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Out with the new, in with the old: Crush delivers a taste of past fashion

Interested in expanding your outdoor prowess? Some UT students can help you plug in

UT partners with nationwide program to raise awareness on federal debt

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

NEWS >>pg. 3

Born to run: The Vols look to up their tempo against the Razorbacks

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 6

SPORTS >>pg. 7

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Issue 10, Volume 125

Local campaign labels Knoxville as ‘food swamp’ Stokes Bradi Musil Staff Writer We are living in a food desert. Despite the abundance of restaurants and chains saturating Knoxville, De’Ossie Dingus, Sr., founder of the Coalition on America’s Poor Health and Poverty, sees only an absence of readily accessible, healthy foods in this region. In fact, Dingus classifies Knoxville as a food swamp. Established in 2012, CAPP

is an organization striving to spread health literacy in Knoxville and revolutionize the way residents regard food. “There is nothing in this area healthy for you to eat on a dayto-day basis,” Dingus said. “You go down Magnolia (Avenue) and you have McDonald’s, Long John Silvers, Arby’s, Little Caesars, Pizza Inn or something, then you have six or seven convenience stores that sell processed food that they fry up. Then, you start getting close to a supermarket. ... That’s a food

swamp.” During the entire month of February, CAPP’s iPledge campaign will seek to stimulate a health revolution in the local community. For 28 days, CAPP will accept ideas from organizations, businesses, institutions and community members detailing ways to eliminate food insecurity. The creator of the winning strategy will win a plaque of recognition, a $250 cash reward and a network of support to implement the plan.

“Good effort with no support goes nowhere,” Dingus said. “We are hoping to come together and say no more individualism in this. We want to take all of these networking people that say they want to work together and dump them all in your lap and say, ‘This is your network; these are the people we want you to work with and they have come on board to support your effort and what you came up with in the 28 days.’” On March 1, CAPP will commemorate the campaign with a

walk-a-thon at Morningside Park in Alex Hayley Square from 9 a.m. to noon. The funds raised will support CAPP’s growth, as well as the Community Garden Programs and the Healthy Kids Community School Program. Ultimately, CAPP hopes to educate the community on growing fruits and vegetables, an effort which will also render produce more accessible to poverty-stricken families.

Hannah Cather • The Daily Beacon Leslie Cox, left, then a senior in journalism and electronic media, gathers information about Sex Week on Valentine’s Day 2013.

Copy Editor The show must go on. This is the unofficial mantra of Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee (SEAT), the organization which hosts Sex Week. Coined by Nicky Hackenbrack, a junior in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology and executive member of SEAT, the phrase represents a commitment to healthy sex education despite last year’s state funding controversy. “Hopefully what you take

away from Sex Week is not that we’re only talking about sex,” Hackenbrack said. “We want to bring about this culture change where you do feel more comfortable with your body and that you should take this and show it in a lot more ways than just on campus.” Since the end of Sex Week 2013, SEAT has been working to prepare for this year’s week-long series of sex education lectures and discussions. Luckily, students do not have to wait until March 2 to see Sex Week in action.

Students can preview spring Sex Week events with the performance of “Rent” at the Clarence Brown Theatre from Jan. 30-Feb. 2 and film showings of “For Colored Girls” and “Love and Other Drugs” in February. Described by SEAT as encouraging a “sex positive” approach to culture, Sex Week seeks to remove the stigma around sex in an inclusive, non-threatening way. Ironically, SEAT executives, such as Summer Awad, a sophomore in sociology, are now thankful for the previous

year’s media and legislative pressures. “I think the negative publicity is what helped us the most last year,” Awad said. “I think that people came out to the events because they had heard about it on the news and because they had gotten fired up about the controversy.” While this year’s Sex Week will reprise favorite events involving abstinence, virginity and transgender sexuality, it will also showcase new offerings. Sex Week 2014 will feature lighthearted events, including an aphrodisiac

cooking class and an instructional sensual dance, alongside more serious topics. “We have not only our religion and sexuality panel, but we also have a cross-cultural sexuality panel and an event solely on the Middle East and sexuality,” said Awad. “There’s a lot of misconceptions about the Middle East and how gender roles and things like that are viewed.” Comprehensive sex education is not a debatable value, Hackenbrack asserted. Instead, she referred to is as a proven necessity. See SEX WEEK on Page 3

Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor

See WALK-A-THON on Page 3

Sex Week promises another titillating year

McCord Pagan

reveals he dislocated shoulder against Tusculum Tennessee’s matchup versus Division II Tusculum College appeared to be harmless; simply a quick breather before entering the alwaystreacherous journey of SEC play. And while the score — a 98-51 Volunteer win — indicated just that, it was revealed Tuesday that the seemingly innocent contest was nearly a season-altering back breaker for Cuonzo Martin’s Volunteers. When asked before practice, UT junior forward Jarnell Stokes admitted he partially dislocated his right shoulder in the Vols’ win over the Pioneers on Jan. 4. However, Stokes was quick to note the injury is no longer an issue. “I felt a pop,” Stokes said. “One of my teammates ran into my shoulder, and I heard it pop. “I took some medical procedures as far as helping that get better, and it’s all of the sudden, I mean, it’s better now. Nothing that requires surgery or anything.” Just three days after the injury, Stokes kicked off conference play in commanding fashion, pouring in his seventh double-double of the year (15 points, 15 rebounds) en route to a 68-50 road win over LSU. While still “really” sore, the positive results gave Stokes confidence he could overcome the lingering injury in UT’s next contest: a Jan. 11 showdown with Texas A&M. That decision, the junior forward said, was unwise as he posted one of his poorest outings of the season against the Aggies. “I played with it against LSU,” Stokes said, “but then against Texas A&M, it sort of came back to haunt me. “I thought I could just come out and do what I did against LSU again.” See STOKES on Page 8

