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Issue 20, Volume 122

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Health Center pharmacy celebrates grand opening R.J. Vogt News Editor Neither cold nor sickness will stand in UT’s way, at least not after the Student Health Center unveiled its new, fully operational pharmacy on Tuesday. The pharmacy accepts all insurance plans and offers all of the medicines that a typical off-campus pharmacy would offer. It also accepts money from VolCard accounts. UT partnered with Keystone Pharmacy Services to install the facility in spring of 2012. Christopher Jaffurs, Keystone’s vice president of business development, explained that the pharmacy’s purpose revolves around convenience. “The reason the university wanted it here in the Student Health Center is that by having the pharmacy here, when students are sick they don’t have to leave campus to go get their prescriptions filled,” Jaffurs said. “That medication non-compliance, in other words people not taking their medicines or even getting them, is a huge health problem nationwide for all types of population.” The fear was that students who went off-campus to fill prescriptions often forgot or ignored the advice.

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

A student receives a prescription from the newly opened pharmacy in the UT Student Health Center during the open house on Tuesday. The new pharmacy offers students an on-site pharmacy to refill prescriptions or obtain medication. “Sometimes if they don’t feel really bad, they won’t get it at all. They just end up getting sicker and they wind up back here again,” he said. “So by making this convenient, it’s easy to get to, and it’s the same prices they would pay at any pharmacy off-campus. It’s a real incentive to come; not only is it easy, but most of the time you’re going to pay the same

price.” The pharmacy officially opened in November, but due to construction and other holdups, the grand opening was saved for Tuesday, Jaffurs said. Inside the small shop, a few shelves hold basic amenities like toothpaste, condoms, deodorant and lotion. A pharmacist and certified pharmacy technician handle the customer

interactions. For Jim Boyle, the Student Health Center administrator, the presence of a pharmacist inside the Student Health Center is a dream come true. “We haven’t had a pharmacy in forever, so it’s been one of my goals to get a pharmacy here,” Boyle said. “It’s a multiple benefit situation. It benefits the health center because we

have a pharmacy and our doctors can talk to the pharmacist and back and forth. You give better care.” He echoed Jaffurs sentiment that some students may not have been filling their prescription in a timely manner, and said that the pharmacy’s convenience would stop that problem. “They’ll be able to get the

medicines they need more quickly, and hopefully if there’s a problem, they can come in and talk to somebody about it,” he said. “You shouldn’t have the volume you have at regular pharmacies, you should actually be able to talk to the pharmacist pretty easily here.” The pharmacy is open to the public and holds the same licensing of any other pharmacy in the country, but Boyle said the primary customers are students. “It should be extremely competitive,” he said. “If you’re on campus and it’s easy to stop by, it should be a little more convenient. It’s designed to be convenient to students, but if it’s convenient for the faculty and staff as well, great.” Boyle also mentioned the educational possibilities of the Student Health Center’s newest feature. UT has a competitive pre-pharmacy program. “I’m sure there will be, but we haven’t established it yet,” he said. “At other schools I’ve worked at, that’s been a big part of it, and we have enough room to do it. We have to get on our feet, but I know that’s in our plans for the future.” The pharmacy opens at 8:30 a.m. every weekday except Wednesday when it opens at 9 a.m. It closes at 5:30 p.m. and is not open on weekends.

‘Stuff White People GSS prepares for library 5K event Like’ author to speak at UT Brooke Turner

Contributor

Victoria Wright Arts and Culture Editor The web has almost an endless supply of resources, but racial hegemony? That’s a new one. Christian Lander, author of The New York Times best selling novel “Stuff White People Like” along with the corresponding blog of the same name that started it all, will visit UT students as a part of the “Post Racial Comedy Tour” Wednesday night in the UC Auditorium. Lisa Dicker, Issues Committee chair and junior in political science and Asian studies, said the event was brought to students in hopes of sparking talk about a touchy subject. “We really wanted to have an open dialogue about stereotypes in America and social stratification but we wanted it to be a really relaxed and entertaining environment for discussion,” Dicker said. Lander’s popularity began on his satirical website where he and a friend, Myles Valantin, list stereotypical interest and other things associate with white people. The website has garnered some upset among visitors, but Lander explains on his website that the topics are less about race and more

about class divides. Dicker said that, because of the sensitivity of these type of discussions, students often stray away from talking about these subjects. She said the popularity of Lander’s work will set the right tone for students to become progressive about these type of issues. Dickers believes campus organizations have improved concerning bringing events to discuss stereotypes among people. “I think campus organizations especially in recent years have done a really good job breaking the ice on these issues,” she said. “It’s not totally acceptable in conversation. ...” Tia Shack, junior in journalism and electronic media, believes campus organizations have increased their coverage of these types of events. “In several of the shows they put on you can always tell which crowd they are aiming to attract or who they are generating toward,” Shack said. The “Post-Racial Comedy Tour” with Christian Lander will begin at 7 p.m. in the UC Auditorium and is free to the public. The event is being held by the Central Programming Council and the Issues Committee.

