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Issue 19, Volume 122

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Vol Court helps student entrepreneurs strive David Cobb

Assistant News Editor The UT College of Business Administration is nationally respected for training students for success in the commercial world. It ranks 27th nationally among top-tier public universities, according to U.S News. It’s not the only outlet on campus through which students can hone their business skills, though. Starting today, students – even those not pursuing a business degree – have the opportunity to broaden their entrepreneurial skills in a hands-on environment designed to provide an experience differing from what’s found in the classroom. The Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation is hosting the first of six weekly workshops at 5:15 p.m. today in room 102 of the Haslam Business Building. “This gives you a slightly different perspective,” Tom Graves, operations director for the Anderson Center, said.

“We bring in people from outside the college – people that are practicing in the field. So it’s more hands-on and less theoretical a lot of times than what students encounter in classes.” Tuesday’s hour-long session will touch on how to develop a business model. Drinks and snacks will be provided, but the incentive for attending extends far beyond chips and soda. During the last week of Vol Court, interested students will be able to pitch their business ideas, with the winner pocketing a $1,000 prize and some jumpstarting assistance for their business. Second place receives $500, but Graves said the program is meant to provide more than just the potential of cash prize. “The Anderson Center really has two missions,” Graves said. “One is talent development of people that are interested in entrepreneurship, and the second is to really grow and strengthen and grow the entrepreneurial eco-system

here in the region.” Vol Court brings in professionals to impart knowledge to students and provide feedback on their business ideas. Philosophically, the program will focus on a different aspect of entrepreneurship each week. “Attending Vol Court, even if you don’t want to be an entrepreneur, gives you the foundation to pick up some really important skills,” Graves said. “It’s a really broad education for a very little time. “One hour a week for six weeks that really will broaden your perspectives,” he continued. Jake Rheude, junior in marketing, participated in the program in fall 2011 and won the $1,000 prize with his business model that has since become Somerset Foods, a company specializing in frozen dipping sauces for retail stores. The idea for the company came from his hometown of Cincinnati, where a similar product was sold in grocery stores. But upon arrival in

Knoxville, Rheude noticed that a similar product was not available in retail stores. He is currently working with Pilot with the hopes of getting his product in stores in the coming months, and he counts his experience in Vol Court as valuable in getting his idea off the ground. “We got that first $1,000 and that helped us establish an actual business,” Rheude said. “That was really our first experience presenting this business plan that we had put together … it gives you the ability to get your idea out there and meet the people that can help you.”’ Rheude will be speaking at Vol Court’s second seminar on Feb. 12 about marketing to customers. “You’re put in contact with entrepreneurs, business owners and higher up lecturers,” he said. “It’s the people who really know what they’re talking about. Vincent Walker • The Daily Beacon “They’ll talk directly to you about starting your own busi- Ken Woody speaks during a Vol Court session last semester. ness.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Ayres Hall was recently renovated to be more energy efficient. This, combined with several other additions, has earned UT a tenth place spot in the Green Power Partnerships program sponsored by the EPA.

UT named in top tier of green schools Emily DeLanzo

Managing Editor

Blair Kuykendall

Editor-in-Chief UT’s Knoxville campus holds a special place in hearts of Tennesseans as “Big Orange” country, but in the eyes of the Environmental Protection Agency, UT’s gone green. UT took tenth place in the Green Power Partnerships program sponsored by the EPA. This award was based off of three components of environmental preparedness: renewable energy certifications, on-site generation and utility green power products. “As a student, this is something that makes me genuinely proud to be a Volunteer,” Eric Dixon, senior in philosophy, said in a statement. “There’s a clear lesson to be learned from this: sustainability initiatives like this garner positive national attention and are what will actually put UT in the Top 25.”

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This award was primarily the result of recent changes made by the administration based on the encouragement of students and faculty supportive of green initiatives. Specifically, a commission that included students and faculty asked UT to purchase more green energy from the Tennessee Valley Authority. “I served on the administrative committee that made this decision last spring,” Dixon said. “Myself and the other student representatives lobbied the committee to spend the same portion of the green fee fund toward green power when we learned that the TVA’s rates for green power were decreasing. Most if not all of the committee members, including faculty and staff representatives, were in favor of the green power purchase.” Their efforts encouraged UT’s policy makers to switch to more environmentally friendly habits. Nick Alderson, a senior in sustainability and environmental studies, was proud of the university for ground gained in the push

for sustainability. “It’s definitely a great recognition for our school,” Alderson said. “However, the work of reducing our environmental footprint is never finished. There is always something that can be done to lessen the impact we have on our environment.” Several older buildings such as Ayres Hall were renovated recently to lighten energy use. New university construction projects like Min Kao and the Student Health Center are required to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Standards. LEED Certification requires buildings to meet a variety of standards like natural lighting, heating and cooling efficiency, and proper insulation. UT is currently updating older buildings to meet similar standards. These renovations and new buildings are paid for by a small fee included in tuition. Within undergraduate tuition scheme, in-state

