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Issue 10, Volume 122

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

SAA offers perks for students willing to serve

Study abroad fair offers route to ‘defining experience’ David Cobb Assistant News Editor

• Photo courtesy of Students Alumni Associates

Students Alumni Associates watch a home football game at the press box in Neyland Stadium. SAA will host a Spring Open House for interested future members at 6:30 p.m. at Tyson House on Jan. 24.

Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief For students who have always dreamed of watching games from the presidential skybox in Neyland Stadium, joining the Student Alumni Associates could be a great way to serve their peers while enjoying the perks that come with playing host to UT’s president. “SAA is one of UT’s most premier student organizations, and, with its privileges, come responsibilities,” said Taylor Odle, junior SAA representative. “Externally,

SAAs are the official host of the President of (UT). We network with accomplished alumni ... and enjoy other university and community benefits. Internally, we have the opportunity to work together with some of UT’s most accomplished and promising student leaders to better our campus and community.” Those interested in learning more about the unique set of opportunities open to SAA officers will get their chance at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday during an informational session in Tyson House. “The membership drive kickoff is a great chance to

get a good feel for what SAA is, see what we stand for, and to better understand our membership process,” Odle said. “Potential new members will get to meet current SAAs and our exec board, and get an inside scoop into this year’s membership theme and structure. This is a great opportunity for both those definitely interested in applying and those who are simply considering it — everyone is welcome.” For new students, serving as an SAA officer could be an accessible way to get involved at UT. “SAA is a way to truly

invest in the university,” Becca Keyes, senior SAA representative, said. “Student Alumni Associates exists to serve students ... past, present, and future. ... The experiences in SAA are unparalleled. It truly connects you to the student body in a way that strengthens your love for the university and knowledge of it. It is an amazing experience and an honor to be a part of. If you have a servant’s heart, than SAA is the place for you. That is what we are all about.” See SAA on Page 2

Forum to educate on global climate change Baker Center to host interdisciplinary discussion with geographer R.J. Vogt News Editor While students are bundled up, climate change is heating up public policy across the globe. The Baker Center’s Energy and Environmental Forum begins its 2013 schedule with a visit from Dr. Karen Seto on Thursday. The Yale professor will discuss the methods of developing countries to combat climate change, specifically in China and India. “Her work has been in proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and other top-notch journals,” said Jacob LaRiviere, a professor in economics and member of the interdisciplinary committee that plans the forums. He added, “Academics are more and more looking for opportunities to present their work to an interdisciplinary audience, and she is a great example of that, as a geographer.” Climate change is especially relevant after President Obama’s recent inauguration comments. He made addressing climate change the primary policy objective for his second term. For Kenna Rewcastle, a sophomore in environmental and soil science, the president’s message resonates with the upcoming lecture.

“He’s been one of the first big-time politicians that mentions climate change, and of course, a big player in climate change is developing countries,” Rewcastle said. “Students, especially around UT, seem to be taking an interest in climate change. And having someone from somewhere as prominent as Yale come speak to us about ways that China and India are developing and where they fall. It’s something to get us thinking.” Rewcastle hopes to be excused from her evening’s class to attend the lecture, the first of the 2013 Energy and Environmental Forum. Nissa Dahlin-Brown, the associate director of the Baker Center, explained that the lectures occur four times per semester. “It’s usually packed, probably 80 or 90. It’s really neat, because they’re from all colleges. Students and faculty from various places all have an interest in this stuff,” she said. The interdisciplinary aspect of the forum is especially important to LaRiviere. To the average economics professor, energy and the environment may not rank highly on his list of priorities. LaRiviere, however, considers public policy as something for everybody. “I just think it’s an example

of the Baker Center’s continued commitment to energy and the environment across all disciplines, with the goal of improving public policy,” he said. The lecture is from 3:30

to 5 p.m. on Thursday in the Toyota Auditorium of the Baker Center. There will be 45 minutes of presentation, followed by 30 minutes of mediated discussion.

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See STUDY ABROAD on Page 2

• Photo courtesy of Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News Service

Karen Seto, associate professor of urban environment at Yale University, will share her research on the topic of sustainability in China and India in the Baker Center on Jan. 24.

