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One rock ‘n’ roll band set to play The Well has embraced the ‘hillybilly soul’ genre

Lady Vols’ hot first-half shooting doesn’t carry over against Fighting Irish

Lights, camera, action: Hodges begins poster series focused on featuring one UT student

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

Two Lady Vols softball players claim they’re ‘100 percent’ after suffering injuries last season

SPORTS >>pg. 6

SPORTS >>pg. 6

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Kendall Thompson

‘A very difficult conundrum’

UT Jewish organization finds silver lining despite lacking permanent home

Contributor

Jenna Butz

See BOSS on Page 3

Hillel has a home but no house. Hillel, UT’s Jewish Life organization, once operated out of a house on Terrace Avenue, similar to the ministry houses lining Melrose Avenue widely known as Church Row. But in 2004 the house was given to the university due to costly structural renovations that were needed to keep the house livable. Deborah Oleshansky, director of Hillel, said her group’s budget comes almost entirely from the Knoxville Jewish Alliance, supplemented by donations from the Nashville Jewish Federation, parents and Jewish alumni. “When the community was supporting the house, it was really difficult, and that’s part of why they gave it up,” Oleshansky said. “It was just too much, and it financially

didn’t make sense anymore.” Prior to its sale, the organization’s house was privately owned. “All of the buildings that are related to a particular religion or church are not owned by the university,” said Jennifer Richter, associate director of the Office of Equity and Diversity. “I don’t know the history, but this area used to be a neighborhood of nothing but private homes. “I suspect those homes were purchased by each particular group quite some time ago, and they’ve been there ever since.” Just as a physical space encourages solidarity and community for other faiths, Hillel board member Andrew Vogel admitted he believes a space on campus would benefit UT’s Jewish community. “Even if there was just an office,” Vogel said, “then people touring or people with an interest in wanting to learn about Hillel could just go in

and talk to someone.” For social gatherings, Hillel currently uses space in the International House, the University Center or commu-

nity members’ houses. The organization often hosts Sunday morning bagels in Vol Hall or other housing common areas. Connections

Out of luck: Notre Dame tops UT, 86-70 Patrick MacCoon Staff Writer Another page was written in the Notre Dame-Tennessee rivalry on Monday night at Thompson-Boling Arena. But after a dubious second half that saw UT register a dozen turnovers and shoot only 25 percent from the field, the Lady Vols might want to have this year’s edition edited from their memory. Despite winning the first 20 games in the all-time series, the No. 12 Lady Vols — behind a double-double from junior center Isabelle Harrison — dropped their fourth consecutive matchup to the No. 2 Fighting Irish, 86-70. While second-year head coach Holly Warlick was proud of her team’s play in the first half, the team’s reccurring second half troubles could not be shaken. “I was proud of our kids’ effort,”

Warlick said after the game. “We had a great first half but couldn’t sustain it. We went up against a tough team tonight and this is a good foundation game for us.” The Lady Vols started the game with an offensive showcase, highlighted by junior Ariel Massengale and senior Meighan Simmons who gave their opponent fits at times. The two guards combined for 26 points in the first period and knocked down five 3-pointers. Massengale brought the home crowd to their feet after she came up with a steal and found driving teammate Bashaara Graves for the fast break layup to give Tennessee a 39-27 lead, its biggest of the first half. “We played hard and together,” Warlick said. “I loved our energy in the first half, and I loved our passion for the game. “They came out and competed and

that’s what I wanted them to do.” While the Lady Vols were in an offensive groove in the first half, the Fighting Irish did not lack in scoring either either. Senior guard Kayla McBride scored 14 of her 22 points in the initial period as her two baskets before the break cut the halftime deficit to five. “I thought at halftime we were lucky to be down by five,” Notre Dame head coach Muffet McGraw said. “I felt like we could’ve been down a lot. We had a nice run at the end of the half to tighten the gap. Kayla did it all for us tonight.” The Fighting Irish took advantage of Tennessee’s zone defense and grabbed their first lead since the opening three minutes of play when Michaela Mabrey hit an open three to put Notre Dame up 52-51 with 13:25 left in the game. See RECAP on Page 6 Donald Page • Tennessee Athletics

