon.com, or call our newsroom at (865) 974-5206. The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Wednesday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com

The Daily Beacon is printed using soy based ink on newsprint containing recycled content, utilizing renewable sources and produced in a sustainable, environmentally responsible manner.

Thorn: Digital Defenders of Children is an organization co-founded by Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher that builds software to fight human trafficking, and Kutcher testified on behalf of his organization on Wednesday, Feb. 15, in front of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Kutcher explained how working with his organization has given him the chance to meet people all over the world who had been affected by human trafficking. Kutcher called for people to look for ways to become involved in the fight against modern slavery. “Technology can be used to enable slavery, but technology can also be used to disable slavery,” he said.

Visit us online at utdailybeacon.com to see more stories and breaking news.

Harward turns Trump down for national security adviser Associated Press

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Ashton Kutcher speaks on human trafficking

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice Admiral Robert Harward has turned down an offer to be President Donald Trump’s new national security adviser, the latest blow to a new administration struggling to find its footing. Harward told The Associated Press that the Trump administration was “very accommodating to my needs, both professionally and personally.” “It’s purely a personal issue,” Harward said Thursday evening. “I’m in a unique position finally after being the in military for 40 years to enjoy some personal time.” Asked whether he had requested to bring

in his own staff at the National Security Council, Harward said, “I think that’s for the president to address.” Following Flynn’s ouster, administration officials said his deputy, KT McFarland, was staying on at the NSC. McFarland is a former Fox News analyst. Harward would have replaced retired Gen. Michael Flynn, who resigned at Trump’s request Monday after revelations that he misled Vice President Mike Pence about discussing sanctions with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. during the transition. Trump said in a news conference Thursday that he was disappointed by how Flynn had treated Pence, but did not believe Flynn had done anything wrong by having the conversations. Harward, a former Navy SEAL, served

as deputy commander of U.S. Central Command under Gen. James Mattis, who is now defense secretary. Harward served on the National Security Council under President George W. Bush and commissioned the National Counter Terrorism Center. Upon retirement in 2013 after a nearly 40-year career in the Navy, Harward became chief executive officer for defense and aerospace giant Lockheed Martin in the United Arab Emirates. Trump has recently been in very public negotiations with Lockheed over the cost of its F-35 fighter jet. Officials said earlier this week that there were two other contenders in the running for the job: acting national security adviser Keith Kellogg and retired Gen. David Petraeus.

Tennessee prosecutor reverses policy after police shooting Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Nashville’s district attorney reversed a policy Thursday and announced that state agents will investigate all future fatal police shootings in Davidson County after authorities said a white police officer there fatally shot an armed African-American man in the back. Police this week revised their account of the shooting of 31-year-old Jocques Scott Clemmons after obtaining new surveillance video. Police initially believed that

Clemmons charged at Officer Josh Lippert and made full contact with him after a traffic stop Friday, but later said the additional footage showed Clemmons stopped short of Lippert, turned around and ran in the opposite direction. Lippert pursued Clemmons, police said, and the suspect refused to drop a loaded pistol before the officer fired at him. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and FBI are investigating. DA Glenn Funk told The Tennessean that the “police department is well trained and professional.” “The investigations performed by the

department are expedient and transparent. However, best practices from around the country require that these investigations must also be independent,” he said. Nashville Mayor Megan Barry applauded Funk’s decision. Police will continue to investigate nonfatal shootings on a case-by-case basis. The new video came amid outcry from Clemmons’ family and supporters who have questioned the police department’s version of events. Protesters on Tuesday marched down to city hall behind Black Lives Matter banners. Some of them have demanded that the officer be fired.