Check out Kitty Pryde’s album review page 5

students pay 10 dollars while out-of-state students pay 35 dollars for environmentally geared projects. This idea was initiated by a 2005 student referendum. “The Student Environmental Initiatives Fee Committee appropriated the money to pay for the Green Power Purchase,” Alderson said. Aside from renovations, the element that pushed UT into the EPA’s list was the dramatic increase in alternative energy. The TVA created a pilot program to support UT’s green efforts. The program allowed UT to move from taking only four percent of its energy from alternative sources to 32 percent. These alternative energy sources run the gamut from wind to solar power. Alderson sees even greater potential for growth in UT’s sustainable practices. “The next step for green power at UT will be onsite generation,” Alderson said. “Work on a large solar array will hopefully begin within the next year.”

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Vincent Walker • The Daily Beacon

Emily Gillies and Emma Meskovic display “Antiquities” in Gallery 1010 during First Friday.

Vincent Walker • The Daily Beacon

Chad Curtis’ “Panorama of Desire” on display during First Friday at the Downtown Gallery. The gallery will be open through the end of the month.

THIS DAY IN 1994 — Beckwith convicted of killing Medgar Evers On this day in 1994, white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith is convicted in the murder of African-American civil rights leader Medgar Evers, over 30 years after the crime occurred. Evers was gunned down in the driveway of his Jackson, Mississippi, home on June 12, 1963, while his wife, Myrlie, and the couple’s three small children were inside. Medgar Wiley Evers was born July 2, 1925, near Decatur, Mississippi, and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. After fighting for his country, he returned home to experience discrimination in the racially divided South, with its separate public facilities and services for blacks and whites. Evers graduated from Alcorn College in 1952 and began organizing local chapters of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). In 1954, after being rejected for admission to then-segregated University

HISTORY

of Mississippi Law School, he became part of an NAACP campaign to desegregate the school. Later that year, Evers was named the NAACP’s first field secretary in Mississippi. He moved with his family to Jackson and worked to dismantle segregation, leading peaceful rallies, economic boycotts and voter registration drives around the state. In 1962, he helped James Meredith become the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi, a watershed event in the civil rights movement. As a result of his work, Evers received numerous threats and several attempts were made on his life before he was murdered in 1963 at the age of 37. Beckwith, a fertilizer salesman and Ku Klux Klan member widely believed to be the killer, was prosecuted for murder in 1964. However, two all-white (and all-male) juries deadlocked and refused to convict him. A second trial held in the same year resulted in a hung jury. The matter was dropped when it appeared that

a conviction would be impossible. Myrlie Evers, who later became the first woman to chair the NAACP, refused to give up, pressing authorities to re-open the case. In 1989, documents came to light showing that jurors in the case were illegally screened. Prosecutor B obby DeLaughter worked with Myrlie Evers to force another prosecution of Beckwith. After four years of legal maneuvering, they were finally successful. At the third trial they produced a riflescope from the murder weapon with Beckwith’s fingerprints, as well as new witnesses who testified that Beckwith had bragged about committing the crime. Justice was finally achieved when Beckwith was convicted and given a life sentence by a racially diverse jury in 1994. He died in prison in 2001 at the age of 80. 1934 — Hank Aaron is born On this day in 1934, Henry Louis Aaron Jr., the baseball slugger who broke Babe Ruth’s legendary record of 714 homers, is born in Mobile, Alabama. Aaron began his professional baseball career in 1952 in the Negro League and joined the Milwaukee Braves of the major league in 1954, eight years after Jackie Robinson had integrated baseball. Aaron was the last Negro League player to compete in the majors. He quickly established himself as an important player for the Braves and won the National League batting title in 1956. The following season, he took home the league’s MVP award and helped the Braves beat Mickey Mantle and the heavily favored New York Yankees in the World Series. In 1959, Aaron won his second league batting title. — This Day in History is courtesy of History.com.