Students from all different majors put on their dancing shoes this weekend and performed for a packed audience in the Clarence Brown Theatre as a part of the BOSS Dance Company’s fourth annual Spring Showcase. BOSS was founded in 2010 by Caitlin Burke and Laura List in response to the phase-out of the dance minor because of budget cuts, according to the company’s website. The group has grown to 70 dancers, students and nonstudents in four years. BOSS’ annual Spring Showcase is its biggest performance of the year, incorporating dances choreographed by locals, students and guests. Students showed their support for BOSS by filling Clarence Brown Theatre and shouting out appreciation. “Please be as vocal as possible,” host McKinley Merritt, a junior in performance and musical theater, said. “This is not traditional theater where you have to sit and wait to clap. You can yell during the dances, they love it.” The audience did just that, cheering loudly and chanting dancers’ names before and after each of the 16 dances, which varied from hip-hop to a more traditional style. “I liked any of the hip-hop ones,” said Alexis Jolley, a freshman majoring in interior design, “like ‘Beast.’ I really loved the costumes.” “Beast,” choreographed by Kelley Seneker, junior in wildlife science, was one of the hip-hop dances preformed. Another was aptly named “The First Drop,” the project of three-year member and first-time choreographer Belinda Loi, a computer science major. Loi’s dance consisted of a mix of music as well as a live beat-boxer. “When the Cat’s Away,” choreographed by Dana Humberger, alumna and former president of BOSS, took a humorous approach. This performance told the story of a group of older people in a retirement home who broke out into energetic dance when their nurse wasn’t looking. The costumes for this dance elicited quite a few laughs from the audience. Other dances included “Werk,” an upbeat tap number that defied the cliché by choosing songs one would most likely find in a club, and “Marie,” choreographed by Chelsea Milligan who double majors in theater and communication studies. Set to the song “Bang Bang,” this dance tells the story of a girl forced to conform to societal norms.

Staff Writer

•Graphic Courtesy of Dillon Canfield

BOSS showcase impresses with popular dance styles

Issue 09, Volume 125

Tennessee center Isabelle Harrison reacts after a foul call during the Lady Vols’ 86-70 loss to Notre Dame at Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan. 20. Harrison turned in a double-double, posting 13 points and 16 rebounds.

“England is notoriously devoid of basketball courts, baseball diamonds, football fields and hockey rinks --- even the casual jogger receives little respect from the British.” @DailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

with local synagogues also allow interested students to access a ride network to attend services. See HILLEL on Page 2

SGA eyes increased student involvement in 2014 McCord Pagan Copy Editor Committed to greater inclusion and increased participation, the Student Government Association and its accompanying Election Commission will hold a non-mandatory informational meeting this Thursday for those interested in serving in student government, regardless of prior involvement. “(We want to) maybe reach out to people who aren’t necessarily involved in SGA right now,” said Election Commissioner and SGA Chief of Staff John Keny. “Maybe give them a chance to come in and ask questions and see if this is something they maybe do want to get involved with.” Whether or not students choose to become involved, Keny said he’s looking forward to heavier interaction between representative and constituent. “But (students) now know we’re here and (they can) put some faces to some names as well with this, and they can … know who to call in the future and maybe see the process and understand it better as it begins to happen in the spring as well.” See SGA on Page 2

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS continued from Page 1 “In Jewish tradition, the day of rest is Friday night to Saturday night,” Oleshansky said. “So, us being able to use the I-House generally is great because they don’t do their own programming, and that’s exactly the time we need it so it’s worked out to be a winwin. Pretty much whenever we want to do a Friday night dinner there, we can arrange it.” With only 50 members, the size of UT Hillel poses challenges in securing funding. “I think the easy answer would be to have that option of kosher meals or to be given more funding for us to do more,” Vogel said. “But to take the needs of probably 10 to 20

students on campus, I don’t think that’s really a huge priority.” At the University of Maryland, Hillel serves kosher meals to an average of 300 attendees per meal. As UT has begun work to recruit more students from the Northeast, Oleshansky has been working with the Office of Admissions to help advise them in the needs of the Jewish community they are attempting to draw in. “They’re not going to be able to recruit those students if those services aren’t available,” Oleshansky said. “It’s a catch22. You can’t get the services until you get enough students. You can’t get enough students until you have the services. “It’s a very difficult conundrum, but if they’re committed to getting the students from

elamb1@utk.edu

the Northeast, they’re going to need to help us to make sure we can provide the services.” However, Oleshansky chooses to think of the lack of facilities as a benefit rather than a disadvantage. “From what I understand, the students that lived there sort of became like a clique where only friends of theirs felt comfortable being in the house,” Oleshansky said. “Now, it’s really open, so everybody can be welcome.” While Hillel would appreciate UT’s help in marketing and support, there is a larger point Oleshansky hopes can help all minority communities. “The more they promote diversity on campus,” Oleshansky said, “the better it is for all of us who are minorities here.”

Around Rocky Top Hayley Brundige • The Daily Beacon

HILLEL

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

In Case You Missed It: The 2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards aired on Jan. 18, recognizing outstanding performances in film and primetime television. From Emma Thompson drinking out of a blue Solo Cup to “American Hustle” taking the night’s top honor for the award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture, the awards show was full of non-scripted celebrity and red carpet moments. UT students took to livetweeting the ceremony from their couches over the MLK holiday weekend. See what they had to say. Members of the UT quidditch team practice the Harry Potter-inspired sport outside the HSS Amphitheater on Monday.