With Valentine’s Day fast approaching, the Graduate Student Senate is offering everyone a chance to show some love. The GSS is sponsoring the annual “Love Your Libraries 5K Race” this March as they run cross-campus to benefit UT’s libraries. The annual race was started 21 years ago by a group of graduate student senators under the leadership of GSS President Cindy Wyrick. They named the race “Love Your Libraries” for its original scheduled date, Valentine’s Day. However, years later, GSS changed the official date of the race to the first weekend of March to avoid possible difficult weather conditions and kept the name as it was. Wyrick and the GSS chose to create the fundraiser in order to supply the UT libraries with the necessary funds it needed to help serve its students. Brian Broyles, annual giving coordinator for the UT libraries, said that GSS saw the race as a way “to do something to benefit the library because it benefited all students on campus.” Broyles said that Wyrick and the original group of students who created the race did it so they could support “what they felt was the most important building on campus.” Current GSS Vice President Alexandra Brewer maintains Wyrick’s legacy by encouraging current students and alumni to participate in the race. “Everybody uses the library and it is an invalu-

able resource,” she said. “The funds raised are for the library to use at its discretion.” Hodges Library recently completed a renovation project to the Commons areas on the second floor, redesigning the location of many library events. The de-stressing dogs and massages that sprout up during finals will call the new Commons home. Many of the events’ funds can be traced back to the “Love Your Libraries 5K.” Whether one is interested in racing for more books and resources or for more massages, everyone can find a reason to run.

Bennett Adkinson, chair of the 5K committee, encourages everyone interested in running to begin registering now. “The big thing that we would like to promote this year is the addition of a team’s competition,” Adkinson said. “The largest team and the fastest team will each receive a trophy. We invite all campus organizations to sign up a team for the race and try to win these trophies. Signing up as a team also reduces the registration fee to only $15. So, sign up early as a team to get a great deal.” For more information regarding prizes and rules

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

Members of the Knoxville community watch as participants in the 5K cross the finish line on March 3, 2011. The 21st annual “Love Your Libraries 5K Race” to benefit the Knoxville libraries will take place on March 2.

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about teams, visit the GSS website, http://web.utk. edu/~gss/, and follow the link, “21st Annual Love Your Libraries 5K.” The deadline to pre-register is Feb. 22. After this date, all wishing to participate, whether as singles or teams, will be required to pay a $25 fee. The race will take place Saturday, March 2. To check in or to register the day of the event, tables will be set up inside the Communication and Information Building from 7:45 to 8:45 a.m. at Circle Park on campus. The race is set to officially begin at 9 a.m.

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Junior Matthew Nelson plays the double bass with Pam Robertson on piano during a recital in Alumni Memorial Building on Monday.

Crime Log January 26 2:34 a.m. An officer observed a subject at 2218 Cumberland Avenue who appeared to be very unsteady on his feet. The subject was transported to Knox County Intake without incident. 3:04 a.m. An officer was dispatched along with the Knoxville Fire Department to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house in response to a fire alarm. The building had no signs of smoke or fire. However, a pull-station had been activated by an unknown person. Two individuals were uncooperative during the investigation, one of whom was issued a citation for underage consumption of alcohol. 8:20 p.m. An officer observed an intoxicated male subject staggering into the intersection of 17th and Cumberland. The male subject was almost struck by a moving vehicle. Further investigation led to an arrest of an intoxicated male. January 27 5:40 p.m. Two officers responded to Hess Hall in response to an administrative search that required confiscation by law enforcement. Officers took possession of metal knuckles, drug paraphernalia, and non-narcotic medication. The suspect in constructive possession of these items was charged with two misdemeanors. 10:02 p.m. An officer was requested for an intoxicated individual at an apartment complex on Highland Avenue and 12th Street. A subject was placed under arrest for public intoxication, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

January 28 6:45 a.m. An officer was dispatched to 1615 Laurel Avenue in response to a report of vandalism. 8:00 a.m. An officer was sent to Morrill Hall in response to a theft or attempted theft of over $500 in value. January 29 3:55 a.m. Two officers began a walkthrough of Neyland Stadium’s east side skyboxes. Upon arrival they found the ground level entrance doors locked. After making entry, they went to the fifth level and began checking rooms on the north end working their way south. All skybox doors were locked, but they were able to use a key to enter Skybox 501, where they found a subject inside the room. The subject had been advised not to be on UT property in the past and was arrested for criminal trespassing. 1:17 p.m. An officer was dispatched to a reported theft at the TRECs. The victim reported the theft of his jacket, spare car key, and VolCard. The victim stated that he left these items unattended in a cubby while working out. February 1 1:36 a.m. While towing a vehicle, an officer observed an intoxicated male stumbling on Highland Avenue. The subject was arrested for public intoxication and underage consumption. 3:54 p.m. An officer was dispatched to the TRECs lobby in response to a reported theft of a UT ID.

