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After the Sugarland split, Jennifer Nettles hits a wrong chord in her debut solo album

Looking for weekend plans? One UT group is ‘making a difference’ through Saturday service

Courtside Preview: For the first time since 1952-53, UT and Kentucky only face off once on the hardwood

NEWS >>pg. 2

SPORTS >>pg. 5

Lady Vols push all-time record against Mississippi State to 35-0 with win

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 3

SPORTS >>pg. 6

Friday, January 17, 2014

Issue 08, Volume 125 Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

tnAchieves provides more than scholarships to students Hayley Brundige Staff Writer

See SCHOLARSHIP on Page 2

Two construction workers set up fence outside of Gibbs on Jan. 9 in preparation for the demolition of Gibbs Hall and Stokely Athletic Center. The demolition is the next step in the university’s plan to redesign residential halls.

Residence hall facelifts kick off UT’s campus master plan Bradi Musil Staff Writer UT dorms are getting a facelift. The new Fred D. Brown, Jr. Residence Hall, currently under construction on Andy Holt Avenue, is the first step in the university’s ultimate plan to redefine residential halls on campus. The current demolition of Gibbs Hall and the Stokely Athletic Center will mark the second reconstruction on campus. “It will be completely different from

what we see now,” said Frank Cuevas, executive director of Student Housing. “After Gibbs is finished, if approved by our trustees and the State Building Commission, we will proceed with the redevelopment of what is west end of campus – essentially the presidential courtyard, Morrill and the Apartment Residence Hall.” This new, coed residence hall will sit “right on the footprints” of Gibbs Hall, next to a new, 1,000-space parking garage and the expanded Haslam Fields. A portion of Johnny Majors Drive will be closed

permanently to allow for the expanded fields, as well as to create a more pedestrian friendly walkway for students. “In the design of this facility we are trying to create broader sidewalks and a safer environment for pedestrians – give it a more campus feel,” Cuevas said. Cuevas also confirmed the new residence halls would include more green space, landscape designs and pedestrian avenues compared to what is currently present. The new residence hall on Volunteer and Lake Loudon Boulevard

will include a tiered green-space and covered walkways to the parking garage. Tucker Towe, a second-year architecture student, lived in North Carrick during his first year on campus. Towe asserted that, for freshmen choosing universities, first impressions are an important factor. “The current halls, students aren’t getting the sense of community and public green spaces that other campuses have to offer,” Towe said. See DEMOLITION on Page 2

Burke inducted into UT baseball HOF Dargan Southard Assistant Sports Editor Chris Burke couldn’t help but chuckle. The former Tennessee infielder and MLB vet owns several impressive titles, including consensus AllAmerican, first-round draft pick and postseason hero. But Hall of Famer? The 33-year-old’s still finding his footing with that one. “I’m kind of trying to wrap my brain around that because I don’t feel old enough to be called that,” Burke said with a laugh, “but it’s an honor.” Burke, who manned the Vols’ middle infield positions from 1999-2001, was recognized Thursday night at the inaugural Tennessee Baseball Leadoff BBQ, becoming the 19th member inducted into the Tennessee Baseball Hall of Fame. “The exciting part,” Burke said, “is to get to thank so many people publicly that were instrumental in my career that have helped me along the way. “To have an opportunity to come back and celebrate an unbelievable part of my life — which was my three years spent here — that’s a huge part of what tonight means for me.” A three-year starter for the Vols, Burke’s most memo-

rable campaign came in 2001 as he garnered SEC Player of the Year honors, posting a .435 average with 20 home runs and 60 RBI. His efforts helped lead UT to 48-20 record and a College World Series appearance, an experience the Louisville, Ky., native vividly remembers as both exhilarating and overwhelming. “When you take the field in Omaha for the first time as a ball player — and as one who always dreamed big — the moment hits you a little bit,” Burke said. “Hey, I’m playing in the College World Series.” The big stage opportunities would only continue as Burke’s career transitioned into the major leagues. The Houston Astros selected him 10th overall in the 2001 MLB draft, and just four years later, Burke found himself in the midst of a dramatic playoff run that would produce the defining moment of his 6-year professional career. In Game 4 of the 2005 National League Division Series, Burke delivered a game-winning, series-clinching home run in the 18th inning as Houston upended the Atlanta Braves 7-6 in what Former Tennessee baseball All-American Chris Burke is currently the longest game addresses the crowd at the Tennessee Baseball Leadoff BBQ Thursday night at Thompson-Boling Arena. Burke in postseason history. was inducted as the 19th member of UT’s Baseball Hall See BASEBALL on Page 6 of Fame at the ceremony.

