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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Issue 15, Volume 122

New York City UT steam plant renovations in progress trip inspires, educates student journalists R.J. Vogt

News Editor

• Photo courtesy of Andrea Tucker

UT journalism and electronic media students pose with Anderson Cooper during their trip to New York City last week. Students had the opportunity to meet famous media professionals in the Big Apple.

David Cobb Assistant News Editor Times Square, the Empire State Building, tours of NBC, CBS, ABC, Fox News and the Food Network. The chance to meet top television personalities and executives including Anderson Cooper and Michael Strahan. The list continues with Broadway shows and networking events with other media professionals, specifically including some of UT’s most successful alumni. Sounds like an exciting summer, right? A group of 20 students within the School of Journalism and Electronic Media experienced all that and more jam-packed into four-and-a-half days during a trip to New York City just last week. Sam Swan, director of internationalization and outreach professor, has been escorting UT students on a variation of the trip every year since 1987 with the hope of inspiring journalism students to reach for any seemingly lofty goals they have. “There’s no way you could ever do anything like this in a class,” Swan said. “I set up this trip to create opportunities for students to meet alumni working in New York, leaders in the field, people who are reporters and anchors and producers and managers,” Swan said, “so that they can talk to them one-onone so that they can explore internship opportunities and job opportunities. That’s the reason we did it.” For Marvyl Cockrell, a JEM senior, the trip quickly turned from an excuse to see New York into a professionally rewarding experience. “If I had known what I was going to learn this week, I would have paid $5,000 to go on this trip,” Cockrell said. “It was not only getting to have a great time … but just every moment you were thinking ‘how is the next day going to top today.’” For Swan the highlight of the trip was seeing the original map of “CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite,” a legend

in broadcasting. It was something Swan had never seen before in his 26 years of taking the trip. “But there were so many different highlights,” he said. “For students, they may all have something different that they enjoyed.” For Cockrell the best part was the networking opportunities that were provided. She was specifically enthralled by a discussion with Food Network executives on the last day of the trip. “This trip changed my life,” Cockrell said. “I’m not exaggerating. I can’t even describe how much I got out of this trip. For going into this field, these people, who are at the top of their networks giving us personal advice, and they were not sugar-coating anything, it was good for a lot of us to get that feedback.” The majority of the students that went on the trip are enrolled in Swan’s JEM 411 course and will be working in a hands-on environment together for the next few months. The group experience of seeing the rigors and rites of passage that media professionals in New York have taken is something Swan feels will be beneficial for his class. “I do it at the beginning of the semester because most of us are working together to produce a newscast everyday,” Swan said. “So when they can come together as a group and really bond like that, it makes working together in TV so fun, because it’s such a team-oriented thing.” Cockrell encouraged students to participate in the trip, but warned that they need to be prepared to present themselves in a professional manner to some of the best in the business – which in the end is exactly what Swan intended when he started the trip in 1987. “I hope they believe that it doesn’t matter where they’re from, if it’s some small town in Tennessee,” Swan said. “It’s not where you’re from, but if you have the dream to one day make it all the way to the Big Apple, you can do it.”

Construction cone orange has become a common sight around UT these days, and there are plans for new changes on Neyland Drive. In Governor Bill Haslam’s State of the State Address Monday night, he addressed the need to fund UT’s steam plant conversion project, a $25 million project. Dave Irvin, associate vice chancellor for facilities at UT, spoke Tuesday afternoon in front of the steam plant. Originally built in 1961, the plant provides steam for heating, domestic hot water and lab sterilization. Administration has begun a plan to convert it from coal-burning to natural gas-based. “This is a very important project on many levels and we’ve been wanting to do this for a long time,” Irvin said. “Many of the controls are outdated. We can’t get parts for them and they’re tremendously inefficient.” The plant has also faced scrutiny for its pollution. A coal-based operation, UT’s steam plant is the second biggest polluter in eastern Tennessee. Irvin said the conversion will vastly improve the problem. “It will reduce our emissions by 50 percent, our carbon dioxide emissions by two-thirds. To put that in context, that’s the equivalent of taking 7,000 cars off the road on a daily basis,” Irvin said. “It makes a huge impact in terms of our quality, in terms of this city and its livability, and in terms of our carbon footprint.” The design planning has already begun, funded by UT. Irvin said the plant has asked for $24 million of the budget to be funded by the state legislature.