This Day in

HISTORY

Elizabeth queen, an avid horsewoman and Corgi dog lover, is one of the world’s wealthiOn this day in 1952, after est women, with extensive a long illness, King George real-estate holdings and art VI of Great Britain and and jewelry collections. Northern Ireland dies in 1937 — Of Mice and his sleep at the royal estate at Sandringham. Princess Men is published Elizabeth, the oldest of the On this day, John king’s two daughters and next in line to succeed him, Steinbeck’s novella Of Mice was in Kenya at the time of and Men, the story of the her father’s death; she was bond between two migrant crowned Queen Elizabeth workers, is published. He II on June 2, 1953, at age adapted the book into a three-act play, which was 27. King George VI, the sec- produced the same year. ond son of King George The story brought national V, ascended to the throne attention to Steinbeck’s in 1936 after his older work, which had started to brother, King Edward VIII, catch on in 1935 with the voluntarily abdicated to publication of his first sucmarry American divorcee cessful novel, Tortilla Flat. Steinbeck was born and Wallis Simpson. During World War II, George raised in the Salinas Valley, worked to rally the spirits where his father was a counof the British people by ty official and his mother touring war zones, mak- a former schoolteacher. A ing a series of morale- good student and president boosting radio broadcasts of his senior class in high (for which he overcame a school, Steinbeck attended speech impediment) and Stanford intermittently in shunning the safety of the the early 1920s. In 1925, he countryside to remain with moved to New York City, his wife in bomb-damaged where he worked as a manBuckingham Palace. The ual laborer and a journalist king’s health deteriorated while writing stories and in 1949, but he continued novels. His first two novels to perform state duties were not successful. In 1930, he married until his death in 1952. Queen Elizabeth, born Carol Henning, the first on April 21, 1926, and of his three wives, and known to her family as moved to Pacific Grove, Steinbeck’s Lilibet, was groomed as a California. girl to succeed her father. father gave the couple a She married a distant cous- house and a small income in, Philip Mountbatten, while Steinbeck continued on November 20, 1947, to write. His third novel, at London’s Westminster Tortilla Flat (1935), was a Abbey. The first of critical and financial sucElizabeth’s four children, cess, as were such subsePrince Charles, was born quent books as In Dubious Battle (1935) and Of Mice in 1948. From the start of her and Men (1937), both of reign, Elizabeth understood which offered social comthe value of public rela- mentaries on injustices of tions and allowed her 1953 various types. coronation to be televised, In 1939, Steinbeck won despite objections from the Pulitzer Prize for Prime Minister Winston The Grapes of Wrath, a Churchill and others who novel tracing a fictional felt it would cheapen the Oklahoma family as they ceremony. Elizabeth, the lose their family farm in 40th British monarch since the Depression and move William the Conqueror, has to California seeking a betworked hard at her royal ter life. duties and become a popuHis work after World War lar figure around the world. II, including Cannery Row In 2003, she celebrated 50 and The Pearl, continued years on the throne, only to offer social criticism but the fifth British monarch became more sentimental. to do so. Steinbeck tried his hand The queen’s reign, how- at movie scripts in the ever, has not been with- 1940s, writing successful out controversy. She was films like Forgotten Village seen as cold and out-of- (1941) and Viva Zapata touch following the 1996 (1952). He also took up divorce of her son, Prince the serious study of mari Charles, and Princess ne biology and published a Diana, and again after nonfiction book, The Sea of Diana’s 1997 death in a Cortez, in 1941. His 1962 car crash. Additionally, the nonfiction book, Travels role in modern times of the with Charlie, describes his monarchy, which is largely travels across the United ceremonial, has come into States in a camper truck question as British taxpay- with his poodle, Charlie. ers have complained about Steinbeck won the Nobel covering the royal family’s Prize in 1962 and died in travel expenses and palace New York in 1968. upkeep. Still, the royals are effective world ambassa— This Day in History dors for Britain and a huge is courtesy of History.com. tourism draw. Today, the 1952 — becomes queen


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

CAMPUS NEWS Britain considers legalizing samesex marriage The Associated Press A bill to legalize same-sex marriage in Britain cleared a major hurdle Tuesday, as lawmakers voted overwhelmingly in favor of the proposals championed by Prime Minister David Cameron. The vote in the House of Commons — 400 to 175 in support of the proposed legislation — will be followed by more detailed parliamentary debates. The proposals also require the approval of the House of Lords before they become law. The process could take months, but if approved, the bill is expected to take effect in 2015 and enable samesex couples to get married in both civil and religious ceremonies, provided the religious institution consents. The bill also lets couples who had previously entered into civil partnerships convert their relationship into a marriage. “Tonight’s vote shows Parliament is very strongly in favor of equal marriage,” Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said. “I genuinely believe that we will look back on today as a landmark for equality in Britain.” The lopsided vote was a qualified victory for Cameron, with around half of his party’s lawmakers rejecting the proposals or abstaining. Nonetheless, strong support from the left-leaning Labour Party and Liberal Democrats party ensured the Commons approval. After the ballots were counted, Cameron acknowledged that “strong views exist on both sides,” but said