The Daily Beacon is printed using soy based ink on newsprint containing recycled content, utilizing renewable sources and produced in a sustainable, environmental responsble manner.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON: Page Page Page Page Page

Simona Koumtcheva and Mackenzie Higgins enjoyed their time studying abroad so much that upon returning from their trips they began working in the Programs Abroad Office to implore others to take part in what they termed as “defining experiences.” Koumtcheva, a junior in international business major, studied at the University of Nottingham in London and saw over 20 cities in her time overseas. Higgins, a senior in global studies, studied in Buenos Aires, and among her many experiences she saw one of the world’s most revered athletes, Argentinian soccer player Lionel Messi, play in person. Higgins and Koumtcheva are Peer Advisers for the Programs Abroad department and will be among the many representatives on hand at the UC ballroom today from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. channeling their passion towards helping other students get on the path — or on a plane — to experiencing the world. “Traveling is awesome, so why would you not want to do that, that’s my first instinct,” Simmons said. “But I’m trying to get other students to see it in that light because, really it’ll change your outlook and perspective on everything.” Higgins and Koumtcheva

agreed that many of the commonly used excuses for why students don’t study abroad, such as finances, academic program requirements being a hindrance, and a fear of classes not transferring back, can be alleviated by simply planning a study abroad trip ahead of time. “We can get everybody abroad,” Koumtcheva said. “But you can’t put off thinking about it. If it’s something you want to do, you have to think about if from the beginning.” The Study Abroad Fair will provide students with the information necessary to begin the process. Those in attendance will learn about semester, academic year, summer and mini-term programs, meet students like Koumtcheva and Higgins who have studied abroad, and learn how to use financial aid and scholarships in their travels. “I think that advice given from fellow students is very helpful to students thinking of studying abroad,” said Programs Abroad coordinator Heather Grigsby, who is overseeing the event. “There may be topics a student thinking about studying abroad would be more comfortable discussing with a peer, and hearing about the benefits of an experience abroad from someone who has just returned can be very encouraging and motivating.”

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Tennis starts season hot on page 6


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 23, 2013 News Editor RJ Vogt

CAMPUS NEWS SAA continued from Page 1 Simona Koumtcheva and Mackenzie Higgins enjoyed their time studying abroad so much that upon returning from their trips they began working in the Programs Abroad Office to implore others to take part in what they termed as “defining experiences.” Koumtcheva, a junior in international business major, studied at the University of Nottingham in London and saw over 20 cities in her time overseas. Higgins, a senior in global studies, studied in Buenos Aires, and among her many experiences she saw one of the world’s most revered athletes, Argentinian soccer player Lionel Messi, play in person. Higgins and Koumtcheva are Peer Advisers for the Programs

Abroad department and will be among the many representatives on hand at the UC ballroom today from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. channeling their passion towards helping other students get on the path — or on a plane — to experiencing the world. “Traveling is awesome, so why would you not want to do that, that’s my first instinct,” Simmons said. “But I’m trying to get other students to see it in that light because, really it’ll change your outlook and perspective on everything.” Higgins and Koumtcheva agreed that many of the commonly used excuses for why students don’t study abroad, such as finances, academic program requirements being a hindrance, and a fear of classes not transferring back, can be alleviated by simply planning a study abroad trip ahead of time. “We can get everybody abroad,” Koumtcheva said. “But

rvogt@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor David Cobb

dcobb3@utk.edu

you can’t put off thinking about it. If it’s something you want to do, you have to think about if from the beginning.” The Study Abroad Fair will provide students with the information necessary to begin the process. Those in attendance will learn about semester, academic year, summer and mini-term programs, meet students like Koumtcheva and Higgins who have studied abroad, and learn how to use financial aid and scholarships in their travels. “I think that advice given from fellow students is very helpful to students thinking of studying abroad,” said Programs Abroad coordinator Heather Grigsby, who is overseeing the event. “There may be topics a student thinking about studying abroad would be more comfortable discussing with a peer, and hearing about the benefits of an experience abroad from someone who has just returned can be very encouraging and motivating.”

Around Rocky Top

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Wesley Lawrence Taylor, as Malcolm X, and Jeff Robinson, as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., perform “The Meeting” as part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration at the UC Auditorium on Jan. 21.