Wade Rackley • Tennessee Athletics

From a Knoxville initiative came a statewide movement. tnAchieves, a program that provides scholarship assistance and mentoring to students pursuing a college education, expanded out of a local program called knoxAchieves in 2011. Created in 2008 by Mike Ragsdale, former Knox County mayor, knoxAchieves aimed to adequately prepare students for college, provide access to higher education and close the achievement gap. The goal of tnAchieves is to provide for high school students who would be otherwise unable to afford college. More than 66 percent of tnAchieves students are the first in their families to attend college. “While all public high school students in the 27 eligible counties can participate with tnAchieves, the program works closely with school counselors to send the student to college who would otherwise not attend,” said Krissy DeAlejandro, executive director of tnAchieves. tnAchieves equips students with scholarship money to fill the difference in education cost after all other financial aid and scholarships have been awarded. Funding for tnAchieves scholarships relies largely on private donors. Once students are accepted into the tnAchieves program, they must fulfill certain requirements to retain the scholarship. All tnAchieves participants are required to attend mandatory meetings, spend at least eight hours per semester volunteering in the community and retain a minimum 2.0 GPA. Virginia Hughes, a junior studying anthropology, got involved with tnAchieves when she attended William Blount High School. Hughes was assigned a mentor, Laura Harrill, a retired hospital administrator to help her with paperwork, financial issues and general concerns with college. Hughes attended Pellissippi State Community College before transferring to UT to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Chosen to represent the program in a Time Magazine article, Hughes said she has been significantly impacted by tnAchieves. “The program helped me through college by giving me a mentor who is constantly checking in and celebrating my milestones with me,” Hughes said. “They support you, and you can truly see that they want to help you succeed in life and help make Tennessee a better place. “If I had never received the scholarship from the program I would never be here, in college, and looking at actually graduating.”

Artist academy adds new culture to Knoxville Kendall Thompson Contributor Jack London once said, “You can’t wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club.” What if you could lay down the weapon in favor of car keys and drive a mere 20 minutes to find it buried in the hills? That’s what the Sundress Academy for the Arts, or SAFTA for short, aims to help artists do. The artist colony is located on the 29-acre Firefly Farms in Karns, Tenn., owned by founder and UT English lecturer Erin Smith. The idea for Sundress came two years ago, when Smith was looking for a job that would allow her to stay in Knoxville. “My significant other and I both really wanted to do something with the artistic community, so we ended up buying our farm,” Smith said. “We really wanted to have a space where all the arts could come together.” See SAFTA on Page 3

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

“At UT, if someone who is 18 wants alcohol, they’re going to get it.” @UTDailyBeacon www.utdailybeacon.com

OPINIONS >>pg. 4

News Arts & Culture Opinions Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, January 17, 2014 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

elamb1@utk.edu

SEEED to host 4th annual MLK service project Janie Prathammavong Photo Editor Despite gray winter weather, some Knoxvillians are seeing green. As part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. “Make a Difference Day,” the student organization Socially Equal Energy Efficient Development, will host its fourth annual “Green the Block” community service project on Saturday at Paul Hogue Park from 12-4 p.m. The project will be followed by a rally with food and entertainment. “Green the Block” will address issues

surrounding green energy efficiencies and the benefits of home weatherization within the urban community. Dozens of volunteers are scheduled to canvas a four-block area within the Five Points neighborhood located in East Knoxville. Volunteers will conduct surveys, talk to homeowners about their energy use, the cost savings of green energy and pick up litter around the area. According to Joshua Outsey, SEEED’s community outreach director, this is the group’s first appearance in this neighborhood, the home of five

Energy Star homes implemented by Mayor Madeline Rogero at the time when she was the community development director. “We want to see what the residents know about energy efficiency, weatherization and what we can do to increase their energy savings,” Outsey said. The data collected will be presented to the Smarter Cities Stakeholder Council to address these issues. “This is a two-way street,” Outsey said. “We let the city know how the communities feel, what their needs are, and how to address their needs sur-

rounding the issue. We also let the residents know where the city stand on this issue. It’s a community between the community and the city.” Rob Huber, an architecture student at UT and the design coordinator of SEEED, said he believes weatherization is a concern that should be universally shared. “It’s less expensive and more effective,” Huber said. “Anyone can do it, and if they do, less energy is exuded as a society. As a result, costs can be saved. Energy is money and if you’re wasting energy, you’re wasting money.”

Saturday’s event is intended to educate local citizens about energy efficiency, building on SEEED’s mission to prepare “at-risk young adults for good-paying, sustainable green jobs in Knoxville’s emerging green economy.” “SEEED is about creating a family within the community and building a stronger relationship surrounded by these issues,” Outsey said. “It’s about wanting to create sustainable jobs, build income and stimulate the local economy.” For more information, visit http:// seeedknox.org.

SCHOLARSHIP

CRIME LOG

continued from Page 1 The number of Tennessee students attending college has increased 7.61 percent since the start of tnAchieves three years ago. In addition, 6,400 students have been admitted to community or technical colleges during the five years of the tnAchieves program. DeAlejandro attributes this success to the scholarship money provided to students, but also to the assistance provided by mentors. According to a 2011 study conducted by Stanford University School of Education, students who are coached during their college experience by text, email and phone are 15 percent more likely to stay in school and 4 percent more likely to graduate than students who are not similarly coached. “Each applicant is assigned a mentor who assists the student in eliminating the barriers associated with post-secondary access,” DeAlejandro said. “tnAchieves mentors support the student through admission and financial aid paperwork, motivate the student to meet deadlines, and perhaps most importantly, encourage the student to reach his or her potential. “I truly believe that the mentor is the heart of our program and the reason behind our overwhelming success.” For DeAlejandro, tnAchieves represents equal opportunity for Tennessee students to attend college and succeed post-graduation. “Since 2008, I have spent the greater part of each day promoting this bold idea that every student, regardless of family income, zip code and even academic preparedness, deserves the opportunity to receive a college credential,” DeAlejandro said. “With a certificate or college degree, our students will increase their earning potential and hopefully inspire others to pursue education beyond high school.”