“We’ll be having a lot of conversations with local legislators. We believe we’ll have a definitive answer by the end of the legislative session,” he said. Sustainability has become a hot topic in recent months, and UT recently began offering a degree program on the subject. Nick Alderson, a senior in environmental studies and sustainability, will be one of UT’s first sustainability majors. He feels ambivalently about the new plans for UT steam. “I’m excited about it, but I wish they had gotten more student input so it could have had a larger impact,” Alderson said. “I think they probably would’ve come up with a longer term less emissions plan.” Alderson described a 2011 trip to Ball State in Indiana. They had just installed the largest geothermal system in the United States, rendering their steam generation almost completely free. “I wish the administration were thinking more long-term and really look at the options. We’re going to natural gas, which is fine, but it still has emissions,” Alderson pointed out. “Maybe 20 or 30 years down the road, you’re going to have to switch again to something else.” Last year, some students began protesting against UT’s coal dependency. Alderson serves on the committee for campus environment, and said that this was the chancellor’s response. “The committee supported it because it didn’t really have a choice. This was the plan and they were going forward with it,” he said. The project will increase efficiency by more than 10 percent and capacity by more than 20 percent. Construction could start as early as next fall.

• Photo courtesy of TVA

Bull Run Fossil Plant, near Oak Ridge, has been the single-generator coal-fired power plant in the TVA system since 1967. Bill Haslam has proposed to convert the steam plant on campus from coal to natural gas.

GSS passes leave policy, tables domestic partner benefits confident that the resolution two we can write something ulty, the proposed graduate in and get graduate students leave policy would allow for a won’t get flat out rejected. That confidence comes protected,” Walker said. graduate student to temporarGraduate Student Senate Currently, there is no set ily leave the grad program for from Walker’s claim that at passed a resolution to create least one of above administra- leave of absence policy for all six weeks for four separate reaan official leave of absence tors already supports the leave graduate students. This leaves sons: for childbirth/adoption policy for graduate students. of absence policy, although he them susceptible to being for family or dependent care The revised resolution, personal health reasons which was first draftand military service. ed in November, SGA Elections was approved at Additionally, GSS Monday’s GSS also voted against an meeting. Copies of amendment to the the policy will be “Student Government sent to Chancellor Association 2013 Rules Jimmy Cheek, Dean and Procedures” packet of Student Maxine that would have prohibDavis, Provost ited campaigns and canSusan Martin and didates from using “all Dean of Graduate tuition-funded, univerStudents Carolyn sity, staff, or departmenHodges. tal resources in order to Martin Walker, freely produce campaign the anthropology materials that might othrepresentative of erwise be of monetary GSS and the resoluvalue.” • Photo courtesy of GSS tion’s main author, This means that potensaid the resolution Graduate Student Senate, or GSS, represents the official voice for tially any printer, screen is designed to start graduate students as a branch of SGA. printer or other device conversations and that is funded through debate with UT would not name which specific kicked out of their program tuition, even if available to all administration about developif they have to leave for an students, would be prohibited one. ing a leave policy. He expects “I would like to think that extended period of time due to from being used in an SGA there to be back-and-forth with the definite one support issues such as illness or having campaign. on the policy’s fine points, we have … we could definitely a child. especially when it comes to Inspired by the leave of start a conversation and hopeSee GSS on Page 2 financial concerns, but he is fully within the next year or absence policy used for fac-

Justin Joo

Staff Writer


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

Around Rocky Top

UTPD offers safety classes to Clement students Samantha Smoak Copy Editor

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Matt Moon, senior in journalism and electronic media, signs up to receive more information about “Sex Week” that will be held April 7-12. “Sex Week” will serve as an open forum about sex, sexuality and relationships for students. More information can be found at their website, sexweekut.org.

GSS continued from Page 1 Under Section F, VII, D, 5 of “Rules and Procedures,” SGA campaigns must not only report any “university, staff or departmental resources that utilized to produce campaign materials,” but all of those materials and resources must be available to all students. This includes, but is not limited to “printers, screen printers, dining supplies, art supplies, etc.” The purpose of that section is to prohibit students from taking advantage of resources otherwise unavailable to the student body, such as free printing provided by a department head that a student was close to. Resources that any student could access (such as video cameras checked out of

The Studio in Hodges Library) are perfectly acceptable to use. Had GSS approved the amendment, it would have gone to SGA for a vote; however, GSS voted “nay,” and the amendment became moot. Afterward, GSS approved the “2013 Rules and Procedures,” and it should be fully available to the public by the end of the week on the GSS website, http://web. utk.edu/~gss. Insurance Benefits for Domestic Partners It was also announced that GSS’s resolution to obtain insurance benefits for the homosexual and heterosexual domestic partners of graduate students is again being tabled until the next meeting in February. The resolution would allow those domestic partners to be covered under the insurance policy that married

partners of graduate students can buy into. Amanda Sanford, GSS president, explained that the purpose of tabling the resolution was to give GSS’s 12-person committee more time to fully research the issue before presenting it to GSS for a vote. “We’ve got 12 different people working on the research now,” said Sanford. “We’ll fine tune it and have a solid proposal for the February meeting.” Sanford is confident that a resolution will be fully prepared and drafted in time for the February meeting, saying that it would be the last time that something such as a resolution expanding insurance benefits could be passed. “(February is) going to be the last really meaningful meeting that we can have (this presented), because March is going

to be wrapping up business for the year and the April (meeting) is where I transition it over to the new administration,” she explained. The GSS president is also not deterred by the recent letter from chancellors Cheek and Larry Arrington explaining and again denying the Faculty Senate’s resolution to get benefits for the domestic partners of faculty. Sanford said that GSS will go forward as planned. “We’re going to anticipate a little bit of pushback. …” Sanford said. “We don’t anticipate that the administration is going to be anymore receptive of (a GSS resolution) than they were to the Faculty Senate. But to those of us working on it, that doesn’t mean it lacks merit as a cause.” The next GSS meeting will be held on Feb. 25.