STUDY ABROAD

studied abroad, the fair will also feature representatives from programs that UT partcontinued from Page 1 ners with. In addition to the presence Students unsure of where to of UT faculty members and start in learning about their students who have previously options can get general infor-

mation from official Programs Abroad tables that will be at the front of the room. “Although the fair is busy and can sometimes be overwhelming,” Grigsby said, “it’s in a convenient location to be

able to browse the offerings and discuss questions in person with individuals who represent programs or who have experienced studying abroad themselves.”

Professor researches streets, history Staff Reports

Streets connect us and define our humanity. Their names tell us where we work, where we play, and where we live. Streets dedicated to Martin Luther King, Jr. do all these things as well, but they also bring to life some of the successes — and continuing struggles — America faces in the civil rights arena. Derek Alderman, professor and department head of geography at UT, is a specialist on streets named for King. Alderman is a cultural and historical geographer; he looks into how places are used to

express culture and commemorate the past, and how these places become important. When Alderman began his research on streets named after King in the mid-1990s, he looked at three things: “How many streets are named for King, and where are they located nationally? What struggles do AfricanAmericans face when trying to commemorate King in cities? And what are the specific locations of streets named after King within a city, and what does this say about the struggles African-Americans face in memorializing the

American civil rights movement?” Alderman’s research shows that more than 900 streets are named after King. These streets are in 40 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, and the streets are densely clustered in the southeastern United States. “About 70 percent of streets named for King are found in the southeastern states,” Alderman said. “That shouldn’t be surprising, the Southeast was the major location for the civil rights battle.” Although the number of streets dedicated to King con-

tinues to grow, the controversy surrounding renaming a street in his memory remains. “I believe early proponents of honoring King with street names thought it would be an easier and less costly way of making King’s name visible to everyone in the city, but they found out it could be just as controversial,” said Alderman. The opposition comes mainly from the desire to protect one’s turf. For more information about streets named after King, visit Alderman’s website at mlkstreet.com.


Wednesday, January 23, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Melodi Erdogan

merdogan@utk.edu

Backup Planet mixes genres for unique musical blend Matthew Reed Staff Writer Those who ventured out despite the weather were certainly granted a memorable experience, especially for anyone willing to make the trek over to Market Square. Local band Backup Planet performed at the Preservation Pub on Thursday. Though a relatively new band, all members have ties to UT and live in the Knoxville area. Ben Cooper (vocals, piano, synthesizer, organ)is a senior in marketing, Gavin Donati (guitar, vocals) and Jack Willard (bass) both studied music at UT, and Chris Potocik (drums, percussion) studied psychology. Their sound is difficult to categorize, but it could be described as “progressive funk rock,” according to Cooper. “Our influences and sound can encompass everything from Thievery Corporation and Daft Punk to John Coltrane and Phish. With our interests being so diverse, we incorporate elements of jazz, funk, progressive rock, roots and electronic music into our own,” Cooper said. Those familiar with bands like the Allman Brothers, Lettuce, Umphrey’s McGee and Phish are aware of the awe-inspiring modes through which these types of musical groups are able to channel multi-genre sounds and rhythms into a coherent end-result. That mixture is almost always something new and innovative. The unique aspect of performing in this manner, and incorporating improvisation into the picture, is that it requires a strong element of trust and respect among band members. Donati explained the band’s chemistry as a collaborative force. “When I’m taking a lead, I think of it more as the band traveling in a vertical, linear direction

as one unit,” Donati said. “Not necessarily a ‘solo’ that departs from other members. I really don’t listen to myself playing, and keep my volume turned down so I can hear the keys, high hats, kick drums and bass to stay in the groove of the song. The song really provides the basic structure of where things will go, with bass and drums giving it the syncopated backbone, and synth, keys and guitar building harmony and melody off that. And from there, things can really take off.” A packed house of snow-coated Knoxvillians were ecstatic throughout the band’s performance. Songs ranged from original tunes written by band members to renditions such as The Allman Brothers’ instrumental classic “Jessica,” Bill Withers’ “Use Me” and Phish’s “Tweezer Reprise.” “For me, playing music is the purest form of emotion,” Cooper said. “To be able to extend yourself through an instrument and share that with others is a special thing.” The diverse influences of the band — Ben’s passion for progressive, funk and electronic; Gavin’s affinity for jazz-fusion and southern rock; Jack’s experience with jazz; and Chris’s interest in country and roots music — seemed to be a favorite aspect among concert-goers. Tucker Lebsack, senior in advertising and self-proclaimed music enthusiast, echoed this sentiment. “Their originals are really unique and the covers are all well done. ... One of the best local bands in Knoxville and they have only played a handful of shows,” Lebsack said. For details regarding future live performances and other band info, check out Backup Planet online at https://www.facebook.com/ BackupPlanetMusic.