CAMPUSNEWS

Friday, February 17, 2017 • The Daily Beacon

3

Real-life Hotel Rwanda hero speaks, inspires at UT Chris Salvemini News Editor

As his country fell into the grips of genocide, resulting in the deaths of approximately 800,000 people over the span of 100 days, Paul Rusesabagina used his hotel as a safe haven for 1,268 people. On Wednesday, Feb. 15, Rusesabagina spoke to at least 150 people in Cox Auditorium about his experiences before, during and after the tragedy. Many spectators were aware of his story because of the film, “Hotel Rwanda.” “He could be your neighbor or he could be you, and it’s that bit of greatness in all of us and that ability to save lives in all of us that attracted people,” Louis Smith, member of the Campus Events Board, said. The Rwandan Genocide began in April of 1994 after the assassination of the Rwandan president, who was in peace talks with the Rwandan Patriotic Front, a rebel force fighting the government. The RPF was made up of mostly Tutsis, an ethnic group who mostly fled Rwanda after the Hutu ethnic group took power. “Hutus had been slaves to Tutsis before

taking over, and Tutsis went into exile,” Rusesabagina, himself a Tutsi, said during his speech. The assassination began a large-scale killing of Tutsis in Rwanda. In the hours after the president and several high-level administrators were killed, the Interahamwe began using machetes distributed by the Rwandan government to kill Tutsis and moderate Hutus. The United Nations had a small force in Rwanda at the time but were instructed only to observe the situation rather than interfere. As soldiers jumped Rusesabagina’s fence into his house, he was told that they were confiscating resources at his hotel, the Hôtel des Mille Collines, and needed him to let them in. “I called the United Nations army believing they had come to protect us, but I was wrong. Their mission was not to keep peace but to observe and leave a report,” Rusesabagina said. “The whole international community had failed.” The people in his house were escorted out and Rusesabagina was told to kill them all after being discovered as Tutsis. Rusesabagina said it took two hours to compromise with the soldier for everyone to be let go before going to the hotel.

Paul Rusesabagina answers questions from the audience after telling his story. Emily Gowder • The Daily Beacon He stayed at the hotel for the rest of the tragedy, sheltering 1,268 people in it. Throughout his time there, he called international and local leaders to assist in protecting him, his family and those seeking refuge. “Nobody can be completely evil, as no one can be completely good,” he told the crowd as he ended the lecture. “The best weapon, which can also be the worst, are

words. Words can be the best weapon.” He attributed everyone in the hotel getting out safely to a stockpile of favors he built up with leaders during his time as a manager of the hotel. He recommended people be nice to one another and to do the same as him and do each other favors. ���I wonder how the talk can help with the future, since history seems to repeat itself,” Patricia Berrier, an attendee, said.


4

The Daily Beacon • Friday, February 17, 2017

CAMPUSNEWS

13-year-old to attend class at UT next semester Priya Narapareddy Staff Writer

Sofia Tomov is a 13-year-old who enjoys fencing, spending time in nature and playing David Bowie songs on her electric guitar. With her diverse set of interests and talents, including computer science, Tomov earned an opportunity to finish high school and college simultaneously. Sofia was accepted into UT as a visiting high school student during the fall of 2016 at the age of 12. This fall, she will be taking a computer science course in coding. Tomov, who turned 13 last October, said she looks forward to furthering her passion in computer science as a student. She said she has always been fascinated by problem-solving. “Computer science is a very interesting way to solve global-scale problems,” Sofia Tomov said. Tomov is currently a home-schooled student in the eighth grade. Career preparation is also something that she’s looking forward to further her high school and college experience. She hopes to pursue a career in sustainable energy. “My current project is to make wind turbine power more feasible,” Sofia Tomov said. Tomov is the first Tennessee recipient of the Caroline D. Bradley Scholarship, a scholarship for gifted high school students. Recipients of the scholarship must be in the seventh grade and in the 97th percentile or above in one or more areas of standardized tests. Last fall, Tomov was also selected as a finalist in Discovery Education’s 3M Young Scientist Challenge. She presented a project on an algorithm that detects mutations in genetic code to reduce the negative effects of prescrip-

