Issuu on Google+

Issue 17, Volume 122

Friday, February 1, 2013

Students return to hall after power outage David Cobb Assistant News Editor

Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief After a failed bus duct and about 45 hours of electrical problems at North Carrick Hall, power was expected to be restored at midnight Thursday and residents be allowed to return at that time. Students affected were given an alternative housing option for the second night in a row. Power returning to the building was welcome news after many students spent the night in whatever space they could find Wednesday evening, and presumably again Thursday. “I stayed in an apartment with one of my roommates’ friends last night,” Ryan McDaniel, a freshmen with business interest, said. “When I am allowed in my dorm, I don’t have electricity to charge my Mac or my phone for that matter. It’s completely dark.

We had to move our interest group meeting from Carrick last night, which caused some problems in our attendance.” The residents were informed via an e-mail sent from the Department of University Housing Wednesday shortly after 7:00 p.m. telling them the dorm would close at 8:30 p.m. and that those who could not make other sleeping arrangements could meet in the lobby to receive a temporary housing assignment. “The time that we were given to get all of our stuff out for the next day was ... hardly enough time for me to get across campus to gather my belongings,” McDaniel said. Problems started in the building around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday morning when a fire alarm sounded, keeping the residents out of the dorm until 5:00 a.m. The power remained off for most of the day Wednesday, leading to the decision to close the dorm for the night. “Apparently very few people took advantage of being placed

in another dorm room and just stayed with friends,” Karen Simsen, Director of UT’s Media Relations, said. While the displaced students experienced some difficulties, most managed to cope well with the situation. “I’m staying at a hotel,” Jackson Wetherington, freshmen in business, said. “It’s just inconvenient, because my classes start at eleven ... (so) not really a problem.” All of the suites in North Carrick have functioning showers, and the emergency lighting remains intact. The power grid, however, has entirely shut down access to electricity in the male dorm, and 88 rooms in South Carrick have been affected as well. “Facility Services has come up with a workaround that we’re going to be able to use – basically a whole new part needs to be ordered – but we’re going to be able to get power Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon back on and hopefully everything will be fine,” Simsen Residents of North Carrick Hall were displaced after an electrical fire caused the said. “We have a really old power to go out on Jan. 30th. Students were provided with other housing options, but most opted to stay with friends. infrastructure.”

Lady Vols dominate Bulldogs, 88-45 Step Afrika! brings in SEC play. A big part of the win was the play of The Tennessee senior guard Kamiko Lady Vols defeated Williams, who recordthe Mississippi State ed a double-double Bulldogs 88-45 on with 10 points and 13 Thursday to move to rebounds to go along 17-4 and a perfect 8-0 with six assists and six

huge, then her assists and rebounding. She was at the point a lot. She needs to put those numbers up every night for us to maintain and be consistent.” Sophomore forward Cierra Burdick, who had missed the previous eight games due to a broken right hand, returned to the lineup on Thursday to a welcoming cheer from the Tennessee faithful as she came off the bench. “I was all smiles,” Burdick said. “Smiling from ear to ear. When basketball is your life since you were five years old and it gets taken away from you for a month, when you get to come back, all you can do is smile. I was so energized on the bench trying to be positive for my teammates, but there’s nothing like stepping in between those lines and having the ball in your hand. Our fans are great. The acknowledgement that they showed me was awesome.” The Lady Vols went into halftime with a 42-18 lead and continued to play with a high intensity in the second half just as Warlick encouraged them to do during the break. “We really emphasized not playing the scoreboards,” Warlick said. “We have to get Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon better and we talked Sohpmore guard Kamiko Williams shoots over Mississippi State about against Notre defenders in Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan 31. Williams scored Dame having lulls, and 10 points with a career-high of 13 rebounds. we can’t. We’ve got to make sure we maintain

Troy Provost-Heron Staff Writer

steals in her first start of the season. “She had a great game,” head coach Holly Warlick said. “One of her best games since she’s been here. That’s our expectation for her. Six steals was

our intensity and how we’re playing and just continue, no matter what the score. We’re behind, we’re ahead, we’ve got to get better and focus on us and understand the importance of how hard we’re playing, the game takes care of itself.” Tennessee was able to dominate the boards all game (rebound margin of +17) and push the ball out in transition (22 fast break points), which Mississippi State (9-12, 1-7) head coach Vic Schaefer said he knew was a problem coming into the game. “You’ve got a great staff over there, veteran staff, they do their homework,” Schaefer said. “They’re going to know that’s an issue for us. Everybody’s attacking us in that area.” Freshman center Nia Moore, who was productive (eight points and three rebounds) in stepping in for the injured sophomore center Isabelle Harrison, said tonight was a big confidence boost for her going forward. “It definitely gives me confidence. With our players going out and being injured, any time I can go out there and help my team is good.” Next up for the Lady Vols is the Missouri Tigers in Columbia on Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. The Lady Vols defeated the Tigers earlier this season 84-39 in Thompson-Boling Arena.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON: Page Page Page Page Page

2 3 4 5 6

. . . . .

cultural dance, music to Knoxville Melodi Erdogan Assistant Arts & Culture Editor

the college arena,” McCollum said. “Historically it started with African American fraternities and sororities but now you can see it everywhere. You have step ministries, you have it in commercials and movies, so it’s not just for college students and it’s not just for African Americans, it’s for anybody who loves to dance.” The show was opened by a step dance performance by the African American fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma. Keith Thomas, junior in sports management, is the second vice president of Phi Beta Sigma and handles coordinating and assisting the president and the vice president. Thomas and his brothers said their opening performance’s goal was to pay tribute to original step dancing roots from Africa. “We just found it as a way to step out of our comfort zone. We’re usually around college students and we do things for Greek organizations, but sometimes we try new opportunities for new experiences and we felt like it would be fun,” Thomas said. Twyneshia Vaughn, junior in special eduacation, said she was pleasantly surprised with the performance. “At first I expected a lot of wilderness and wild dances, but I enjoyed the entire show,” Vaughn said. “It was full of energy and it was back to back of them giving all they had, there were no parts where they were lacking anything. I love stepping and I figured this event would be something different and I enjoy different things, so I’m pretty glad they came.”

