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Tuesday, February 12, 2013 Issue 24, Volume 122

‘Lumberjack’ club up to chops David Cobb Assistant News Editor The winner of Tennessee vs. Kentucky no longer brings home the blue and orange painted beer barrel which, until its abolition in 1997, was a coveted prize for nearly 75 years in the border state rivalry. At least not in football they don’t. Lumberjacking is a different story. UT’s timbersports team captured first place at Saturday’s Timbersports and Bluegrass Bash – a competition between four schools in events such as axe throwing and log rolling – and in the process reclaimed the infamous beer barrel which lives on in the competitive lumberjacking community. “It’s the same as it is for the football team,” Jack Lipkin, senior in forestry and president of the team, said. “You win that match and you

win bragging rights and you have the pride.” Though Sewanee and North Carolina’s Haywood Community College also had teams represented in the overall competition, there was, as there has been for two years now, a side wager between UT and UK for a re-creation of the legendary wooden cylinder. “It’s a pride thing, but it is just kind of for fun,” Lipkin said. “We aren’t like too horribly serious about any of this, we aren’t like bitter rivals … It went the way it did and everyone went home happy just because it was that good of a time.” The “lumberjack” team, as they sometimes refer to themselves, is a part of UT’s chapter of the Society of American Foresters and meets every Tuesday to practice the ten events that comprise a typical intercollegiate timbersports competition. The events include archery, team bolt split, stock sawing, bowsawing and the standing block chop, just to name a few. But

don’t be intimidated by the jargon. The club is open to anyone – even “lumberjills.” “Anybody (can join),” Jacob Lunsford, sophomore forestry major and first year team member, said. “Even women – we need women, and you don’t have to be majoring in forestry or wildlife.” The co-ed group of axe-wielding UT students will travel around, competing a handful more times before the end of the spring. They’ll be looking to build on Saturday’s victory – but they’re also looking towards the future of a club that they’re very passionate about. Prior to joining the club in January, Lunsford had never been involved in timbersports, which allows him to give an honest sales pitch to anyone considering trying their hand at it. “You don’t have to have any experience,” Lunsford, who placed in Saturday’s axe throw competition, said. “And with a little training

you’ll be able to compete and be good at it.” But for both Lunsford and Lipkin, it provides more than just the thrill of competition. “It’s a tradition, doing this year after year,” Lipkin said. “We travel probably about six to seven times a year and host events just for fun. Until you go to one of these things, you don’t really know what’s possible here at UT because these events are so much fun.” The team has a strong presence on the Ag campus, but Lipkin stressed that the club is open to all students, regardless of major. “There are events that if you don’t have experience doing certain things, it’s going to be a hindrance,” Lipkin said. “But there are events that we expose new people to. If you’re any kind of an athlete or have any coordination, it’s pretty easy to pick up.” Lipkin can be reached at jlipkin@utk.edu for inquiries about the club.

Impact UT hosts open house David Cobb Assistant News Editor

Danielle Dyer • The Daily Beacon

Students talk with companies during the Diversity Job Fair on Monday.

Campus prepares for spring job fair R.J. Vogt News Editor Although Valentine’s Day looms on the weekly calendar, many UT students and area employers are already looking further into their future. From 2 to 6 p.m. today, the Spring Job and Internship Fair will offer summer internships, part-time jobs and post-graduation employment on the court of Thompson-Boling Arena. Free pens and stress balls will be provided, but Mary Mahoney, the assistant director for Career Services, said the jobs are the true prizes. “Students will come back later and say, ‘I talked to five companies, I had two interviews and I have a job offer.’ And we are always excited to hear that,” she said.

Career Services began organizing the event almost an entire year ago, days after the previous spring job fair was over. The hard work pays off; today’s job fair will bring in more than 190 different employers, including such well-known businesses as Macy’s, Northwestern Mutual Financial and even the U.S. Department of State. “Many of them are employers that we already have a relationship with,” Mahoney said. “They come on campus to interview, they’ve attended job fairs in the past … We also always pick up a number of what I call ‘new employers’, meaning new to coming to (UT), and it’s because they’ll hear about our programs.” Mahoney added that UT’s top-ranked programs, such as the logistics supply chain

major and the College of Engineering, help draw the multitude of employers. “They know that there’s quality majors at (UT) — we are a large recognized school — so the employers want to reach out to our students,” she said. Career Services also sponsored a Diversity Job Fair on Monday afternoon from 3 to 5 p.m. The smaller setting of the UC Ballroom attracted all kinds of businesses, from multinational corporations like Pepsi and Wal-Mart to local businesses like the Knoxville News-Sentinel. These businesses all committed to hiring a diverse pool of applicants. The definition of diverse is broad, and students attending the fair were encouraged to define their own diversity.