SGA continued from Page 1 Keny mentioned that SGA also hopes to “increase the visibility of all campaigns” this year and “encourage dialogue” across campaign lines. This year, the Election Commission is launching its first “Vols Need” campaign, an effort to solicit student ideas and opinions. “We went forward really trying to get good ideas … and trying to change things so that people on campus weren’t so apathetic about elections in general,” said Jordan Frye, another Election Commission member and a junior in social work. With additional input, Frye said he believes SGA will gain more than politicians. “I think the more people you have running, the more awareness the student body will have about elections,” Frye said,” the more involvement you’re going to have and the more perspectives.” Noting low attendance at this meeting in past years, Lindsay Lee, a member of the Election Commission and a senior in math and Spanish, said widespread student par-

ticipation – as with the gender-neutral housing bill and the dining services proposal – allows SGA to work more effectively. “With a higher voter turnout, we’ll ultimately have more students taking an active role in conversations about campus issues through SGA,” Lee said, “which will in turn increase students’ interest in SGA elections. “The more students that can be involved in that conversation, … the better campus will be.” While the 2013 SGA elections saw a 25 percent voter participation – an SGA record – the commissioners are working to exceed last year’s turnout. As Frye and Keny mentioned, the commission is not advertising for a specific campaign but for the election itself. “We’re just trying to get involvement,” Frye said. “Because in the end that’s really all that matters, that the most amount of people are heard. “… It’s not just to get somebody elected into the office.” The interest meeting will take place in the UC’s Shiloh Room at 7 p.m.


Tuesday, January 21, 2014

ARTS & CULTURE BOSS continued from Page 1

Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

“It’s really cool to see how she balances dance with a major and how passionate she is about it,” Jolley said. “BOSS is a way for these dancers to still do what they love, and you can tell they love what they do,” Graves said. “Everyone should come out to see them.” In a video shown during the showcase, members such as Madilynn McCollum, a senior in chemistry, talked about how BOSS helps them express themselves. “BOSS is a place for a chemistry major, like me, to be more than just a really nerdy chemistry major,” McCollum, a four year member, said. “When comes down to it, after the all the lights have been turned off and the studio door locked, BOSS Dance Company is home.” BOSS Dance Company holds auditions in the fall and offers a variety of technique classes. More information can be found on their website or on their Jian Yin, center left , performs to “Locked Outta Heaven” with his partners during the BOSS Dance Company’s Facebook page. Spring Showcase on Jan. 17 at the Clarence Brown Theatre. All photos courtesy of Zoe Yim • The Daily Beacon

Though the program stated 15 dances would be performed, the audience was treated to an extra dance near the end of the show. It was originally performed at a gala for the UT Medical Center, themed “Midnight in Paris.” Fitting the theme, the group decided to prepare a Parisian can-can. “I really liked the can-can they threw in at the end there, that was impressive,” Meredith Graves, freshman in architecture, said. “I did not know that they were going to do that, so that was really neat to see how they worked so hard and pull it off.” Despite the variation in style, two features remained evident throughout the whole showcase: hard work and passion. Jolley, who had attended to watch her friend Olivia Monroe perform, stated that her friend had been “in six dances.”

THE DAILY BEACON • 3

Dancers entertain the audience dressed as residents in a nursing home with their canes and old attire as part of the piece “When the Cat’s Away” for the BOSS Dance Showcase at the Clarence Brown Theatre on Friday, Jan. 17.

Chelsea Milligan, senior in communication studies, performs her solo dance in the piece, “I’m in Here,” choreographed by Olivia Riggins at the BOSS Dance Company’s Spring Showcase at the Clarence Brown Theatre on Friday, Jan. 17.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