Jan. 8, 2014 7:29 p.m.: Officer responded to the BYX fraternity house in reference to a theft of property that had occurred earlier in the day at the TRECS. The victim advised the officer that his wallet had been stolen. 9:25 p.m.: Officer executed a traffic stop on 18th Street near Cumberland Avenue on a red Ford Escort after observing that the passenger brake light lens was busted. The driver and back seat passenger were issued a misdemeanor citations for simple possession of Schedule VI narcotics.

DEMOLITION continued from Page 1 As well as increased green space, the new residential halls will offer a variety of room layouts, rather than the standard dormitory style. Cuevas explained the rooms in the updated Gibbs Hall will house up to four single bedrooms and two shared baths per suite. The Fred D. Brown, Jr. Residence Hall will also feature an enhanced dining hall on the ground floor accessible without having to enter any residential

Jan. 9, 2014 3:08 p.m.: Officer was dispatched to the International House in reference to a theft. Staff reported electronic equipment stolen from that location. Jan. 10, 2014 1:21 a.m.: Officer was dispatched in response to a disturbance at Reese Hall. One intoxicated male subject was placed under arrest for underage drinking. 2:47 a.m.: Officer was dispatched to Alpha Tau Omega to conduct a walkthrough which yielded drugs and paraphernalia that were confiscated. A citation

quarter of the building. In addition to the new dining facility, each floor in the building will have its own laundry room and small study area. Despite these improvements, some students remain apprehensive. Marianela D’Aprile, a fourthyear architecture student who lived in Morrill Hall her first year and Apartment Residence Hall her second, appreciates the unique architecture of UT’s campus. “A lot of the residence halls in UT are a product of the Brucism Movement that happened in the 70s and 80s,” D’Aprile said, refer-

was issued for underage consumption. 8:45 p.m.: Officers were dispatched to Massey Hall for a report of the odor of marijuana coming from room 346. A consent search of the room yielded a glass jar and two pill bottles containing a leafy green substance believed to be marijuana, a VaporBlunt and two packages of rolling papers. Misdemeanor citations were issued to two subjects for simple possession and unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Jan. 12, 2014 2:09 p.m.: Victim in Morrill Hall reported that suspect emailed

encing the famous Knoxville architect Bruce McCarty who designed the Humanities Complex, the Clarence Brown Theatre and the Art & Architecture buildings on campus. “They are part of that heritage and that part of era of design. They are really special in that way and have that character that’s unique to Knoxville.” Still, D’Aprile admitted she agrees that renovations are necessary, given her frequent problems with asbestos in Apartment Residence Hall. Nonetheless, D’Aprile said she hopes new structures will retain

the victim several times and made sexual remarks. Jan. 13, 2014 3:14 p.m.: Officer was dispatched to Clement Hall in regards to the odor of marijuana being smoked. Officer confirmed that there was an odor emanating from room 323. The resident consented to let the officer search her room, but officer was unable to locate any marijuana. However, the officer located a pill container on the resident’s desk containing 15 pills presumed to be Citalopram. The pills were confiscated due to the resident not having a prescription for them.

some of their Brucism design. “It seems like there’s a trend going towards a collegiate gothic style like in Vol Hall and the new residence hall, but instead of reverting back to old style, maybe we should try to build on the legacy that McCarty left,” D’Aprile said. “UT has the potential to show a campus that has really progressed and redefine the American campus as we think of it, to design something environmentally friendly and serves the needs of its residence and looks like it’s not trying to copy something else.”


Friday, January 17, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

‘August: Osage County’ disappoints on silver screen Alex Goldberger Contributor

August: Osage County Cast: Meryl Streep, Dermot Mulroney, Julia Roberts Director: John Wells Genre: Drama Rating: R

While the screen somewhat limits the intimacy and spontaneity of these many arguments, there is still plenty of drama inherent in a dinner table packed with enemies, with one medicated voice at its head constantly on the brink of divulging their every secret. At the film’s best, these scenes will have viewers holding their breath and waiting for the violent catharsis that is sure to follow. There is plenty of good, stagey dialogue

• Photo Courtesy of Sundress Academy for the Arts

Adapting a stage story for the screen is no easy task; anyone attempting it must not only uphold the source material’s original impact, but attempt to create a cinematic work that can stand alone. Director John Wells mostly skirts these issues in “August: Osage County,” allowing Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning dialogue to carry the film with minimal interference from the camera. This method produces rather mixed results. “August: Osage County” is entrenched in the conventions of dark family dramas before it: the sudden death of family patriarch Beverly Weston (Sam Shepard) reunites the family’s many troubled members and reopens old wounds between them all. The Westons argue separately in cars and then together in the home of Beverly’s widow, the cancer-ridden and pill-addled Violet (Meryl Streep). The three Weston children argue over what to do with their mother, and couples argue over the state of their decaying relationships. Bits of plotting centered on incest and molestation are thrown in for good measure, but the film is essentially a delivery system for a series of angry and explosive confrontations.