Despite wind, rain and flood warnings, UT students and the Knoxville community gathered at the Bijou Theatre to see “Step Afrika!” The Cultural Attractions Committee hosted the event on Wednesday and invited the professional step dance company to Knoxville for a special performance designed for college students. Step Afrika! performed various step dance routines, ranging from modern to traditional dance, and the event showcased the company’s ability to promote an understanding of different cultures and traditions. “We wanted to bring something cultural and we liked that (Step Afrika!) mixed music and dance together and it’s a historic tradition with the African American community, and it is definitely within our goal to bring cultural events like this to Knoxville,” Elaina Spiekermann, president of the Cultural Attractions Committee and senior in logistics, said. Tour manager of Step Afrika! Brian McCollum is in charge of venue logistics and details, such as designing specific lighting, organizing space on stage for the dance routines and preparing sound with microphones. McCollum said that step dancing began with college students in fraternities and sororities in the early 1900s. “(Students) would gather round (at) school on their breaks and after class and they would start singing, and then stepping and then clapping their hands and that’s really where stepping started, in See STEP AFRIKA! on Page 2

The Daily Beacon is printed using soy based ink on newsprint containing recycled content, utilizing renewable sources and produced in a sustainable, environmental responsble manner.

. . . . . . . . News . . . Arts & Culture . . . . . . Opinions . . . . . . . Sports . . . . . . . Sports

utdailybeacon.com

Get to know local Vol, Brandon Fickey on Page 6


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, February 1, 2013 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

Author discusses global issues Brooke Turner Contributor

Emily DeLanzo • The Daily Beacon

Step Afrika! members dance to drums and wear traditional costumes during a live performance at the Bijou Theatre on Jan. 30.

STEP AFRIKA! continued from Page 1 The show, originally from Washington, D.C., attends NACA (National Assosciation of College Activities) to reach out to young college students and makes a point to perform at elementary, middle and high schools. “(Grade school shows) are more education-based and we try to focus on the three most basic and major parts of stepping: teamwork, commitment and discipline,” McCollum said. “We are here to share, expand and educate people about the art form of stepping, and we do that through workshops, and we have residencies and we have our shows.” McCollum said that his favorite part of performing is seeing the emotions that the audience experiences throughout the show and hopes that their performance will make the dance company memorable. “I love when you can see different emotions in people, when we can take people from laughing to just crying to screaming to having so much fun. What we try to do is have people remember Step Afrika! as an experience and not just a show,” McCollum said. “Once we perform we want to make friends, we want to give our all so that the audience will want to be our friends. We try to reach out so it’s not just a show but ... an experience.” Concerned about weather conditions before the event, Spiekermann said the

committee was excited about the large amount of people who attended the show. “We were really worried about the turnout because my umbrella went inside out twice today,” Spiekermann said. “A lot of people showed up, and we had a lot of tickets purchased by the Knoxville community, so we like that they can get involved as well. A lot more students showed up than we thought would.” Considering the flood and tornado warnings all across East Tennessee, McCollum said the event had a great turnout. “It was an amazing crowd, I couldn’t have asked for anything more,” McCollum said. “I was a little concerned because I didn’t know there was a tornado warning, and I looked out my window and I thought this is going to be interesting. Given all the circumstances, I think we had an amazing turnout and the crowd gave us so much energy and we just gave it all right back.” During the show, the dancers asked for volunteers to come on stage and encouraged the crowd to clap their hands and stomp their feet. Vaughn said she appreciated Step Afrika!’s extra effort to involve the audience. “Most people don’t really involve the audience,” Vaughn said. “Throughout the majority of the show there was involvement with the crowd, and like one of the performers said, what you give us is what we give back so it was really nice.” Spiekermann said that her favorite part of the event was the audience interaction. “Everyone was dancing and tapping their feet and clapping, it was so high

energy and they really seemed to love what they were doing,” Spiekermann said. “I think they loved the energy and they loved being involved. It had a little bit of the hip hop beats that everyone likes and it also had percussion that a lot of people liked too.” The dance company had just arrived back from touring in Spain and Italy before coming to Knoxville. McCollum said the goal with their performance is the same everywhere. “We travel all around the world trying to share this dance, everybody loves to dance,” he said. “We always say that people love to eat and people love to dance. That is one way that we reach out to other people, through dance.” Thomas said that the event as a whole was a “blast.” “The involvement with the crowd is something you don’t really see with a step show, or any show really,” Thomas said. “I got to see amazing steppers, the fraternity learned a lot and it was an honor to be a part of this.” The event’s goal was to let UT students and the Knoxville community appreciate the tradition behind step dancing, said Spiekermann. “I hope (attendees) took a better understanding of the history of the black fraternities and their transition into universities and how stepping became a cultural way for them to bond. We’re really glad that they came, this is the kind of thing that Knoxville needs, and when it comes Knoxville loves it.”

A small group of students and professors gathered in the Hodges Library Auditorium on Wednesday night to hear social rights activist and professor of political science at Eckerd College, Dr. William Felice, discuss the pressing issues of social rights and justices in a global setting. In his book, “The Global New Deal,” Felice discusses how the current injustices at work in the world today can be easily combatted. He believes that these are “needless sufferings” that could be prevented through existing policies, such as the 20/20 policy and the Tobin Tax, being put to practice in the U.S. and around the world. Felice began Wednesday night’s session by quoting screenplay writer and playwright Tony Kushner, who most recently wrote the script for Oscar front-runner “Lincoln.” “The great question before us is: Are we doomed? The great question before us is: Can we change? In time? ... and theory? How are we to proceed without theory? What systems of thought have these reformers to present to this mad swirling planetary disorganization, to the inevident welter of fact, event, phenomenon, calamity?” he asked the small audience. Felice has been researching and studying these issues for nearly 20 years. He said that it was during his college career when he first became concerned about issues of social rights and justice. “Traveling in Latin America and seeing how poverty stricken it was really had an impact on me,” he said, adding that he wondered if the “desperation I saw could be alleviated.” He shared the statistics con-

cerning poverty, explaining that the majority of the world does not have the privileged socioeconomic circumstances that are experienced in America. Even among the poorest in America, they are still wealthier than the majority of the world’s population. He made it clear that it is not good enough to answer a poverty stricken world by imposing American culture, tradition and ideals upon them. “What have you to offer in its place? Market incentives? American cheeseburgers? Watered down … makeshift capitalism?” he said, returning again to the words of Kushner. Felice’s arguments resonated with Temple Duke, freshman in economics and global studies. She said she genuinely enjoyed the lecture and wished more students had been there to hear what Felice had to say. She found the issues he discussed to be relevant not only to her but to any college student. “Though I have not yet read his book, I would really like to obtain a copy,” she said. “It appears to offer some detailed solutions to urgent global problems and I would love to learn more about specific policies designed to alleviate the greatest infringements on human rights.” Concerning social injustice issues, namely poverty, Felice said he suspects that all people want to end the world’s destitution. His book’s intention is to empower his readers to do so. “I hope that they react by saying that there are doable policy options forward, that there is no reason to remain so wired in cynicism that we cannot put forward a vision to end needless suffering,” Felice said. “I think change happens first through the vision and if the book can help people to see that, then it has served its purpose.”