Victoria Brown Staff Writer A bit of artistic spirituality will be on display at UT through the discussion of renowned composer Ernest Bloch’s work in a lecture series. The Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies will host “Ernest Bloch: A Musical Neshuma” with Maestro Lucas Richman of the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra on Thursday at the McClung Museum Auditorium. The lec-

ture is set to take place at 5 p.m. According to its website, the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program was established in 1993 to support a scholar of Judaism. The program works to organize programming including “Holocaust conferences, Israel semesters, film festivals and exhibitions, often in collaboration with other university units and outside organizations.” UT’s Judaic Studies is celebrating its 20th anniversary with the schedule of events. A musical tribute to Bloch will be performed by the Knoxville

Symphony Orchestra on Feb. 20 and 21. Angela Batey, associate director for graduate studies, serves the university as director of choral activities and will be participating in the event. “All of our choirs will be presenting the piece with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra playing,” Batey said. “We have had a long-standing collaboration that occurs roughly every three years with the KSO in which we provide our students as the chorus to allow the KSO to present a major choral work. In 2010, I

suggested this work as the collaborative work for 2014.” The event will feature Richmond, the music director of the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, as he speaks on Ernest Bloch, one of classical music’s most renowned SwissAmerican composers. Gilya Schmidt, professor of religious studies and director of the Fern and Manfred Steinfeld Program in Judaic Studies, was involved in the founding of the program in 1993. See BLOCH on Page 5

Eric Smith • The Daily Beacon

Lecture set to honor renowned composer

Lucas Richman, who has served as music director for the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra since 2003, will lead Thursday’s lecture on the work of Swiss-American composer Ernest Bloch at McClung Museum.

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

“Write down who you are. Don’t be forgotten in a world of forgetfuls.” @DailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

In Short News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5-6 Page 7-8


2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

IN SHORT

rvogt@utk.edu

Managing Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

Beacon Flashbacks Jan. 22, 1975 In the 82nd issue of its 10th volume, The Daily Beacon reported on President Gerald Ford’s stern comments about the 1973 oil crisis; he said he would rather see gas prices increase than implement a mandatory fuel rationing program. Ford said a gasoline rationing program would have to stay in effect for five to 10 years and would limit motorists to approximately nine gallons of gas per week. Ford also said mandatory rationing would be unfair to commuters and rural Americans. On Dec. 31, 2013, CNN reported a decrease in gas prices, and also reported they were set to go lower in the New Year. CNN also reported that Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst for AAA and GasBuddy.com, said the boom in North American oil production in recent years has given the U.S. the lowest price for crude oil anywhere in the world. Such is a relief to American motorists who have felt the sharp increase in gas prices in recent years. As of Dec. 31, the average price for gas in Tennessee was $3.11. In other news, the 1975 Beacon staff reported two tavern operations on the

Another snowstorm hits urban Northeast Associated Press

Strip were arrested the previous day for allegedly bribing a Knoxville police officer. The article reported the two men offered a weekly payoff to Officer Billy McCoy in order to illegally continue paying off customers who were using gaming devices.

For more interesting and unusual crime, check the Crimelog on Fridays in The Daily Beacon and online at utdailybeacon.com. This Beacon Flashback was complied by Online Editor, Samantha Smoak.

PHILADELPHIA — A swirling snowstorm clobbered parts of the mid-Atlantic and the urban Northeast on Tuesday, grounding thousands of flights, closing government offices in the nation’s capital and making a mess of the evening commute. The storm stretched 1,000 miles between Kentucky and Massachusetts but hit especially hard along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston, creating perilous rides home for millions of motorists. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said 10 inches of snow had fallen just outside Philadelphia in Drexel Hill by Tuesday evening and there was about 6 inches in Philadelphia. The National Weather Service said parts of New York City also had about 6 inches. The snow came down harder and faster than many people expected. Forecasters said some places could get 1 to 2 inches an hour, with wind gusts up to 50 mph. A blizzard warning was posted for parts of Massachusetts, including Cape Cod. Highways in the New York City metropolitan area were jammed, and blowing snow tripled or even quadrupled drive times. “I just want to get to the Bronx,” motorist Peter Neuwens lamented. “It’s a big place. Why can’t I get there?” In Jersey City, N.J., Stanley Gaines, wearing just a thin jacket and huddling

beneath an overhang as snow stung his face, said he had been stuck for more than an hour waiting for a ride home from his appointment at a Veterans Affairs clinic. “I’m waiting on anything I can get: a taxi, a shuttle, a bus,” Gaines said, squinting to read the destination on an approaching bus in near white-out conditions. “I didn’t really pay attention to the weather this morning because there was no snow on the ground, and now — this!” In White Plains, N.Y., Anthony Schirrone pulled over his car to scrape snow from the windshield. “I just did this five minutes ago,” he said. “But it’s coming down too fast.” Forecasters said the storm could bring up to 14 inches of snow to Philadelphia and southern New England and up to a foot in New York City, to be followed by bitter cold as arctic air from Canada streams in. Washington was expecting 4 to 8 inches. As of Tuesday evening, there was mostly light snow across Connecticut, Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts from the Boston area southward. Snowfall totals in the region ranged from about 5 inches to 6.5 inches. In Maryland, 8 inches had accumulated in Westminster and at least 7 inches had fallen in Frederick. The storm was blamed for at least one death in Maryland after a car fishtailed into the path of a tractor-trailer on a snowcovered road about 50 miles northwest of Baltimore. The storm was a conventional one that developed off the coast and moved its way up the Eastern Seaboard,