the result was a “step forward for our country.” Officials have stressed that all religious organizations can decide for themselves if they want to “opt in” to holding gay weddings. However, the Church of England, the country’s official faith, is barred from performing such ceremonies. That provision aims to ensure that the Church, which opposes gay marriage, is protected from legal claims that as the official state religion it must marry anyone who requests it. Currently, same-sex couples only have the option of a civil partnership, which offers the same legal rights and protections on issues such as inheritance, pensions, and child maintenance. Supporters say that gay relationships should be treated exactly the same way as heterosexual ones, but critics worry that the proposals would change longstanding views about the meaning of marriage. Some Conservatives also fear the proposals would cost the party a significant number of votes in the next general election. “Marriage is the union between a man and a woman, has been historically, remains so. It is Alice in Wonderland territory, Orwellian almost, for any government of any political persuasion to seek to come along and try to re-write the lexicon,” Conservative lawmaker Roger Gale said. The bill’s provisions apply only to England and Wales — there are no plans for similar legislation in Northern Ireland. Scotland is considering introducing a similar bill.

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Taria Person, senior in English creative writing and African studies, performs a spoken word piece at the last Café Noir hosted at the Emporium on Feb. 1.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Editor’sNote Li Chengpeng calls out Chinese government

Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief Li Chengpeng reminds me a great deal of Hoot Gibson. Yes, you read that correctly. You have likely never heard of either of these gentlemen, but we are going to use one to elucidate the importance of the other. Li Chengpeng is currently levying heavy blows against the foundations of a repressive Chinese government. Hoot Gibson might have been a 1960s Texas schoolboy. When I was a little girl, I had trouble falling asleep at night, so my Dad would always tell me stories. Every night I would beg my father to talk to me before I went to sleep (since he usually got home late, around my bedtime), and he would launch into some intricately woven tale to entertain us both. Enter Hoot. To this day my father swears he was real, but I have my doubts. You see, Hoot had a nasty penchant for any type of trouble imaginable. He lost control of grocery carts, terrorized his teachers, and in general seemed to be a magnet for accidents. If he ever really existed, Hoot endured enough hardship for three lifetimes by the time he was 12. As the story goes, Hoot was a scrawny adolescent with an ornery streak. His spirit, though, was boundless. The Hoot that I came to know was endowed with a moral compass abnormally developed for one his age. In creative and sometimes blundering ways, he attempted to stand for right in the world. Enter Li Chengpeng. This Chinese sports writer turned political rights activist has gathered almost 7 million Chinese followers. They rally around him for spreading what is forbid-

den: a litany of social grievances against the Chinese government. His recent collection of essays, “Everybody in the World Knows,” targets many of the Chinese Communist Party’s failings. He recently attempted to run for a government position in Chengdu, but was blocked by the CCP. Liu Xiaobo, the Chinese Nobel Laureate still being jailed for political activism, is reported by The Economist to have said of Li, “You, man of words, just keep writing.” What could such an outspoken Chinese innovator have in common with our scrawny schoolboy? Passion in the right place. Hoot lost control of grocery carts when attempting to help his friends finish their chores. He terrorized his teachers by fighting for weaker classmates facing unfair accusations and the corporal discipline of a past age. He confronted bullies, though a weakling himself. While accidents seemed to plague Hoot in particular, he routinely compromised his own interests for the betterment of his friends. Hoot Gibson was likely a product of my father’s designs to indirectly instill me with a moral compass. His sufferings were trivial, but Li Chengpeng’s are, unfortunately, very real. He has been forced as of late to keep a low profile and has been forbidden to speak at rallies of his supporters by order of the Chinese government. In an attempt to escape retribution, he has repeatedly encouraged his followers to focus on the issues instead of the person writing about them. Only time will tell whether or not Li will be able to avoid the consequences that come from antagonizing Beijing’s entrenched bureaucracy. It may take a few more like Li to defeat that bully. — Blair Kuykendall is a senior in College Scholars and economics. She can be reached at bkuykend@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... •Katie Dyson-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Senior theses difficult to get started at UT The Maple Kind by

Hunter Tipton As a member of the Chancellor’s Honors Program, I have spent the last two semesters working on a senior thesis. I think that my education has been thoroughly improved by my research requirements, and I believe that theses are still important in upper level education. While I still agree with requiring theses of UT’s top students, I am still upset with the lack of standards and qualifications that the university has in explaining the process of developing a thesis and declaring what exactly constitutes a complete and final project. First off, most students are thoroughly lost when figuring out where to start. Most people don’t even have a plan until the end of their junior year or beginning of their senior year, at which point they enter freakout mode. Similarly, many people drop out of the Honor’s Program simply so they don’t have to do a thesis project. A clearly established thesis timeline set forth by the university could help to alleviate this confusion. By letting students know roughly when they should start developing a thesis and meeting with potential advisors, students may be more likely to stay in the Honor’s program and put forth the effort to write theses. Relatedly, many students do not know where to begin looking for an advisor. Thesis grades and completions are determined by an advisor of the student’s choosing, so picking a good advisor is critical. Unfortunately, finding someone who is actually willing to devote time to help develop a quality thesis may be hard. For example, I met with two professors in separate labs in the Department of Microbiology who outright told me that they did not want pre-med students working