College campus crime is on the way up, but UTPD is working to keep Rocky Top safe. Crimes on college campuses increased by 4.2 percent from 2010 to 2011, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. UTPD is taking steps to help decrease that statistic by educating the student body on campus and personal safety. Tonight from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Clement Hall residents have the opportunity to hear the monthly safety blitz from UTPD. “Blitzes are monthly proactive safety information programs that we have conducted since the fall 2011 semester,” Sergeant Donnie Ross of UTPD’s community relations unit said. “We typically target areas in the Fort Sanders neighborhood that have a high concentration of UT student residents.” Ross said that UTPD received positive responses about safety outreach programs. “We will go door to door and speak with residents about general safety tips, area crime trends and answer any specific questions that they may have,” he said. “This has been received very well in the past from the residents and we have made some positive contacts through these programs.” Ross hopes that through a collaborative effort between UTPD, KPD and UT, students will be more educated about safety issues and how to protect themselves. “We usually have representatives from our department, many departments of Student Life and the Knoxville Police Department. We hope the students gain an understanding about their personal safety and are able to clarify any questions they may have of us,” said Ross.

Michael Miceli, a sophomore in linguistics, doesn’t feel the blitz would be useful. “I honestly believe that anything UTPD would have to say I have heard a dozen times before or is common sense,” Miceli said. Miceli, a former resident of Clement Hall, also said that despite a few disturbances, he felt safe in the area surrounding Clement. “I feel safe around the entire campus, night or day,” he said. “This applies to my time in Clement Hall, despite having to report a violent disturbance where a drunkard was throwing glass bottles ... and another incident where my bike was vandalized.” Miceli attributes his feelings of safety to growing up near a large metropolitan area and with a father who worked in emergency management. He learned how to respond to such disturbances from a young age. Katherine Cahill, a junior in English, said that she would be interested in the blitz, but would only attend if new information were being presented. “I think it depends on whether the talk will provide any new information. If they’re telling us to run if we see an attacker, that’s obviously not something I don’t already know to do,” she said. “If they’re giving us new safety ideas, current statistics on Fort and Knoxville safety, self-defense idea and techniques ... then I think such a talk would be very useful to residents. I would go to talk like that.” UTPD encourages residents to secure their housing and vehicles and avoid allowing strangers into one’s home. They also advise keeping valuables out of sight, avoiding walking alone at night and staying in welllit areas, using the “T” for transportation and reporting suspicious behavior to authorities.

• Photo courtesy of UTPD

A UTPD officer hands out toolkits to students during National Campus Safety Awareness Month near Vol Hall in 2010. UTPD will be holding monthly safety blitzes to provide programs to people in the Fort Sanders area.


Wednesday, January 30, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Play showcases ‘Writers’ program strong female leads begins in Hodges Sarah Bradsher Contributor

• Photo courtesy of All Campus Theatre

All Campus Theatre presents “The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds” by Paul Zindel from Jan. 31-Feb. 3.

Melodi Erdogan Assistant Arts & Culture Editor The undergraduate theatre organization, All Campus Theatre, will be presenting the play, “The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds,” from Jan. 31 to Feb. 3 at the Clarence Brown Lab Theatre. The play was originally written by Paul Zindel in 1964, who earned a Pulitzer Prize award for Drama and a New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for his work on “Gamma Rays.” The play follows a family made up of a single mother named Beatrice and her two daughters, Ruth and Tillie. “The play is a play about how the abuse of bullying and the power of hatred can mold a family into something that it’s not, how it can morph a family into a totally different entity than a family should be,” said sophomore Brock Ward, play director and College Scholar studying therapy in theatre. Written in a Tennessee Williams style, this drama revolves around themes of discrimination, abuse and egotism. The play begins by focusing on the protagonist, Matilda “Tillie” Hunsdorfer, who uses marigold flower seeds that were exposed to radioactivity in her science project for her school’s science fair. Malorie Cunningham, junior in journalism and electronic media, plays Tillie and said she identifies with her character in more ways than one. “Tillie has a lot of strengths in her, her ability to overcome and not care what others think of her, to be her own person and to do her own thing, regardless of what other people think of her, which is a big relation that I have with her,” Cunningham said. “It is able to make her a strong character even though she can come up one dimensional, it can give her more of a platform and more dimensions than just, ‘oh she’s sweet, oh she’s nice,’ it’s like she’s got this strength to her that lets her overcome a lot of things.” The play’s cast is female dominant. Ward said he chose to propose this play to the All Campus Theatre because of its message on bullying and its strong female characters. “It has a strong stance on the effect that bullying can have so I thought that was a message that we could all relate to at this time of our lives, coming from the high school setting,” Ward said. “I wanted to make a stance against bullying but I’ve also seen a bunch of plays where females were used as just companions or almost accessories to male characters. They were never really their own character, they were always half of a couple, or always had something to do with a male character. But in ‘Gamma Rays,’ these are three individual females who have real problems and real lives other than the world of men.” Playing the role of Beatrice is freshman majoring in public relations, Jessica Karsten. Karsten said that the play, in short, is about a bond between a family that can overcome any obstacle. “I think the play will go great, it’s a very entertaining story, but it’s also very encouraging for people that are going through the same problems the characters are,” Karsten said. Ward said the characters and their different sides are his favorite part. “Each character is totally rounded, there are no flat characters in this play, and it’s interesting to see how different their personalities are, like the different masks they put on depending on the characters they talk to,” he said. “When the youngest daughter Tilly is talking to Beatrice, it’s completely different from when she’s talking to Ruth and it’s really interesting to see how the dynamic of a person’s personality can change regarding who they’re talking to.”