As a homeschooling mom, the two biggest lessons I’ve learned from raising and teaching Sofia are the importance of learning by doing.” Beverly Tomov, mother

tion drugs. When Tomov is not working on a project, she said she enjoys spending time in nature. She often visits Ijams Nature Center, the UT Gardens and the UT Arboretum to walk, write in her journal and take photographs. Tomov’s favorite photography subjects include birds, insects and fungi. She also enjoys identifying bird calls. Music is also a passion for Tomov, who wore a David Bowie necklace when she was being interviewed. She said she loves learning to play Bowie’s songs, such as “Ziggy Stardust.” Having visited UT previously for camps, Tomov said she is familiar with the campus setting. Her father, Stanimire “Stan” Tomov, also works as a research director at the Innovative Computing Lab at UT. Sofia’s mother, Beverly Tomov, said that Sofia is considered a visiting high school student at UT until she turns 15. Her graduation date has not yet been determined. “As a homeschooling mom, the two biggest lessons I’ve learned from raising and teaching Sofia are the importance of learning by doing,” Beverly Tomov said. “And the importance of connecting – connecting ideas, connecting to nature, connecting to each other.” Beverly Tomov said she hopes that her daughter will be happy, feel challenged and expand her horizons during the next few years.

Sofia Tomov is a 13-year-old who will be attending UT next semester. •Courtesy of Beverly Tomov


SPORTS

Friday, February 17, 2017 • The Daily Beacon

5

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Vols try to maintain high level of confidence in weekend matches Cory Sanning

Contributor Lack of confidence is something that the Tennessee women’s tennis team does not know about. While no longer undefeated, the Vols confidence has not quivered one bit. Coming off a 4-0 shutout victory over Liberty University on Sunday, Tennessee heads into Sunday’s against in-state opponents Belmont and Lipscomb loose and confident. “We tell our team all the time that confidence comes from preparation and not from winning,” head coach Alison Ojeda said. Standing at 9-1 on the season, the Vols have been on a mission since play resumed in January. Outside of a 7-0 loss to the hands of the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Tennessee has outscored their opponents 42-4 in those nine matches. Belmont, on the other hand, boasts a record of 1-6 on the season, mustering up just 12 combined points since the start of the new year. Lipscomb has proved no different, standing at 1-5 while riding a three-match losing streak. Ironically, the only opponent Lipscomb has defeated this season is the Belmont Bruins. A combined win percentage of .182, neither opponent appears to be an equal match, at least on paper. Numbers aside though, Ojeda isn’t taking the challenge likely, pushing her team to even higher levels in practice. “The girls did such a great job that Ty

Schaub and I met as a coaching staff and decided we needed to raise the bar again this week at practice. That is exactly what we have done,” Ojeda said. So far, the hard work and perseverance has paid off. Tennessee currently sits in the top half of the SEC standings, and with only four matches remaining before conference play begins, the Vols find themselves in great shape as the conference season steadily approaches. For senior Eve Repic, Sunday’s match holds some sentimental value – and not only because the team has been thriving as of late. “My teammates and I have put in lots of hard work so I think that’s a testament to the positive results we’ve had at the beginning of the season,” Repic said. “Coach Ojeda moved senior day to Sunday at 10 a.m., so I hope everyone can make it out to the Goodfriend Tennis Center to watch my fellow senior Brittany Lindl, myself and our team compete.” With both Repic and Lindl graduating this spring, it should prove to be an eventful day for both Lady Vols, as well as fans in attendance. As the conference season slowly approaches, Ojeda credits the growth of team culture and togetherness as the primary reason for Tennessee’s success. “The biggest reason I am so confident in our girls is because our culture has grown so much in the last six months,” Ojeda said. “We respect and love each other as a family, and we come to practice every single day committed to working hard and smart.” Their matches against Belmont and Libscomb will begin at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the Goodfriend Tennis Center.