under them. Whether it’s from an irrational personal bias based on perceived intelligence or possibly something even deeper related to their own career choices, there are professors in our university who refuse to put the education of students first. While we could debate the ridiculousness of this idea based on the fact that they are employed by a public institution that exists to first and foremost serve the needs of the residents of Tennessee, I would even settle for the university compiling a list of professors who are willing to serve as thesis advisors each year. This would go a long way in ensuring that students could find supportive professors in a timely manner. Another issue some students run into is the fact that what constitutes a completed thesis is extremely vague. If there are standards out there that address the field of research, length of paper, and complexity of topics, I have yet to find them. I have even met with some professors in an attempt to find them and cannot. I appreciate the fact that some fields may have different qualifications as to what defines “complete,” but surely there can be at least a few broad guidelines that establish general parameters for history, Spanish, accounting, and engineering majors alike. By making these guidelines well known from the beginning, both students and professors are better equipped to produce a polished product. These are just a few things for the university to consider, but it is certainly not an exhaustive list. Hopefully in the near future the university will set some hard standards for their students. For those of you who haven’t started considering your thesis, my advice is to pick an advisor that you enjoy and can relate to and get started as soon as possible. For those who are in the process, good luck. — Hunter Tipton is a senior in microbiology. He can be reached at jtipto10@utk.edu.

Life’s high points seem fleeting All Things Dark and Twisty by

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

The other night I was on my way out to dinner with my family at a local Thai restaurant. When we approached the restaurant we noticed an ambulance and a firetruck. After entering the restaurant we discovered that a man had choked and he would not be OK. Think about it: that night a man and his wife, and possibly their children, simply went out to dinner like it was any other Saturday night. In a split second, the world and existence of those people changed entirely. Everything they knew and some of what they loved simply ended. That night, a man lost his life, the lives of his family members were changed forever and the rest of the patrons simply went on to another restaurant for dinner. Everyone faces tragedies, and at the end of the day, we are all forced to move on. For each of us, there has been that moment that we think we will never be able to move past. Many of us will move past that moment though, while others will forever stay paralyzed. It’s easy to forget that every experience we have changes us. It’s easy, though, to not notice the tragedies and changes other people are facing. It’s even harder to remember how those tragedies have and will change their futures. People die. We don’t cry every time these things happen because they are constants. It is impossible to escape these occurrences; these are some of the things that change us the most. I won’t go so far as to say they determine who we are, but they show our

character and our strength. Moving past the tragedy of someone else is one of the most natural and easy things to do. Moving on past our own tragedies and challenges is one of the hardest things we do, because we will always carry those moments with us. The wife of that man will always remember the night they went out to dinner. The families of the victims of 9/11 will always have those memories playing through their minds. For the rest of us, though, life will move on. We may hear about these events and feel bad for the people, but it will not occupy the back of our minds forever. We will continue to go out to dinner and read the newspaper about all of the local events. We may never realize that one day, if we haven’t already been, we will be that person who is facing the tragedy. Knowing that life moves on should be something to remember during those difficult times. Through life we search for happiness, and we often find it. This happiness is not perpetual, because nothing good can last forever. It’s like that old saying, “Nothing good ends unless it ends badly.” If something is truly good, how can it end and still be good? A person’s life can be one of the most beautiful things, so how can that beautiful life ending be a good thing? As cynical as it sounds, it’s something that must be said, because it is the only way to remember all of the good things. Life is not meant to last forever and neither are the beautiful moments. For every bad moment that changes us, there will be another beautiful moment to follow, making all the pain worth it. — Samantha Warchol is a sophomore in psychology. She can be reached at swarchol@ utk.edu.


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Student club designs for fun, careers Jessica Traughber Staff Writer Interior design is a field most people associate with HGTV, and that’s about it. However, this is not the case for members of the American Society of Interior Design. For them, it’s a way of life. Founded in 1975, ASID strives to advance the art of interior design and, in the process, cherish the power of design to change lives. This professional organization dates back even further to its predecessor groups, the American Institute of Interior Designers and the National Society of Interior Designers. Currently, ASID has more than 250 student chapters at universities, design schools, colleges and even online universities. The student chapter of ASID at UT works to prepare interior design students for what to expect from a career in the field. Erin Metelka, president of the UT chapter of ASID, said the organization helps students in networking. “Professionals come in and talk, and you get to know them and hear about their experiences� said Metelka.

In order to prepare students for employer expectations, UT’s chapter of ASID focuses on networking and extensive preparation in interior design. “Sometimes we’ll have product reps come in and talk about specific things going on in the real world,� senior ASID member Abbey Stepanek said. “We’ll also have mock interviews, portfolio discussions and just try to help students in varying aspects.� There are about 80 students in the interior design program at UT, and roughly 20 students regularly attend ASID meetings. “Our goal is to try and get the first years more involved because the first year is the big, overwhelming year,� said Metelka. Although it appears that UT’s chapter of ASID only focuses on interior design, that’s not necessarily the case. “Everything we do in our group isn’t geared just toward interior design. It’s all about how we can use our degree in the real world,� senior Teal Nabors, president of the International Interior Design Association at UT, said. The student affiliates of ASID and IIDA combine together to help educate students about the