Friday, February 1, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE Local Natives score hit with second album

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Comedian to perform on attending grad school Victoria Wright Arts and Culture Editor The title of the show may sound abrasive, but the content is anything but somber. The Graduate Researchers in Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution organization will host a performance and reading from Adam Ruben’s book, “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School” Friday in the UC Ballroom. Sara Kuebbing, organization president and graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology, said the organization decided to bring Washington, D.C. based comic to speak to UT students to address common concerns every graduate student has. “He writes and speaks about something that most UT graduate students have thought about at one time or another, and what any UT undergradu-

ate student should be thinking about if they are considering applying to graduate school,” Kuebbing said. “Personally, I am really happy with my decision to attend graduate school because I am really interested in what I study, and I think my degree will be critical in helping me in my future career.” Ruben, who balances his schedule as a molecular biologist, writer and comedian, will address some of the downsides of graduate school by reading from his book, a satirical survival guide to post-baccalaureate education. One concern he addresses are the pangs surrounding a student’s graduation date, which Ruben said can be shrouded in mystery. “You’re not really sure when you’re graduating, and you can’t plan your life at all,” Rubin said. “It’s an inability to plan your life.”

That hard lesson came when he began applying for jobs during his fifth year of graduate school. Though the prospect seemed positive, Ruben was unable to seal the deal because of issues with his graduation plans. Despite some of the dififuclties he experienced, Rubin said he has used his writing as a means to ease the pains he experienced in his schooling. “It’s kind of the way you suffer through something and find a way to look at it through humor.” Kuebbing said the benefits of attending a graduate degree outweigh the low points, but said she notices some students who enter programs only to realize they no longer want to pursue the degree. “There are lots of good reasons to pursue graduate education and an equal number of bad reasons to want to attend

graduate school,” Kuebbing said. “Adam’s frank communication on graduate school allows folks to consider why they really want to go to graduate school.” Kuebbing hopes students will break from a night of studying and attend the show for laughs, but also for a chance for some introspection. “I hope that students will walk away from the event tired from laughing so hard,” Kuebbing said. “Laughing about the annoying and exhausting (but very true) parts of graduate school is a great way for folks to feel better about what they’re doing and realize that lots of other people share their feelings.” “Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School” begins Friday, Feb. 1 at 6 p.m. in the UC Ballroom. Admission is free and open to all students.

Around Rocky Top • Photo courtesy of Local Natives

A member of the Local Natives shows their hit single, “Breakers.” The song is the top hit off their most recent album, “Hummingbird.”

Spencer Hall Staff Writer The curse of the “sophomore slump” is a hurdle that many bands fall victim to. As was the case for musical artists such as MGMT and The Strokes, the hype around a stellar debut album often results in an average follow-up record. However, after the critical acclaim of their late 2009 debut album, “Gorilla Manor,” the Los Angeles-based rock band Local Natives are making sure they aren’t just another one-and-done act like so many of their peers in the independent circuit. After a three year recording process, the band is back with their latest LP, “Hummingbird,” and they are ready to show off their evolving sound with a strong sophomore album. “Hummingbird” doesn’t try to duplicate the distinct sunny California sound Local Natives produced with “Gorilla Manor.” The album provokes a deeper and much more moody, harmonious sound without completely straying from what made their fans fall in love so many years ago. Through their heartfelt lyrics and lush musical arrangements, the band captures the listener’s attention and guides them on an emotional journey full of love and heartbreak. With pounding drumrolls and an echoed keyboard introduction, the album’s second track, “Heavy Feet,” is the first standout of the record. As the song builds, the delicate singing voice of lead vocalist Kelcey Ayer gradually blends in with the harmonies of vocalist Taylor Rice leading into an explosive chorus. The track is closely similar to The National’s song, “Brainy,” most likely due to the fact

that The National’s Aaron Dessner has songwriting and performing credits on the album. The first single from the album, “Breakers,” is clearly the breakout hit of the record. The track is perhaps the most ambitious song on the album, complete with layered harmonies comparable to Grizzly Bear, a drumming pattern similar to Arcade Fire and a fast-paced tempo reminiscent of bands such as Dodos and Morning Benders. As the album progresses, so do the emotion in both Ayer’s and Rice’s voice. Two of the more stripped down and forthright songs on “Hummingbird” are “Mt. Washington” and “Colombia.” The tracks pull at the listener’s heartstrings with earnest simplicity evoking a raw emotional angst. On “Colombia” Ayers sings the lyrics, “If you never knew how much/if you never felt all of my love/I pray now you do.” He questions if his efforts for his love’s affection are sufficient as he sings, “Every night I ask myself/am I loving enough? Am I?” Both ballads show the growth Local Natives have taken as lyricists. These songs showcase that they have the ability to create a toned-down song that can still achieve their goal of reaching out to their audience. With “Hummingbird,” the band shows that they will continue to grow with each album. Not satisfied with making the same record time and time again, they will continue to please fans with thought provoking lyrics and a progressive sound. Getting over the sophomore slump has proved not to be a challenge for Local Natives, and the years of consideration put into “Hummingbird” will delight fans eager for a longawaited album.