Beyonce, others serenade inauguration crowd The Associated Press

Beyonce drew a loud cheer at the inauguration Monday even before her impressive rendition of the national anthem. But in the role she played four years ago singing for the president and first lady at the inaugural ball was her “Dreamgirls” co-star Jennifer Hudson. If President Barack Obama’s first inaugural theme seemed to be summed up by Beyonce’s “At Last,” this time it was Hudson’s version of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together.”

Hudson was among the entertainment at Monday night’s inaugural balls, joined by Stevie Wonder and Alicia Keys, who modified her hit “Girl on Fire” to sing “He’s the president and he’s on fire ... Obama’s on fire. Obama’s on fire.” The crowd at the official Inaugural Ball joined in with the Grammy-nominated anthem “We Are Young” by Fun. And Wonder got small knots of dancers going with crowd-pleasers such as “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours.”

• Photo courtesy of Backup Planet

Backup Planet bassist Jack Willard plays at the band’s live set at Sunspot on the Strip.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Editor’sNote Buchanan: Vol, economist, baller Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief Immortals are as rare as a pleasant trip to UT’s bookstore, and thus, this week I must bid farewell to one of UT’s greatest heroes, James M. Buchanan. You’ve probably never heard of him, and that, my dear readers, is no small tragedy. A Nobel laureate in the field of economics, Buchanan died earlier this month on Jan. 9 after pioneering the field of public choice. He received his master’s degree from UT and a doctorate from the University of Chicago. He spent most of his career as a professor at the University of Virginia and George Mason. Why should you care about the passing of an economist? Aside from sheer moral imperative, fellow Volunteer Buchanan blazed a trail straight through the crag between political science and economics to understand the world in a more comprehensive way. His work was sometimes disrespected because of its departure from traditional mathematical economic analysis, but his theories on selfinterest are used internationally as a key to understanding political strategies. Take Congress, for instance. Buchanan was one of the first economists to address the elephant in the room: politicians are not saints. Thus, their actions are never executed out of pure public duty. In economic models, the state was traditionally viewed as a homogenous actor bent on maximizing public welfare. Essentially, it existed as a potential remedy for economic problems.

Instead, Buchanan called for economic analysis that recognized that politicians don’t check self-interest at the doors of the Capitol. He did not suggest that politicians have no interest in general welfare but that traditional economic decision-making theories can be applied to the choices faced by politicians. He suggested that sweeping attempts at socialism represented governmental overreach. When he applied incentivebased reasoning to government actors, he found that governments have limits. Ever humble, Buchanan chalked up his contrast between socialism and political reality to mere “interpretation of what can everywhere be observed.” For the economics nerds out there, his contribution is integral to modern economics. Pork barrel spending, growth in bureaucracies, rent-seeking behavior and tax exemptions can all be explained through basic public choice analysis. Most relevant, though, are his commentaries on excessive deficit spending. Eerily prophetic might perhaps be a better term. His insights into government spending revealed that politicians have little incentive to ever cut spending. Political capital is won by providing voters with perks that range from tax breaks to local infrastructure improvements. Buchanan’s work was featured in this week’s issue of The Economist, in which it is cited as an in-depth analysis of political philosophy, an “outlier” in the field of economics. Perhaps that’s why he is considered a founder in the study of political economy. Even if you think economics is drab, you should still appreciate a Volunteer who did what he did, and did it well. — Blair Kuykendall is a senior in College Scholars and economics. She can be reached

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

DOTTY... • Katie Dyson-Smith

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Te’o situation puzzles everyone The Maple Kind by