Cunningham said her favorite part of the play is being able to see how the three characters deal with the conflicts in their storylines. “I think it shows you three different scenarios,” she said. “I think each woman in this place has dealt with bullying in some sort of way or just something that is messed up in their life and how each one deals with it differently. One lets it destroy them with Beatrice, one becomes a part of it and conforms to it which is Ruth, and Tilly overcomes it.” Sophia Shefner, playing the role of Ruth, said her character is comparable to herself. “Ruth has a little edge to her and I think that anyone who knows me well would agree with that in my personality also,” Shefner, sophomore in journalism and electronic media, said. “She’s dealt with some hardships and that manifests into some hardships into her own life which makes her pretty interesting.” This is Karsten’s first performance with All Campus Theatre and she said her experience so far is “amazing.” “I joined All Campus Theatre and they promoted a whole bunch of auditions that we could go to, and when Brock talked about ‘Gamma Ray’ so much and it seemed like a great opportunity to get involved and the story sounded amazing, it’s a very encouraging story,” she said. Cunningham hopes that students will take something away from seeing “Gamma Rays.” “It’s not just something to entertain but it actually tells a story,” Cunningham said. “I think it will be well received and hopefully (students) can see all the things that we see as characters, all the things that we’ve put into it, and all the different ways each character is as a human, that they can see the little things that they do that can become lost in the story and in essence become a part of it.” Ward said that the students who go to see “Gamma Rays” shouldn’t expect a big fight scene or amazing special effects. “The reason you’re going to come and see it is because it’s a family story and it’s a story we can all relate to and in a story that’s so normal, you can find something extraordinary.” Attending the event would give UT students a nice change in their weekend events, Shefner said. “I think that theatre is a really nice way for people that don’t get exposed to that thing a lot to break out of the monotony of what you do every weekend and I think it’s a really good way to get some culture and see what people are doing artistically on campus, it’s a good way to spend a night and it’s a cheap date,” she said.

Complex, brilliant, dark and ingenious are just a few of the adjectives critics use to describe the writing of Adam Ross. Students had the opportunity to form their own opinions of Ross’s work on Monday during the first “Writers in the Library” event of the semester. Ross read an excerpt from his debut novel “Mr. Peanut,” which was named a 2010 New York Times notable book and also one of the best books of the year by The New Yorker, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New Republic and The Economist. Chris Hebert, the current Jack E. Reese writer in residence at UT, described Ross’s writing to have its own dark edges and an uncomfortable familiarity. Modern day horror and suspense master Stephen King declared that Ross’s novel gave him nightmares. Ross has had the chance to travel the past couple of years doing readings of “Mr. Peanut” and his collection of short stories, “Ladies and Gentlemen.” The audience in the John C. Hodges auditorium on Monday listened to a reading from “Mr. Peanut,” of which he had not done a reading for in over a year. Ross also read a segment that he had never chosen to read aloud before. The acclaimed novel is a story of David and Alice Pepin, a married couple that seem find success in their careers and love lives. However, Ross delves deeper into the enigma that is marriage. The story takes a turn when Alice dies after eating a handful of peanuts, to which she has a terrible food allergy, and David claims it was suicide. The police investigating this puzzling sequence of events, however, believe it was murder. The foundation for this novel is rooted in events that actually took place in Ross’s life. He

began writing the novel when his cousin died after eating peanuts, to which she had a lethal food allergy. Her husband claimed it was suicide, but there were other troubling factors surrounding the incident. The husband told police the reason he could not revive her was because she hid her EPI pens, and shortly after the case he left town and was rarely heard from again. It was after these events that Ross decided to begin work on sharing this story while also exploring the less talked about side of marriage — the angry, spiteful, manslaughter side. “There’s something murderous about long-term commitment,”

Ross said. Despite his affinity for troubled marriages, Ross himself is a happily married man and has been for many years. While his real-life inspiration did not spawn from a failed marriage, his ability to tackle a subject that seems so ordinary yet terrifying has resonated with critics and students alike. Shiloh Jines, senior in English, enjoyed Ross’s unorthodox approach to the concept of matrimony. “I liked his take on marriage,” Jines said. “It’s refreshing that he chose to look at marriage and pregnancy in a horrific way instead of the usual, sympathetic way.”