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

A vandalized Volkswagen beetle says “U R GAY” in a scene from the documentary “Fagbug” in Hodges Library on Jan. 23. The next film in the LGBT series is “Edie & Thea: A Very Long Engagement,” which will be shown on Feb. 13.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, February 1, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

College-Educated

& Domesticated

Five steps to turn hurt into healing Emily DeLanzo Managing Editor Last Friday, I wouldn’t have been found in a club or watching trash television. I was too busy being whiny. Now that I am a week more mature, my misery has turned into freedom and hurting into healing. 1. Spend no more than five hours wallowing in misery alone. That normally ends in blubbering pleas or shaving your head. Both of which can easily be avoided with the help of friends. You can squeeze in small amounts of alone time. Looking a hot mess and using every available inch of fabric as tissue isn’t the most attractive behavior ever. Cry quietly — or loudly — behind a closed door. Practicing that will help you keep whatever small amount of dignity left. Also, don’t let the mourning period last too long. No one likes a weenie. The best part about hurting is the healing. 2. Don’t drink at first. Alcohol doesn’t help, and it has the potential to exacerbate pain. You may lose feeling in your face, but that empty hole might still be there. There’s no amount of whiskey or wine to fill any void. Use caution when mixing alcohol, feelings of sadness and the internet. Your fingers work better than you think, and Facebook chat doesn’t have a drunk censor. Alcohol, at least in my extensive experience, has the potential to make any bad situation worse and even more embarrassing. Eventually, though, you’ll feel better, or at the very minimum indifferent. As soon as you see that opportunity, feel free to break out the wine. Whatever you do, don’t drink alone. Go out with friends or stay in with them. Don’t feel obligated to drink but do whatever you need to help you move on. 3. Get out of the area. Don’t go somewhere that will remind you

of what you’re running away from. Make new memories and remember why you’re lucky to be young and independent. Life isn’t over, and if anything, the world became even more of your playground. 4. Surround yourself with people that care. Believe it or not, there’s often more than one. Go to dinner with your friends. Even if you’re not hungry, enjoy the company. Buy Oreos and squawk about life to your roommates you never see enough. Waddle to one of your best friend’s houses to watch “Mulan.” Facebook creep with the best ladies in the world. Watch stupid cat videos, work too much, do your laundry for the first time in weeks. Feel better and do it with people that care. 5. Don’t wait. You’re in college. Waiting and wishing is for the birds. Peanut Butter Brownies 1/2 cup peanut butter 1/3 cup margarine, softened 2/3 cup white sugar 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 2 egg /2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 9x9 inch baking pan. In a medium bowl, cream together peanut butter and margarine. Gradually blend in the brown sugar, white sugar, eggs, and vanilla; mix until fluffy. Combine flour, baking powder, and salt; stir into the peanut butter mixture until well blended. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes in preheated oven, or until the top springs back when touched. Cool, and cut into 16 squares. Bask in the fact you can eat peanuts again without feeling guilty. — Emily DeLanzo is a senior in environmental studies. She can be reached at edelanzo@ utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... • Katie Dyson-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Traditionalist finds benefits in Kindle Chaos Theory by

Sarah Russell For years, I have sworn to myself that I would never buy an e-reader. As an avid reader and a student assistant in the library’s Special Collections and Rare Books department, I have come to love the entity that is a physical book. I love the smell of a library book, the look of an unbroken paperback spine, the beauty of the covers and illustrations in old books, and even the feel of the pages. I loved filling up my bookshelves with different shapes, colors, and sizes of books I had read and loved. And then the unthinkable happened. I asked for, and received, a Kindle for Christmas. I felt like a traitor for even requesting it, because it went against my very heart and soul. I had asked for a Kindle initially as a space saver, because as I’ve started planning for my move after graduation, I realized that the books I had accumulated over twenty years of life were starting to take up an absurd amount of space. As much as it would pain me to part with some of my books, I knew it would make the move easier if I could get rid of some of the hard copies and replace them with digital editions. However, once I received my Kindle and began reading on it, I discovered that it had many more merits beyond simply saving me space. I could download PDFs for class onto it and not have to spend a small fortune printing them. I could get digital versions of classic books for free because they are in the public domain. And perhaps most strange and wonderful of all, I now had the ability to carry an entire library in my backpack. Possessing an enormous library used to be a sign of wealth and status, because books were so expensive and because few people could read. Now,

because of the advent of e-readers, libraries are inexpensive, portable and available to anyone with seventy dollars to spare. Although it still saddens me to watch the physical book slowly become next to obsolete, I have come around to recognizing the longterm benefits of e-readers. From an environmental standpoint, it saves paper and energy for production, and as I mentioned, it significantly cuts down on the volume of stuff in one’s living space. But aside from the personal and environmental benefits, e-readers can be beneficial in academic and professional settings. They are lighter than laptops; they can hold entire books and documents in one organized place; they permit the same kinds of highlighting and bookmarking capabilities as a real book and are keyword searchable. An e-reader weighs much less than many books students are required to carry around and wireless downloading enables immediate access to the book instead of waiting on it to come in from Amazon three weeks after the first reading is due. In many ways, it would make students’ lives much easier. The biggest obstacle to this is getting professors on board. Many teachers do not allow electronic devices in their classrooms for obvious reasons -- who enjoys lecturing to a bunch of students who are far more interested in Facebook than in the topic at hand? Unlike laptops or even tablets, however, the most basic e-readers are little more than an electronic book. Without internet surfing capabilities, an e-reader provides just as much distraction as a hard copy of a book (meaning none at all). If teachers were to allow e-readers in their classroom, it would eliminate the amount of paper consumed by students printing PDFs, save students money, make their backpacks lighter and would provide for a distractionfree but technologically advanced classroom environment. —Sarah Russell is a senior in history. She can be reached at srusse22@utk.edu.