A splash of history on ‘rowing the boat’ Turn of Phrase by

Sarah Hagaman

My freshman year of college, I found myself standing in a glass boathouse along the Tennessee River with a large group of particularly tall college girls. I looked with wide eyes at the sleek boats lining the walls and the racks of long oars hanging by the door. I had a vague concept of rowing as a sport requiring excessive arm strength and height, but I truly knew absolutely nothing about the rowing – but here I was, trying out to be a part of a Division I athletic tradition. The prerequisites had already been met – rowers usually stand above 5 feet 8 inches – and our new coach had already tested and timed us for speed and endurance. Following a flurry of examinations, from heart echoes to blood work, I became one of more than 20 of the Lady Vols novice rowing team. Tennessee has an amazing variety of athletic teams and facilities with the most visible being football and basketball, among others. Rowing, however – with its boathouse location on the edge of campus nestled along the riverbanks just behind Neyland Stadium – carries a slightly more mysterious aura. One might see the boathouse on a leisurely drive down Neyland Drive. Some catch a glimpse of a boat, moving with smooth tandem, down the Tennessee River on a misty morning or a sunny afternoon. Rowing’s mystique can partially be attributed to the sport’s origin; it began as a popular sport in the United Kingdom, especially among universities like Oxford and Cambridge. In my time studying abroad, I saw this distinction firsthand. England is notoriously devoid of basketball courts, baseball diamonds, football fields and hockey rinks – even the casual jogger receives little respect from the British. However, the rivers provide an important competitive outlet, and British universities popularly hold annual races. America’s inheritance of British culture brought rowing to the athletic tradition of many Northeastern schools, notably those in the Ivy League. Naturally, the sport depends upon a waterway, and the boats and equipment are costly and difficult to maintain. Gradually, as my teammates and I spent roughly three hours an afternoon at the boathouse – training, running and rowing – I increased greatly in my knowledge of the sport and physical strength. I never imagined I’d reach and surpass incredibly rigorous physical challenges. We generally trained six days a week for three hours or more per day. My teammates and I spent mornings at the Tennessee track, running in freezing temperatures. We spent a week training more than five hours per day during winter vacation, and on spring break we remained in Knoxville and rowed in the middle of snow flurries. When summer rolled around, the campus emptied, but my team remained for two extra weeks to train for the NCAA regatta. Without even trying, the girls on the team forged incredibly strong friendships. We were all different, but the nature of the sport and our hours upon hours spent training together made us incredibly cohesive. Rowing with strength and effectiveness requires that every member in the boat – whether it holds two, four, six or eight – follow each other’s rhythm with meticulous accuracy. Small mistakes in speed, tempo, power, blade depth, blade rotation and other movements can result in chaotic motion in a waifish boat. Although the emotional and physical strain of rowing takes a toll, the sport has an incredible history and tradition at universities around the world and at Tennessee. I have witnessed firsthand the hard work, the steely commitment to improve and the community the sport encourages. My teammates and I imagined afternoons when we could nap rather than run, or meals where we could drink soda and eat sugar rather than drink endless bottles of water and eat healthily. Ultimately, however, we continued to train, to push and to work because of each other. We refused to let each other down, no matter how exhausted we might be. Rowing provided an incredible opportunity, and Tennessee is exceptionally lucky to have a program that encourage young athletes to pursue new heights of physical competition and to have a unique water sport that is at once exhausting and exhilarating. Sarah Hagaman is a sophomore in English. She can be reached as shagama1@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

The truth behind that crippling fall from your high horse Cullenary Arts by

Cullen Hamelin Have you spent your entire life on a boat, or the majority in a cave? No? Then you have undoubtedly met a person in your life that thinks they are better than you and most likely everyone else. Some chin up, grammar-correcting hypocrite that “sees” the entire world but is oblivious to people five feet in front of them. While these people are easily identified, many elitist tendencies disseminate like a rotten rumor through a high school. Sadly, many people, including myself, can act above another person and not even know it. What’s wrong with thinking you’re an incredible person? Nothing. You should think that way. In no way is confidence a spoiler of the soul. It becomes one, however, when that confident scent turns into a competitive stench. When you legitimately think you

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

forget that. Sometimes we can all get lost in our own accomplishments and boast hubris that would make a Greek tragedy jealous. We often get so happy and lost in bragging about ourselves that we forget to listen to others. This slip is a product of elite character in our society, and we can all be guilty of it from time to time. Do you really want to be that person that everyone dreads talking to? You will never truly get to know anyone if you pursue that path because no one will trust you with subjects that are sensitive to their heart. Remind yourself that you are a human being in the presence of other human beings. You cannot condemn society lesser, because you are a part of that society too. Don’t take the first step onto your high horse, because no one belongs there. Some people win the beauty pageant and some athletes get the trophy. Sometimes the guy you know gets the promotion and the guy you hate gets the girl. It doesn’t make them better people. Don’t become the blind visionary so often found looking down on others; you will miss how beautiful the world is. Cullen Hamelin is a junior in chemistry. He can be reached at chamelin@utk.edu.