pulling in cold air from the arctic. Unlike the epic freeze of two weeks ago, it wasn’t caused by a kink in the polar vortex, the winds that circulate around the North Pole. Pennsylvania’s Department of Transportation said it had already blown through more than half of its $189 million winter weather budget. “Lots of nuisance storms this season have meant that PennDOT crews have been plowing and treating roads more frequently this winter,” spokeswoman Erin WatersTrasatt said. About 3,000 flights for Tuesday were canceled, with airports from Washington to Boston affected. More than 1,000 flights for Wednesday were called off as well. Amtrak planned to cut back train service. The rush to get home early by many workers was evident in Philadelphia, where many commuter trains were packed. The storm put a damper on New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s inauguration, forcing the cancellation of an evening party on Ellis Island. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick postponed his annual State of the State address, and the Philadelphia Flyers postponed their Tuesday night game. Schools in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut, Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky stayed closed for an extra day after the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday or sent students home early. Some parents kept their kids home all day, unwilling to put them on slippery roads for a few hours of school. Federal workers in the Washington area also were given the day off.


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb elamb1@utk.edu

Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Around Rocky Top

Scott Serro, freshman in theater and communications studies, speaks with research assistant Ingrid Ruffin on Jan. 15 at Hodges Library about the services UT Libraries Research Guides offer, such as EndNote, a citation management software that organizes your research and automatically generates in-text citations and bibliographies as you write.

WALK-A-THON continued from Page 1 Elaine Streno, executive director of Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee, said the biggest challenge lies in overcoming fast food deals that attract low income families. “There is tons and tons of information that tells you that a fast food meal is so much cheaper than a healthy meal,” Streno said. “If you buy a few apples, that’s $7, but you can get a full meal for $3. “It’s just a real challenge in trying to educate our clients on eating healthy.” Second Harvest campaigns for similar goals. Supplying over 1 mil-

lion meals per month to 18 regions in Tennessee, Second Harvest continues to develop new ways to distribute nutritious food and health education. “We are all focused on not just providing food to the needy, but providing nutritious food to the needy,” Streno said. The heart of the issue lies in awareness, Dingus affirmed. “The root cause is health illiteracy,” Dingus said. “If you really, truly understood it, you would not do it. “... These families, they have eaten, but what they have eaten on a daily basis is killing them from the inside out.” Amanda Plante, a graduate student in the

UT Department of Plant Sciences, began volunteering at CAPP a year ago. Plante said one of CAPP’s primary visions is to establish a farmer’s market. “(A farmer’s market) would place the power in the hands of the people,” Plante said, “so they can grow their own fruits and vegetables and they don’t have to rely on someone else.” CAPP welcomes volunteer support for the campaign and all CAPP projects. “They’re trying to build a really good service,” Plante said. “I hope that a lot of people will contribute and see the value in what he’s doing.”

Student group puts focus on national debt solutions Victoria Brown Staff Writer It’s “up to us” to address the national debt. Or at least that’s the motto UT students could be hearing across campus soon. Through Feb. 21, UT is partnering with Up to Us, a nationwide program that challenges students to raise awareness on long-term debt and fiscal and economic problems. Jessica TenBroeck, senior in economics, is the president of the Economics Leadership Team, a group of students who operate the Economics Club at UT. She said she hopes the campus will start a new tradition with the Up to Us program after this year. “Up to Us is a nationwide competition geared toward educating our peers on the national debt, which is over $17 trillion, how it affects us now and in the future, and what can be done about it,” TenBroeck said. “The competition is a five-week long campaign where we will have weekly events such as painting the rock, events in conjunction with

SEX WEEK continued from Page 1 “This isn’t a political thing,” Hackenbrack said. “Science shows, studies show, that an abstinenceonly policy doesn’t work. We have done a lot of work researching these topics and making sure that it was right for this university, so it really is hurtful

the Baker Center such as speaking with senators and meeting with the Concord Coalition, and we will be hosting a discussion panel with professors, and more.” Events are open to all students. Kayla McMurry, senior in economics and event coordinator for Economics Leadership Team, discovered the Up to Us challenge last fall. “The reason I was so excited about finding this challenge is because we are doing more than just research,” McMurry said. “This is a chance to reach out and speak directly to students on an important issue that will affect all of us in the future. “This might not be the trendiest topic to talk about, but it needs to be understood by students at the University of Tennessee.” The student-run campaign is partnering with the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy and UT Recycling for a few of the debt related events, which include a budget simulation, film viewing, and a visual representation of the national debt.

Samuel Rule, senior in economics and marketing coordinator for Economics Leadership Team, said he hopes the Up to Us program will engage the campus and help educate them on how national debt affects our generation. “As a member of the Economics Club, I’m excited about making the national debt issue on campus one of importance,” Rule said. “I don’t believe that UT students realize the magnitude of the national debt. “We are trying to do the best we can to help students become aware about the issues and reward them for their support in the process.” Throughout the campaign, students can sign a petition to raise awareness for the national debt, interact with the organization’s Facebook page, and take a short quiz created by the Up to Us program. All of these activities give eligibility for weekly cash and gift card prizes. For more information on UT’s partnership with the Up to Us program, visit the Facebook page, Up to UTK.

when these politicians try to say these certain things or that a misconception of Sex Week is that it really is only about sex, and that is not true.” In Awad’s opinion, higher education should encompass all aspects of maturity, as opposed to academia alone. “I think it’s about transitioning from adolescence to adulthood, and that is learning how to drink

alcohol responsibly and how to form your social circles,” she said. “And part of becoming an adult is defining your sexuality and becoming comfortable with your gender role. Without that, your college experience is lacking.” Sex Week 2014 will take place from March 2-7. The final schedule for this year’s series will be released at the end of this week.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Forging a lasting legacy starts by laying down your iPhone Guest Column by