Tuesday, February 5, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb dcobb3@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Oak Ridge research replication protein Deborah Ince

Staff Writer Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., in conjunction with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif., is currently conducting research on RPA, a replication protein that prevents a single strand of DNA (ssDNA) from getting damaged when being unwound from the DNA double helix. The double helix is essential to DNA as it stores all of the information coding for our genes. Unwinding the double helix is performed so as to read the coding of each strand one base at a time. Dr. Walter Chazin of Vanderbilt University first suggested conducting research on the protein, and the majority of the data going into the research has been performed in Chazin’s own lab at Vanderbilt. Chazin is a Chancellor’s Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry and directs the Center for Structural Biology and the Molecular Biophysics graduate student training program at the university. His research is based on “understanding the structure and movements of proteins and the manner in which they interact with other proteins, DNA and drugs and is funded by multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health.” “RPA was first discovered many years ago and has beed studied for a long time,”

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

Junior Smokey helps clean the court during a media timeout at the Lady Vols game against Miss. St. on Thursday.

Chazin said. “But because it is a very complicated protein, knowledge of exactly how it works has been missing all this time. Our study has provided some critical new insights to how RPA works.” Researchers are using a High Flux Isotope Reactor, which uses powerful neutron beams to perform small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments using a CG-3 Bio SANS instrument. These experiments give scientists more information on RPA’s structure. Chazin’s graduate student Chris Brosey and beamline scientist Dr. William Heller collected and analyzed much of the data gathered from the SANS experiments, and Chazin said both were instrumental to the research’s current success. First discovered 30 to 40 years ago, RPA research continues to be conducted, as there is still much to learn about its function and structure. “This is an ongoing project,” Chazin said. “In order to get the whole picture, many different techniques are being used to study RPA, with important roles for x-ray crystallography, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, small angle x-ray scattering and computer modeling. I brought the problem to RPA.” Chazin said research done on RPA has given new insight into how the protein works, including looking into ways the protein could be used for cancer chemotherapy, an

exploratory process currently being conducted at Vanderbilt along with other researchers. Elizabeth Seydell, junior in zoology at Kent State University, relates the importance of RPA to what she is learning in her major. “RPAs are important to any organism’s survival,” Seydell said. “Without them, cells wouldn’t be able to replicate. It keeps genetic material moving through generations.” Julie Kolson, senior transfer student in biomedical engineering at UT, says that the research being conducted is significant for a lot of reasons. “I know that this research could help cure diseases, because if there was a certain gene of mutation in the DNA you could synthesize new proteins to code for the production of healthy DNA without any defect,” Kolson said. “I didn’t know of any specific research being conducted, but I know that the findings from any research done on RPA are capable of big things.” Chazin said the research being conducted on RPA will further scientists’ understanding of the way the protein functions and hopes that the data collected can be used for other other medical processes in the future. “RPA is a member of a class of proteins that cannot be fully understood by standard methods,” Chazin said. “The experiments performed at ORNL and at LBNL represent a new approach to studying how RPA molecules perform.”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

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Feminism still relevant in 21st century Last week we defined feminism as equal acknowledgement of all perspectives and equal treatment of all experiences. Feminism calls for equality in society. Stated this way, feminism ideas doesn’t seem very controversial. And, as some people are tempted to say, it doesn’t even seem very relevant to the 21st century. Feminism was certainly necessary a hundred years ago when women could not vote, lacked many legal powers and were strongly discouraged from working outside the home. Today, women are a significant voting block, have gained power in the court system and frequently have high-paying jobs — many CEOs today are women. What more equality are we looking for? It would be wonderful to agree with these protesters that yes, feminism has done its job and the 21st century is fully post-patriarchal. But women still face significant obstacles that men do not. Overcoming those obstacles requires a feminist perspective. Let’s discuss some examples of why feminism is still relevant. The workplace is one of the most obvious places to see these issues. Although women work in many of the same professions as men, they are paid far less for doing the same job. A recent study found that even when a woman and a man have the same level of education, the same level of previous work experience, the same family situation, and the same type of profession, the woman will be paid 82 cents to the man’s dollar. Even when women are CEOs, they face different types of discrimination and expectations than men. When Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo, announced she was pregnant, people immediately began to speculate that it made her unqualified for her job. When male CEOs become fathers, the same questions aren’t raised. It is assumed women will have trouble balancing work and family since it is

nearly impossible to fulfill the stereotypical role of the completely selfless mother when also having a career of one’s own. Our society still views the “good” mother as one who can pick her children up from school each day and have dinner on the table by six. It is perfectly acceptable for a father to come home late after work, but if a mother does so, she is usually criticized. This double standard makes it difficult for women to advance in the world. Even women who do not describe themselves as feminists face these obstacles. Sarah Palin was heavily criticized during her campaign for the vice presidency for running for public office and not focusing her full attention on her children, especially considering she has a daughter who had an unplanned pregnancy and a son with a mental disability. Again, these are concerns never raised about male politicians. Rick Santorum, for example, had a child with a mental disability, but this was not cited as evidence that he should stay out of politics or that he was a bad father. This creates an impossible standard for women pursuing political office as well. Sarah Palin may not personally identify as a feminist — in fact, many feminists have criticized her stances on important issues — but the fact that she was attacked on these grounds is itself a feminist concern. Feminism is important in the 21st century because even people who don’t describe themselves as feminist will encounter the challenges that feminism is trying to solve. Feminism brings these types of discrimination to light and provides solutions. We can do more good working together to solve these problems than we can struggling alone. — Lisa Dicker is a junior in political science. She can reached at ldicker@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