Ditch the ‘Right vs. Wrong’ debate and focus on you Lost In Communication by

Jan Urbano Everyday, whenever we turn on the TV and watch our favorite shows or listen to today’s music, we find ourselves bombarded with different ideals. Covertly inserted into the thousands of frames that are displayed to our eyes, there is no end to the amount of ways that society tries to force-feed us their beliefs – from the songs of artists from all genres of music to the style in how news is relayed to us. On top of that, we have the people that we directly interact with – our friends, classmates and professors – as another potential source of “intruding” opinions. When we look closely at these we see contradictions all across the board. There is no end to the amount of times that we are told to believe one thing, but another person tells us something differently. In either case, the arguments seem to make sense. What, then, should we believe in? Take, for example, the concept of one’s self. Most of us would agree that a person should love who he or she is and be his or herself. There should be no pressure to be someone else, to cater to the likes and whims of other people. We hear of numerous situations where people are forced to change themselves in order to fit into society and gain acceptance with the people or environment they live in. It’s not a dramatic, fictional situation – it does happen to people, and

much more often than most of us realize. I myself did the same when I first came to the United States. I lived a good portion of my life as a military brat, spending my childhood growing up in Japan and Guam. After my father had orders to come to the U.S., we followed. Up to that point, I had spent most of my life in two cultures, each of which I easily assimilated into. In Japan, it helped that I looked like many of the other children – whenever my family and I traveled off the military base, I was assumed to be Japanese, which made interactions with the ethnically Japanese much easier. On base, diversity and respect were heavily emphasized, both through words and actions. When my family moved to the U.S., however, everything changed. Middle school was a horrific time for me thanks to my differences, such as my short height, physical features and a lack of other Asians at the school. I was picked on often. Fights were commonplace, always ending in a terrible loss for me. Everyday life was difficult, and it seemed there was no hope for me. However, thanks to such an experience, I was able to recognize how to change myself to fit in. Looking back, I still wonder if it was right or wrong to change myself. It’s a hard question to answer, though. On one hand, it appears wrong that I had to change myself just to fit in. Yet, on the other, stating that it was right or wrong seems irrelevant. In the end, I did what I had to do in order to persevere. I don’t regret the choice. Whenever society tries to advocate ideals, people are eager to join the bandwagon, saying why one stance is right when compared to other viewpoints. They may have good intentions, but more often than not

they don’t educate themselves fully and end up completely getting sidetracked from the real goal. It wasn’t long ago when people began raising concerns about body size and how models were too thin. Though the concerns arose as a worry for their health, it quickly went overboard. Strangely enough, those who were thin found themselves criticized for how they looked. Previously, there had been the same stigma against those who were overweight and obese. You would think society would have learned to not discriminate and denounce a group of people for who they were. And yet, here we are seeing them do the same mistake again but to a different group. Whether we like it or not, we are part of a society that is full of good and bad ideals. The line between both sides is not solid – it is blurred. Society may have good intentions sometimes, but it can easily lose sight of the goal. In the previous case, society should have learned from its prior mistake in ostracizing a certain group but instead only repeated it. Sometimes, we should stop questioning what is right and wrong and focus on what we must do. Otherwise, we’ll find ourselves continuously questioning if we should have jumped on the bandwagon, too, and do what others have done instead of doing what we personally believe we should do. Whether it’s changing yourself to fit in or attempting to stay the same, what that entails cannot be seen as right or wrong. The only thing we’re allowed to do is to believe that we won’t regret the choices we’ve made. Jan Urbano is a senior in biological sciences. He can be reached at jurbano@ utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

are better than another person, not only are you wrong, but you’re completely arrogant – and here’s why. You can’t quantify people. You can’t quantify character, emotions or personality, and you definitely are in no place to quantify spirit. Life is no standardized test. No amount of money in the world can make you better than me, and no amount of friends or fame can either. How does someone with little knowledge of his or her “lesser” counterpart legitimately make such a big assumption? That’s a fault in logic, and in the unity of people around the world, which we all try to make better or preserve. If you honestly propel yourself on your own high horse, you are attempting to enumerate your life and compare it. That’s so great that you make so much money, or that you are so smart. It’s wonderful that girls like you so much or that you have so many friends. It truly is. But does that computation of immeasurable goods define you? Do you really want to be evaluated and quantified by another person? No? Then I wouldn’t do it to others. People are meant to encompass a multitude of qualities. And sometimes we can all

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

Bryn Lindsay, junior in accounting, eagerly chooses a book to pose with for the “Star in the Library� poster competition on Jan. 15 in Hodges Library.