in “August: Osage County” for one to chew on, but dialogue is only as good as the actors who deliver it. It is here that the film shines. Streep is as reliable as ever, suggesting the beginnings of madness in a woman who can feel life slipping through her fingers. Julia Roberts also impresses as oldest daughter Barbara, ably supported by sisters Ivy (Julianne Nicholson) and Karen (Juliette Lewis). Ewan McGregor, Chris Cooper, Margo Martindale and Benedict Cumberbatch round out this impressive cast, and each of them get a moment to shine before fading into the background. While the intensity of every spoken line in the film can occasionally veer into melodrama, the actors often manage to indicate the vitriol of Letts’ screenplay without going too over-the-top. Still, “August: Osage County” never amounts to anything more than a collection of good moments scattered among comparatively slack padding. The film lacks a strong enough throughline to tie together these moments, making the whole affair feel rather inconsequential as the credits roll. Perhaps, with greater revision, Letts’ play could have proved more compelling on-screen, but this attempt has produced a film too intense to ignore but too restrained to truly relish.

Andrew Emitt performs at the Pilot Light for the inaugural SAFTA First Friday on Jan. 3.

SAFTA continued from Page 1 Smith said she believes most of Knoxville’s art community is divided by medium. The film people stay with the film people, the writers with writers and dancers with dancers. One of the main goals of SAFTA is to provide a place where all the arts work together to better the community instead of remaining divided. In order to achieve this goal, workshops are held once a month in order to broaden artists’ horizons in writing, filmmaking, theater and visual art, according to their website. Each workshop has an extra element incorporated to further the experience, one example being the recent yoga and writing workshop. “Next month we have ‘Fiction and Firearms,’” Smith said. “It’s an opportunity to shoot guns and then write about it.” Some future workshops will include digital photography and OUTspoken, a session about being LGBTQ in the South. Lyric Dunagan, alumna of the University of Tennessee, has helped teach two workshops. “I think it’s a great resource for the area,” Dunagan said. “We also do creative writing once a week. We meet downtown and discuss poems, or fiction and nonfiction as well.” The group also holds monthly readings at the Birdhouse. This month’s reading features UT’s own Creative Writing Director, Marilyn Kallet, and Darren C. Demaree. However, this property is not only intended for two-day workshops or short readings. It also functions as an artist residency, meaning artists stay for free on the grounds in order to work on projects of artistic merit. “At some point we’re going to build tiny houses, about the size of a small room, with all the amenities you need,” Smith said. “We’ll bring people in, regionally and nationally, so they will be able to work on their art.” According to Marilyn Kallet, this is quite unique. “I believe the closest artist residency to us is in Virginia,” Kallet said. “This would be the only one in Tennessee that I know of.” Smith confirmed the residency’s individual traits by pointing out that, while there are many

artist residencies across the country, very few are in the mountains. Even less are conveniently located near a city. Alexis Hamilton, marketing intern and sophomore in nutrition, identified the importance of SAFTA’s artist residency. “When people are yelling at you from all sides to hurry and rush, sloppiness is usually a side effect,” Hamilton said. “SAFTA found a way to help artists get their best work on in their own time. “That’s where good art comes from, somebody working for themselves and not for somebody else.” Those involved are at a consensus that the residency will attract artists from all over the country to Knoxville. In fact, two artists already live in residence: Rhonda Lott and T.A. Noonan. However, the artists aren’t the only ones who can benefit from SAFTA. “We offer student discounts off of all of our workshops,” Smith said. “It’s about 35 percent off the total cost. We also hire interns, who get real world experience working within a startup

non-profit. We are constantly growing.” Hamilton can attest to this. “I can do anything from writing blogs to creating digital media, or even baking for an event,” she said. “My job description is ‘marketing intern,’ but I get the chance to do a lot in the organization, which is exciting.” She went on to explain that those guiding her were genuinely interested in her progress and help out in whatever way they can. Also, the experience has helped her grow as a writer and taught her many skills she can use once she enters the job market. As for the future success of SAFTA, Hamilton said she has no doubt of the outcome. “I have absolute and total faith that SAFTA will take off,” she said. “It’s going to change Knoxville and the artistic community, and I’m very excited to be a part of it.” For more on the Sundress Academy for the Arts, including information on internships and workshops, visit their website or Facebook page.