SOUTHERN GLAMOUR •Jacob Hobson

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Super Bowl delivers poignant message Lost in Communication by

Jan Urbano For many of us here who attend UT, we live in a type of bubble. Although this may not apply as much to those who commute here, those who live in or close to campus understand this phenomenon. Living here at UT creates a type of microcosm, as most of us have our basic needs – food, water, exercise, even friends – very close by. As a result, we may find ourselves out of touch with the rest of the country and the world in relation to news and events. Even the Super Bowl that occurred Sunday was not immune to this. However, that doesn’t mean that everyone ignored the Super Bowl. On the contrary, I saw quite a few people on computers throughout the library on illegal streams of the game, cheering and supporting their team, while bashing the opposing team. I myself watched the game as well, instead of studying for my then-upcoming BCMB exam. Seeing the game, it fascinated me to see these players compete to the very best, smashing each other’s faces and bones to insane extents. Initially, the San Francisco 49ers had a very disappointing start, and up until the third quarter, it seemed like the whole game would lead to an overwhelming victory by the Baltimore Ravens. However, later events didn’t follow that predicted path, and instead, the 49ers had a comeback. Although they may have lost, there are still a few things one can take to heart from the game. Our nation is plagued with an ever-growing list of problems and tragedies, with the recent widespread shootings being an unfortunate addition to said list. This doesn’t mean that we should be ignoring these and think that they are impossible to find solutions to. We can say that being here at UT makes it harder to keep up to date with events, but all that does is make us look like ignorant, indifferent

imbeciles that would rather save face instead of trying to do what is right. That, I think, is a problem with our society – we care too much about reputation instead of trying to work hard or become morally open people. When things get difficult, we always want to give up immediately. There’s no doubt that the head coach of the 49ers, Jim Harbaugh, thought of completely giving up at one point during the game, as he saw his team get steamrolled, play-by-play. He might’ve thought to himself, “At this point, I should stop caring; it’ll be easier that way.” He didn’t give up, however, and he even managed to get his team back into the game. He kept fighting to strive to lead his team to be the best, and even though they didn’t win, there’s no doubt that people must recognize his ability to effectively coach and inspire his team to go even further. The Super Bowl, in a sense, reflects part of our society today. Just as we have problems, so did the Super Bowl, evident in the surprising power surge that knocked out half the lights in the Superdome. One can’t help but relate it to our own power outage that recently occurred in North and South Carrick, which also inconvenienced many students for days. The amazing comeback performed by the 49ers was surprising by itself, but the fact that they managed to break the Super Bowl record for surpassing the largest point deficit and have the longest kickoff return for a touchdown – 108 yards -- were two other merits they had. If there was anything to take away from the game, other than bloated stomachs, lots of dirty dishes, and a sore throat from screaming and raging so much, it is that one should continue to work hard for the rest of one’s life, even if it would be easier to give up. You will never know how much you can achieve if you don’t put forth the effort and willpower for it. As Beyoncé herself said before the halftime show: “Excellence must be pursued, it must be wooed, with all of one’s might and every bit of effort that we have.” — Jan Urbano is senior in microbiology. He can be reached at jurbano@utk.edu.

Super Bowl unique to American culture (Un)Common Sense by

Ron Walters EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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I’ve determined that the Super Bowl is one of the most fascinating displays of American society that we have ever created. The combination of continual media coverage, consumerism, the elevation of athletes to privileged status and the always popular “defying the odds” story that Americans love, all define important national characteristics. I’m convinced that if extraterrestrial life were to ever visit and want to know about the U.S., all we need to do is show a highlight reel of ESPN’s coverage of the Super Bowl from the week before to perfectly understand the cultural phenomenon of spectacle in 21st century America. This is certainly not a negative thing. I am always eager to view spectacles, and I rarely need an excuse to get a group of people together to eat, drink and socialize. There are few things Americans love more than a compelling story, and in true media fashion we always cover it until everyone becomes utterly sick of what was once something intriguing. I love the Super Bowl, but I am ecstatic that I will never have to hear the phrase “Harbaugh Bowl” again, and that I will never watch another “Crying/Emotional Ray Lewis” video tribute. We love excess and drama, and the Super Bowl perfectly captures that wonderful combination of grandeur, lavish spectacle and gross excess. Perhaps the strangest and most difficult aspect of the Super Bowl to understand is the fascination with the commercials. With football, it is all or nothing, go big or go home, a perfect representation of the boom or bust fascination we possess. Because of this once-ayear spectacle, it makes sense that advertisers