Cortney Roark Most people in today’s world spend the majority of their day with technology. From posting a photo to Instagram to communicating strictly through rapid thumb movement, technology has become a part of the person using it. During my Christmas break, I realized just how much we are losing because of this technological dependency and how much our families will lose when we’re gone. For me to realize this, however, I lost both my mamaw and my papaw in the span of three hours just two days before Christmas. I was torn between two sides of my family with no clear reason for any of it. In the midst of all the pain and constant disbelief, I was reminded what each of my grandparents lived for and was forced to take a step back from the technologically “advanced” world we live in. For three days, my family sifted through hundreds of pictures. Some of these held memories for specific family members and some of them seemed to hold an untold story from my mamaw or papaw’s past. A story worth photographing. As we laughed and told stories that could only be remembered because of the black and white or faded colors we held, I wondered about the grandchildren of the future. The days of developing a role of film, saving and framing countless pictures are over. What will my future grandchildren have to look at? Will they have my iCloud password? The last time I saw my mamaw she said, “You’re only as old as you feel.” Just one month ago she was Black Friday shopping. She went out every Friday with her friends and went on midnight Wal-Mart runs with her best friend. She lived her life with passion and taught me to do the same. I feel as though now, after seeing her house the emptiest a house can be, without her, I know her better than ever. Her drawers were full of photo albums, newspaper clippings of articles that meant something to her, and endless memorabilia from her life. These articles were her loved ones that she lost, her son’s football recaps, her son-in-law’s concert announcement, and anything else she thought was worth keeping. What will my family have? An outdated link to these articles? Maybe I’ll share it on Facebook and they’ll search my history. My papaw was the kind of man you never forget, even if you only met him once. There wasn’t a single time I was with him that he didn’t see someone and say, “Howdy neighbor!” with a huge smile on his face. He never treated anyone as less than a friend and I will strive to do the same. Among his things, we found calendars that he had written important events in. These events weren’t world news, or even local news. They were events important to my papaw and that’s it. On some days the calendar would read, “Stayed with Cheryl and the girls tonight.” Some were as simple as a fishing trip and some were the births of his grandchildren. What kind of memories will my family read decades from now? Am I going to print out screenshots of the calendar from my iPhone? Although I had different relationships with both my mamaw and my papaw, I see them in my life. I have my mamaw’s red velvet cake, her banana punch and her personal wedding cake. When I made each of these things, she was a phone call away to tell me the recipes. Now my family has her handcrafted recipe box. What will my family have? My favorite Pinterest recipes I found out of pure boredom? I see mamaw in the board game Aggravation, in the handmade quilt that now hangs in my room and I see her in her daughter, my momaw. I see my papaw in his baseball team, the Orioles, and his forehead kisses which will be with me forever. These are the things I will remember and it is truly terrifying to think future generations will never know the meaning of such personal items that hold endless memories. Instead of securing a password for your photo albums, print them out. Pick up the paper and clip the article that means something to you. Write down who you are. Don’t be forgotten in a world of forgetfuls. Cortney Roark is a junior in journalism and electronic media. She can be reached at croark4@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

The best relationship you’ll ever have should be with yourself In Rare Forum by

Julie Mrozinski I have good and bad news. The bad news is, according to Facebook’s breakup timeline, the upcoming season is forecasted to hit romances hard, especially within the next three months. So this article is for all of your heartbreaks waiting to happen. Now for the good news. There is someone better to date — you. The dating scene has become a sad and pathetic engagement. As both a witness and a player in this game, I can safely say I know of zero healthy college relationships. It is even sadder to see the rings on some friends whose decisions I can’t support. These discouraging observances come from a vital mistake some of us have made – by disregarding the option of dating oneself. Here are some telltale signs you are in desperate need of dating yourself: Do you hop from one person to another in need of intimate affection? Does being by yourself scare and bore you? Are you the culprit more often than not for ruining a relationship? Have you not been truly alone in the last year?

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

While the first two were technically references to the bedroom, they equally transfer into admirable qualities outside of it, too. It’s unfortunate to admit that causal dating left us in high school, so having a flexible checklist of qualities seems like a smart way of contextualizing and compartmentalizing who it might be you’re looking for. The easiest way to create a list of this sort starts from dating yourself. The window of opportunity for dating yourself is coming to a close. Now is the opportune time to get a better grasp on what you want out of life, people and yourself; because according to the Population Reference Bureau, the average age of marriage for Tennessee women is 25. For many of us, this is only a few years away. And while I think 25 is entirely too young, I can’t ignore the demographic truth and neither can you. So, while wallowing in a pool of your own tears might be an effect of dating yourself, it won’t be the only one. And if you want to be among the minority of healthy relationships in the college scene, you must struggle through the tough and lonely nights to reap the benefits of happy mornings to come. Julie Mrozinski is a junior in English. She can be reached at jmrozins@utk.edu.

UT professor’s artistic, cultural efforts deserve recognition The Jeremaid by

Jeremy Brunger A few days ago, I interviewed University of Tennessee professor and poet Erin Smith about her long-running arts project, Sundress Publications. She founded it in 1999 and has managed it out of Firefly Farms ever since. While such arts communities are not a strange formation to find in Knoxville or in other university towns, Erin Smith wants something more – an upcoming installation focused on breaching the schism between Knoxville’s gay community in the university and outside it. We live in a cultural zeitgeist that is being shorn of its homophobia. The arts have always been the vanguard of such movements, and Smith is going to be at the forefront of it. OUTSpoken performances, including poetry and film, focus on the intersection of art and sexuality that

are going to be made part of the publication’s oeuvre. It is going to be an effort toward the unification of a divided subject. Knoxville’s gay population is scattered insofar as its segments do not interact in many formal manners. Town does not meet with gown. The university’s gay population and the town’s population can bridge together through art; the arts will be as diverse as its producers and consumers. Don’t forget Knoxville can boast of the second largest writer’s guild in the South, so its impulse for creativity is already massive. The arts, of course, are not known for being a source of much wealth creation, especially in depressed economic climates like our own. Hopefully OUTSpoken will see an audience as large as its ambition and professor Smith and her staff ’s efforts will be rewarded by recognition. The importance of the arts coincides with the sociology of its consuming demographic – the gay community suffers from some of the highest rates of mental illness – as well as creativity.