Nettles produces solo album, lacks overall maturity Melodi Erdogan Managing Editor The Supremes did it. Simon and Garfunkel did it. The Dixie Chicks did it. Almost every talented musical group does it. After years of success they decide to split and move forward making music without one another. Although, not every post-breakup artist goes on to do great things. You could say Justin Timberlake was successful post NSYNC, but do we ever actually hear about Joe Jonas’ music after breaking up with the band he had with his brothers, the Jonas Brothers? This month, Jennifer Nettles released her debut solo album “That Girl.” Her name is relatively unknown, unless someone knows of the mainstream country duo Sugarland. She fronted the band with guitarist Kristian Bush, but after recording five studio albums and giving birth, Nettles decided to release an album under her own name. Produced by Rick Rubin, co-president of Columbia Records, the album dabbles in folk but mainly focuses around Nettles’ country roots, perfectly showcasing her typicalof-country vocals while ignoring the music component. The title track “That Girl,” the fourth out of a total of 11, reminisces on a confusing, muddling love that leaves Nettles in the middle of fourminute ballad that doesn’t seem to have any variety. The track has a flat, over-produced feel and rambles on to imma-

ture and stereotypical complications of relationships a la Taylor Swift. “Saw them holding hands / knew he was a married man,” is how the song “Know You Wanna Know” starts off. The song has a jig and reel vibe, but its lyrics prove to be nothing more than a journal entry. Her voice remains within one octave and competes with the instruments attempting to accompany them. Most of the album focuses around that childish motif, a theme that seems out of place given Nettles’ age. The collection of songs has the potential to be sophisticated, but it disappoints when the songs seem to follow a very formulaic structure that gets tiring by the fifth track. With hardly any variation or experimentation, “That Girl” falls flat for Nettles. Together, the songs reflect teen pop rather than a mature musician with years of experience. Rants, self-conscious comments and infantile infatuations make the album into more of a public diary than a musical piece. Although its production is average, its structure is messy with ballads after love songs after revenge tracks; the album falls short of telling a story that listeners can relate to. Alas, some artists have proved to be better off without their musical significant others. Although with this album, Nettles demonstrates that her solo career may be short lived. “That Girl” is a mediocre representation of her musical pursuits that brought her fame through Sugarland.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, January 17, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

‘Dry campus’ label a farce 50 Shades of Wade by

Wade Scofield Traditionally, UT student government campaigns brand themselves with a catchy buzzword. Since 2010, there’s been “Spark!” and “Reach!” and “Revolt!” and “Fuel!” and “Amplify!” and “Engage!” But though these are undeniably riveting, a running joke in SGA circles for some time has been that if a campaign were to call itself “Wet Campus!” they would have no issue in securing every seat in Senate and on the executive board. Yes, the University of Tennessee is a “dry campus.” This means that, according to Hilltopics, a student may be disciplined for possessing an alcoholic beverage on Universitycontrolled property. So even students of legal drinking age who live in university housing may be disciplined for the mere possession of a beer. I place “dry campus” in quotations marks. If newspaper columns allowed for air quotes, I’d be flashing them like a high school English teacher who’s had too much coffee because we all know the University of Tennessee is not a “dry campus.” In fact, UT’s standing as a “dry campus” does little to keep alcohol out of residence halls or even teach any sort of precautions about responsible drinking. Instead, “dry campus” perpetuates perceived norms about the dangers of underage drinking, ensures a culture of binge drinking and radiates blatant distrust in our own students. The idea that “dry campus” will deter underage students from consuming alcohol is clearly myth. American drinking culture holds college above its head as the standard, a golden time of drunkenness. With or without “dry campus,” freshmen and sophomores already feel the peer and cultural pressure to consume or at least be around alcohol. According to the 2008 publication of the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Survey, underage students drank alcohol as often at schools with a ban than without one. So not only is the “dry campus” moniker misleading, it encourages of-age students in university housing to go out and drink heavily – which obviously entails its own gamut of risks – because they can’t enjoy a few beers or a glass of wine in their own residence because of a selfish, misleading university policy. Most irking to me about UT’s status as a “dry campus” is a clear message that UT doesn’t trust its own students to make responsible decisions about alcohol. Our students are full-fledged adults. UT expects them, at 18, to take a strenuous course load, get on track to graduate in four years and in many cases, work part-time jobs on top of studying to pay the school for their education. A common objection is that on a dry campus, since ofage students will be discouraged to have alcohol in their possession, it will be more unlikely that underage students will experience that presence. That assertion is laughable at best. The Harvard study indicates that freshman binge drinking has remained stable over a long period of time, no matter what university policy is. (In fact, effects seem to hinge more on state policy). Like in high school, if someone who is 15 wants alcohol, they’re going to get it. At UT, if someone who is 18 wants alcohol, they’re going to get it. Sure, maybe the university encourages responsible drinking, but it seems clear that encouragement ends at freshman orientation. It seems reasonable to me that a continuing education on how to safely consume alcohol through required online classes and surveys or required meetings with resident assistants would not only lead to a better understanding of alcohol among students but convey a constructive university attitude that could reduce dangerous drinking habits. To me, the killer in this whole argument can be found at UT’s other favorite pastime, outside Neyland Stadium on a fall Saturday. If you walk around after the traditional Vols loss, you will notice that alumni, adult fans and students have littered the campus with red solo cups, Natty Light cans and plastic Fireball handles. Granted, it would take an army of boys in blue to curtail the amount of drinking on our “dry campus” on a Saturday, but if the university wasn’t quite as obsessed with the types of good that a successful football atmosphere can bring (money, money, money), and actually want to truly be proud about its “dry campus,” it would bring in the Tennessee National Guard to make sure everyone is safe and sober. Maybe then the policy would seem a little less selfserving and paper-thin. Wade Scofield is a senior in religious studies. He can be reached at wade@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Asian-Americans underrepresented in Sochi Olympics, as usual Crossing Cues by