Kenneth Bell, a recruiter for information technology company TEKsystems, explained that his company’s interest in diversity is derived from customer service. “We are looking at ways to be more inclusive for how we recruit internal employees,” he said. “Obviously, demographics in America are changing every year, and so our customer base is changing every year. We want our internal employees to be a reflection of the customers we serve.” Although diversity was a prominent theme of Monday’s job fair, many of the same companies will set up shop in Thompson-Boling today. And almost all of the representatives offer the same advice: do your research. See JOB FAIR on Page 3

Impact UT has something to offer students today that it won’t be able to offer them when the organization begins its application process in 2014. The chance to get in on the ground floor. The group, newly formed through the Alumni Affairs Office with the intent on raising awareness on the importance of philanthropy, is holding an open house in room 223 of the UC at 6:30 tonight. Impact’s student leadership board has already been selected and will be on hand to discuss the program with potential members, but the group may take up to 100 students, depending on the number of applicants. “You’ll get a much more in-depth look at who we are and what we’re trying to do,” Paige Atchley, leadership board member and senior in marketing, said. “And I think that should draw a lot of people because a lot of people have heard ‘Impact’ and there’s been a little bit of buzz, but there’s just some confusion on what it is exactly.” In short, the group’s purpose is to facilitate relationships with UT alums that will delve deeper than the occasional mass newsletter that a Vol of years past may receive in their email inbox. “I think that a student that would want to be involved in this group would be one that wants to see UT get better and has a lot of school pride,” Atchley said. “Because if you’re not excited about what’s going

on, then how are you ever going to convince someone else to be excited?” The organization is similar to ones that have flourished through the alumni offices at other major universities and will seek to connect alumni with facets of the university that align with their interests and passions. And according to Lance Taylor, the group’s advisor and UT’s director of annual giving and student philanthropy, it’s not just about soliciting monetary donations. “We’re kind of promoting our group as a very entrepreneurial group,” Taylor said. “We’re so new and have just a few members that are serving on the leadership board to help us get started, but most of our programming isn’t really set so we want our new members to come in and help us with ideas, and tell us how we can expand and get our word out there.” Applications for the program are due Feb. 28, and a tworound selection process will follow. “We desperately rely on our alumni to support the university,” Taylor said. “So this group is hopefully going to teach students about the importance of not only giving your money back, but your time and your talent back to your university once you graduate and how important it is to come back an serve, be involved.” The applications are available at the Tyson House or online at volsconnect.com/ impactut. “Students will really have the opportunity to build a program from the ground up,” Taylor said, “which is really exciting.”


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

A tree begins to fall after being cut down on Feb. 6 to make way for construction on the new Student Union.

THIS DAY IN 1809 — Abraham Lincoln is born On this day in 1809, Abraham Lincoln is born in Hodgenville, Kentucky. Lincoln, one of America’s most admired presidents, grew up a member of a poor family in Kentucky and Indiana. He attended school for only one year, but thereafter read on his own in a continual effort to improve his mind. As an adult, he lived in Illinois and per-

HISTORY

formed a variety of jobs including stints as a postmaster, surveyor and shopkeeper, before entering politics. He served in the Illinois legislature from 1834 to 1836, and then became an attorney. In 1842, Lincoln married Mary Todd; together, the pair raised four sons. Lincoln returned to politics during the 1850s, a time when the nation’s long-standing division over slavery was flaring up, particularly in new territories

being added to the Union. As leader of the new Republican Party, Lincoln was considered politically moderate, even on the issue of slavery. He advocated the restriction of slavery to the states in which it already existed and described the practice in a letter as a minor issue as late as 1854. In an 1858 senatorial race, as secessionist sentiment brewed among the southern states, he warned, a house divided against itself

cannot stand. He did not win the Senate seat but earned national recognition as a strong political force. Lincoln’s inspiring oratory soothed a populace anxious about southern states’ secessionist threats and boosted his popularity. As a presidential candidate in the election of 1860, Lincoln tried to reassure slaveholding interests that although he favored abolition, he had no intention of ending the practice in states where it already existed and prioritized saving the Union over freeing slaves. When he won the presidency by approximately 400,000 popular votes and carried the Electoral College, he was in effect handed a ticking time bomb. His concessions to slaveholders failed to prevent South Carolina from leading other states in an exodus from

the Union that began shortly after his election. By February 1, 1861, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas had also seceded. Soon after, the Civil War began. As the war progressed, Lincoln moved closer to committing himself and the nation to the abolitionist movement and, in 1863, finally signed the Emancipation Proclamation. The document freed slaves in the Confederate states, but did not address the legality of slavery in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska or Arkansas. Lincoln was the tallest president at 6’ 4. As a young man, he impressed others with his sheer physical strength--he was a legendary wrestler in Illinois--and entertained friends and strangers alike with his dry, folksy wit, which was still in evidence years later. Exasperated by one