world of interior design and all it entails. Contrary to popular belief, interior design is far more complicated than just painting a room and adding a few decorative pillows. “Lots of people think interior design is decorating, but it’s really more about function and how the space works,� Metelka said. UT’s division of ASID recognizes the power of interior design to affect the quality of life for people. Since the atmosphere of someone’s living space — lighting, temperature, acoustics can have a major impact on their psyche, ASID strives to make things more functional for the end user. Students may join the campus extension of ASID or IIDA by paying $15 in chapter dues, respectively. For five more dollars, students may participate in both organizations. In order to put either group on a resume, students must pay $45 for national chapter dues as well. ASID and IIDA meet the second Wednesday of each month in the Art and Architecture building, Room 325. Students are encouraged to stop by and learn about the ins and outs of interior design.

Around Rocky Top

• Photo courtesy of College of Architecture and Design

A mockup of an inside space from a UT interior design student is displayed on the College of Architecture & Design blog at www.arch-design-utk.squarespace.com

Vincent Walker • The Daily Beacon

Members of the American Institute of Graphic Arts discuss their future goals as a club in Art & Architecture on Jan. 24. The local Knoxville chapter held a state-wide Graphic Design competition where several UT members won. The exhibition can be viewed at Pellissippi State Community College until Feb. 14.

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 With 71-Across, breakfast choice â&#x20AC;Ś or a punny hint to this puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme 6 River in a 1957 hit movie 10 SALT topic 14 Singer/actress Luft 15 Boss Tweed lampooner 16 ___ avis 17 Midwest hub 18 Eye 19 Words after â&#x20AC;&#x153;comeâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;goâ&#x20AC;? 20 Mark down for a sale, say 22 Modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path 24 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lawrence of Arabiaâ&#x20AC;? figure 27 Spotted 28 Angel dust, briefly 30 Ore tester 32 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amo, amas, I love ___â&#x20AC;? 34 Cut crosswise 38 Slangy affirmative 39 Make scents of? 42 Cry of derision

43 Hot desert wind 45 Yankees manager before Girardi 47 F.D.A.-banned diet pill ingredient 50 Thrice, on an Rx 51 With 35-Down, fictional heroine who says â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am no bird; and no net ensnares meâ&#x20AC;? 53 Augustus ___ 55 Hit for Guy Lombardo in 1937 and Jimmy Dorsey in 1957 57 Jewish or Iranian, e.g. 61 Make 62 Auden or Aiken 65 [Bo-o-oring!] 66 Swarm member 67 Layer of the eye 68 Singers James and Jones 69 Hard thing to carry 70 Meal for a weevil 71 See 1-Across DOWN

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A R E T E C A S A C O B B

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D E M E N T U B I B R A E A R T O P A M E F S L R R O P

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O T O E

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O V I N E

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14

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38

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43

26

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59

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31

41

42 45

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52

36

27

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51

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Tennessee, Jones seek future, not present Hope for strong finish in 2013 recruiting class Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor It’s officially National Signing Day, the day every fan anticipates. Recruiting websites are scoured for information and every reporter awaits the tip that will give their news organization a lead on everyone else. On NSD eve, the Vols are ranked No. 24 in the nation, making the Vols a Top 30 team. Tennessee made a big jump from No. 32 only last week with the help of an additional signee. As first-year head coach Butch Jones seeks to bring Tennessee back to the glory days, everyone is aware that this is not a one-and-done process. Building the program will take time and energy, years and not days. That said, the key to any

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

program is the possibility of star recruits. The Vols are 11th in the SEC with five signees and 18 total commitments. Jones has commitments from five four-star recruits, namely offensive linebacker Jalen Reeves-Maybin, wide receiver MarQuez North, wide receiver Paul Harris, strong-side defensive end Jason Carr and wide receiver Ryan Jenkins. Safety Lemond Johnson, inside linebacker Corey Vereen and cornerback Riyahd Jones have all signed, but UT is waiting for a few important additions to the 2013-2014 roster. Some notable recruits who have yet to commit, but are still considering UT as a potential school are defensive tackle Montravius Adams, safety Vonn Bell, defensive back Mackensie Alexander, running back Alvin Kamara

and safety Antonio Connor. Bell, a safety coming out of Georgia, has expressed a high interest in Tennessee and is a five-star recruit. After recently losing quarterback Tyler Bray and wide receivers Cordarrelle Patterson and Justin Hunter to the NFL draft, the Vols will focus on wide receivers and preparing rising-senior Justin Worley to lead the team to a winning record this coming fall. Up-to-date information on signees will be reported via Twitter by The Daily Beacon sports staff, and more information can be found on utsports.com where they will be hosting a live show along with regular signee updates. The Beacon’s Twitter handle is @DailyBeacon. Tennessee will hold a press conference at 4 p.m.

Around Rocky Top

Butch Jones introduces himself as the new Tennessee head coach at a press conference on Dec. 7, 2012.

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Junior Meighan Simmons watches her teammates play against Mississippi State Jan. 31. Simmons was added to the State Farm “Wade Watch” list.