Melissa Lee Last Saturday, when figure skater Mirai Nagasu placed third at the U.S. National Championships, she had every reason to believe she had secured herself a position on the 2014 U.S. Olympic team. In Olympic years, after all, the U.S. National Championships have acted as the figure skating Olympic trials, and the U.S. Figure Skating Association has only ever disregarded their results four times in history – each time because of an injury. It was a surprise, then, when the three figure skaters representing the United States at the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games were announced and in Nagasu’s stead was fourth place National Championships finisher, Ashley Wagner. It was a legal move – according to the rules, the U.S. Figure Skating Association is allowed to consider a skater’s body of work over the past year and give it an unspecified but “significant” amount of weight. But it was unprecedented, too, and controversial. Ashley Wagner, after all, blonde-haired, blue-eyed, looks the prototypical all-American. Nagasu – you can probably tell by the name – does not. There are a lot of people calling it racist. I do not know if they are right. There are reasons to believe the decision was, as the USFSA insists, “fair” – though Wagner’s performance on Sunday was so riddled with errors that she felt the need to publicly

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

announced by MSNBC with the headline, “American beats out Kwan,” Nagasu’s thirdplace National Championship finish and presumed earned Olympic spot felt a bit like a collective victory. For the USFSA, the decision may truly have not had anything to do with race; for many Asian-Americans around the country, the decision has had little to do with anything else. As a child, I watched the Olympics with a special kind of attention – criss-cross applesauced on the floor at the kind of short distance from the television usually reserved for the few hours every Saturday morning the cartoons showed up on the six or so channels picked up by our antennae. The Olympians I rooted for were decided on two factors. First, I cheered for the athletes that talked like I did – in English with American accents – dressed in the old, familiar red, white and blue. Next, I cheered for the athletes that looked like I did – with features that I, at the time, probably could not have defined, but that stood out both to me and to the classmates that asked me why my eyes were so slanted. It’s been 16 years since her Olympic debut, but I still remember the special pride I felt as Michelle Kwan glided across the screen of my family television and, for the first time in my six years of life, I did not have to choose between the two. For whatever the reason Wagner replaced Nagasu on this year’s Olympic team, it’s a pity my 6-year-old counterparts this season will be left still waiting. Melissa Lee is a senior in College Scholars. She can be reached at mlee48@ utk.edu.

Avoid the drive-thru and take a crash-course in simple nutrition Working Out Happiness by

Andrew Fleming Dieting can be hard, especially when “health companies” take shots at your dignity with photoshopped images of happy, racially ambiguous people that “look and feel great” because they drink the carb-less protein mush with 34 billion necessary vitamins and minerals. (Spoiler alert: they don’t actually drink it.) So where lies the truth in the oversaturated health food market? Are any foods truly evil or off limits? It depends. The most important thing to remember is that dieting is not about finding this magic weight-loss regimen to try for a few months. I actually don’t even like the term “dieting,” as it implies there will be a time in the future when you’re not “on your diet.” Dieting is about gradually working into a healthy lifestyle that you can stick with. If you can’t stick with it, it’s not going to help. As complicated as the human body is, it’s actually been fairly well mapped out from a nutritional standpoint. Yes, there’s always infinitely more to learn, but what we know about nutrition is more than enough to help you attain whatever sort of figure you want. Most nutritionists break food down into three categories: carbohydrates, pro-

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

apologize via Twitter afterwards, she is the two-time defending national champion, with the highest American placements at the last two World Championships. Yet, Nagasu is the only candidate with Olympic experience – she finished fourth at the 2010 Vancouver games. Under the high-stakes of the National Championships, Nagasu was the only one of the candidates to overcome her nerves and perform two error-free routines. One would think that if the Olympic team decision was, as the USFSA claims, truly based on overall experience, second place finisher, 15-year-old Polina Edmunds – for whom Sunday night was a senior-level competition debut – would have been the one to go. Figure skating is an inherently subjective sport, and there really is no way to judge the role race did or did not play in the USFSA’s decision. What we can note, though, is the role that race has most certainly played in its response. For many Asian-Americans, the USFSA’s decision has felt like a betrayal. AsianAmerican celebrities, after all, are few and far between; though we comprise 5 percent of the general population, we represent less than 3 percent of prime-time actors on television, often only the role of a foreigner or a stereotype. In sports, these numbers are even sparser. One need only consider the cultural significance of Jeremy Lin – the fourth ever Asian-American in the NBA – and his 2012 “Linsanity” to understand the importance of such prominent profiling to a population starved of popular representation. In Olympic figure skating, where Michelle Kwan’s 1998 loss to Tara Lipinski was