Mental health key to reducing violent crime Burden of Infallibility by

Wiley Robinson

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

ADVERTISING MANAGER Alison Embry

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

beaconads@utdailybeacon.com

MANAGING EDITOR Emily DeLanzo

ADVERTISING

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Preston Peeden CHIEF COPY EDITOR Eric Nalley DESIGN EDITORS Alex Cline Caroline Gompers PHOTO EDITORS Tia Patron Tara Sripunvoraskul NEWS EDITOR RJ Vogt ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR David Cobb ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Victoria Wright ASSISTANT ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Melodi Erdogan SPORTS EDITOR Lauren Kittrell ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Austin Bornheim COPY EDITORS Hannah Bloomfield Claire Dodson Jacob Hobson Justin Joo Samantha Smoak

REPRESENTATIVES Casey Lawrence Andi Overby Sookie Park ADVERTISING PRODUCTION ARTISTS Will Jellicorse Ryan McPherson EDITORIAL PRODUCTION ARTISTS Brittany Coggins Kristi Frazier Taylor Presley Katrina Roberts CLASSIFIED ADVISER Savannah Pickard orderad@utdailybeacon.com

To report a news item, please e-mail editor.news@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-2348 To submit a press release, please e-mail pressreleases@utdailybeacon.com To place an ad, please e-mail beaconads@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-5206 To place a classified ad, please e-mail orderad@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-4931 To submit a Letter to the Editor, please e-mail letters@utdailybeacon.com or call 865-974-4931 If you think something has been reported incorrectly, please contact the managing editor at 974-2348. Advertising: (865) 974-5206 Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 Managing Editor: (865) 974-2348 Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 Fax: (865) 974-5569

The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

The fact that so many people are still jumping on this “assault weapon” ban wagon provokes me to reiterate the main overlooked points that have led to this laughable nation discussion on gun control. I’d use the word “uncritical” as well, but it almost seems unnecessary in light of the laughably transparent appeal of social reinforcement this anti-gun trend has unfortunately acquired. Moral reinforcement as well, surely, but the blatantly uncritical aspect of this media fodder necessarily designates the chemical reward gained from participation in the trend as a substance-less, merely social one. I wish this were not the case. And I wish I wouldn’t be referred to as a conservative of some kind when I attempt to point out that a blanket ban on semi-autos because an AR-15 was used in a tragedy was not either. Firstly, to recap, please stop talking about how some amorphous mixture of assault weapons, assault rifles and semi-autos need to be banned just because the guns themselves have recognizable shapes from movies and are easy and symbolic to rally around in ignorance. And although it reeks of gun-snobbiness, using completely undefined terms like “assault weapon” is not okay just because many other people are using it falsely and uncritically -- “assault weapon” only really has one meaning legally, and it means as many things as there are jurisdictions in America pertaining to the vague grouping. Blatantly ignoring -- no, having outright contempt for the relevant specifics just because you’re preoccupied appearing anti-weapon and therefore moral is perhaps the main cause for the unlikelihood of actually getting anything useful done with this legislative energy. An assault rifle is a very real, well-defined category of weapon that has a particular functionality arguably based around the specific category of round (bullet) it is designed to fire. The round is of an intermediate size and power between the full length high-powered rifle cartridge and short length pistol cartridge.

You can think about the sizes roughly in segments of your middle finger from base to tip -- a pistol bullet being up to the first knuckle, an assault rifle around up to the second, and highpower using almost the whole finger, depending. It is necessary that it can fire full auto, like a machine gun, so that one sustained pull of the trigger will empty the magazine, but also that is has a selective-fire feature that makes it able to fire in bursts or semi-auto (one trigger pull per bullet) to optimize ammo use based on range and situation. Now, everyone knows civilians can’t (easily) own full automatic rifles, even well before the assault weapon ban of the nineties. The Thompson submachine gun of the twenties was the first and last full auto the federal government wanted to deal with. So I don’t feel like making the case that the government has been slowly eroding our right to bear arms, because it honestly hasn’t. In fact, many more states have adopted carry and conceal pistol laws in just the last few decades. But there is clearly something to be said about the deadliness of even civilianized (unable to fire full-auto) weapons designed to fire an intermediate cartridge that has been adopted as the standard combat round all over the world. The relative power, lack of recoil, and easeof-use of these weapon systems are evident. And I’m not implying that the whole idea of refining or changing gun control and gun regulation is somehow wrong. Quite the opposite. Gun control is too inconsistent between state laws, and could only save more lives if unobtrusive measures like more background checks were enforced. Mental health in this country is at a low for developed nations, which clearly has a bigger correlation with violence as a whole than with gun availability itself. With such systemic cultural inequalities in place, our poor overall mental health should really take precedence over the legally purchased AR-15. For all intents and purposes, the general availability and cost of a gun should not be so much less than most people’s access to adequate psychiatric care. The forces politically against more available health services not ironically responsible for that inequality. —Wiley Robinson is a senior in evolutionary biology. He can be reached at rrobin1@utk. edu.


Friday, February 1, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5

SPORTS

Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

Vols show promise heading down stretch promise the past three games. I doubt the Volunteers will make it to the NCAA Tournament this season. They could surprise me and make a big run for the final 11 games, but even with that I think the lack of depth in the SEC and lack quality wins will keep Tennessee out on the outside Austin Bornheim looking in. Assistant Sports Editor It might be another year in the NIT and fans are tired of mediocrity from their sports Up to this point, Tennessee programs, but that might be basketball fans are more than the course. likely a little disappointed It’s tougher to overcome with the way the season has the loss of a great player on gone thus far. a basketball team than on a The team is just 11-9 and football team, and it’s taken under .500 in conference play, the Vols healthy and for a team who finroster too long ished second in the SEC to develop. Down East last year with high the final leg of the hopes, it hasn’t lived up season, don’t be to the hype. surprised to see But though the team a run much like hasn’t necessarily prothe Volunteers duced the way the late season magic fans — and the team last year now that — would like to have they have seemed at this point, there are to start clicking. some things about this It might still year’s team that have go down as a disimpressed me. appointing year The Vols are a resilwhen preseason ient group. hopes are taken Outside of the home into account, but game against Ole Miss, it might be the Tennessee hasn’t lost best thing for the by more than 17 — team to experiI’m going to throw the ence the disapOklahoma State game Vincent Walker • The Daily Beacon pointment before out because the Vols were trying to give lots Junior Trae Golden crosses up a defender they attempt to the of players minutes and against Vanderbilt in Thompson-Boling resurrect Tennessee of years trying out different rota- Arena on Jan. 29. past. tions in the beginning of the year tournament. The a true scoring threat, Jarnell team doesn’t give up. They Stokes has figured out how — Austin Bornheim is a battle and because of that they to play in the post without senior in journalism and always seem to have a chance the help of another bruiser electronic media. He can be at the end of ballgames, even taking up bodies, and fresh- reached at abornehi@utk. if they have been outplayed for men Armani Moore and Derek edu. Reese have showed lots of 35 minutes — the Kentucky game is a good example. It has taken some time but Tennessee has seemed to overcome the loss of Jeronne Maymon well. Early in the season there was lots of talk about how well the Vols were playing without him but that was against lesser competition. When the Vols matched up against equal or greater opponents the loss of the AllSEC forward was glaring. But after a deep valley where they lost 4-of-5, it appears the team has started to figure out their identity for the back stretch of the season. Jordan McRae has emerged

Vince Walker • The Daily Beacon

Sophomore Isabelle Harrison is helped off the court after injuring her knee during the first half of the Notre Dame game on Jan. 28. Harrison will undergo surgery to repair the meniscus in her left knee.