• Photo courtesy of Adam Ross

Adam Ross, a writer and special projects editor for the Nashville Scene, holds his first written book, “Mr. Peanut.” Ross read at the “Writers in the Library” event on Monday.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Editor’sNote Homelessness puts ‘shivers’ in perspective

Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief I freeze on the regular. I’m cold most of the time. I’m the person that brings a sweater to indoor gatherings during the summer. I usually refuse to venture outside in the winter without at least three layers. Under Armour is my best friend. In some feat of cruel irony, the universe has led me to dwell in an apartment building that will not heat up. I keep my thermostat on 76 degrees, yet it still feels like a meat locker. I have been compelled to use my oven as a source of heat. Many of my friends have expressed genuine concern for my health and safety, as it has become my practice to turn my oven on 400 degrees and leave the door open. When I am at my apartment, which is all too rare, I huddle under an electric blanket. Occasionally, I have been reduced to blowdrying my body with my hair dryer. Let’s just say, times have been hard this winter. At least, I thought they were. Fast forward to this morning, as I was enjoying a brisk run along the greenway near Tyson Park. I was bundled up, benefiting from the increased circulation, and feeling at least human out-of-doors. In January, that really is saying something for me. As I was enjoying the musical stylings of The Royal Concept, I was taken aback by what looked like a pile of garbage stacked up on the side of a hill overlooking the river. Upon closer reflection, I realized that this slipshod pile of trash was in fact a dwelling. A series of tarps created a cave-like effect amidst the brush and brambles. I immediately felt like the most ungrateful, spoiled human to walk the face of the planet. I have spent the last three months

moaning to my friends and family about the trials of inhabiting an apartment that won’t heat above 70 degrees. I have bemoaned my evenings spent huddled under my queen-size chenille electric blanket, underneath my silkquilted coverlet, that rests underneath my hand-embroidered duvet. In short, I realized every complaint I have ever had, really, is null and void. This is not really a column designed to shed light on the homeless problem in Knoxville, because we already know it exists. I would just like us to start living like it exists. Trust me, I’m the first person that needs to wake up. I know there is not a magic bullet for combating homelessness, but I think the effort starts with a general attitude of respect for the reality of poverty. That means guarding our attitudes when it comes to luxuries we have, that most people in the world frankly do not. Everyone has issues in their life, and our problems are real, but they should be put into perspective. We need to appreciate the tremendous amount of opportunity even the poorest of college students has been given, and that should be humbling. If we take a more holistic look at the world around us, it’s exceedingly obvious that there is little for us to be truly bothered about. We complain about poor cell phone reception in certain classrooms. We complain about cover charges in bars. Amidst all of these grievances, we go about our days mainly wrapped up in fulfilling whatever “needs” we have at that given moment. There is probably enough money spent on Natty Light and cigarettes in this town alone to pay for adequate housing for the homeless. We complain about walking to class in the rain. What if we had to sleep in it? —Blair Kuykendall is a senior in College Scholars and economics. She can be reached at bkuykend@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... • Katie Dyson-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Lab experience not just for science majors The Maple Kind by

Hunter Tipton One of the most wonderful aspects about UT is that many various types of students can be educated within its walls. This allows for students of political science, mathematics, English, graphic design and musicology all to interact with each other on campus, further enhancing their education experience. However, one issue I do not understand is the varied sets of expectations placed on these majors. While I realize that it is necessary to consider each field individually when establishing an effective and efficient curriculum, I do think it is always necessary to balance the quality and standards of education in one field to another. For example, I am a senior in microbiology. In order to provide both an academic and a practical education in my field, I am required to take two microbiology labs on top of all the prerequisite labs I’ve taken prior to my major classes (two in physics, three in chemistry, and three or four in biology). Each of these labs is roughly one to two credit hours, but you are guaranteed to spend three or more hours in the lab per credit hour. In advanced micro lab, I received two credit hours for spending roughly seven actual hours in the lab per week. This is amplified in my research lab, where I receive three credit hours for roughly 15 hours of research per week. My labs have been this way throughout my entire college career. I have spent countless more hours in lab than my final transcript will ever reflect. However, I do actually believe that these labs contribute to