Hunter Tipton In light of the recent Manti Te’o madness, I would like to offer up my own opinion on the situation. For those of you who have somehow missed one of the largest and strangest sports stories of all time, here’s a little background for you: Manti Te’o just completed his senior football season at the University of Notre Dame in which he was the starting middle linebacker and a finalist for the Heisman Trophy. At some ambiguous time in 2012, Teo’s girlfriend, Lennay Kekua, gets in a near-fatal car wreck and is on the brink of death for some time. Upon recovery, doctors discover she has leukemia, and Kekua begins treatment. Later in the season, Te’o’s grandmother and girlfriend both die within a few hours of each other. The day after receiving this news, Te’o plays an outstanding game against Michigan State which the Fighting Irish went on to win. After this story hit the national media, Teo’s situation quickly becomes an inspirational tale. He gives several interviews to media outlets such as ESPN, discussing his pain and how he had to fight through it for his fans and loved ones. Here’s where the story begins to break down. The sports website Deadspin.com reported earlier this month that the entire story involving Kekua was a hoax, claiming that she never existed. Despite earlier reports from Te’o’s father that Te’o had spent time with Kekua face to face on several occasions, Notre Dame held a press conference saying that Te’o and Kekua’s relationship was entirely online, and that Te’o was solely a

victim in this whole experience. With all of that background out of the way, I only see a few potential scenarios here that make sense: 1. Te’o is unbelievably and monumentally stupid. Assuming he was actually tricked into all of this by some sociopathic weirdo, doesn’t it also make him the worst boyfriend ever? His girlfriend got in a near-fatal car wreck, had cancer for an extended period of time, AND had a funeral — NONE OF WHICH TE’O ATTENDED. I mean, I suppose weirder things have happened, but isn’t that one of the most unbelievable stories of all time? I find this one incredibly hard to buy. 2. Te’o intentionally makes up the whole story to make himself a media darling and help his Heisman Trophy campaign. If this is the true scenario, it worked well for a while. Sports Illustrated, ESPN, CBS, NBC, Yahoo Sports and USA Today all ran stories on Kekua and Te’o’s relationship and how it was affecting one of the NCAA’s best players on one of the NCAA’s best teams. His national profile rose significantly because of this heartbreaking situation, and no doubt made him more prominent in the minds of Heisman voters. To me, this scenario makes the most sense. There are other speculations that make some sense, such as that he lied as a cover for being gay and the lies spun out of control (Te’o is from a devout Mormon family, was one of the most popular people at a Catholic school, and played in a sport that is not known for being welcoming to homosexuality), but I think the two I listed are far more likely. Either way, this situation is just too weird. We may never actually know the entire story or motive for whoever perpetuated it, but we can already be sure it will be one of the biggest sports stories of 2013. — Hunter Tipton is a senior in microbiology. He can be reached at jtipto10@utk.edu.

Fight toward goals valued All Things Dark and Twisty by

Sammantha Warchol

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blair Kuykendall

editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com

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The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com. LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for publication by the editor on the basis of space, timeliness and clarity. Contributions must include the author’s name and phone number for verification. Students must include their year in school and major. Letters to the editor and guest columns may be e-mailed to letters@utdailybeacon.com or sent to Blair Kuykendall, 1340 Circle Park Dr., 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The Beacon reserves the right to reject any submissions or edit all copy in compliance with available space, editorial policy and style. Any and all submissions to the above recipients are subject to publication.

We’ve all heard the old saying, “Anything worth having is worth fighting for.” I’ll admit that this statement can be annoying, because sometimes, let’s face it: we want things to come easily. Life, though, is a balance of finding out what we actually want and then figuring out how to get it. Sometimes we don’t get what we want, and it ends up being a blessing in disguise. Other times we get exactly what we want, and it becomes our worst nightmare. If you are anything like me, then you tend to hold back on doing things you truly want out of fear of failing. I always think the cost of failure or hurt is worse than the possible benefits. There are so many ways to fail: a bad relationship, making bad decisions, and even just making decisions that personally don’t make us happy. It is so easy to look around and find people who have failed in many ways, because the catch is that everyone has failed. I know a guy who has always regretted not asking out that girl he liked because he was too nervous that she would humiliate him by saying no. In his own way he has failed, because he didn’t follow his heart and fight for what he wanted. It sounds cliché, but the worst thing that he could hear if he took a chance with the girl is two little letters put together, “no.” That one word would hurt for a while, but not forever. Humans are resilient, and each experience we have is a lesson. Avoiding disappointment and fear of judgment seem to be at the heart of many decisions that we make. There are so many