Library seeks new star in READ poster series Jessica Karsten Contributor Last week, UT Libraries offered any student on campus the chance at a semester of fame with the “Star in the Next Library READ Poster� contest. Many students on campus are familiar with last year’s posters featuring Smokey, Little Smokey, the Volunteer and Dr. Bill Bass of the “Body Farm� reading their favorite books, and this contest gives students the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of these UT celebrities. Robin Bedenbaugh, coordinator of Library Marketing and Communications for UT Libraries, was a primary coordinator for this contest. “Our posters are a part of the American Library Association’s READ campaign,� Bedenbaugh said, “and are sent out to high schools to promote literacy in schools.� The ALA’s long-standing READ poster campaign features professional sports figures, actors and other celebrities, including Hugh Jackman and Alan Rickman, reading from various books. UT Libraries has been developing similar posters as means of

supporting the cause. “We thought it would be fun to have a UT student on our next poster,� Bedenbaugh said. “What better way to do that than with a contest?� The contest, which ran last week, invited students to Hodges Library, the Haslam Music Center and the Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Library to pose. “First, the contestant will fill out the contest release form to give us permission to use the photo,� Bedenbaugh said. “Then, the person can pick up one of our books, or bring one of their own, and the photographer will take their picture.� All of the photos are expected to be available today on the UTK Libraries Facebook page, and any person can go online and vote for his or her favorite photo. The photo with the most votes will be selected for the next poster. Nick Meyers from UT Video and Photography was the photographer for the contest and was charged with setting up the candid shots of the reading students. “They are fun pictures,� Meyers said. “It’s good as long as they are smiling and happy in the photo.� Many students were

unaware of the contest until they walked into Hodges Library on Wednesday and were asked if they wanted to participate. Sara Barrera, sophomore in Economics, was merely a passerby until she was invited to have her photo taken for the contest. Barrera picked up the library’s copy of “Casanova in Bohemia� by Andrei Codrescu and was positioned by Meyers at one of the nearby tables where he photographed a candid shot of her reading. Barrera felt as though the whole experience was “random� and was surprised that this contest was occurring. “I was a little nervous with it happening out in the open,� Barrera said. “I’ll be the next star if I fit what they are looking for.� Becoming well-known on such a large campus can be difficult to accomplish, but UT Libraries is providing an opportunity for any student to step into the campus spotlight and have his or her own “semester in stardom.� “Everyone who participates is involved as part of the campaign when we post the pictures,� Bedenbaugh said. “However, there is only one winner.�

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The Hooten Hallers bring â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hillbilly soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to The Well Marina Waters Contributor Throw together a bearded guitarist with more twang than a Friday night at the Cotton Eyed Joe, a drummer with a style about as traditional as Chinese food at a baseball game and an instrumentalist whose specialties range from the harmonica to the tuba, and you have a band unlike any other. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also got the rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll, hillbilly soul band The Hooten Hallers, who are set to play at The Well this Tuesday. This outlandish trio has been traveling the country nearly non-stop since their start in Columbia, Mo., in 2006. The Hooten Hallers then created a fan base that launched them from open mic nights and local venues to a tour throughout the Southeast and beyond. Though they started with just the lead vocalist/guitarist, John Randall, and the backup vocalist/drummer, Andy Rehm, the duo added third member and instrumentalist, Paul Weber, to the group about a year ago. As if the three characters werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to spark oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest, the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name could be considered unique, quirky and perfectly odd, which ultimately is quite fitting for the band. Rehm had some insight on how the band stumbled upon such a suitable name for the group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It kind of started as a joke,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just stuck. We started out playing at open mic nights and so we had to come up with a name. We said it and laughed about it and kept it. It works for the music, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

for sure.â&#x20AC;? Though hard to compare this music to any other band, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even more difficult to define the genre to which they belong. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re definitely more blues than anything, but rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll and hillbilly soul is the term that we use to describe it often,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A good friend of ours came up with that term and it just sorta stuck. It kind of provokes looking up the band. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll and hillbilly soul? What the hell does that mean? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna have to look that up!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The Hooten Hallers are not only breathing life into old and new genres, but the band is also bringing realness and authenticity to its live shows

or magic going on. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just us playing the song for you.â&#x20AC;? Of course, with a genuine band typically comes honest lyrics, and The Hooten Hallers are no exception. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We definitely ... blur the lines on what is fiction and what has actually happened to us,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But there is a little bit of truth in a lot of these songs, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in some cases, more than a little. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We write about experiences. ... We write about our state, which we dearly love. We write about people we love and people we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love.â&#x20AC;? And this raw, honest, rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hillbilly music is the product of the smorgasbord of instruments the band uses. Rehm said he sometimes uses nothing but his bare hand and a snare drum on his hip. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not really sure why I started doing that (playing the snare drum on his hip), but it seemed like it kinda made sense,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In an acoustic setting, we might not even have a microphone at all in a small place jam packed with people. But when we play electric, I play standing up on a little bit more of a normal drum kit â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still not totally normal.â&#x20AC;? Meanwhile, Weber sometimes throws a tuba into the musical mix to add a bit of bass to their unique sound. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paul plays primarily the harmonica, but just after he joined the band he came out and told us all that he played tuba and grew up playing the tuba,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why the hell not?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The Hooten Hallers will play at The Well on Kingston Pike with a $7 cover charge, starting at 8 p.m. Tuesday.