Civil War military defeat after another, Lincoln wrote to a lethargic general if you are not using the army I should like to borrow it for awhile. An animal lover, Lincoln once declared, “I care not for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it.” Fittingly, a variety of pets took up residence at the Lincoln White House, including a pet turkey named Jack and a goat called Nanko. Lincoln’s son Tad frequently hitched Nanko to a small wagon and drove around the White House grounds. Lincoln’s sense of humor may have helped him to hide recurring bouts of depression. He admitted to friends and colleagues that he suffered from intense melancholia and hypochondria most of his adult life. Perhaps in order to cope with it, Lincoln engaged in self-effacing humor, even chiding himself about his famously homely looks. When an opponent in an 1858 Senate race debate called him two-faced, he replied, If I had another face do you think I would wear this one? Lincoln is remembered as The Great Emancipator. Although he waffled on the subject of slavery in the early years of his presidency, his greatest legacy was his work to preserve the Union and his signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. To Confederate sympathizers, however, Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation reinforced his image as a hated despot and ultimately led John Wilkes Booth to assassinate him on April 14, 1865. His favorite horse, Old Bob, pulled his funeral hearse. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.


Tuesday, February 12, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS JOB FAIR continued from Page 1 “We want to make sure that all of our applicants are aware of our organization, what it is that we do, how long we’ve been in business … all of those important things,” said Shelley Bell, a human resources representative for the Knoxville News-Sentinel. Her sentiments were echoed by Brianna Ruggles and Hannah Certis, interning masters students in the college student personnel program who staffed the student check-in desk at the Diversity Job Fair. “Be prepared and look up the employers that you would be most interested talking to, because there can be a lot of employers here and that can be very overwhelming,” Ruggles said. “So I would choose four to five that you know you want to talk to beforehand.” Certis also mentioned the technological resources offered by Career Services, touting their Facebook page and Hire-A-Vol database.

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

Hire-A-Vol, sponsored by the student technology fee, offers students an opportunity to create a profile, upload a resume or cover letter and search for jobs. An updated list of employers who will be in attendance at ThompsonBoling Arena is also kept on the site. As the assistant director of Career Services, Mahoney said the Hire-A-Vol resource is almost an ongoing job fair in itself. “I think that’s the key thing, that the student does some preparation and they have a list of employers that they do want to go talk to,” she said. “You can speak more confidently to them, because you know what they’re looking for and you know what you have to offer and how it matches.” Mahoney also lent a few insider’s tips to making the most of a job fair. She recommended bringing plenty of copies of a resume and mentioned that arriving in the first half of the event may mean fresher employers. “By the time six o’ clock rolls around, they’ve been standing for four hours,” she said.

Around Rocky Top

Around Rocky Top

Erica Fabbri • The Daily Beacon

Sigma Kappa and Delta Zeta perform songs from “Annie” during “All-Sing” on Feb. 7.

Erica Fabbri • The Daily Beacon

Alpha Delta Pi performs during “All-Sing” on Feb. 7.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Letters Editor to the

Safer, more accesible parking needed Dear Editor, The most dangerous place for a student on campus to be is not in the classroom or even in their dorm, it is walking to their cars. A college’s first priority should be the safety of its students, but UT seems to prioritize using their budget on sports facilities and renovating more than establishing safer and more secure parking for its students. The problem with UT’s parking is not necessarily with the location of their student lots but with the amount and security. With the increasing number of students attending UT comes with more required space. People are reverting to the more desolate parking lots on the outskirts of the campus just to have a spot for class, which should not be an issue. What is the UT parking authority doing to resolve this issue? According to UT’s Capitol Projects Report, within the part of the administration that deals with financing projects that renovate and expand the campus, the administrators are currently planning a parking garage on Volunteer Blvd and Pat Head Summit Drive for some time in the future. This project is budgeted for around $21,500,000, but is predicted to cost over $50,000,000. Seems like a lot of money but a good improvement, does it not? Would you still think this is a lot when the total money spent on projects in planning and design and the projects currently under construction is over one billion dollars? That is nine zeros, and the little parking garage project is just a tiny fraction compared to the total. This seems great and all, but when are they planning to do this? After speaking with Jeff Maples, the Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for UT’s Finance and Administration, a project like this is projected to take about four years in total. There are dangerous crimes, such as shootings and muggings, being committed near those student parking lots at the present time. It could be a student next. Sure the parking garages are being renovated and have cameras and lighting around them, but what about the flat lots? They do not contain cameras and