would put special effort into making commercials, knowing that they possess a captive audience for around four hours. This isn’t even a new phenomenon; one of the biggest Super Bowl ads of all time was the wonderfully bizarre 1984 Apple commercial, which still sparks conversation to this day. When you really think about it though, isn’t it strange that we find such fascination in thirty second clips of companies trying to sell us products? That for the other 364 days of the year we have declared war on T.V. commercials and have created numerous devices for the sole purpose of skipping commercials? One can of course analyze the undercurrents of the Super Bowl ad craze -- that it represents our rampant consumerism and supremely materialistic culture -- but that isn’t particularly fun and is too cynical for weekend musings. Athletes, at least for the past century, have occupied a special place in the pantheon of American celebrities. We hear of “heroic” achievements by athletes, of determination and hard work, and we grant them special credibility that few others enjoy. There is certainly a sense of fantasy in this elevation of athletes. How many of us grew up wanting to be professional athletes, to be paid millions of dollars to play a game we love? Perhaps there is a sense of resentment, too, a sense that athletes should not be paid these absurd amounts of money to play, what is in effect, a game. Yet we cannot get enough, and a ridiculously large industry has been established and entrenched in the form of sports. I’m probably thinking too much about the Super Bowl. Perhaps I should just enjoy the game for what it is: a spectacle that has become a shared experience for millions of Americans. I hope everyone enjoyed the game, and the next one is only 363 days away! — Ron Walters is a senior in English literature, French and global studies. He can be reached at rwalter5@utk.edu.


Tuesday, February 5, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

A$AP Rocky’s new album welcomed by fans Jessica Traughber Contributor

Fans of ASAP Rocky can now breathe a sigh of relief. His latest album, “Long. Live. ASAP,� recently dropped on Jan. 15. Buzz about the Harlem rapper piqued after he released his 2011 mixtape, “Live. Love. ASAP.� Rocky’s impressive mixtape combined lyrical genius and catchy, pop-savvy beats. On his new album, the 24-yearold MC, born Rakim Mayers, ups the ante with noticeable charisma and the ability to hit each line with incredible force. The title track begins with a bang that sets the tone for the rest of the album. The menacing beat conveys Rocky’s personality as listeners are presented with a rapper full of swag, saying, “I said I’d probably die in prison, expensive taste in women/Ain’t had no pot to piss in, now my kitchen full of dishes.� ASAP Rocky bounces between his initial struggles as an up and coming rapper, the luxurious life he lives now and where he hopes to be in the future. The energy of ASAP Rocky’s album is palpable from the beginning, and the talented rapper keeps the momentum going on tracks such as “Goldie� and “PMW.� In “Goldie,� Rocky raps, “Cristal go by the cases/Wait hold up that was racist/I would prefer the Aces/Ain’t no difference when you taste it.� This line alone gives a small sample of Rocky’s ability to couple humor with clever lyrics. Similarly, the track “Fashion Killa� is an undeniably catchy number about Rocky’s profound interest in the opposite sex. Other tracks, such as “Phoenix,� show the insightful and chill side of Rocky. The young rapper paints a better picture of his life than the typical stoner rap listeners have heard in the past. Though ASAP Rocky was criticized for sounding lazy on some of the harder beats on his mixtape, “Long. Live.

ASAP� doesn’t have this issue. Every song shows Rocky laying down each beat with a determined force. Prominent track “1 Train� includes six minutes of absolute rapping domination. Featured artists, including Kendrick Lamar, Joey Bada$$, YelaWolf, Danny Brown, Action Bronson and Big K.R.I.T., join ASAP Rocky on this epic track. Not to be outshined, Rocky kills the beat with raw, intense passion. Whether it’s a slower, more perceptive track like “Hell,� or a darker song like “Jodye� and “Ghetto Symphony� featuring Gunplay and ASAP Ferg, Rocky’s past laziness turned into motivation and direction, giving music lovers a more sophisticated flow that has Rocky owning each beat. The end of “Long. Live. ASAP� features the incredible, self-produced track “Suddenly.� This song serves more like a stream of consciousness memoir with flashes included from his younger years in Harlem. The unsettling, sporadically tuned beat shows Rocky describing his bleak surroundings, saying, “Roaches on the wall/Roaches on the dresser.� The MC also raps about his parents struggling to scrape by and consistent shootings next to family events. As the song ends, Rocky simply can’t believe his life is suddenly so comfortable, considering his upbringing. A piece of him is thankful, of course, but he seems more wonderstruck than anything. On the whole, Rocky appears to be near to perfecting the bests parts of his game. The amount of attention the album has already received matches Rocky’s enthusiasm. On this album, fans will get a better Rocky with a stronger voice and catchy beats to match. “Long. Live. ASAP� debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart. Since its release, the album has sold 177,000 copies. If that doesn’t convey the success of this album, nothing else will.