my education. I think they are an interesting and necessary part to my full understanding of the world of microbiology. However, many majors at UT lack the educational opportunities that are provided to the science and engineering students. Friends that I have in political science and history have told me that, for the most part, their credit hours are a fairly accurate reflection of the amount of time they are in class. In essence, they actually spend less time per week being educated than many other students at UT. Admittedly, I do not fully understand the curriculum of the various other majors, but I am led to wonder why the university does not feel the need to require smaller workshops for these students as they do for science and engineering students. The idea behind any type of lab is that students receive hands on experience in their field. That way they learn practical skills that may amplify their academic education. This can easily be done in other majors. For example, several three hour writing or research workshops where small groups of students are paired with faculty or graduate students could greatly enhance the educational experience of many non-science students at UT. These “labs” would only further serve to produce better writers and greater intellectuals upon graduation. I think innovative ideas such as this are what it takes for UT to become a Top 25 university. However, it is even more important that UT take necessary steps to produce better students regardless of external rankings. This idea could work to achieve both without asking too much from the students. Hopefully the university administration will continue to further evaluate their programs in order to enhance the learning experience. — Hunter Tipton is a senior in microbiology. He can be reached at jtipto10@utk.edu.

Planning often unreliable in life’s chaos All Things Dark and Twisty by

Samantha Warchol

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

A friend once told me that life and time are like fickle friends. Whether you are a fatalist or an indeterminist, there are some things that go wrong, seem unavoidable or are just plain surprising. As someone who thinks through almost every possibility for almost every situation, I am constantly shocked by how things can be the exact opposite of the 50 different scenarios I imagined. A few weeks ago, I was on my way to meet a new friend, and I planned out at least a dozen topics in my head. If I said this, how could I lead the conversation in this direction? Needless to say, I am frequently wrong. Conversations never go the direction that I am expecting. As a psychology major, I should be more inclined to think about the aspects of life that I always forget: other people are always thinking, just like I am. In the busy college world of organizing schedules and doing classwork, it’s easy to forget about the other variables. People are unpredictable, and no decision we make will have a guaranteed result. My theory is that there are two reasons why things never go as we plan. First, timing is everything. Benjamin Franklin’s old adage, “You delay, but time will not,” is true. Everyday we put off dozens of things, stressing too much about things that either don’t matter or that we could affect if we would just stop thinking and act. Think of every great story of love that was later lost. Timing was the ultimate failure. Consider “Romeo and Juliet.” Romeo arrives too late to save his beloved. What about “Atonement?” Robbie dies only hours before the evacuation

at Dunkirk. These may just be stories, but isn’t there some truth in literature? Timing is one thing all humans share, yet our individual perceptions of it are entirely different. It’s easy to forget that other people had lives before you met them, and these parts of their history determine the decisions they make. Time never seems to go the way we intend. When we’re happy and want time to slow down, it dissipates before us like words being erased off of a piece of paper. When we want something to simply move on quickly, time slows down, refusing to leave. Second, circumstances are unavoidable. At the beginning of the year, I knew what clubs I would be in and who I would hang out with. Plans change. I ended up leaving the club I had planned on loving. By a stroke of chance or fate, I found myself searching for something to kill my extra energy. My roommate left me a list of clubs. I emailed four, and only one emailed me back. That club, which I never would have known about otherwise, now has a permanent spot in my weekly planner. I have re-ignited a childhood passion and talk to people I may have never met. This wouldn’t have happened if the person who emailed me back had been too busy to check their email that day. If my original club had worked out, I would not have found myself in the club I am in now. Every person has their own time and circumstances. We can never truly plan ahead, because we’re all variables in the lives of everyone else. I personally believe that the end result is set, and we only choose the path we take to get there. Neither the path nor the result should be the focus, though, because we can only control how we use our time and circumstances to make decisions. Life isn’t what we want it to be. Instead, it just is. — Samantha Warchol is a sophomore in psychology. She can be reached at swarchol@ utk.edu.


Wednesday, January 30, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

Dooley moves on Defensive consistency biggest question for Lady Vols from Vols to Cowboys Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor So the Dallas Cowboys are gonna hire Derek Dooley. He gets to work with Dallas head coach and former co-worker Jason Garrett as the Cowboys’ wide receivers coach. They both worked together under Nick Saban for the Miami Dolphins. I wrote “Dooley column� on the Beacon whiteboard for the last time today. It was a rather sad moment. He was the inspiration of so many unread columns and debates. Tennessee said they moved on. They were done with Dooley. Athletics Director Dave