Wednesday, February 6, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols look to bounce back against UGA Troy Provost-Heron Staff Writer Coming off a tough 73-60 loss to the Arkansas Razorbacks, the Volunteers (11-9, 3-5 SEC) are looking to bounce back against the Georgia Bulldogs (10-11, 4-4 SEC) later tonight. The Vols are 3-1 against SEC opponents at home this season, but they’re running into a Georgia team that is being carried on a hot streak by sophomore guard Kentavious CaldwellPope. “Georgia is a team that’s won three in a row,” head coach Cuonzo Martin said. “They are playing really well together, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope is playing good basketball, some of the best basketball in the league, scoring the basketball, getting to the rim, shooting three point shot, getting out in the pass lane, getting steals, and he is playing well for those guys.” Tennessee holds a sizable rebounding margin over Georgia, and senior forward Kenny Hall says that is definitely going to be an advantage for the Vols. “I think we’re a lot more physical inside than Georgia is,” Hall said. “We’re a little bit bigger so I think that that will definitely be an advantage for us.” Jordan McRae started out hot against SEC opponents, averaging 20.8 points per game in the first six match-ups this season, but the previous two SEC games’ defenses have changed their defense on him, which has led

to him shooting 4-of-21 with a combined 13 points. “Well I think they are being physical with him,” Martin said. “They’re being aggressive up front, forcing his looks, forcing him to make plays off the dribble, and rotating people to help on him. We have to get him off the ball so now he’s able to just catch and shoot, come off screens and make plays as opposed to bringing the ball up because when he brings the ball up they can identify him, they know where he is at all times, as opposed to where he is running off screens, cutting through the lane, setting back screens for other guys, and he’s catching and shooting then he uses his dribble.” Both Georgia and Tennessee are prone to turning over the ball so taking care of the ball could be a factor. “That’s gonna be a factor,” Hall said. “We gotta do our job and make them turn the ball over as well as we gotta take care of the ball but what we got to do is just key in on our defensive assignments, rebound the ball, of course take care of the ball, score the ball, get the ball inside and shot the ball well and we’re gonna be OK.” Hall was arrested earlier this week for driving with a suspended license. It is unsure whether he will be playing on tonight. The game will tip-off at 8 p.m. in Thompson-Boling Arena. Last Meeting: January 18, 2012 in Athens, Ga. - Bulldogs 57-53

Probable Starters: Tennessee: G Armani Moore G Josh Richardson G Jordan McRae F Yemi Makanjuola F Jarnell Stokes

Georgia: G Brandon Morris G Vincent Williams G Kentavious Caldwell-Pope F Donte’ Williams F John Florveua

UT

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

Cuonzo Martin reacts while watching his team play against Kentucky on Jan. 15.

UGA

63.9

Scoring Offense

59.6

62.1

Scoring Defense

61.4

0.428

Field Goal %

0.422

0.289

Three Point %

0.344

+5.1

Rebound Margin

+.5

10.4

Assists Per Game

11.6

3.9

Blocks Per Game

4.0

3.8

Steals Per Game

6.1

-2.1

Turnover Margin

-2.6


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Lady Vols battle midseason injuries Thomas Duggins Staff Writer Coming off their first SEC loss against Missouri on Sunday, the Lady Vols (17-5, 8-1) are battling a major war of attrition as the season has worn on. Sophomore Isabelle Harrison had already gone down indefinitely with a meniscus injury in the Lady Vols’ Jan. 28 loss to Notre Dame. Injury was added to insult in their loss Sunday as senior Kamiko Williams went down with an ankle injury and freshman Jasmine Jones also suffered an injury late that prevented her from finishing the game. “It’s hard because they’re like your family,” said senior Taber Spani. “And so when you see that many people go down, we understand it’s part of the game. They’re doing everything they can to get back and we believe in them and whoever has that next role is just stepping up. Obviously we didn’t get that done at Missouri, but what-

ever it looks like for LSU and going forward that’s going to have to happen.” The Lady Vols have been battling injuries throughout the season. Freshman Andraya Carter went down in December with a seasonending shoulder injury that required surgery. Sophomore Cierra Burdick went down with a hand injury in early January and had been out of action until the Lady Vols’ Jan. 31 win against Mississippi State. Ideally, the Lady Vols would like to not have to play players coming off of injuries, but with the current roster being affected by injuries the way it is, players who are still getting back in the groove of playing like Burdick have to take on a heavier role. “I definitely want to do the best thing for the longevity of my career, my health, but my team needs me and I feel like with us dropping like flies I can take a little pain to get back out there with my teammates,” said Burdick. Despite the injuries though, the Lady Vols are not letting

that be an excuse for poor play. “I think we have the mindset, no excuses,” said Burdick. “In the beginning of the year, everybody kept saying we were a young team and we were, but that’s not an excuse and right now we have to deal with the injuries, I mean that’s part of basketball. We’re going to get hurt unfortunately, and we just have to bounce back and do all the treatment, the maintenance work that we can to make sure we’re preserving our bodies and just compete to the best of our abilities.” Head coach Holly Warlick agrees that although the Lady Vols’ injury situation is tough, the expectations for this team have not changed and that the loss Sunday was a reflection of their effort rather than how healthy the roster is. “I think when you’ve had the loss that we did and you play the way we did without any effort, you tend to look elsewhere instead of inward and we just wanted to make sure that we’re on the same page,” she said.