• Photo courtesy of Kitty Pryde

Kitty shocks with new album Lacy Hayes

Staff Writer Kitty Pryde, now known as Kitty, brings out the claws with her new album, “DAISY Rage.� The title is fitting for the female rapper, who looks as delicate as a flower with razor sharp lyrics. The artist from Daytona Beach, Fla., is sure to shock and awe in her second EP, which was released on Jan. 3, with a tone so innocent, but words so vicious. Unique beats accompany the lyrics, giving a tranquil, almost hallucinogenic feel to the music. It’s a mature sound that is not meant for younger listeners. Kitty has a style reminiscent of Weird Al Yankovic, making parodies of other artist’s works, and she isn’t too keen to be at the center of her own ridicule. She transforms negative comments written about her into witty lyrics -- an admirable trait. She may rap about being unkempt, but her verses are well put together. A perfect example of her style is on the track “R.R.E.A.M.,� which uses WuTang Clan’s “C.R.E.A.M� as a template. She stays true to the iconic rhythm of the chorus in “C.R.E.A.M.� in her own rendition of the hit record from the ‘90s.

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Instead of cash, it’s an anxiety rash that rules Kitty’s world, and she is not afraid to get personal with her listeners as she raps about it (“Rash rule everything around me/ (RREAM)/ Getting Drowsy/ Bena- bena- dryl, y’all�). In addition to making fun of herself, Kitty is quite the name dropper. In “$krillionaire,� a title inspired by Travie McCoy’s “Billionaire,� Kitty pokes fun at artists such as Skrillex and the All American Rejects. The message of this track is humorous with a healthy serving of intrigue. Kitty raps about incontinence as if it is the reason for not measuring up to other artists. She sounds genuine when questioning why she’s “the dirty little secret,� asking “is it because of all the undies that I’ve peed in.� It’s not clear whether Kitty is seri-

ous about problems wetting the bed, but she alludes to the issue as being an additional reason (the other being her lyrics) for being judged. Kitty is no stranger to judgments, whether they are her own or the views of someone else. She begins the third track, “Ay Shawty 3.0,� with remarks about greasy skin and dingy teeth. The best lines represent her talented mind, not her flawed appearance, saying, “Always free/ I can leave with you/ Birds and bees are a mystery/ Teach me,� and “Most boys would liquor me up/ Poison trickery.� Her words reveal her own bit of sorcery in a matter of few seconds, as she expresses a sense of sexual naivety as well as an air of knowing better than to become a man’s drunken plan. Contrary to “Ay Shawty 3.0�, on the track “UNfollowed,�

Kitty is again the cat, no longer being the mouse. The song tells the story of an elusive man, the object of Kitty’s desire. As good friends usually do, hers try to convince her that she doesn’t need him, but she fantasizes about a relationship with the guy already in the arms of a woman. The title seems a bit ironic, because the track reveals a stalker’s tactic: she’s on the chase, with no plans to stop her follow. She knows he is out of her reach, but that does not stop her from playing pretend. This is not mainstream music, but with Kitty’s childlike voice of innocence spitting rhymes chopped full of mature, racy content, it is worth a listen. Experience something different; embrace the new year with a new sound. Get a cat’s curiosity and check out the EP on daisyrage.com.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD • Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Dacha or villa 6 Rock used to make sparks 11 Equine : horse :: vulpine : ___ 14 Unsophisticated sorts 15 Storm tracker 16 Dined 17 End-of-semester doings 18 With 61-Across, goal of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Beecher Stowe 20 Big book 21 Disclosure to a loan applicant: Abbr. 22 U.S. capital and environs 23 With 51-Across, presidential order signed on January 1, 1863 26 Hit it off with 27 Old Russian leaders 31 Art movement for Picasso 34 Scrooge player Alastair

36 Stockyard call 37 & 39 Signer of the 23-/51-Across 42 Jetsam locale 43 Rapper with the #1 album “Hip Hop Is Dead� 45 Almost 46 ___-Detoo of “Star Wars� 49 Signs of spring 51 See 23-Across 56 Acquired with little or no effort 59 TV’s Sue ___ Langdon 60 Romance 61 See 18-Across 63 “Holy Toledo!� 64 “It’s f-f-freezing!� 65 Salsa singer Cruz 66 Lectern 67 Jazz style 68 Rickover known as the Father of the Nuclear Navy 69 Imbeciles DOWN 1 Mountain ridge