Hart broke up with Dooley in November, and Tennessee and its three-year head coach parted ways. There was the occasional Dooley sighting at Publix or the mall, but they were always uncomfortable and awkward. Fans would try not to stare and Dooley would avoid conversations. Instagram photos would appear, along with a few shocking Snapchats, but mostly just awkward silence. Dooley was no longer praised by friends and relatives of UT’s football program. Fans didn’t bow at his feet and he no longer condescended to their wishes and acknowledged their existence. It wasn’t one of those breakups where the people involved remain friends. The breakup was too painful and there was way too much gossip involved to recover well. UT was the first to move on with the hire of Tennessee head coach Butch Jones. No one knows how Dooley responded, but Tennessee and its fans fol-

lowed Jones’ Twitter account with no regrets. They were done with Dooley. Until Dooley moved on. Then the emotions began again and, much like a relationship, fans were upset that he could move on, that he didn’t just curl up and die at the thought of never being “with� the program again. Facebook and Twitter blew up with, “Who would hire a guy like him?� and “He can’t coach.� Much like any broken relationship, the response to Dooley taking a position with Dallas was amazement and condescension for Dooley, Dallas, Garrett and UT. Maybe Tennessee fans just need to curl up with Jones, pull out their friends, Ben and Jerry (to quote a co-worker), and watch a few highlight reels. Maybe then they’ll officially be able to “move on.� But with one last column, I’ve realized I have to move on. No more Dooley columns. Hey Butch, what’s new?

39 minutes and 30 seconds – she went to the bench once but after a errant pass out of bounds the game went to a media timeout and Diggins returned. Outside of Glory Johnson’s weekend performance in last year’s SEC Tournament, I haven’t seen that level of play in women’s basketball. Against the likes of Baylor and Stanford, the Lady Vols had the same problems: stopping easy baskets and forcing the opponent into bad shots. Yes, all three of these teams, at Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon the time the Lady Junior guard Meighan Simmons Vols played them, were in the top attempts a deep 3-pointer over Allthree nationally American Skylar Diggins against (Stanford No. 1, Notre Dame on Monday. Notre Dame No. 2 trying to coach their team out and Baylor No. 3). of the “lulls and valleys,â€? but so Yes, those are difficult far it hasn’t happened in these games, and I didn’t expect games. Tennessee to come away from When they’ve gotten in those three games unblem- those valleys offensively ished. But I did expect them against quality opponents, to be within single digits at the the defense hasn’t been there final horn at least once. to bail the team out. Against This season, more so than Baylor, Tennessee trailed by as in recent years, Tennessee is many as 28, Stanford 19 and dependent on its defense get- Notre Dame 19. It’s difficult to ting stops and creating points. come back from deficits that The Lady Vols’ offense just large. isn’t consistent enough against Yes, there is still time to corpremier opponents to slack on rect these things, but Monday the other end of the floor. night was the final great test That caliber opponent is for the team before post-season going to be able to take away play. Until then there will still facets of the gameplan and be questions of whether or not defense has to keep you alive. this Tennessee team can get it Warlick and her staff and done with the best of the best.

Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor The Lady Vols basketball program has been built on two pillars: defense and rebounding. This season Tennessee has been pretty good outmanning their opponents on the glass – UT has been out-rebounded just four times in 20 games – but against the best competition, defense has let the No. 9 Lady Vols down. Monday night’s game is a prime example. No. 2 Notre Dame was able to run simple backdoor cuts for easy buckets time after time. “Our defense let us down tonight,� senior Taber Spani said. “We rely on playing solid defense but tonight we gave up too many easy layups and it killed us.� Tennessee is young, I will give them that. But Holly Warlick and the players won’t use it as an excuse, so I won’t use it as one for them. The Lady Vols expect to win and they expect to play solid defense regardless of who’s on the floor and what their age is. Poor defense play wasn’t the entire story of why the Lady Vols dropped to 1-3 against top 10 teams this year. I have to give credit where credit is due and Skylar Diggins was unbelievable. The All-American posted a career high 33 points against the Lady Vols, on two days rest and played roughly

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Former Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley has reportedly been offered, but not yet accepted, the position of wide receivers coach for the Dallas Cowboys.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS Vols hold off rival Vandy, 58-57 Matt Gray Staff Writer The enduring rivalry between Tennessee and Vandy usually sets the stage for a tight contest, and Tuesday’s game was no different. The Volunteers (11-8, 3-4 SEC) squeaked by the Commodores (8-11, 2-5) by one point, 58-57, in a last second contest. The Commodores had a chance to win the game at the end, but sophomore guard Kedren Johnson missed a contested layup and freshmen guard Kevin Bright missed the put back as time expired. Vol head coach Cuonzo Martin said rivalry games like this are never easy, no matter what the opponent’s record. “Any rivalry game, whether it be high school or college, doesn’t matter records, personnel, it’s going to be a fight,” said Martin. “I knew it was going to be a boxing match. So that was never the case I knew those guys wouldn’t roll over. Kevin (Stallings) does a great job of preparing those guys. They run the Princeton style offense, which the last time we saw that was against Georgetown, so it’s not something you normally see.” Tuesday’s game marked the Vols’ third game in six days, a feat that would take a physical toll on the most fit of athletes. “Like I told the guys after the game, three games in six days, I was impressed