people out there who are in a club or a sport that they don’t even enjoy, just because they don’t know how to get out of it. It’s scary telling someone that you care about that you don’t share his or her interest or passion for something. It’s hard to be honest with other people sometimes, because for most people getting out of something is substantially more difficult than getting yourself into it. It’s easy to be idealistic and want to do everything and please everyone; yet, there are also times that being honest to both yourself and those people around you is the only way. I, on the other hand, struggle with getting myself invested in things. I am afraid of taking chances and fighting for what I want. At times I find myself standing by motionless, watching other people get what I want, even when I rightfully deserve it. I (we) know that failure and disappointment are a part of life. There are times when my standing by doing nothing has been a form of failure. For some, the fear of disappointing others is preventing them from truly enjoying what they want. Each of these moments develops us into the people we want to be. As nice as it sounds, who really wants to be someone who has never been hurt? It sounds great, but if you are never hurt then you never can realize what it truly means to be happy. All disappointments and failures are only temporary. There is always another opportunity to succeed, just like anyone who truly cares about you will understand you making a choice to be happy. Therefore, it’s my thought that people hold back for fear of failing. As Robert Schuller has asked many others, “What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?” — Samantha Warchol is a sophomore in psychology. She can be reached at swarchol@ utk.edu.


Wednesday, January 23, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Vols prepare for ‘payback week’ Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor Because of a quirk in the SEC scheduling the Vols are playing both Ole Miss and Alabama just two weeks after their first matchups. The Vols lost to both the Rebels, 92-74, and Crimson Tide, 68-65, in the first week of conference play, putting Tennessee in an early hole. Forward Jarnell Stokes is excited about the opportunity to play two teams they have lost to on a quick turnaround. “It gives us a great chance to make up for some of the things that we did and improve our game,� Stokes said. “We’re back on the road so this is a chance to turn the seasons around.� Tennessee currently sits at 1-3 in conference and hope to close the gap on the 4-0 Rebels and 3-1 Crimson Tide with wins this week. According to Josh Richardson, it is payback week for the Vols. “It’s payback week. We lost two games to these guys (Ole Miss and Alabama). These

next two games are going to be big for us,� Richardson said. Tennessee will travel to face an Ole Miss team that is on a seven-game win streak and are focusing on slowing down the hot-hand of Marshall Henderson. “He had a good game and hit a lot of shots,� Richardson said. “We just have to do everything in our power to slow him down this game.� “He’s a very crafty basketball players,� head coach Cuonzo Martin said. “He’s 6-foot-2 with a slight frame but he knows how to get in and get you off your feet with his shot fake.� The Vols will also be concerned about the inside presence of Murphy Holloway and Reginald Buckner. “They put themselves in position to get lots of offensive rebounds,� Martin said. “They have two of the best bigs in the country (Holloway and Buckner) who average four offensive rebounds a game in league play which is an amazing stat.� Tennessee will host Alabama on Saturday but

who has the chance of jumping back to .500 in league play or falling to 1-5. “They are a pretty good team, but we have a great chance because they are 4-0,� Stokes said. “We definitely don’t want to go 1-4. We feel like we can beat them; we feel like we can beat anybody.�

the team is trying not to look past the week’s first game. “Both games are important, but obviously you can only win one game at a time,� Armani Moore said. “Ole Miss is the first one up so we have to take care of things there.� It is a make-or-break week for Tennessee

Lady Vols look to tighten up on defense Thomas Duggins Staff Writer The Lady Vols (15-3, 6-0) have opened up SEC play with an undefeated conference record. That perfect conference record hasn’t come easily, though, as the last two road games versus Florida and Auburn both came with their own challenges. The Lady Vols were forced into overtime in their contest with Florida before winning 78-75. In addition, the Lady Vols trailed Auburn by five points at halftime before pulling out a 75-66 win. “We’ve got to start quick, we’ve got to set a tempo on defense and dictate what we want to do from the tip,� said senior guard Taber Spani. Consistency on defense has been what has prevented the Lady Vols from pulling away in their SEC games. In their overtime victory over Florida, the Lady Vols allowed the Gators to shoot 46 percent from the field during regulation, but limited them to percent shooting in the extra period. Against Auburn, the Lady Vols were outscored 32-20 in the paint and allowed the Tigers to shoot 48 percent in the second half. “We’ve started playing some really good defense in second halves of games, you know South Carolina, Georgia were really good defensive spurts for us,� said Spani, “We need to just do that for 40 minutes.� Junior guard Meighan Simmons echoed Spani. “We have to bring bulldog defense,� said