Eve Repic during her doubles match against Indiana at Goodfriend Tennis Center on Feb. 12, 2017. Adrien Terricabras • The Daily Beacon

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Vols in need of recovery after worst loss of season Rob Harvey

Asst. Sports Editor

On Tuesday night against the Kentucky Wildcats, the Tennessee Vols men’s basketball team were outplayed, out-hustled and frankly embarrassed by the Wildcats. The Vols suffered their worst loss of the season on Tuesday, Feb. 14, and head coach Rick Barnes didn’t have many positive things to say about the team. “I’m just sorry we didn’t give them a better game,” Barnes said. “Because I think we’re better than we played tonight. There’s not many positives I can take from our end. I thought Jordan Bone – for us – really tried to do some things, but we had too many guys

that didn’t do what we expect from them.” The Vols have now lost two consecutive games and will have to bounce back on Saturday if they want to stay in the hunt for an NCAA tournament bid. Sophomore Admiral Schofield has no concern about the Vols crumbling after their embarrassing loss and believes the Vols will bounce back. “I just know we get another day to recoup, and I know that this team is going to fight back, because this is not a team that stays down, and I’m just looking for that team that’s going to fight back right now,” Schofield said. Luckily for the Vols, their opponent on Saturday is Missouri, one of the lowestranked teams in the SEC. Missouri comes into the game with a record of 7-18 and 2-11 in the conference,

which sits them in next-to-last place in the SEC. However, the Vols have struggled against Missouri careerwise, going 5-6 including a loss at Missouri last year to a very subpar Tiger team that finished with just 10 wins and only three conference wins. The Tigers are led by junior Jordan Barnett. Barnett, a transfer from Texas, averaging 12.6 points and 6.6 rebounds per game. Along with Barnett are sophomores Kevin Puryear and Terrence Phillips. Both are averaging around 10 points per game and have been crucial in their two conference wins. Missouri has struggled all season however, they have been on a hot streak as of late. The Tigers defeated the Arkansas Razorbacks – a team who beat Tennessee – on Feb. 4, and

then turned around the next week and beat the Vanderbilt Commodores by 20 points at home. For the Vols, they will look to try and return to the gameplan and mindset that they have had all season and try to not approach the game with the NCAA tournament on their mind. “But that’s not how we’re going to approach this,” Schofield said. “We’re going to approach this one game at a time. We’re going to come out, play together and play inside-out basketball. Just play aggressive. We have to get back to playing as that team that’s on fire. Not that team that, I don’t know, seems like egos. We can’t have egos.” The game will tipoff in Thompson-Boling Arena at 1 p.m. and can be watched on the SEC Network.


6

SPORTS

The Daily Beacon • Friday, February 17, 2017

SOFTBALL

Young Vols looking to progress with long weekend ahead Damichael Cole Contributor

The Tennessee softball team will have to adjust very quickly to different conditions this weekend, as the Vols travel to New Mexico to play in the Troy Cox Classic. In the tournament, they will play a total of five games over a three-day period. Saturday they will take on DePaul at 4p.m. ET and then Bradley at 8 p.m. ET. Sunday’s bouts will be against Northern Colorado at 1 p.m. ET and Oregon St. 3p.m. ET. The final game will be Monday against New Mexico State at 8 p.m. ET. The Vols have taken off to a 5-0 start in non-conference play and are ranked 15th in the country. Historically, this is lower than the norm due to the youth of the team. This season, 17 of the 24 players on the roster are freshmen or sophomores.

“It’s good to go out and do these tournaments before we get into SEC play,� sophomore Matty Moss said. “I remember for me last year it was really important for me to get a feel for the mound because I was super nervous.� With a young team, co-head coaches Ralph and Karen Weekly haven’t settled on a starting nine just yet, so the team will look to build depth and solidify their starting lineup this weekend. The pitching and hitting have both been strong so far, but this tournament will continue to give a better indication of this team. Pitching has been solid early, but they have some improvements to make. The pitching staff is very young, with Moss serving as the team’s ace this season. “I think we’re super confident,� Moss said. I have so much faith in all of our (pitching staff) abilities, and I think we bring a lot to the table.�

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As far as hitting, the team has gotten off to a sizzling start batting .388 at the plate through the first five games. This production has been led by “The Meg’s� – Megan Geer and Meghan Gregg – who have both started the season strong, as expected. “Our offense needs to continue to swing good sticks like we did this past weekend and that’s the strength of our team,� Karen Weekly said. “(Geer and Gregg) are two of our captains and they provide the most leadership for our team.� Another main strength of this team is the defense. The defense is drawing great reviews from the coaches and seems to be where the young team is farthest along at this point. “We may have the best defense we have had here in quite a long time,� Karen Weekly said. Of the five teams this weekend, the team best equipped to challenge the Vols is Oregon State. They are currently undefeated at 3-0, and they’re also the only team in the tourna-

ment who has ever beaten the Vols, doing so four times. The defensive lineup is proving to be strong, but what’s holding the team from settling on a starting nine is freshman Jenna Holcomb at the plate. So far this season, Holcomb is batting a blistering .545 at the plate, third on the team and is forcing the coach’s hands. “As long as Jenna keeps producing with the bat the way she is, we’re going to have to figure out a way to keep her in the lineup,� Karen Weekly said. This weekend will just be the beginning of a big road trip out west. After this tournament, the team will head out to California to play in the Mary Nutter Classic. This tournament will be loaded with big time teams, including the defending national champion Oklahoma Sooners. Along with the Sooners, the Vols will face UC Santa Barbara, Nebraska, Utah and Texas.

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PUZZLES&GAMES

Friday, February 17, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ The Daily Beacon

STR8TS No. 945

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How to beat Str8ts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Like Sudoku, no single number can repeat in any row or column. But... rows and columns are divided by black squares into compartments. These QHHGWREHÂżOOHGLQZLWKQXPEHUVWKDW complete a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;straightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. A straight is a set of numbers with no gaps but can be in any order, eg [4,2,3,5]. Clues in black cells remove that number as an option in that row and column, and are not part of any straight. Glance at the solution to see how â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;straightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; are formed.

SUDOKU No. 945

Medium

6 5 9

9 6

4

Previous solution - Very Hard

1 4 5 6 9 3 8 2 7

3 3 6

2 5

The solutions will be published here in the next issue.

3 6 9 8 7 2 1 5 4

4 8 3 2 1 9 5 7 6

5 9 6 3 8 7 2 4 1

7 2 1 4 6 5 9 8 3

8 1 7 9 2 6 4 3 5

6 3 4 1 5 8 7 9 2

9 5 2 7 3 4 6 1 8

7RFRPSOHWH6XGRNX¿OOWKHERDUG by entering numbers 1 to 9 such that each row, column and 3x3 box contains every number uniquely. Š 2017 Syndicated Puzzles

4 3 2 6 9 5 3 7 2 4 2 4 1 3 5 6 2 1

2 7 8 5 4 1 3 6 9

For many strategies, hints and tips, visit www.sudokuwiki.org If you like Str8ts, Sudoku and other puzzles, check out our books, iPhone/iPad Apps and much more on our store at www.str8ts.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 After the hour 5 Lou who wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exporting Americaâ&#x20AC;? 10 Plague, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;atâ&#x20AC;? 14 Instrument with a bent neck 15 Key 16 Defraud, in slang 17 Very much 18 Recreational sites not designed for walkers 20 Is a bad loser, say 22 Family name in Sir Walter Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bride of Lammermoorâ&#x20AC;? 23 Fr. title 24 Zimbalist of old TV 26 One of the renters in Steinbeckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tortilla Flatâ&#x20AC;? 30 Founder of the American Shakers 32 Sweet pitcherful 34 Important word to a marriage counselor 35 New homeownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feeling, maybe

39 @fakechucknor-ris, for one 40 Diorama, maybe 41 Updated art? 42 Wrap (up) 43 Things to do after dinner 46 Painterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primer 48 President who said â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to see your plays performed the way you wrote them, become presidentâ&#x20AC;? 51 Secret ending 52 Word before or after state 54 Ricoh rival 56 Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re â&#x20AC;&#x153;familyâ&#x20AC;? 60 Pride : lions : parliament : ___ 61 God for whom a weekday is named 62 Real stinker 63 All-nighter, maybe 64 Like high school and college students of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s-â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s, e.g. 65 Competitive and outgoing, say 66 Views