Track and field breaks record Jack Felix Contributor Red shirt freshman Austin Whitelaw broke a 25-year school record this weekend at the Armory Collegiate Invitational in New York City. Whitelaw covered the 5,000-meter (3.1 miles) race in 14:18.11 seconds, placing third at the invitational. The time broke former 1988 UT track star Todd Williams’ time of 14:24.29 seconds. Williams went on to take the American record in the 10,000 and 15,000 meters and compete in the Olympics for the United States. Whitelaw and Williams are both from Michigan and graduated from the same high school. Whitelaw said taking the record meant more, knowing Williams’ background. “It feels good taking the record knowing that he was such a storied athlete,” Whitelaw said. His performance puts Whitelaw 13th in the nation and first in the SEC. He is seventh all-time in UT school history. Whitelaw said he thinks the accomplishment will work as a performance boost. “I think it will immensely boost my fitness and confidence level come outdoor

Nick Kaiser, also a Michigan native, said the race will put Whitelaw in a position to succeed. “(It) puts him in a great place going into SEC’s in a couple of weeks to run fast,” Kaiser said. The SEC Championships begin Feb. 22 in Fayetteville, Ark. The past year was a less than smooth road for Whitelaw leading up to his record performance. During the fall of 2012, Whitelaw was forced to drop out of the SEC championship race for cross-country and was not able to compete in the NCAA D1 South Regional Meet for a chance to compete at the NCAA D1 National Championship. The freshman was unable to compete due to severe shin splints. Whitelaw missed massive amounts of training throughout the winter and is just beginning to get back into full training cycles. Because of this, Whitelaw will also be a red shirt freshman for the outdoor season and is not far from the outdoor freshman record in the 5,000 meters with a time of of 13:59 minutes. As a team the Vols finished fourth with over 100 teams competing and will compete next at the Tyson invitational in Fayetteville, Ark., starting on Friday.

Softball set to ‘attack’ upcoming season Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor After a crushing finish to 2012, the Lady Vols softball team is ready for 2013 to begin. “I can’t tell you how ready I am to start playing,” junior Tory Lewis said. “We’ve been working on situations and scrimmaging one another for awhile and where that’s been good preparation. We are ready to play someone else.” Tennessee, preseason No. 5, kicks off the year in Utah as part of the Red Desert Classic. Southern Utah, Idaho State, Utah State, South Dakota, BYU and Oklahoma State are the other participants. “It is good to get back to playing other teams,” junior Ellen Renfroe said. “We get to start against some good teams and (it) will be good to measure how well we have been preparing this offseason.” In 2012 Tennessee made it to the Women’s College World Series but were bounced in two games. They are ready to avenge that finish. “The end to last season was pretty disappointing,” Lewis said. “It was great to have that experience, but getting that far and then ending the season in that way was not fun. I think it has motivated us during this offseason.” This offseason the team has focused on being prepared and attacking each game. “We want to be ready and attack every situation head on,” Lewis said. “Our biggest mantra right now is to attack. It’s what we learned from our preseason program and go 100 percent all the time. When you take just one second off someone is right on top of you, ready to go, ready to take it from you.” The Lady Vols have four preseason All-SEC

players — Lauren Gibson, Raven Chavanne, Madison Shipman and Kat Dotson — and an experienced pitching staff and a freshman to start molding for the future. “We’re going to have a different path pitching-wise this season,” co-head coach Ralph Weekly said. “We have four really good pitchers and I think we are going to use all four of them this season.” Freshman Erin Gabriel was an ESPN High School All-American three times in high school. “The SEC is all about pitching and offense,” Weekly said. “If you can do that, you’ll be pretty good. We may throw three or four pitchers in one game. We’ll see what happens. We have a very talented pitching staff. We are very fortunate.” The program currently has 799 wins, but the Renfroe sisters are not fighting too much for the right to pitch in win 800. “I would love to be in the circle, but Ivy (Renfroe) is senior so the coaches are going to let her step in the circle for game one and hopefully win that game,” Ellen Renfroe said. After two more tournaments to start the year, the first series of the season is against preseason No. 1 Alabama. “Early in the season you want to see where you are at and build from that,” Lewis said. “It will be interesting to see how fired up and ready we come out for an early season test. “Sometimes you think ‘hey give us a break with these hard teams,’ but the people who take breaks are the ones who don’t get it done at the end,” Lewis said. “You always want to be pushing harder than the competition.” • Photo courtesy of Armory Track The Lady Vols’ first game of the year is Feb. season,” Whitelaw said. 7 against Southern Utah. Red shirt freshman, Austin Whitelaw, breaks the 25-year-old record in New York Sophomore middle distance runner Feb. 1. during the Armory Collegiate Invitational

The Daily Beacon  

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University of Tennessee.

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