HOOTEN HALLERS

Janie Prathammavong â&#x20AC;˘ The Daily Beacon

croark4@utk.edu

Where: The Well When: Jan. 21st at 8 p.m. Cost: $7

and albums. The trioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chillicothe Fireballâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; released just a few weeks ago â&#x20AC;&#x201C; projects an authentic feel that matches their off-the-wall live shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not putting on anything (different from live shows) for the album,â&#x20AC;? Rehm said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is what we sound like.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no trickery

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD â&#x20AC;˘ Will Shortz ACROSS 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Poeticaâ&#x20AC;? 4 Alerts to cruisers, for short 8 Footlong sandwich maker 14 Fraternity T 15 In fashion 16 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeldâ&#x20AC;? ex-girlfriend 17 *Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insignia, in old westerns 19 How to make money â&#x20AC;&#x153;the oldfashioned wayâ&#x20AC;? 20 Like trees during the spring 21 Privy to 23 Shot from an air gun 24 Burns black 25 L.B.J. or J.F.K., but not D.D.E. 26 Speak on the stump 28 Old coll. entrance hurdle 29 *Actor named in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Six Degreesâ&#x20AC;? game 31 Hemingway novel title location

33 Oaxaca uncle 34 Piece next to a bishop: Abbr. 35 Word with sister and story 36 Some appliances, for short 38 Alley-___ (hoops play) 41 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nope, not interestedâ&#x20AC;? 43 Ironfisted ruler 46 *Tangy breakfast item 49 Stock exchange debuts, briefly 51 Author James 52 Sounds from Santa 53 Surgically implanted tube 54 Org. found in the answer to each asterisked clue 55 Swiss river 56 Italian granny 57 Supercute marsupials 59 *Packersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hometown 61 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good enough for meâ&#x20AC;?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE L A P I P R I M S E E Y O A C D U S H O R H I S S E N V S K I S D I S T A N L O N G U T I L G A Y E S L A T

S E A N C E G L A D E

C R L A E M T S S D O O O P P E S L H A E M T A

I O T A C O D E R I S I T

A O M E E R N S B M H A I U B L B Y E S M A T E N E S T T A L R E A R

Y O U L O S E

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62 â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś happily ___ afterâ&#x20AC;? 63 Carbon-dating estimation 64 Have faith in 65 Shoulder muscle, for short 66 The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? of Roy G. Biv DOWN 1 Where webs may accumulate 2 Galoshes go-with 3 *Tanning method 4 Prep schools: Abbr. 5 M.A. follow-up, maybe 6 Grandiose proposal 7 Part of many a Shakespearean act 8 Observed 9 Suffix meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;little oneâ&#x20AC;?

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42 Response to a wisecrack 43 Merit 44 *Feature of many a charity gala 45 Shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carrying capacity 47 How some temperatures â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and tests â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are taken 48 Stuffed 50 Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go 53 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hägar the Horribleâ&#x20AC;? dog 55 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like ___ to meâ&#x20AC;? 57 ___ Royale (cocktail) 58 Hubbub 60 Sinuous fish


6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

Peter Murray Contributor The Lady Vols got off to a blistering start as Ariel Massengale, Meighan Simmons and Mercedes Russell began the game a perfect 11-of-11 from the field against Notre Dame at Thompson-Boling Arena on Monday night. The trio combined for 26 of the team’s first 33 points as their performance helped Tennessee build a 46-41 halftime lead. Unfortunately for the guard and for the Lady Vols, Massengale would go on to miss her next 10 shots, going scoreless in the second half and leading to an eventual 86-70 Fighting Irish victory. Each excursion into the paint was met with strong defense. Shots from the outside that fell in the first half simply refused to fall in the second. ”Nothing changed the way they were guarding ball screens,” Massengale said. “They started switching it on the perimeter. Sometimes I think we took bad shots or took quick shots and didn’t neces-

numerous trips to the free throw line. But the Lady Vols couldn’t capitalize. Tennessee went 10-of-19 from the charity stripe in the second half, stifling any comeback chances the Lady Vols received. “It was tough,” junior forward Cierra Burdick said. “I think we played the best basketball we’ve played all season in the first half, and for us to come out and just play kinda down in the second half when we were so close is tough, it’s disappointing.” Moving on up: With a team-high 23 points, Simmons moved into 10th place (1,736) on the Tennessee all-time career scoring list, surpassing Mary Ostrowski (1,729). Top 5 disparity: With the loss Monday night, Tennessee has not won a game against a top-five opponent since Dec. 19, 2010, when it defeated then-No. 3 ranked Stanford in overtime. Since that game, the Lady Vols have gone 0-8 against top-five opponents.