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Simmons. “It’s just one of those things that this Pat Summitt foundation was built on is defense and rebounding and I feel like if we do those two little things the game will start out wonderful.â€? Getting a more a consistent effort on defense was the theme of Tuesday’s practice for the Lady Vols. “We got to work on us and what we need to do,â€? said head coach Holly Warlick. “Our defense has got to get so much better. To me, we’re not even close yet, so that’s what we’re going to focus on today.â€? Although the team isn’t playing up to Warlick’s defensive standards, freshman Jasmine Jones has made an impression on the coach. “I like Jasmine Jones anywhere on defense,â€? said Warlick, “She plays aggressive, she plays hard, she loves to play and I think she plays it Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon with a passion and when you do that it shows and I think it shows she loves to play the game.â€? Sophomore guard Josh Richardson rushes past a Kentucky defender on Jan. 15. One area where the Lady Vols have had much success this season has been on offense. They rank seventh in the nation and first in the SEC in points per game, averaging 79.7 on 44 percent shooting, which ranks 23rd in the nation. The Lady Vols’ offense has benefitted from having multiple scoring options. They have three players averaging double-figures in points and three more players averaging at least eight points. “We all know that really anybody on our team can score 20 at any given night,â€? said Spani. “That’s just the nature of the types of players our program brings in. Offensively, we feel very confident that we can score with anybody.â€?

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

Athletics continue to progress Lauren Kittrell Sports Editor The world of Tennessee athletics is the most visible element of the total university structure, and athletic director Dave Hart is at the helm of it all. In a previous article, The Daily Beacon published Hart’s view for the future of Tennessee athletics. “We want to pursue comprehensive excellence in every sport we have, men’s and women’s,” Hart said. This excellence is not focused solely on the competitive arena. “When I say we want to achieve comprehensive excellence, I’m not just talking about the competitive arena,” Hart said. “We want to achieve at a high level everything that we do, not just the competitive arena.” But, the competitive arena remains the most visible. Hart said he would like to see impersonal relationships between fans and the coaches and players they support reconsidered. “They don’t get enough opportunities, and we’re trying to create more, where they can see our student athletes as people and as students outside of that competitive arena,” Hart said. “We have some outstanding young people in this program.” A better and deeper relationship between fans and athletes begins in the administrative department. Hart said the athletic department has met with the administrative leadership team and student government officers to engage them on how to make a student’s experience as a fan more conducive to their lifestyle. “We have engaged them about what we can do administratively to make acquiring a football ticket better in terms of where you sit and who you sit with,” Hart said. “We’ll engage the appropriate people on campus, student life and other people because we want to make it easy, not hard, for students to attend our sporting events.” Just as Bruce Pearl once

stood on the cafeteria tables in Smokey’s, Hart said campus will see coaches like Butch Jones and Cuonzo Martin continuing the tradition. “I’ve always enjoyed developing relationships with student leaders and that’s something that is important to our administrative staff,” Hart said. Part of progressing the athletic department overall included facilities. “We’ve got some excellent facilities here, but we’ve also got a lot of needs that we’re still trying to strategically arrive at all of our goals,” Hart said. “I always assess that by looking at where the student athletes go. Where do they walk and where do they train, where do they eat, where do they sleep, where do they get academic support, all that is very important and it’s important in the recruiting process.” Hart said this is a continual focus for him and his staff. “We’re always assessing, in those arenas where the student athletes go, to make it a better experience for them,” he said. During this season of reflection, Hart said he has worked closely with chancellor Jimmy Cheek. “I’ve thoroughly enjoyed working with Dr. Cheek,” Hart said. “He’s been extraordinarily supportive of our goals and where we want to go. He has played and will continue to play an important role. I’ve been very impressed that he is an exceptional listener and he absorbs everything. “He has told me that he doesn’t want us to be at a competitive disadvantage athletically.” Hart said that in the future, students can be prepared for an athletic plan and campaign for the future. “We will build a financial plan obviously, we’ll build a facilities plan, we’ll probably go into another campaign at some point in time to raise money for our master facilities,” Hart said. “We had a plan and we haven’t taken anything off the table, we’ve simply reordered some of