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE H A I R A L O E G I N G I G E T S A S H G P A A N T S T E C H E E R O A S E A R E R S P S I Y E T

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2 Big-bosomed 3 Time’s Person of the Year for 2008 and 2012 4 Loss of faculties 5 Beginning of summer? 6 Fruity iced beverage 7 Runners of experiments 8 Nuptial vow 9 Old-time actress Nita 10 Knit fabric in lingerie and swimwear 11 Like a fly ball off the foul pole 12 Tribe encountered by Lewis and Clark 13 Lucy Lawless title role

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Bronzes Quarterback Troy Legal tender Labor Omnia vincit ___ Move on casters LG Electronics competitor House in Havana Above, in Berlin Misbehaver Role for diminutive Verne Troyer in “Austin Powers� films Artist Chagall “99 Luftballons� singer, 1984 Made a random selection, in a way Sunny rooms German auto make

48 Jerry of stage and screen 50 Canopy tree 52 Comment from a kvetcher 53 Early Great Plains residents 54 Sheeplike 55 Imperatives 56 All-time career batting average leader 57 Early Michael Jackson hairstyle 58 Car sticker fig. 62 Tree in many street names 63 When doubled, a Gabo


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols prepare for streaking Bulldogs Marshall Hunter Contributor

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

Jarnell Stokes looks for a teammate against Vanderbilt on Jan. 29.

The Tennessee Volunteers (11-9, 3-5 SEC) are looking for a win Wednesday night as they play host to the Georgia Bulldogs (10-11, 4-4). The Vols are coming off of a loss at Arkansas Saturday, falling to the Razorbacks, 73-60. Jarnell Stokes and Kenny Hall were the Vols’ two leading scorers, netting in 18 and 14, respectively. In the loss at Arkansas, Tennessee had a problem with turnovers. “This is what I talked to the guys about, you spend a lot of time working on breaking the press and you do a good job of breaking it but you get the bulk of your turnovers when you are trying to execute your offense,” head coach Cuonzo Martin said. “Turnovers aren’t characteristics that you should have going into games like that.” “I think we definitely played a good team at forcing turnovers,” Stokes said.

“In that type of environment I think they play very well at home. I think I made a lot of careless turnovers that I wouldn’t usually make.” The Vols will have a tough test at hand Wednesday as they are facing a redhot Georgia team – the Bulldogs currently boast three-straight wins against SEC foes. “They changed some lineups and now I think they have the right lineup more than anything,” Martin said. “They have not changed what they do, their system and style is still the same and their guys are playing with a level of confidence.” Stokes and Hall look to keep up the good shooting against Georgia. In Saturday’s loss, they each shot 6-of-7 from the field. Hall also shot two for three from the free throw line and had five total rebounds. “The one thing I want him to do going

February, Super Bowl bring unexpected surprises Not to be incredibly cynical, but to be incredibly cynical, Feb. 14 is a major letdown. On average, about one percent of the population actually enjoys the holiday and most of those people are children who don’t fully grasp the concept of a day of love. They just see candy and grin. The other 99 percent can’t figure out why they’re still single. Sports Editor But then there’s the Super Bowl. It’s the I Ching of February holds little to rec- February. ommend itself. Hot wings are sold everyIt’s cold like January and where, oversized jerseys December, but it’s not cool are a must (in fact, Urban enough to include Christmas Dictionary even has a definiand not fresh enough to claim tion for “Super Bowl” clothes) the “first month of a new year” and football is the theme of title. the night. It’s not March, so there’s no Football-shaped brownies promise of warmer weather or (one of my co-workers made spring. Showers don’t bring some), team-inspired cupflowers, but they often include cakes, and balloons are all part freezing rain, sleet or snow of the Super Bowl Sunday trathat doesn’t stick long enough dition. to be of any use. Families get together with Groundhog Day provides co-workers and their families, some amusement. There’s the college students throw raging obligatory groundhog/muskrat parties and the entire country Facebook shout outs, photos sits down to a night of football and memes, and Bill Murray and commercials. always provides a laugh in Yes, even the commercials Punxsutawney, Penn., driving have become a highlight of this on train tracks and smashing non-traditional holiday. With alarm clocks. over 108 million viewers tunAnd then there’s Valentine’s ing in (about 90 million more Day.