TUTORING

UNFURN APTS

HOUSES FOR RENT

CONDOS FOR RENT

*5(35(3&/$66 +DOIWKHSULFHRI.DSODQ &ODVVURRP 6HWWLQJ ([SHUL HQFHG 3URIHVVRU &ODVVHV I R U P L Q J  Q R Z  JUHSUHSFODVV#JPDLOFRP

6RXWK.QR[YLOOH87GRZQ WRZQ%5DSWV0RYHLQVSH FLDO IRU WKLV PRQWK   

7(6735(3(;3(576*5( *0$7/6$7 )RU RYHU  \HDUV 0L FKDHO.6PLWK3K'DQG KLVWHDFKHUVKDYHKHOSHG 87VWXGHQWVSUHSDUHIRU WKH *5( *0$7 /6$7 2XUSURJUDPVRIIHULQGL YLGXDO WXWRULQJ SUDFWLFH WHVWVDQGFRPSXWHUDG DSWLYH VWUDWHJLHV DW D UHDVRQDEOH SULFH 3UR JUDPV FDQ EH GHVLJQHG DURXQG \RXU VFKHGXOH ZHHNGD\VZHHNQLJKWVRU ZHHNHQGV &RQYHQLHQWO\ ORFDWHG DW  6RXWK 3HWHUV 5G &DOO     IRU PRUH LQIRUPD WLRQ

WK3/$&($3$570(176  EORFNV IURP 87 /DZ 6FKRRO +LJKODQG $YH 2QH %5 DSW RQO\ %ULFNH[WHULRUFDUSHWODXQ GU\ IDFLOLW\ RQ ILUVW IORRU *XDUDQWHHG DQG VHFXUHG SDUNLQJ  KRXU PDLQWHQ DQFH1RGRJVRUFDWVQG \HDU LQ )RUW 6DQGHUV ZZZVL[WHHQWKSODFHFRP EULWKRZDUG#VL[WHHQWKSODFH FRP  

%5KRXVHVLQ)RUW 6DQGHUV VKRZLQJ VRRQ IRU $XJXVW  1HZO\ UH PRGHOHG:'+9$&SDUN LQJODUJHEHGURRPVZDONWR FDPSXV %HVW KRXVHV JR TXLFNO\  RU 9ROUHQWDOVFRP

&21'26)25/($6( 2187&$0386 1RZOHDVLQJIRUIDOODW /DXUHO6WDWLRQ6W&KULVWRSK HU DQG )UDQNOLQ 6WDWLRQ ,Q FOXGHVZDWHUFDEOHDQGLQ WHUQHW 8QLYHUVLW\ 5HDO (V WDWHDQG3URSHUW\0DQDJH PHQW //&  WK 6WUHHW .QR[YLOOH  ZZZXUHKRXVLQJFRP RU UHQWDOV#XUHKRXVLQJFRP

EMPLOYMENT 37&285,(5326,7,21: &3$),500XVWEHGHSHQG DEOH DQG KDYH \RXU RZQ YHKLFOH 0:) 3030 0DNLQJSLFNXSVDQGGHOLYHU LHV WR .QR[YLOOH DQG VXU URXQGLQJDUHDV6RPHJHQHU DORIILFHWHOHSKRQHGXWLHV KU PLOHDJH #PLOH (PDLO ULVDWKRPVSRQ#GHFRVLPRFR P)D[ 37WRGGOHUWHDFKHUQHHGHG 300XVWEHDYDLODEOH0 ) :HVWVLGH /HDUQLQJ &HQ WHU9DQRVGDOH5G 



UNFURN APTS DQG%5$SWV87DUHDDQG :HVW.QR[DUHD&DOOIRUDS SRLQWPHQW  

FOR RENT

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

CONDOS FOR SALE +RXVHVLQWKH)RUW$YDLO DEOHIRU)DOODQG %5 LQFOXGHV DSSOLDQFHV DQGLQWHUQHW6RPHZLWK IURQW \DUG DQG SDUNLQJ &DOO  7RSRIWK6WDW/DXUHO /DUJH%5EULFNKRXVH %$ 5HQW QHJRWLDEOH +DUG ZRRGIORRULQJFHQWUDOKHDW DYDLODEOH QRZ DQGRU -XQH $OVRDYDLODEOHDQG%5 KRXVHV1RSHWV'HWDLOV  :HVW.QR[YLOOHPLQV87 %5%$+DUGZRRG FDU SHW&HQWUDO+ $:'$OO DSSOLDQFHVIXUQLVKHG$YDLO DEOH-DQ5HIHUHQFHV&DOO -LP

CONDOS FOR RENT &DPSXV&RQGRV$YDLODEOHLQ $XJXVW %5%$DQG%5%$XQLWV DYDLODEOH :' LQ XQLW 5H VHUYHGRIIVWUHHWSDUNLQJ PLQXWHZDONWR/DZ6FKRRO DQG VWDGLXP PR   5HQW87.FRP%5 &21'26 6HDUFKRQOLQHRU 

&DPSXVFRQGRVDQG%5 DW 5HQDLVVDQFH /DXUHO 6WD WLRQ )RXQWDLQ 3ODFH DQG /DNH$YH3ULFHGIURPN )RUDOLVWRIFRQGRVIRUVDOH HPDLOPKDUWV#DROFRP RUFDOO0DUW\ +DUWVHOO ZLWK 5HDOW\ ,Q YHVWRUV&HGDU%OXIIRI ILFH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD • Will Shortz ACROSS 1 Opinion add-on 10 It can go from liquid to frozen 15 Taqueria treat 16 Critter with humanlike fingerprints