some of those lots receive dim lighting or no direct lighting at all. Why should they be left in the dark? It may not seem like it, but there are actually more spaces for non-commuters than you might think -- there are actually hundreds of extra spaces. The downside to this though is that there are not many for the commuters. They revert to parking further away and even in the non-commuter section, resulting in a longer walk and a chain pushing more cars to the far away lots. The commuter lots already existing are scarce and distant from major points on campus, which is even worse in terms of safety. A poll for property crime statistics in Knoxville shows the chances of being subject to a crime of burglary, theft, or car theft are 1 in 13. There have been 819 reports of motor vehicle theft in the past year in Knoxville alone. During the months of September and October, there have been three armed robberies near the Fort Sanders area, and even one of those on the campus itself. Crime is closer to home than you think. It could have been anyone: a student walking home to their dorm, a teacher, or a student going to their car. All of these factors together make the commuter and even some of the non-commuter parking may not seem as safe as they could be. Just by beefing up security around parking lots, it would keep UT’s students protected with peace of mind knowing that they do not have to worry about being mugged or attacked while walking to their cars after a long day. Ideas should be put into action, actions should be initiated and the process should be perfected to ensure the safety of a college’s students. UT has the budget, the potential and the resources to create a safer environment for its students, and what better way to start than with the student parking lots? — Joseph Stahl is a freshmen in biochemistry and molecular biology. He can be reached at jstahl1@ utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR • Jacob Hobson

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Love for everyone, not just couples Lost in Communication by

Jan Urbano As we find ourselves fully immersed (or not) in the curriculum of our classes, staring at books with strange symbols and drawings for hours on end and studying long after the midnight oil has run out, February has somehow come upon us. It’s hard to believe that a month of school has already passed, but at the same time, it’s also not so difficult to believe – many of us are already looking forward to spring break, which will begin on March 22, a little over a month from now. That’s not the only notable thing we have coming up, though. As most of us know, some begrudgingly, Valentine’s Day is in two days. With the amount of commercial propaganda and awareness about Valentine’s Day, there’s no doubt that many of us will use this as a potential opportunity to get closer with those we love. For those who need a special way and reason to ignite a relationship, this is the time to do it. For those already in relationships, this is an opportunity for you to express your love and dedication to your significant others, and affirm your hopefully collective desire to stay together for months to come. However, there is one critical and often over-looked factor that provides the context for Valentine’s Day — single people. Every year, I always see the same pattern of single people rising up to protest Valentine’s Day and point out its segregating nature. The amount of public attention and memes that also explode during this time of year, spanning from rants of horrible, former partners, to the forever popular “forever alone” memes, illustrates some examples of the criticisms that are directed towards the practice of

Valentine’s Day. Talking about such a strange and seemingly-trivial topic makes it look like a waste of space in this column, however. There is a reason for this, and I intend to address it accordingly. Although Valentine’s Day was originally a special day to honor the Christian saint Valentinus, who performed benevolent actions, in today’s world, its purpose is to highlight and help foster the feelings of love and closeness between lovers. I have no problem with having a day being dedicated to such an honorable moral that acts as an island of light in an ocean full of darkness, evil and hatred. Some people, though, still view such a day as being bad, but on what grounds? Is it because you’re just jealous and don’t put the time and effort, much less the desire, to enter a relationship? Such a problem should be solved privately, instead of being used as justification to lash out against those that finally have found happiness and a true sense of belonging. It does not seem right to take the happiness from someone else just because you cannot find your own. Perspectives like these end up making the world even more depressing and hostile than before. Instead, use Valentine’s Day in an alternative way, and spend time with your friends. Love does not always have to manifest itself solely within romantic relationships – it can exist through the bonds between you and your friends, and everyone else who has supported you on your journey to where you are today. In lieu of calling Valentine’s Day “Singles Awareness Day”, perhaps we could rename it to “Solidarity Action Day”, where we relax and have fun with our friends and give ourselves a break from our hectic, non-social studying lives. In the words of a favorite techno-song of mine: Love the world. —Jan Urbano is a junior in biological sciences. He can be reached at jurbano@utk.edu.