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE B U S U N A W T A X I L H O P S U N L O S T A N B A N A R E A N I T W D O S E I N E I G A R M H B R O

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DOWN Bank deposit Fall Record stat for major-leaguer Rickey Henderson Running event Slam Title role in a 1993 film â&#x20AC;Ś which sounds like a prize the film won Unimpressed Character who dies at the end of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Womenâ&#x20AC;? Editorial reversal Burkina Faso neighbor Here-there connection Require (of )

13 Jazzman Montgomery

40 Newsstand offering, informally

19 The first one was a modified Ford D-Series truck

44 Change with the times

21 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toodlesâ&#x20AC;? 25 What a meow may mean 27 Grammynominated 2011 Lady Gaga album

45 Intuits 47 Big name in shapewear 49 Start to malfunction

29 Dug stuff

50 Author with a restaurant at the Eiffel Tower named for him

31 Bonus upon signing, e.g.

53 Like Hansel and Gretel in the forest

28 Aphrodisia

33 Adjudicate

55 Bead producer?

36 George Dickel product

56 Part of the works

37 ___ and violins (music pun)

57 â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Sleep the Brave,â&#x20AC;? e.g.

38 Some French votes

58 28-Down, e.g.

39 Without any filler

59 Handle preceder

7


8

ARTS&CULTURE

The Daily Beacon • Friday, February 17, 2017

Charity art gala brings diversity awareness to Knox Courtney Whited Copy Editor

On May 20, 2016, a law was passed by a House vote of 63-21 and a Senate vote of 22-3, without the signature of Gov. Bill Haslam, that defunded the Office for Diversity and Inclusion at UT. “We are trying to bring back the issue,” Emmanuel Gyebison, senior in marketing and president of the UTK Diaspora Student Association, said. To do this, the Diaspora Student Association teamed up with Rooftop Collective to host a charity art gala on Friday, Feb. 17, in the Panhellenic Building from 5 p.m.– 9 p.m. “I think (this issue) is still important to us as students,” Gyebison said. The event will include performances from Chuck Die$el!, Notty Taylor, Hyperbolic Headspace, Shanks Akimbo and Thelo-Que. Thelo-Que, who has lived in Knoxville for almost 14 years, is an up-and-coming artist in the area who describes his music as “hiphop with some psychedelic rock influence.” “I think (art is) one of the best ways of

I think (art is) one of the best ways of displaying diversity. You can just look at art from all different cultures, and when you bring them together, you still see the separation among all of them.”

displaying diversity,” Thelo-Que said. “You can just look at art from all different cultures, and when you bring them together, you still see the separation among all of them. But at the end of the day, it is all art. It’s a good way to link all the cultures together. “If a local artist is trying to do their part in their community or in their city with their art, then it is always right to support events like this because they are few and far between.” Gyebison agreed that art and music have a special connection to diversity. “A lot of the stuff that my organization

Thelo-Que, artist does is focus on African music; so, hip-hop came out of that ‘cause it is spoken words and the voice of impoverished people. And you see how it has evolved and how it is, basically, popular culture now,” Gyebison said. “It shows something growing from a small niche to including everybody.” There will also be a live painter present to capture the event. The event is free to attend, but donations are encouraged. “These are some good bands,” Gyebison said. “Instead of charging a $5 or $10 cover, we are asking people to donate that (to the Office of Diversity and Inclusion).” Along with the donations at the door, at

least 30 percent of the profit of the art sales will be donated. Expecting a little more than 100 people to attend, Gyebison hopes the event is successful enough to make it an annual event, maybe to the point where it will occur off campus. “There are some disadvantages to it being on campus,” Gyebison said. “With an event like this, I wanted it to go to midnight, but we are having it go until 9 p.m. because campus shuts down.” For more information, please go to either the event page at: http://events.utk.edu/ index.php?eID=64458 or the Facebook event at: https://www.facebook.com/ events/138735519963736/.

When: Friday, Feb. 17 from 5 p.m.– 9 p.m. Where: Panhellenic Building Who: Diaspora Student Association teamed up with Rooftop Collective


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