MERCH. FOR SALE %22.6 6XVDQQDK ZDV D \RXQJ ZRPDQ LQ ORYH 6KH ORYHG'HUHNJRVVLSVQRRS LQJ FKRFRODWH PRXVVH DQG URPDQWLFIDQWDVLHV6KHZDV ERXQGWRJHWLQWRWURXEOHLQ &OXPV\ +HDUWV D VOLJKWO\ PLVJXLGHGURPDQFHE\+\V WHULD 0ROW $YDLODEOH YLD $PD]RQFRP

This could be YOUR ad. 974-4931

1

39 It’s a gas

15

16

40 One coming from Mars?

17

18

42 Apt rhyme for 26-Down

19

43 Letters for a princess

23

17 Natalie Portman’s birthplace

44 Cry that’s often sung

18 It gets a chick’s attention

49 Unworldliness

19 Where R.F.K. and his brother Teddy went to law school

52 â€œâ€Ś ___ can’t get up!â€?

2

3

4

5

25

29 Intertangle

35

36

32 With 46-Down, a bit below so-so 33 Flipping out

11

12

13

14

47

48

22 28 31

33

34

38

39

41

42 45

50

46

51

52

53

56

57

A V E N U E Q

T O L D T O

54 58

62 Old car with ignition trouble?

62

63

63 Spitfire landing locale

64

65

65 Snide reply to being given a chore

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

H A R D C O R E

27

44

49

64 “Pale Blue Dot� author

35 Opening pitch

S P A M A L O T

21

26

37

43

58 Wowed basketball announcer’s cry

31 Square for a roll

A S P I R A T E

10

30

40

56 Factor in a beauty contest

27 Steps on a scale

S W F N E D C E C L O E B T I O N K S E N S

9

55 Part of 10/15: Abbr.

23 Trendsetting

P O L L O I

8

20 24

32

53 “A failure of imagination,� per Graham Greene

22 Really long

O N A H O P

7

51 Flimflam

20 10/15, e.g.

P S H A W

6

29

45 Complimentary

30 Sabre ou pistolet

5REHUW+ROPHV5HDOWRUFRP /DNH3OD]D%5SUHPL XPFRQGRIRU6DOHN 6XOOLQV 5LGJH  N 5REHUW +ROPHV 5(0$; 5HDO(VWDWH7HQ&RPPHUFLDO 

38 Many an ascot wearer

E L S E

F R P O R O Z A L E E B O S E M C I S I N K

I T V O O N R A A M W R I A I D X P S C L I H A N O Y A I F I C O E R

K I S M E T

I R E A L I Z N E Y P S D A F N A O R H I

S A A R I N E N E X A L L Y

S Q U E E G E E

E A S Y A

DOWN

55 59

11 Like panels on some racecars 12 It’s handled on the range

60

61

37 Holed up 38 Hard-to-block jumper, in hoops 41 Smallish room

1 Dull

13 Tightwad

2 Like bars that are often near horses

14 Chills briefly

42 Grp. interested in long drives

21 Pro beginner?

46 See 32-Across

3 Impenetrable script

24 Dropped off

4 Night to watch “The Office�: Abbr.

47 Form 1040 info

25 Assistant

5 Family moniker

26 Cur curer

48 Certain volleyball player

6 Like

28 Most Atari-playing kids

50 Prospect

30 Ancient meeting place

54 Quaker pronoun

7 Clinton, Bush or Cheney 8 Like many perps in lineups 9 Try to impress by association 10 Dog show org.

34 Intimate 35 Brandy alternative 36 Theme of “The TellTale Heart�

51 Quaker makers? 57 Long time 59 Twain boy 60 Listerine bottle abbr. 61 Educ. higher-ups?


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, February 1, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Holly Warlick’s mother continues to shape her Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor Fran Warlick has watched her daughter grow from a child dabbling in the world of sports, to a collegiate athlete, to the coach of one of the greatest women’s basketball teams in the nation. She watched her play softball, went to her track meets and cheered her on as a Lady Vol, long before Pat Summitt became a legend and women’s basketball was widely recognized. Now, as her daughter’s title has changed to Lady Vol head coach Holly Warlick, Fran Warlick doesn’t quit. Life hasn’t changed for her, she just continues to enjoy life and support her talented little girl. Fran Warlick works as a hotel clerk. She builds puzzles. She loves playing cards. She cheers for the Lady Vols. At 83 years old, it’s business as usual. She said her kids have told her there’s no need for her to continue working, but she doesn’t like being told what to do. She said sitting at home would drive her up the wall. “I enjoy people and it gets me out of the house,” Fran Warlick said. “I think everybody ought to work with the public at least a week, they couldn’t take it.” Her daughter said she felt Fran Warlick has a special gift. “She seems to have never met a stranger,” Holly Warlick said. The spunky mother of three hasn’t missed a beat over the year.

Her life revolves around staying active, enjoying people and keeping her kids on their toes. Holly Warlick said she thinks there are a few things she’s picked up from her mom, specifically a love for people. “I think, like her, I try to treat everybody as people and as fair as possible,” Holly Warlick said. Fran Warlick could talk about Holly Warlick all day. While Fran Warlick said she’s never been the most demonstrative mother, she shows her love and affection for her daughter by cheering her team on. “We talk every day on the phone and I go to the games,” Fran Warlick said. But her influence began long ago. “I used to snap my fingers and give them one of my looks,” Warlick said of her kids. “I’m very disciplined and I say what I mean and I mean what I say.” Fran Warlick felt this might be one of the reasons her daughter was able to take Pat Summitt’s famous stare. “I had too much respect for Coach Summitt to do anything to deserve her stare,” Holly Warlick said in response. While basketball is everything to Holly Warlick, her mother said she tries to avoid the topic of basketball. She said it’s important to her that her daughter have time away from her job and be able to enjoy life outside of basketball. “She’s heard it all day long so

I try to get on something other than basketball,” Fran Warlick said. While her mother never imagined Holly Warlick would be as successful in her field as she has been, watching her daughter grow up was a path towards where she is today. Fran Warlick said she’s not one to admit it, but she’s proud of her little girl. “She’s always been in sports and always enjoyed them,” Fran Warlick said. “I have to brag a little bit because she always excelled in them.” Softball, track and basketball were key to Holly Warlick’s youth, but Fran Warlick said track was the most nerve-racking sport. “I used to go to some of her track meets and I thought I was gonna chew my fingernails down to the bone.” But Holly Warlick has interests outside of sports, believe it or not. Pets were always a love of hers, including a cat named “Stray” and a dog named “Bud”. Fran Warlick said her daughter took a woodshop class during her high school days at Bearden High School that continues to influence her free time now. “She liked doing things with her hands,” Fran Warlick said. Which is perfect, since basketball relies on hand-eye coordination. For now, Holly Warlick will continue to coach the Lady Vols Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon and Fran Warlick will continue to support her, and work at the Lady Vols head coach Holly Warlick claps for her team against Notre Dame in Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan. 28. hotel.