HOPE credit hour limitations harmful to education (Un) Common Sense by

Ron Walters

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

As a student who has had a large portion of my education paid for by the Tennessee Lottery Scholarship, more commonly known as the HOPE Scholarship, the importance of the HOPE for thousands of Tennessee students is not lost on me. Even more fortuitously, I have managed to use the HOPE for five years without operating under the restrictive credit hour limitation that perhaps was instituted for well-intentioned reasons, but in practice represents an incredibly shortsighted restriction for students who choose to take more than 15 hours a semester during their college career. Under current credit hour guidelines for the HOPE Scholarship, a student’s allotment of the scholarship ends with their graduation, if their enrollment at their academic institution exceeds five years from their initial enrollment date, or if a student exceeds 120 attempted credit hours. The first two restrictions on HOPE usage speak for themselves, and are common sense guidelines usage of the scholarship funds, but no matter how hard I try to rationalize the 120 credit hour limit, I cannot come up with a valid and compelling reason for this limitation. The ceiling of 120 credit hours assumes that students will take 15 hours a semester for the entirety of their college career, a reasonable assumption to make. However, any increase in the number of classes during any semester means that a student will exceed 120 credit hours, putting them at risk of losing their HOPE scholarship for being too academically ambitious, and not for reasons of poor performance. Of course, not everyone will take enough classes to push their number of attempted hours above the limit of the HOPE, but

for students attempting to double major or students who simply take more classes than the minimum required to graduate, the 120 hour limit can be a serious limitation. I know I’m not the only student who took a class simply because it looked interesting, and perhaps it’s a naïve position to adopt, but isn’t part of college cultivating and exploring those interests? On a more practical level, for those of us choosing to major in liberal arts, double majoring is almost a necessity in order to create resumes in a job market that is increasingly devaluing liberal arts degrees. Furthermore, on a purely fair level, where is the justice of a four year double major student who has taken a full course load losing their HOPE Scholarship due to exceeding the 120 credit hour limit? This credit hour limit, however, is merely one additional example of a growing trend throughout numerous universities in the United States – a push to graduate students in four years with degrees that prepare students for careers, rather than merely educating students. Four year graduation is clearly an essential goal worth striving for, but it seems that a disturbing trend of devaluing academic curiosity and exploration for the sake of finding jobs and pushing students out the door has taken over many of our public institutions of learning. A university education is a substantial investment for all parties involved and some form of return, professionally or financially, should be expected. Still, it is hard to place a financial value on an education, but it is the intangibles. The critical thinking, analysis and time management skills students learn that makes an education so valuable, and attempts to limit that exploration, confine it or conform it to a uniform four year plan robs university education, particularly in the American context, of its power and value.

— Ron Walters is a senior in English literature, French and global studies. He can be reached at rwalter5@utk.edu


Tuesday, February 12, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Stars win big at 55th annual Grammy Awards Spencer Hall Staff Writer For some, it was an honor just to be nominated, but for many, Sunday night’s 55th Annual Grammy telecast was a night to remember. With star-studded performances and touching tributes, the broadcast seemed to hit all the right notes. Unlike last year’s ceremony in which Adele made a clean sweep, this year’s Grammy voters seemed to spread the love to all nominees. In a year without a major standout album, Sunday’s festivities were fair game for all, with awards going mainly to a variety of younger generational musical acts. This year’s Grammy celebration put the spotlight on some up and coming acts, such as Miguel, Alabama Shakes and Frank Ocean. Similar to past years, Sunday’s Grammy ceremony was heavy on the performances. Opening the show was Taylor Swift singing her hit breakup song, “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,� with an elaborate circus performance. One of the night’s shining moments came from Justin Timberlake who performed his new song, “Suit and Tie,� as he returned to the stage after taking a long musical hiatus. The night also celebrated some of music’s icons and those lost in the past year. Elton John, Zac Brown Band, Mumford and Sons, Mavis Staples, Alabama Shakes and T-Bone Burnett joined together in an all-star tribute to The Band’s Levon Helm

as they sang every cool guy’s karaoke song, “The Weight.� Kelly Clarkson also gave a solo performance paying tribute to Patti Page, which segued into “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,� honoring one of the night’s lifetime achievement honorees, Carole King. As for the awards, plenty of 2012’s top performers received honors during Sunday evening’s televised award celebration. Gotye and featured artist Kimbra received “Record of the Year� for the song “Somebody That I Used To Know.� Fun., along with Janelle Monae, won song of the year for their hit, “We Are Young.� The award for best country album went to Zac Brown Band and their album, “Uncaged.� Kelly Clarkson’s hit, “Stronger,� was recognized as the best pop vocal album. Fun., although this was their second major label record, managed to pick up their second Grammy of the night for best new artist. Carrie Underwood received her sixth Grammy for best country solo performance. Adele also managed to add another award to her mantle with her win for “Set Fire to the Rain (Live)� as she received best pop solo performance. Technically speaking, the big winner of the night was Dan Auerbach, winning three awards with his band The Black Keys and one as producer, but the night belonged to British roots rockers Mumford and Sons and their hit album, “Babel.� In what appeared to be the most competitive category of the night, Mumford and Sons managed to strum