The arts bridge the gulf between performance and life, between recognition and the quietude of solitary existence. The arts, we remind ourselves, are suffering not from lack of quality but from lack of funding. If you’re compelled to partner with Smith, donations to Firefly Farms can be made by contacting her at esmith83@utk.edu. Speaking of economic deprivation, you might also want to check out David Harvey’s lecture series on Karl Marx’s Capital. The arts and economic philosophy go as well together as white and rice. Before you graduate, you ought to at least have knowledge of the book that invented Marxism; I guarantee it will be making a comeback in the coming years as our generation discovers the carpet has been pulled out from under it. May the arts help soothe that discovery. Jeremy Brunger is a senior in English. He can be reached at jbrunger@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

If you answer yes to more than one of these questions, continue on. Now I know dating yourself sounds like movies, sweatpants and cuddling up in a pool of your own tears. But in reality, dating yourself is fun, exciting and exploratory in nature. Here are some fun dates you can go on with yourself: Get in your car and aimlessly drive. Sit on a bench around campus and people watch. Meet new people with the notion that you are taken, by yourself. Go out and treat yourself with gifts and encouraging thoughts. Go on a walk and leave your cell phone at home. Meander to a coffee shop and write down your long-term goals for the next five, 10 and 15 years. Really get to know yourself. I can distinctly recall the year I dated myself – oh, 2012. It was the toughest, most fruitful year of my life. Moving out to California, going to a community college, and essentially living by myself proved to be one long, difficult date. Embarrassingly enough, everything listed above I’ve done. However, these dates yielded a healthy relationship, one that is guaranteed to have my back. I have a guy friend who has also successfully dated himself (though he probably wouldn’t call it that) by safely escaping the college dating scene. While explaining his desires to marry a rock climber, he listed off his dream girl’s qualities as “strong, flexible, enjoy the outdoors and presumably be chill.”

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Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for pub-

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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Eyes on Knoxville Liv McConnell Copy Editor It’s a Monday morning – the only day of the week Crush, Knoxville’s first rockabilly specialty clothing boutique, is closed. But that doesn’t stop the owner, Sarah Frankel, from graciously opening up shop to allow The Daily Beacon an exclusive look at her kitschy, Americana wares. “It’s so funny when you look at this retro-reproduction lifestyle, because the people who are really into it were always the same people in high school,� said Frankel, a 2009 UT graduate with departmental honors in history and Japanese. “They were in band or watched anime, and then they go to college and make their own clothes and go thrifting. Now that we’re older, we’re embracing a more conservative appearance and lifestyle in some regards, but we’re all nerds deep down.� Conservative is not likely the first adjective Frankel’s quirky aesthetic would generate from most passersby. Clad in a pair of slim-fitting vintage cigarette pants, striped blouse, and black blaz-

BLOCH continued from Page 1 “Maestro Lucas Richman invited us to collaborate with him on a campus lecture that would introduce Ernest Bloch to students, faculty, and staff in anticipation of the concert which the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra is planning for Feb. 20 and 21 that includes Bloch’s ‘Sacred Service’,� Schmidt said. “So I organized the event on Jan. 23 in collaboration with the KSO.� Bloch was born in Switzerland but came to the U.S. in 1916 and worked in the states for most of his life. “It is my understanding that this piece by Bloch, ‘Sacred

er ornamented with a chunky flamingo brooch, her outfit’s minimalist color palette is offset by a shock of orange, perfectly coiffed hair, and bright red lips. “People come in and ask, ‘Oh my goodness, how long does it take you to do your hair and makeup?’� she said. “It takes me about 20 minutes. I teach pinup styling classes in the store because so many people get on YouTube and watch a video on pinup hair and think, ‘Wow, what do I do? Where do I even start?’� Classes are generally $20 per person for a two-hour session and require pre-registration via Crush’s Facebook page. Frankel, who opened the Old City boutique nearly three years ago, focuses these tutorials on providing simple, effective techniques to evoke glamorous 1950s beauty trends for the modern gal on the go. “I teach women eyebrow shaping and the traditional ways of setting and styling your curls so that when you wake up in the morning, you can just brush it out and it goes right back to that molded shape,� she said. “If you come into the store, I’ll teach you basic techniques and that’s totally free.

• Photo Courtesy of Samantha Davis

Local boutique aims to ‘Crush’ drab modern duds

Sarah Frankel, second from left, and boyfriend Levi Gager, far left, entertain patrons of Crush at the boutique’s 2013 Christmas party.