Tennessee prepares for road test Fickey more than just a tennis player Lopez, McRae ready to step up in absence of injured Golden Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor The Volunteers have won two games in a row, but have lost point guard Trae Golden in the process. That won’t stop Tennessee from trying to continue their momentum as they head to Arkansas for a weekend showdown. They are good at home and when the crowd is behind them they are a tough group to play,” Kenny Hall said. The Vols (11-9, 3-4 SEC) will have to deal with the Arkansas full-court press for the majority of the game, something that isn’t seen often in the college game. They have the ability to wear you down with their pace and their press,” Jordan McRae said. “We just have to be ready for it. In our practices the next few days we just have to make sure everybody is focused and ready for it on Saturday.” The press is something the Vols will be working on extensively during their practice time leading up to the game. If you can’t handle the ball it’s going to be a long night for you,” head coach Cuonzo

Martin said. “They put so much pressure up front you have to get over the top, which is easier said than done. They keep coming, but once you get past them they have guys coming from behind you.” Scoring in transition will be key for Tennessee. “You have easy opportunities to score initially, but you can’t settle for those quick shots,” Martin said. “You have to swing, swing, swing then shoot the 3-point shot so now you have rebounding balance. If you come down one shot and don’t make it then all of a sudden it’s a long rebound and outlet for those guys. “You have to be careful. Shot selection has to be good.” Walk-on sophomore Brandon Lopez will more than likely see the largest amount of minutes he has seen in his young career. Lopez appears prepared for his opportunity. My mindset has always been the same if I’m playing one minute, no minutes or forty minutes,” he said. “Always stay focused because you never know when your

time will come.” Martin is very confident in the young point guard’s ability to orchestrate the Tennessee offense in a hostile environment. He is a smart young man,” Martin said. “He is aware in practice and knows the offense very well. If he makes a turnover it will be a legitimate turnover. It won’t be because he is making careless mistakes with the basketball. He’ll be fine.” The rest of the team is confident in Lopez’s ability to run the offense, and feel the team won’t miss a beat. “It’s not much different with him out there instead of Trae (Golden),” Hall said. “Trae might shoot a little more, but the offense is the offense.” Golden, who was injured late in the first half against Vanderbilt, is doubtful for Saturday’s game due to a strained hamstring. Golden received an MRI, but the test showed no tear. Martin didn’t rule out the possibility of the point guard being back for Wednesday. It just depends on his progress over the next week,” Martin said.

While Fickey’s game does free 20-year-old who likes to most of the talking, the sup- have fun and has a love for Staff Writer For a majority of the players port from family and friends music. “I like to play drums,” Fickey on the UT men’s tennis team may factor into his hot play of said. “Music is a big part of my late, as the Andy Murray fan they aren’t acclimated to the life. It’s something I keep to is on a streak of eight straight surrounding area. myself and takes a little while The team roster size may match wins. When the 5-foot-11-inch, to get stuff out of me.” seem small, with only 10 stuHis teammate and doubles 173-pound sophomore is on dent-athletes, but they come from quite different back- the court he and his team- partner has noticed his shygrounds. In fact many come mates consider him to be very ness of playing music in front of others. from all across the world; “I’ve been to countries such as Latvia, his house a couple Poland, Australia and of times and tried Argentina. to get him to play While many had never and he won’t do known what Big Orange it,” redshirt sophcountry was while growomore Hunter ing up, there is a member Reese said. “But of the team that knows all when your not about the Volunteer tradipaying attention tion and has been playhe’ll bust out a ing college tennis in his beat for twenty backyard. seconds and then One of the two curhe stops once he rent Vols who grew up in realizes people Knoxville is sophomore are paying attenBrandon Fickey. tion.” While many colleges There’s also were after the former something else Knox Webb standout — that many people who was the first player to may not know win four-consecutive state about him: he high school singles titles loves the game of — it was a relative easy baseball as well. decision for him. “I grew up a “It’s great playing in massive baseball your backyard,” Fickey fan,” Fickey said. said. “I’ve always grown “In fact most of up bleeding orange and it’s the guys I played the only thing I’ve ever • Photo courtesy of Tia Patron/Tennessee Athletics with are on the known. That’s one thing Sam (Winterbotham) real- Sophomore Brandon Fickey returns a UT baseball team. ly sold me on when he was forehand against Murray State on Jan. 21. If you would’ve told me about recruiting me.” at 11 or 12 I’d Although he doesn’t live fiery and the type of player be playing tennis in college at home anymore the conveI would’ve thought you were nience of being so close to that hates to lose. Although he may be an crazy.” family pays its dividends. emotional player on the court While you can find Fickey “It’s great seeing everybody that you know come out and there is another side to the supporting his friends that support you,” he said. “My speedy tennis player outside play for the UT baseball team in the spring, he is glad to be family’s all here and it’s always the sports arena. When not working on his playing the sport he found the good for when you need dinserves and volleys he is a care- greatest success in. ner every once in a while.” “Baseball was always what I loved, but I just liked the more individual aspect of tennis,” he said. Like many other athletes he also has his gameday rituals, as he always has to have his tennis bag on the left side when he is on the bench. That may tie in to the fact that tennis is the only sport he plays right-handed. All-in-all Fickey has impressed his teammates and found a place with his hometown team. “I love his fight, he’s awesome as a doubles partner,” Reese said. “He fights exactly like we want him to and you have to respect that.”

Patrick MacCoon


The Daily Beacon