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and finger pick their way past Frank Ocean, The Black Keys, Fun. and Jack White to take home album of the year. Mumford and Sons may have won the nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most coveted award, but no artist stole the show quite like R&B superstar Frank Ocean. After a breakout year, which brought the critically acclaimed debut â&#x20AC;&#x153;Channel Orange,â&#x20AC;? and a touching confession in which Frank reveals his first love to be a man, the double Grammy win was the cherry on top for Ocean. After receiving his first ever win for best urban contemporary album, Frank made his way back to the stage moments later to accept the award for best rap collaboration, which he shares with Jay-Z and Kanye West. In a night full of highly energized musical performances, Ocean stood out with his calming love song, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forrest Gump,â&#x20AC;? as he sang in front of a large CGI screen, recreating the running scene from the movie of the same title. As the song finished in its whistling outro, Frank made his way off-stage to a standing ovation, symbolizing his triumphant night. The night was a celebratory evening enjoyed by all in attendance. Of course, many music lovers will feel as if their favorite artists were snubbed, but the 55th Annual Grammy Awards was a night for fans to enjoy and celebrate music. Also, Jimmy Fallon won in the best comedy album category and personally, next to Frank Oceanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wins, this was the most satisfying of the night.

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Constant nuisance 5 Dashboard device, briefly 9 Post-op program 14 Writer Wister 15 Say again 16 To love, in Milan 17 Voting district 18 Laine of jazz fame 19 South Pacific island nation 20 1977 Boz Scaggs hit 23 Neth. neighbor 24 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sophieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choiceâ&#x20AC;? novelist 25 Hoyle of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hoyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rules of Gamesâ&#x20AC;? 27 Source of ground chuck 31 Bird with redeyed and yellowthroated varieties 34 Coal-rich area in Europe 35 Common cotton swab 37 Italian diminutive suffix

38 Unsportsmanlike 39 Year, in YucatĂĄn 40 Film terrier played by Skippy 42 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picnicâ&#x20AC;? playwright 43 Volga River native 45 All-in-one offer 48 Takes hold 49 Skepticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response 53 Here, to Henri 54 Something with which you might do the actions at the ends of 20-, 27- and 45-Across 58 Hurricane, e.g. 60 Fair share, maybe 61 Wild about, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;overâ&#x20AC;? 62 Toy truck maker 63 Hankering 64 At least once 65 Firebugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense 66 Result of a successful slap shot 67 Covers, as a football field

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE W H I M E U R O B R O N N E S O F T O B I S I S I O T T A M B U N S A L O O A C I D B E D E A R E A A S A D

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21 Manhattan district with art galleries 22 Doubting 26 1974 John Wayne crime drama 28 Taking drugs regularly 29 Popcorn order for two, maybe 30 PassĂŠ 31 Going by way of 32 Lestrade of Sherlock Holmes stories, e.g. 33 E.R. doctors work them 36 ___ favor 38 Photographer Arbus 41 Some window installations, for short

43 Baby powder component 44 Whom G movies are for 46 Best Actress winner for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hoursâ&#x20AC;? 47 ___ Tower 48 Woman with an Afro, maybe 50 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good job!â&#x20AC;? 51 Sharp-___ 52 Bygone Russian leaders 55 Down in a hurry 56 Corn syrup brand 57 Gymnast Korbut 59 Original â&#x20AC;&#x153;King Kongâ&#x20AC;? studio


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon

Coleen O’Leary, a second year interior design student, and Gerry Hogsed, a fourth year architecture student, ask students to participate in TAAST, The Annual All-College Spring Thing.

Fashion Week for everyone, not just elite Melodi Erdogan Assistant Arts and Culture Editor February is a notable month for more than a few reasons. It’s celebrated as Black History month, the month Saint Valentine and cupid have couples falling in love, and is the shortest month of the year. However, what most people don’t know about February is that it is also fashion month. Fashion month takes place twice a year, once in February to release the fall/winter collections and once in September to release the spring/summer collections. This year the iconic event began in New York on Thursday, Feb. 7, then will make its way through London and Milan, finally ending in Paris on March 6. Hundreds of different fashion designers and brands will be debuting their collections for the fall/winter seasons of this year, unveiling the future trends and fads that everyone will be wearing. Due to movies such as “The Devil Wears Prada,” television shows such as “Sex and the City” and even books, New York Fashion Week has been dubbed a very aristocratic event for only the nation’s chicest women among the upper class who are known for their taste in fashion, and of course, their limitless bank accounts. Someone was lucky if they knew a friend of a friend who was getting an invitation to a show, even if they were only assisting the models backstage. But in this day and age, fashion month is so much more than limited to just a select few people in the fashion industry. Among the front row of the Burberry show in London last season there were a number of magazine editors, including Vogue US editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and celebrities such as cabaret dancer Dita Von Teese, “Breaking Bad” actor Aaron