sarily run our offense at all like we should have.” A tale of two halves: The Lady Vols opened up the second half against the Irish confidently. And who could blame them. Offensively, the Lady Vols shot lights out, flirting with the 60 percent mark while seeing shots fall from all over the court. However, the second half quickly turned into a polar opposite of the first. Poor defense from the Lady Vols, coupled with cold shooting from UT allowed the Irish to pull ahead and stomp on the accelerator. “In the second half we lost our assignments, we didn’t react when we should, and we gave up 10 three’s.” said head coach Holly Warlick. “We’d identified and knew who their 3-point shooters were but they had to make them - and they made them. ”They made them when they needed to make them.” Fickle freebies: The Lady Vols were given opportunities to try and dig their way out of an ugly second-half deficit with

RECAP continued from Page 1 Notre Dame would hit three straight from beyond the arc to give them a seven-point lead they did not let go of. While UT has failed to beat a top-5 ranked opponent, several Lady Vols admitted they still refuse to hang their heads. “We just have to come out and play a full 40 minutes,” junior forward Cierra Burdick said. “Great basketball teams are going to come out and switch their defenses. It’s just a matter of us coming out and accepting that. “We have to come out and respond to the blows.” Simmons scored her second-highest total of the season with 23 points, as she was 10-of-14 shooting and 3-of-4 from 3-point range. Next up for the Lady Vols will be an SEC home matchup with Florida on Thursday night at 6:30 p.m. “I know they’re upset,” Warlick said. “ I’m upset. We have to get our focus back for conference play. We have Florida here and then we go to Texas A&M, so it doesn’t really get easier for us.”

86 Notre Dame

Tennessee 70

Knoxville, Tenn. // Thompson-Boling Arena // 13,346 50

Field Goals

40.9

50

3-pointers

66.7

57.1

Free Throws

52.6

37-11

Rebounds-Off

46-19

12

Turnovers

18

19

Fouls

13

17

Largest Lead

12

Individual Leaders K. McBride 22

Points

M. Simmons 23

2 tied, 7

Rebounds

I. Harrison 16

K. McBride 7

Assists

A. Massengale 6

3 tied, 3

Steals

A. Massengale 2

N. Achonwa 2

Blocks

M. Russell 1

• File Photo

Massengale, Simmons’ hot start doesn’t carry over against Irish

Tennessee senior first baseman Melissa Davin prepares for the pitch in a game against Tennessee Tech at Lee Stadium on April 10.

Softball seniors recover, prepare for new season Taylor White Contributor Two key members of the Tennessee women’s softball team had off-season surgery, but neither expects to miss a beat as the Lady Vols look to return to the Women’s College World Series for the third time in three years. Seniors Madison Shipman and Melissa Davin both suffered injuries toward the end of last season, forcing them to have surgery over the summer. Both players were limited during Tennessee’s fall scrimmages, but as the season approaches they are confident their injuries are behind them. “I’m feeling great,” Davin said. “I’m ready to get back at it. I’ve been 100 percent since December.” Davin, a fourth-year starter from California, had surgery to repair her labrum soon after the Lady Vols ended last years’ season and spent most of the fall in rehab to ensure she was ready for the spring. “I’m still working a little bit on rehab,” Davin said. “I just want to keep building the muscle and keep it from reccurring.” Davin has made 124 starts over her career, splitting most of her time between left field and first base. She has been known as a power hitter over her career, and last year finished fourth on the team with five home runs. Shipman suffered a broken tibia in her knee late last season. The injury did not prevent her from finishing the season strong, however, as she hit a three-run, go-ahead home run against Oklahoma in the 2013

World Series finals. The Valencia, Calif., native’s injury kept her out of fall practice, but she is not expecting any complications going forward. “I’m feeling really good,” Shipman said. “I actually feel better than I did before. I am done with rehab, and I am fully healthy, back to everything. I’m 100 percent.” The senior shortstop has started 184 games at Tennessee and had her best season as a junior, garnering both All-SEC and AllAmerican honors. She was second on the team in home runs (11) and RBIs (63) as well as third on the team in batting average (.367) on the season. The Lady Vols are coming off another successful season under head coaches Ralph and Karen Weekly. They ended the 2013 season with a 52-12 record, finishing second in the SEC with a 16-6 conference record. Tennessee reached its sixth Women’s College World Series under the Weeklys in 2013, making it to the championship series where they fell in back-to-back games to Oklahoma. Despite an outstanding finish, Shipman said it was not enough to satisfy the team. “I want to win a National Championship,” Shipman said. “We were so close last year, and I got that taste in my mouth. I wanna make sure we win it this year.” Davin said she has enjoyed her time at Tennessee but is looking to ending her career in style as she begins her senior season. “I just wanna go out with a bang,” Davin said. “I’m gonna make these four years count.”


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