with the way they compet- he operates. He isn’t a tra- when I have fun. You know ed, with the way all the ditional guy who’s back is it’s easy to say, but with the games went down, (from) always to the basket. He game not going your way, a an emotional standpoint it likes to face up and post up lot of things not going your can take a real toll on you,” off the block so just really way, it’s just hard to have Martin said. “So I was very getting a feel for how he fun,” said Stokes. “These impressed with the guys fin- plays.” last two games, I’ve had ishing it out.” Stokes is attributing his fun.” Sophomore guard Josh success the past two games Tennessee will be back Richardson, who played to the simple idea of hav- in action Saturday at 31 of the game’s 40 min- ing fun. Arkansas. Tip-off is set for utes, said he felt a little bit “I think I play better 4 p.m. “winded” toward the end of the game, but nothing too serious. “We felt good. I know I felt good,” Richardson said. “I got a little fatigued there at the end but it’s just something you have to play through.” Sophomore Jarnell Stokes certainly didn’t look tired at any point in the game. Stokes led all scorers with a double-double performance of 19 points and also added 11 rebounds. After a slow start to the season, Stokes has had two impressive games in a row, totaling 28 rebounds between the two. Martin said he knew Stokes would come around eventually. “I saw it coming. He’s taking his time, very aggressive, but I also think it is the development of the Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon guys around him,” said Martin. “They Sophomore forward Jarnell Stokes attempts a dunk over are making shots, Dai-Jon Parker against Vanderbilt on Tuesday. Stokes making plays, get- scored 19 points with 11 rebounds against Vanderbilt, ting a feel for how making it his sixth career high.

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Warlick’s journey grounded in past, family Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor Lady Vols head coach Holly Warlick’s mother, Fran Warlick, never dreamed that her daughter would one day be the face of the very team she played for. Cheering her on game after game and watching her little girl grow from a sports fan, to an athlete, to a coach was just a part of life. Fran Warlick said she thinks the coaching position is a wonderful accomplishment and something neither Warlick ever thought possible. “It’s been quite an experience and she’s just elated,” Fran Warlick said. The years and the program have been good to Holly Warlick and Fran Warlick said she thinks her daughter’s success is due to her own drive, head coach emeritus Pat Summitt’s influence and the support of Tennessee itself. “I’ve really appreciated all that the university and Pat has done for Holly,” Fran Warlick said. “I feel like Pat just took her under her wing and she’s really enjoyed Pat and more or less puts her up on a pedestal. She thinks she’s the ‘cat’s pajamas.’” During Holly Warlick’s 32 years (coaching and playing) at UT, her mother said she never heard her daughter say anything negative about Summitt. “(Summitt’s) decisions were her decisions and (Holly) went along with them,” Fran Warlick said. Summitt’s decisions continue to shape Warlick’s coaching style. “I think it’s everything with her. I’m sure she has some of her inputs, but I’m sure a lot of it stems from her playing and coaching with Pat,” Fran Warlick said. “I think (Summitt’s) been a great influence.” Fran Warlick said when she hears people talk about Summitt’s stare and determination she just shakes her head. She said that while Holly Warlick has worked with Summitt for several years, it was growing up that developed her ability to deal with “the look.” Holly Warlick said she had too much respect for

Summitt to not do what she was told. As with her mother, she was afraid of the consequences and tried not to do anything to deserve them. “They kept talking about Pat’s look, I used to snap my fingers and give them one of my looks,” Fran Warlick said of her kids. “I’m very disciplined and I say what I mean and I mean what I say.” That said, the transition from associate head coach under Summitt to head coach is a process that had more than fans nervous. “Those are hard shoes to fill,” Fran Warlick said. “People would tell me, ‘I’d rather be the second one to follow Pat Summitt, not the first one,’ but (I) always said ‘somebody’s gotta do it.’” The support of Lady Vol fans made the transition less difficult. “It’s so nice that they’re so complimentary,” Fran Warlick said of her daughter’s fans. “It gives you courage and I try to pass it on to Holly that they’re behind her.” Fran Warlick said her first thoughts when she heard Holly Warlick would be transitioning to head coach were toward seating. “Does this mean I get better seats?” Fran Warlick said, jokingly. “I’m gonna see where Cuonzo Martin’s mother sits.” In reality, Fran Warlick said she’s glad she doesn’t sit near Holly or the team. “Are you kidding?” Fran Warlick answered. “I’d be saying, ‘for God’s sake, what are you putting her in for? She hasn’t hit a basket all night!’” For now, the two Warlick ladies are enjoying the season they’re in, coaching and cheering on their Lady Vols. Holly said she thinks the transition has been incredibly smooth. “As a player I was taught all the aspects of coaching and the positions and I thought Pat’s always done a great job in preparing myself and anybody else to learn the game,” Holly Warlick said. “We just didn’t think about this happening,” Fran Warlick said. “She was blessed to be chosen.”

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