teins and fats. You need all three. Let’s start with carbs. There’s simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are delicious, delicious sugars. These are found in honey, molasses, fruit beverages and sugar of all kinds – brown, white or otherwise. They are called simple carbohydrates because they are quite small, molecularly speaking and they digest QUICKLY. Complex carbohydrates are just long strings of simple sugar subunits linked together. These are found in many vegetables, pastas, grains, oatmeals and beans. Simple carbohydrates are quickly processed, and can lead to reactive hypoglycemia, a scary term for a sugar crash. Complex carbohydrates are great for more sustained energy. They are also going to help you eat less often and reduce your total caloric intake. Lean away from simple carbs and more toward complex carbs. Next comes protein. Honestly, protein is great. It makes you feel full, takes longer to break down (leaving you feeling full), and is responsible for the development of skeletal muscle, as well as muscle recovery (on top of a multitude of cellular uses). Protein, while sometimes used to gain mass when paired with size-building exercise, can actually help maintain weight loss goals by curbing appetite. This fact has nothing to do with the excessive, dangerous diets that cut carbs. Protein is great when kept within reasonable caloric parameters. Don’t eat meat? Protein can be found in soy, kale, nuts, beans and seeds. However, these protein sources are often not as

complete as ones found in meat, so some mixing and matching may be necessary for a well-rounded protein intake. Last, the F word: Fats. Not all fat is bad fat. Unsaturated fats, both mono and poly, are incredibly healthy in certain amounts. They raise your HDL cholesterol (the good kind), lower LDL cholesterol (the bad kind), protect against plaque buildup in arteries, contain those great omega-3s you hear about, and can even prevent belly fat. Saturated fats are a different beast, promoting heart disease, bad cholesterol and inflammation. Do your best to limit them. All of that said, I want to end with what would seem like an obvious statement: Eat real food. You’re worth more than what’s easy. Convenient foods are foods that are easy for others to make, easy to preserve and easy to sell. Convenient foods are also horrifying conglomerates of odd things, like that episode of Spongebob where they start serving fake Krabby Patties. Did you know that Chick-fil-A pickles are dyed with yellow 5 and blue 1? That’s because their pickles aren’t green, and they have to dye them to make them look green. That’s not some weird propaganda circulating the internet. That’s on their website. Look it up. Food chains don’t care about your health. They care about their money. Andrew Fleming is a junior in neuroscience. He can be reached at aflemin8@ utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

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Classifieds: (865) 974-4931 orderad@utdailybeacon.com Editor-in-Chief: (865) 974-2348 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com Main Newsroom: (865) 974-3226 editorinchief@utdailybeacon.com The Daily Beacon is published by students at The University of Tennessee Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and Tuesday and Friday during the summer semester. The offices are located at 1340 Circle Park Drive, 11 Communications Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-0314. The newspaper is free on campus and is available via mail subscription for $200/year, $100/semester or $70/summer only. It is also available online at: www.utdailybeacon.com LETTERS POLICY: The Daily Beacon welcomes all letters to the editor and guest columns from students, faculty and staff. Each submission is considered for pub-

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Friday, January 17, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

Matthew DeMaria • Tennessee Athletics

msoutha1@utk.edu

Vols set to visit Kentucky, eye second straight win in rivalry As if the past week of Tennessee basketball needed any more drama, the Vols will head to Lexington, Ky., Saturday for a noon contest with the No. 13 Kentucky Wildcats in Rupp Arena. Cuonzo Martin’s squad will go up against another version of Wildcats head coach John Calipari’s freshman showcase. Thought to be one of the best recruiting classes in college basketball history entering the season, Kentucky boasts four first-year phenoms who average more than 10 points per game. However, the Wildcats’ (12-4, 2-1 SEC) season has seen more bumps than expected. Three non-conference losses derailed an early top-five ranking, and they are coming off an overtime loss at Arkansas on Tuesday. After Tennessee (11-5, 2-1) also faltered recently in a late heartbreaker to Texas A&M last Saturday, the Vols and Wildcats will be playing to

Who to watch for

How they match up Kentucky Scoring Offense

74.9

67.1

Scoring Defense

61.9

.476

Field Goal %

.305

16.9 11.1 1.4

.534

.457

#1 F James Young

14.6 4.6

4.9

.388

3-Point %

.362

#15 C Willie Cauley-Stein

8.9

7.6

0.9

.656

+13

Rebound Margin

+9.1

12.5

Assists Per Game

13.2

6.9

Blocks Per Game

5.0

4.2

Steals Per Game

5.4

-1.9

Turnover Margin

+1.4

EMPLOYMENT

FOR RENT

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TUTORING

EMPLOYMENT

Tennessee

80.8

Tennessee senior guard Jordan McRae flies through the lane and attempts a layup in the Volsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 78-67 victory over the Auburn Tigers at Thompson-Boling Arena on Jan. 15.