Service,’ or in Hebrew, ‘Avodath Hakodesh,’ was commissioned by a synagogue in San Francisco in the 1930s for mixed chorus and orchestra,� Schmidt said. “It is based on elements from the Shabbat morning synagogue service which Bloch was well familiar with from his own life.� The musical program brings in many elements from religious backgrounds, particularly the Hebrew culture. “It is my understanding that the Maestro will talk about how spirituality is expressed through music, giving the example of Bloch’s ‘Sacred Service,’� Schmidt said. “He will demonstrate this concept with musical excerpts that he will play for the audience. “Through the presentation, the students should have a very good

“I really just like people to know (the look) is really obtainable. It’s not nearly as scary as one thinks.� Christy Baird, overseer of southernpinups.com, praised Frankel for her dedication to helping local women bring a little whimsy to their everyday lives through their wardrobes. “Sarah had a vision and she has brought that vision to Knoxville,� Baird said. “She goes out of her way to educate those who are interested in the genre by providing makeup classes, photo shoots and just by opening her store to those who want to meet and network with others in the whole rockabilly-pinup

scene.� Crush is noteworthy for price point as well as style, Baird said. “It’s worth checking out the merchandise simply because there is not another store like it in Knoxville,� she said. “You will find quality items at a fair price that fits all budgets.� Frankel’s delectable array of vintage-reproduction frocks, full skirts, screen printed T-shirts, and retro accessories are sourced primarily from lines like Pin Up Girl Clothing, Unique Vintage, and a few local antique shops. A significant percentage of her wares are American made. “I sell a little bit of lingerie, as well,� she said. “I have

access to this amazing company that makes modern-day girdles in modern-day sizes, but they haven’t changed their pattern since the 40s. It’s amazing.� For Frankel, the ability to integrate aspects of authentic vintage style with modern touches to culminate in a wholly individual look is something she clearly delights in. “I think when you mix vintage and modern together, it gives you a really unique feel that’s very different and really your own,� she said. “Bringing in small aspects into your daily look is how you can put your own personal flair on vintage style.� Personal style has always been Frankel’s favored form of expressing individuality. “When I went to college, everyday was a fashion show for me personally,� she said. “I felt rad. I made a lot of own clothes and I’d be walking in front of all these people and felt so good.� Although she understands the demands of a hectic school and work schedule, Frankel said she believes it’s important that college-aged women put a little effort into polishing their appearance in the interest of increasing self-

awareness and potential for success. “College is really your first time on your own, and you’re finding who you are as you’re being thrown into all of these different situations,� Frankel said. “The only way to defend yourself is to persevere and work on you and becoming a better you. That path for your education, the path for your future – fashion does go along with that. “Just because you’re in school working hard doesn’t mean you need to be lazy in your appearance.� Frankel said she believes that by taking a few style cues from the elegant icons of the ‘40s and ‘50s, young women will find confidence in themselves that extends to all areas of life. “When you feel good about yourself, that resonates,� she said. “You dress to impress, you dress how you feel, and when you see someone with a put together look, all you can think is – they’re put together. You don’t know that they’re having a hard time with their chem lab. “If you have the drive to do well and to move forward, why not show it in every aspect of your life?�

grasp of the connection between spirituality and creative activity as expressed in the work and life of Ernest Bloch.� Not only will both events be a learning experience for the audience, but Batey also said the tribute will be a new experience for the performers as well. “This will likely be the only experience in the singers’ lifetimes in which they sing a major work in Hebrew,� Batey said. “The learning curve for the majority of our singers is steep, and it provides a rich fabric of diversity to our students’ musical experiences here at UT.� Ticket prices for the musical tribute range from $15-$85, with discounts available for students, and may be purchased from knoxvillesymphony.com

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44 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something is rotten in Denmarkâ&#x20AC;? 49 Drought-ridden 50 What Charlie rides, in a 1959 hit 51 Capp and Capone 52 Double-decker, e.g. 54 Municipal grid: Abbr. 55 Trims 57 Targets of sutures 59 Arrive via a red-eye? 64 Clarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smallville crush 65 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of wrath,â&#x20AC;? in a hymn title 66 Longhornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grid rival 67 Like centenarians 68 Adopt-a-thon adoptees 69 Like the sound of bagpipes DOWN 1 Lea call 2 Detroit labor org. 3 Carrie on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sex and the Cityâ&#x20AC;?

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R A I N H A T

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE Mark Schelstrate Contributor Independent films breed Oscar gold. Alexander Payne, the filmmaker who in years past brought us Oscar winning indie gems “Election,” “Sideways,” and “The Decendents,” has once again proven indie power with this year’s inspired effort, “Nebraska,” which has been nominated in six categories: picture, director, screenplay, cinematography, actor (Bruce Dern), and supporting actress (June Squibb). “Nebraska” is a character study wrapped in road movie. The original screenplay, written by Bob Nelson, introduces a series of entertaining and distinctly offbeat characters as we follow elderly Woody Grant on his quest from Billings, Mt., to Lincoln, Ne., to collect a suspect $1 million sweepstakes prize. Payne again teams up with cinematographer Phedon Papamichael, who he worked with on “Sideways” and “The Decendents,” as the duo decided to shoot Nebraska in black and white. Black and white film helps to define the Nebraska landscapes, the small towns and small town characters, and the relationships which are explored in “Nebraska.” Payne is an Omaha native who often utilizes Nebraska locations in his films and many of the exterior shots in “Nebraska” are poetic

homages to the calm, sweeping beauty of the state. While the use of black and white film helps to set the mood and period in “Nebraska,” it is the characters that bring it to life. Payne is known as an actor’s director, and he allows his cast to make inspired choices in the film. As each new scene comes along, it is inhabited by another unique character that brings something different to the screen. Dern depicts Grant with a gritty realism that has garnered the veteran actor many well-deserved accolades this year, including an Oscar nomination. The performance is at times comedic and at others deeply soulful, but at all times is interesting to watch. Dern’s portrayal of Grant’s path of discovery delivers moments of selfrealization to the audience even as those moments slip past the character unnoticed. Grant desperately wants to find some value in his life, and Dern displays that desire with honesty and an inviting accessibility. Will Forte takes a role out of his comfort zone with his turn as David Grant, Woody Grant’s son and reluctant co-pilot of the sweepstakes odyssey. The SNL alumnus gives a tender performance that is endearing to watch but too understated. As David discovers details of his father’s life, he undergoes a transformation that could have been better defined by Forte – simply