that based on the fact that our reserve is minimal and we’ve got to build that reserve back,” he continued. Dr. Cheek stepped up in a very big way recently so that we could stabilize financially and returning some athleticgenerated revenues that we had transferred to campus. We’re making very positive progress toward where we want to go and what we want to do.” Hart said he sees the university playing a key part in progressing the athletic department as a whole, and he is pleased to see a move in the right direction. “It’s a unified collective effort,” Hart said. “When you look at those schools who excel at the top of the athletic pyramid, I assure you in each and every case, that’s in place. It’s always a campus-wide collective effort and not just an athletic department effort.” Student involvement will continue to be a focus going forward. He said requests he has seen from students have not been unreasonable. “We have an obligation as an administration to engage the students and engage the student leaders to see what their priorities are, get input from them,” Hart said. For now, Hart said he is confident in the staff he has put together. That said, he’s not doing anyone favors, Hart said he expects progress in each department. “I do feel good about our coaching staff. We have some outstanding coaches,” Hart said. “I think coaches understand that working a clean program, that’s not a request, that’s a mandate. Prioritizing academics, that’s not a request, that’s a mandate. The expectation also is that we do expect reasonable progress within the competitive arena. Coaches inherit programs in all different states. Some of them inherit stable, successful programs, and others have huge rebuilding jobs.” He added, “As coaches in that competitive arena, you have to make progress as well.”

Vols start season right with consecutive victories weekend to participate in the Kickoff Weekend, which is the first two rounds of the National Indoors. “We’re all excited. We just talked to our coaches about the schedule,” Reese said. “We are going to have a good practice tomorrow, Wednesday we will take off, and then Thursday we will head out and get there.” Tennessee will start the Kickoff Weekend by playing the home team Illinois. After that, they will play either Tulsa or North Carolina. The Vols are hoping that their

Marshall Hunter Contributor

experience will boost them this season. “You hope that with maturity you can be able to say less things to them and basically more coaching goes on,” Winterbotham said. With Fickey, Libietis and Reese all having last season to build up experience, the Vols are looking for a strong outing from them this coming weekend and through the rest of the young season. “We got two tough ones this weekend, so we need to prepare as best we can,” Reese said.

Tennessee came out of their three game home stand unblemished, defeating Eastern Kentucky and Murray State to improve their record to 7-0. The 19th-ranked Vols had a full day scheduled for them with a triple header against EKU and Murray State. The Vols won the first match of the day against EKU 4-0, and then went on to defeat Murray State 4-0 and 6-0. Tennessee did not lose a single match on Monday in singles play. Mikelis Libietis and Brandon Fickey (both sophomores) went 3-0 in Monday’s matches. Libietis started off the day by defeating Daridge Saidi of EKU and later defeated Adam Taylor and Tyler Jeffers of Murray State. In his first match of the day, Fickey defeated Aleix Alvarez of EKU and then went on to defeat both Joao Camara and Max McLean of Murray State. Fickey did not lose more than two sets in a single match throughout the whole day. Sophomore Hunter Reese won his 10th match in a row by defeating Taylor 6-1 and 6-2. “We were 6-0 going into that one, so it was really important as a team to go in and get a win,” Reese said. Head Coach Sam Winterbotham was pleased with the team’s overall performance. “Really impressed, really impressed,” Winterbotham said. “We have been trying to make sure that we are all on the same page.” “They played three matches, and to come out in the third match with the energy that they had and the focus that they had was awesome. • Photo courtesy of Tia Patron/Tennessee Athletics I’m very proud of them,” said Winterbotham. Redshirt senior Hunter Reese returns a forehand The Vols are now prepar- against Murray State at the Goodfriend Tennis ing for a trip to Illinois this Center on Jan. 21.

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