Paul and One Direction band member Harry Styles. Their seats at the front row must have been pretty cool, but I was sitting on my couch watching the show from the privacy of my own bedroom via a live feed of the show from Burberry’s website. As the models strutted down the runway in fluorescent, metallic trench coats, it dawned on me that high fashion, what once was a luxury of the upper class, was now available to anyone who had internet connection. Not only could I watch the fashion show live as it was happening overseas, I could also tweet about it in the same window and connect with other people on Twitter on the same web page. Technology is great for many reasons, but I must admit that the fact that I can watch the Chanel fashion show live from Paris in Knoxville really makes me appreciate these new initiatives. I am a huge fan of fashion and style and I am constantly checking websites for the latest updates and news and reading through magazines for the latest trends and styles. When I was younger, I considered the types of people who would get invited to the shows and parties I read about, and I got discouraged. The fashion industry has always been so exclusive and I wondered how any of the designers would even sell their clothes if only a few people got to see them. I bet if you asked Karl Lagerfeld five years ago how he would feel about his show for Chanel being broadcasted live on the Internet, he would have said a curse word in French. Probably only a stereotype, but a widely recognized one, is that fashion is for the elite -- but not anymore. Today, I can find every single Haute Couture collection that premiered last month, I can reblog my favorite backstage photos from the official Vogue Tumblr account, I can retweet direct quotes from Marc Jacobs in an interview minutes after his show on Twitter and I can even follow the popular shoe designer Christian Louboutin on Instagram and see his sketches for the accessories he created for the Marchesa show. What once was limited for only royalty and industry insiders is now completely available to anyone willing to access it. With websites, social networking sites, apps and even blogs, fashion has taken full advantage of technology and in turn created it into something everyone can take part in. Sure, Tom Ford shoes are still not affordable and you can only dream about carrying a Celine handbag, but considering how fast fashion became something so easy and convenient to keep up with, it has come a long way. Fashion may still just be a luxury for most people, but with technology, Fashion Week is something everyone can attend — even if you’re not in New York or Milan. This month I know I’ll be on top of my Instagram and Twitter in between classes and I am excited to see runway looks on my dashboard on Tumblr. I still dream of the day that I’ll get to sit front row at the Michael Kors show, but until then I’m completely content with hanging out in my pajamas and watching the show on my laptop. — Melodi Erdogan is a freshman in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at merdogan@utk.edu.

• Photo courtesy of Filippo Fior/InDigitalteam/GoRunway.com

Jason Wu Fall 2013 Collection


Tuesday, February 12, 2013

SPORTS

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Youth movement sweeps baseball Vols Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor

Every season brings on new Austin Bornheim challenges Assistantfor Editora coach, but this baseball season brings head coach Dave Serrano a challenge he’s never encountered in his eight years as head of the program. “I have never had this many new players at one time come onto a team that I have been a part of,” Serrano said. Out of the 32 players on Tennessee’s 2013 roster, 21 of them are new with 18 true freshmen. But that fact doesn’t worry the second year head coach; rather, it excites him. “I am as excited about this group that I have ever been in all of my years of coaching, especially as a head coach,” Serrano said. “There is such a big unknown out there about this team right now, even from our coaching staff and from within our team, but there is a sense of excitement and security and confidence within this team because of what they have established within themselves.” With so much youth the Volunteer team will look Baseball head coach Dave Serrano shouts to players on the field during a game last season. for leadership from the 11 returning players. “They have brought them in and helped show them the reigns of what direction we want this program to go,” Serrano said. “I can’t be any prouder of those 11 guys because they have taken a group of new players and they have helped mentor them along with the coaching staff.” Freshmen agree that the returning players are helping make the transition from high school to SEC baseball as smooth as possible. “Zach Godley, Zach Luther and Will Maddox have all been really key leaders,” freshman A.J. Simcox said. “They do a great job of leading. If we have any questions they’ll help us out. They’ve done a great job welcoming us here and meshing the young guys, helping us grow.” “With all the hard work we’ve put in, we’re excited to see it pay off,” Simcox said. Even with this excitement Serrano realizes that he is in the midst of rebuilding the Tennessee program. “I knew there would be tough times before us just because of where this program was at,” Serrano said. “I’m not going to deny there may be some tough times this year still, but I’m starting to see really bright lights at the end of the tunnel.” Serrano believes this 2013 class is that beacon toward sunnier days for his program. “I actually went up to Zach Godley in the outfield when we were taking (batting practice) and said ‘I kind of feel bad for you Zach’ – Zach is one of two seniors on our team – and I said ‘because I think we are going to do something that we’re all going to be excited about this year, but I feel bad because this is your last year and you’re not going to be part of this place when these guys really take off,’” the head coach said. Time will tell how the recruiting class pans out, but the coaching staff is pleased with the group they were able to bring onto campus. “I will say this, the proof will be in the pudding down the line … but we haven’t missed, if at all, on many players,” Serrano said.