put, the character is likable but not memorable. This isn’t the case with Squibb’s portrayal of Kate Grant, Woody Grant’s longsuffering wife. Squibb grabbed a best supporting actress nomination for this role and her Kate will be long remembered. Kate is tough and plainspoken and Squibb relishes the moments when her character sets someone straight without mincing any words. What makes this performance special is Squibb’s ability to invite an audience inside Kate’s heart, even during her brassiest moments. Bob Odenkirk and Stacy Keach each give fine supporting performances, as do the rest of the supporting cast and bit players. Of special note are Devin Ratray and Tim Driscoll as Cole and Bart, Woody’s nephews. The two should be prosecuted by other cast members for scene theft. Nebraska is a simple film that has a lot to say. The pace of the movie runs parallel to its protagonist, steadfast and unrelenting but occasionally a little slow. It is important not to lose patience during the slow moments, however, because they are followed by something sweet you won’t want to miss. Expect a charming little journey that exposes the ridiculous nature of mankind, and you won’t be disappointed.

croark4@utk.edu

UT’s Canoe and Hiking Club finds solace in great outdoors Claire Dodson • Photo Courtesy of Brian Payne

‘Nebraska’: A simple tale, simply told

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

Arts & Culture Editor While students lug heavy backpacks up and down the rolling hills of UT in the cold, they do not often stop to appreciate Knoxville’s unique geographic location. The UT Canoe and Hiking Club, however, spends its weekends embracing all Knoxville and the surrounding areas have to offer by backpacking, spelunking, kayaking, rafting, biking, climbing, cross-country skiing, and taking mountaineering trips. The club, a part of RecSports, is entirely student-led and organized. The $50 per semester fee covers gas, lodging, and some gear for any trip the students plan. So far, the club has trips planned every weekend from Jan. 25-March 1. Brian Payne, junior in mechanical engineering and president of the club, said he hopes to promote the many unique opportunities UT students have available to them. “The Knoxville area has so much to offer,” Payne said. “With the mountains so close, it opens up a bunch of outdoor opportunities. “I think it is important for students to take advantage of this location because there is so much fun to be had in the outdoors.” While the Smokies are a popular destination for people who love the outdoors, undecided sophomore Austin Eddy said he simply gives encouragement for students to broaden their adventure-seeking horizons. “A lot of people always say ‘You really should go hike in the Smokies while you have the opportunity,’” Eddy said. “While I’m certainly not disagreeing, as I do hike there when I can, I actually spend a lot more time taking advantage of the close proximity of the Obed Wild and Scenic. It is about an hour away from Knoxville and has over 450 rock climbing routes, some of which are considered the best in Tennessee.” Many club members, like

Leslie Turner, left, spots Keith Shook while he climbs during the Virgin Falls backpacking trip put on by the UT Canoe and Hiking Club last semester. Payne and Eddy, have a background in the outdoors – Payne lived in Alaska for five years, and Eddy has been camping since the age of four. For students less naturally inclined, however, the club offers a community of students that hope to encourage new people in their fresh air pursuits. “Before I joined Canoe and Hiking, I had never really done anything outdoorsy,” said Hayley Moran, a junior in child and family studies and psychology who transferred to UT her sophomore year. “However, in just two years I have tried everything from outdoor rock climbing, to first time snowboarding, to crawling on my knees on our annual caving trip. “After coming to the first meeting in fall of 2012, I was hooked.” Moran said joining the club helped her conquer some of her fears about the challenges of trying new things. “The club really opened me up to new experiences and has really given me a new relationship with nature,” Moran said. “I honestly just never knew I was capable of doing these things

until everyone in the club encouraged me to try them. I always assumed they were too strenuous or that I would be too slow to keep up with everyone else. “C&H really just cares about having fun and being with each other outside, so its never a competition or anything like that. Everyone just wants everyone to be enjoying themselves.” UT students are often in the prime of their lives, and it is a time that students should be taking advantage of their youth, Moran said. “Unfortunately, I feel that UT’s community mostly cares about partying on the weekend when they could be spending their time observing the beautiful world around them,” Moran said. “We have the rest of our lives to go to bars on the weekend. Why not spend this time stretching your body and your mind when you live in such a geographically advantageous place?” The Canoe and Hiking Club will hold an interest meeting Wednesday Jan. 22 at 8 p.m. in TRECS room 227. For more information, contact Brian Payne at bpayne7@utk.edu.


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 7 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

msoutha1@utk.edu

Tennessee hopes to run past ‘fast-paced’ Arkansas squad Steven Cook Copy Editor Jarnell Stokes might have picked the wrong time to ask his team to “run the floor” more. After Saturday’s loss to Kentucky, where failing to play quickly hurt Tennessee, the Vols will welcome the fast-paced, offensively-potent Arkansas Razorbacks to Thompson-Boling Arena Wednesday for an 8 p.m. tip. The Razorbacks lead the SEC in points per game (83.3), scoring margin (plus-14.5) and assists (16.1) thanks to their constant efforts in dominating the transition game. They toppled Kentucky in overtime on Jan. 14 but fell to Georgia in overtime over the weekend. “They are a very good 3-point shooting team and they play fast,” Stokes said before Tuesday’s practice. “They can control the game as far as making you turn the ball over.” The junior forward said after the Kentucky game that he wants his team to push the ball more. Not doing so in the second half, he added, was the

difference in the game. UT head coach Cuonzo Martin wondered if he relayed that to the Vol point guards. “I like that,” Martin said of Stokes’ post-game thoughts. “Well, he has his point guards. Did he tell them that?” Apparently, he has. “Yeah, I definitely express that to them,” Stokes said. “I tell them all of the time. But I guess coach Martin wants me to fight someone. I don’t think that’s my behavior — to fight a teammate. “But he’s really been stressing me to tell them, because he feels as if my opinion, or voice, carries more.” Martin and his players made it apparent that Arkansas’ style will not affect the tempo Tennessee features on Wednesday. But steering clear of turnovers will be a major point of focus. The Vols have averaged nearly 15 turnovers per game in their four SEC appearances, and cutting that number down would be a welcomed asset for starting point guard Antonio Barton and Tennessee. “That’s going to make a huge differ-