Lauren Kittrell

viewers than for President Obama’s inauguration), advertising is a hot commodity. A 30-second commercial during the game has been valued at an average of $4 million, which means the advertisements are generally pretty ballin’. Some nameless viewers watch the Super Bowl solely for the commercials. It’s an American tradition that has almost become an American holiday. This sunday night’s Super Bowl was no exception. Nearly 115 million viewers tuned in on Sunday to watch the Baltimore Ravens take on the San Francisco 49ers. That would be a record for the most watched program in American television history. The program aired on CBS but was available online. Probably so more people could hear the melodious sound of Jim Nance’s voice. Beyonce made an appearance, covering the halftime show with black Illuminati signs and a million new fans. Haters are gonna hate, but no one was hating on her performance. The singer hit a home run. The Ravens’ wide receiver Jacoby Jones managed to tie an NFL league record (he

almost set the record, but it was revoked upon further review) and set a Super Bowl record for longest kickoff return, 108 yards, in a Super Bowl to open the second half. And then something strange happened. The lights went out. You could no longer hear Jim Nance speak and the players left the field. It was a Super Bowl crisis. It wasn’t even a spoof for the next Batman movie. Some said terrorism, some said Beyonce “stole the show” and her “performance was so electric, the power failed,” and others just turned the channel. It wasn’t really a good game anyway. The lights went out and after a 34-minute delay, what had previously seemed like a normal night and an easy win for the Ravens ended with a down-to-the-second nail-biter between the Ravens and the 49ers. And that is why February is a great month. It’s everyone coming together for one night of the unexpected. — Lauren Kittrell is a senior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at lkittre1@utk.edu.

into that game was to score the basketball. We felt like that was a great opportunity to score against Arkansas around the rim and I thought he did that,” Martin said of Hall. “He made his face up shot which is probably one of his best strengths. He loves to shoot that ball but he has been working on it.” Freshman Derek Reese is going into the Georgia came after going 2-3 from the field for six points and snagging up eight rebounds, two offensive and six defensive.

“He has really given his body up to go in there and get rebounds,” Martin said of Reese. “The tough part for him is he is really a small forward with his frame and his fifteen pound weight loss.” One thing the Vols hope happen soon is the return of junior guard Trae Golden. “We didn’t practice yesterday. Yesterday was a day off, so we will find out today where he is. (Golden) is listed as day-to-day so we will see how it goes today,” Martin said.

End of season, beginning of another

Austin Assistant Sports Editor With the Baltimore Ravens’ Super Bowl victory over the San Francisco 49ers Sunday night, the final football game has been played in the 201213 season. Football fans were saddened following Alabama’s win over Notre Dame, but were able to take solace in that there was still NFL football. Now there is nothing. Along with all of you, I am also disappointed and will probably walk around campus in mourning for a few days thinking about the fact that another wonderful football season, with some of the most outrageous and head shaking storylines in recent years, is in the record books. But after seeing Ray Lewis tell all of America that God loves him and his team more than the rest of us, I found a shimmer of hope for the future. Baseball. After the presentation of the Lombardi Trophy, I channel surfed for a few minutes and landed on the Mexico vs. Dominican World Baseball Classic qualifier game on ESPN2. It was a coincidental find, but one I am the better for because it was a great game. I came into the contest in the top of the ninth, runners on second and third with two outs; talk about a pressure cooker. The Dominican pitcher proceeded to throw a passed ball to bring home the tying run and the pro-Mexico crowd went wild.

The game ended up going 12 innings and ended on a 3-2 count, bases load line drive into the gap to bring home the winning run in favor of the Dominican team. Talk about a great finish. Not only did it remind me that the WBC is starting up, but it opened my eyes. Something that I have known all along finally clicked in my mind. The season is almost here. Pitchers and catchers report in seven or eight days for their MLB clubs, and the college baseball season starts in less than two weeks – the Vols’ first game of the year is the 15th and the first home game is against Arizona State on the 22nd, kicking off a three-game series. For softball fans, the season is even closer. The Lady Vols – who are preseason No. 5 and boast four preseason All-SEC players – start their season in the Red Desert Classic in just two days. Two days! It should be another great year for the Weeklys and their program, but it’s also Dave Serrano’s second season here at Tennessee. I don’t think this is the season for the Vols to explode onto the SEC scene – Gold Glover and Silver Slugger winner Chase Headley agreed when he was in town a few weeks back – but it will be a measuring stick to see how far they have come. Some might think February is a boring sports month, and yes, it can be. But for those who really love sports, this is the month of build-up. College basketball teams separate themselves into great, good and mediocre programs; baseball kicks off the rust in preparation for another 162-game slate. America’s favorite new sport might be at an end, but America’s pastime is just about to start. — Austin Bornheim is a senior in journalism and electronic media. He can be reached at abornhei@utk.edu.

The Daily Beacon  

The editorially independent satudent newspaper of the University of Tennessee.