File Photo • The Daily Beacon


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols slip by Gamecocks for win Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Trae Golden shoots a jumper against Ole Miss on Jan. 9.

The Tennessee Vols finally managed their first win on the road Sunday. Head coach Cuonzo Martin said that beating the South Carolina Gamecocks 66-61 in Columbia, S.C., was a great experience. “That was always one of those things I took great pride in as a player. Every time you get a road win it’s just a great feeling,” Martin said. “The level of confidence to beat someone on their home court, it takes a lot of mental preparation, game planning, players making plays to get the win. I feel like the guys did a great job of stepping up.” On top of Jarnell Stokes’ fifth straight double-double, Trae Golden put up 16 points, his largest output since midDecember. After sitting out for a few games due to a hamstring injury, Golden has come back with a vengeance. “Trae Golden came in and played well and that was the old Trae that I’m used to seeing, a guy that’s attacking the rim,” Martin said. “I thought he was very aggressive. I thought he got the outlet passes and was up the court, looking to score the ball and find his shooters, but when he didn’t have anything he did a great job of going to the rim. That was good to see.” The win worked as a confidence boost for more than just Golden. “It was a good team win for our guys,” Martin said. That said, Martin feels Golden’s performance is key to game-making plays. “If Golden’s playing that well and everyone is doing their part, I think we’ll be fine,” Martin said. Stokes’ performance over the last several games marks him as a top-tier player. Martin said mentality is key to being a great player. “When you’re a good player, you should

put pressure on yourself,” Martin. “It’s a matter of maintaining how you handle that pressure, but that’s why the great ones become great. It’s the reason they are who they are because of pressure. They have a bounce back response to certain situations and when you get in hostile environments, they come out of there alive.” For Stokes this means finding the drive to win no matter what. The head coach said that to be a high caliber competitor you have to have the drive to win games. “As an individual player when you want to be the best and especially when you can see signs that ‘I can be one of the best, if not the best,’ then that’s the next push to dominate games,” Martin said. But that drive, that push isn’t found during regular play. It starts on the practice court. “If it doesn’t start in practice, there’s no way it’s gonna start in a game for you,” Martin said. “You have to program your body to practice at a certain level so that game time is somewhat easy. “The great ones hold their own,” he said. “They know every night, ‘I will get there. This is my production.’” Martin hopes winning and performing won’t stay in South Carolina. “In order for us to be a team, we need to do that on a consistent basis,” Martin said. “We need Trae Golden and Jarnell Stokes and those guys to be the players we need them to be.” On Wednesday, the team will face another SEC challenge. The team will be heading to Nashville to play the Vanderbilt Commodores. In their last meeting, the Vols pulled out the 58-57 win, but that was in ThompsonBoling Arena. Martin is looking for consistency and drive, something he hopes will carry over from Sunday. “It should be a physical game, a tough game, and that’s the bottom line,” he said.

Stokes Named SEC Player of the Week Staff Reports The Southeastern Conference office announced Monday that Tennessee power forward Jarnell Stokes has been named SEC Basketball Player of the Week for the week of Feb. 4-10. Stokes averaged a double-double for the Volunteers last week, and his active streak of five straight double-doubles is tied as the longest such streak by an SEC player this season. In dominant performances vs. Georgia and South Carolina, the Memphis, Tenn., native averaged 18.0 points and 10.5 rebounds. He also totaled four assists and four blocks. In 22 games this season, Stokes has nine double-doubles. In SEC play, Stokes averages 13.7 points per game while ranking second in

the conference with 9.8 rebounds per game. His 4.0 offensive rebounds per game in league play lead all conference players. This is the second SEC weekly honor received by a Vol this season, as junior guard Trae Golden was named SEC Player of the Week on Dec. 17. As a newcomer last season, Stokes earned one SEC Freshman of the Week award as well as one SEC Player of the Week honor. Monday’s most recent honor for Stokes marks the fifth SEC weekly award received by a Vol during the tenure of second-year head coach Cuonzo Martin. Stokes and the Vols are back in action Wednesday at 8 p.m. EST when they face Vanderbilt at Memorial Gymnasium in Nashville. The game will be televised regionally on the SEC Network.

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Jarnell Stokes attacks the rim against Ole Miss on Jan. 9.


The Daily Beacon