How they match up Arkansas

Senior guard Antonio Barton hoists a jump shot over Auburn defenders in a game against the Tigers at Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan. 15.

ence in this game,” Barton said. “We have to take care of the ball. We’re a team that likes to run, too, but we can’t turn the ball over when we get out and run.” Whether UT can answer Arkansas’ tempo with its own is yet to be determined. But one thing seems certain — the Vols should own the glass. The Razorbacks rank 13th in the SEC in rebounding margin, while the Vols rank second and are coming off a 39-24 boards advantage against Kentucky. “We should be in pretty good shape rebounding-wise,” Stokes said. “The (Razorbacks) lack size and length, so I feel like we will be able to dominate them inside the paint.” The Vols can talk tempo and rebounding all they want, but as Barton said, it will come down to the “little things.” “It’s going to be a real fast-paced game,” Barton said, “but it’s going to come down to the little things — defending, taking care of the ball and just getting stops.”

Who to watch for

Tennessee

83.3

Scoring Offense

74.4

68.8

Scoring Defense

62.6

.460

Field Goal %

.355 -1.2 16.1

Assists Per Game

13.0

5.8

Blocks Per Game

4.8

PPG RPG APG FG% # 24 G Michael Qualls

12.4 5.1

2.4

.434

.454

# 10 F Bobby Portis

12.1 6.6

1.7

.526

3-Point %

.352

# 0 Rashad Madden

11.7 2.3

1.9

.542

Rebound Margin

+9.4

8.3

Steals Per Game

5.3

+6.6

Turnover Margin

+1.1

Last Meeting Feb. 2, 2013, in Fayetteville, Ark. Razorbacks 73-60


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard Andrew Bruckse • Tennessee Athletics

msoutha1@utk.edu

Junior forward Jarnell Stokes dunks in a game against the Tusculum Pioneers at Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan. 4. Stokes revealed before Tuesday’s practice he suffered a dislocated shoulder and has since been playing through the injury.

STOKES continued from Page 1 The junior forward, however, turned in quite the opposite. After picking up two early fouls, Stokes played only 24 minutes, posting just six points and five rebounds. His no-show was a crucial ingredient in A&M’s 57-56 comeback win as the Aggies consistently attacked the

post in Stokes’ absence. “When I got those two fouls,” Stokes said, “there was no more adrenaline. “In the second half, I was basically dead. That’s why I feel like in the second half of Texas A&M, I got one rebound, zero points, so that really hurts me.” But after Stokes’ dominant performance at Kentucky this past Saturday, disaster has seemingly been avoided,

and Martin is confident in his prized big man going forward. “I think he’s one of the best in the country regardless of what league (or) what level,” Martin said at Tuesday’s media luncheon. “It doesn’t matter what the rankings are because when he’s playing at that level, everything kind of falls in line. “The way he rebounds the

basketball and the way he’s moving and scoring the ball like that, there’s no doubt in my mind I would take him up against anybody.” This is the Vols’ second shoulder injury issue of the year. On Jan. 10, Martin announced through a university release that freshman guard and former five-star recruit Robert Hubbs needed season-ending surgery on his left shoulder.

Sochi forces search for three potential suicide bombers Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia – Russian security officials are hunting down three potential female suicide bombers, one of whom is believed to be in Sochi, where the Winter Olympics will begin next month. Police leaflets seen by an Associated Press reporter at a central Sochi hotel on Tuesday contain warnings about three potential suicide bombers. A police letter said that one of them, Ruzanna Ibragimova, a 22-year-old widow of an Islamic militant, was at large in Sochi. Russian authorities have blamed the so-called “black widows” of slain insurgents for previous suicide attacks in the country. Security officials in Sochi were not available for comment on Tuesday. The Black Sea resort town will host the games in February amid concerns about security and potential terrorist attacks. The southern city of Volgograd was rocked by two suicide bombings in late December, which killed 34 and injured scores more. An Islamic militant group in Dagestan posted a video on Sunday claiming responsibility for the bombings and threatened to strike the games in Sochi, about 500 kilometers (300 miles) west of Dagestan. Police material distributed to the hotel staff also included pictures of two other women in veils: 26-year-old Zaira Aliyeva and 34-year-old Dzhannet

Tsakhayeva. It said they had been trained “to perpetrate acts of terrorism.” It warned that the two women “are probably among us,” but, unlike Ibragimova’s case, did not say if they are in Sochi. No further information was provided about the two women or their motivation. The term “black widow” refers to the belief that women who have carried out past suicide attacks in Russia did so to avenge the deaths of husbands or other male relatives. The Olympics are to be held Feb. 7-23. Russia has mounted an intense security operation in the city, but concern persists that “soft targets” outside the Olympic venues, such as buses and tourist facilities, are vulnerable to attack. Russian troops also have been active fighting militants in Dagestan, one of the predominantly Muslim republics in Russia’s North Caucasus and the center of an Islamic insurgency that has engulfed the region. On Tuesday, troops shot dead the leader of a militant group, Interior Ministry spokeswoman Fatina Ubaidatova said. She said the militant, Eldar Magatov, was wanted in attacks on security forces, bombings and the extortion of businessmen. Interior Ministry troops elsewhere in Dagestan defused an explosive device placed near a village administration building and engaged in a firefight with militants holed up in a house, the spokeswoman said.

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