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Martin said he thought the midweek win was crucial heading into what should be the most hostile environment the Vols will see all season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think our guys will be back on the grind after this,â&#x20AC;? Martin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get (the Texas A&M loss) off your back and continue to push forward. League play â&#x20AC;&#x201D; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about 18 games. You learn from (the Auburn win) and get ready to rumble on Saturday.â&#x20AC;? Still caught up in the aftermath of the Auburn win, Martin said he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t laid any eyes on Kentucky tape â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is normal in college basketball. But he has an assistant coach who has been scouting them all season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t watched film with a pen and a pad on them, because my focus is obviously Auburn,â&#x20AC;? Martin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start that (Thursday) morning, start breaking down film and analyzing. One of our assistant coaches already scouts them, so he has a game plan, but for me, I have to watch these four or five pieces of film.â&#x20AC;? Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game will air on CBS.

avoid falling to .500 in conference play. A UT win would also be the second straight against Kentucky after a dominating, 88-58 Vol victory at home last season. Vols guard Jordan McRae has caught a couple of Kentucky games, and said he sees the usual, highoctane product in Lexington â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but not an unbeatable one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a good team,â&#x20AC;? McRae said after Wednesday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win over Auburn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re their usual Kentucky team. They are going to be tough to beat at home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I think we can manage.â&#x20AC;? Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game is doubly important for the Vols, who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play Kentucky at home this season for the first time since 1952-53. The new SEC schedule omits divisions, which fluctuates the teams that play twice in a season. The Vols lost the momentum of a then-four-game win streak in the Texas A&M loss, but regained some of that on Wednesday with a 78-67 win over a pesky Auburn team that made UT sweat in the final minutes.

Steven Cook Copy Editor

Last Meeting Feb. 16, 2013 in Knoxville, Tenn. Vols, 88-58

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Friday, January 17, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard

msoutha1@utk.edu

Wes Tripp Contributor Rankings-wise, the best of the Tennessee men’s athletic teams will finally begin their season this weekend. The sixth-ranked Volunteer tennis team – according to the Intercollegiate Tennis Association rankings – will take to the court Saturday inside the Goodfriend Tennis Center, kicking off the spring schedule against Tennessee Tech (10 a.m.) and Eastern Kentucky (2 p.m.). The men’s squad returns four starters – Mikelis Libietis, Hunter Reese, Jarryd Chaplin and Brandon Fickey – and welcome four newcomers to a team that won 26 matches last year and made it to the NCAA team quarterfinals. Reese ranks No. 16 in singles competition after he finished 12-6 this fall and defeated two top-10 opponents. He will also continue to play alongside Libietis – the reigning SEC Player of the Year – as the No. 1 ranked doubles team in the country. The duo finished the fall season with an 11-2 record and won their first national title at the ITA All-American Championships back in October. With so much momentum coming into the spring from

BASEBALL continued from Page 1 “When I hit that home run as a young arrogant rookie”, Burke said, ‘(I was like) what’s the big deal? I’m going to be doing this for a long time to come,’ and boy I’m glad I hit that home run now because no one would remember me otherwise. “It’s certainly a fond memory and one I was fortunate to be a part of.”

the fall and last season, both coaches and players are anxiously anticipating kicking the team season off. “The wait is over,” head coach Sam Winterbotham said. “I think you just get tired of working out. You actually want to compete against somebody other than yourself. It’s been a long time for us to wait to get to this first match. “Tennis-wise we’re ready, certainly emotionally we’re ready to get this season going.” For the junior All-American and All-SEC player, Reese, the new season is a culmination of everything the team has been working for. “It feels like we spend the whole fall training and doing the individual stuff and finally it’s going to mean something,” Reese said. With so much talent on the squad, Winterbotham said he expects the team to get better every day from competing with each other. “We’re a tough team and I expect our team to be tough on the court in practice,” Winterbotham said. “I expect them to be the toughest competitors when they go out in their matches.” While players like Reese and Libietis may get most of the attention, Winterbotham admitted he still expects his seniors to lead the team.

The Burke Effect With the 2014 UT baseball team in attendance for the induction, head coach Dave Serrano admitted he believes this year’s squad can benefit from what the former Vol has to offer. “I’m hoping,” Serrano said, “as our guys sit in the audience and listen to Chris, and listen to his accolades and listen to him speak, that one of them sitting there is hoping they can be a Chris Burke.” “I think every good team;

Andrew Bruckse • Tennessee Athletics

Tennis Vols embrace lofty 2014 expectations Turnovers don’t

Junior Hunter Reese returns a volley in a singles match during the UTSA/ITA Ohio Valley Regional Championships inside the Goodfriend Tennis Center on Oct. 15, 2013. “Sometimes that’s a cliché relying on seniors to be the heart and soul of your team,” Winterbotham said. “We have Colton Norton and Jarryd Chaplin who really are the heart and soul of our team. They are our leaders. They’re leading our workouts. They understand the dynamics within the team, what needs to be said, who needs to be supported, who needs to be ripped. This season is all about them.”

every great team has a Chris Burke on it.” But what exactly is Serrano’s definition of a ‘Chris Burke’? “Knowing that he was a young man coming out of high school that wasn’t drafted ends up being a first rounder three years later,” Serrano said. “A guy that just wasn’t going to take no for an answer and proved a lot of people wrong and played the game the right way. “Our guys can learn a lot from that.”

While individuals on the team have succeeded in the past, Reese said he believes his teammates – and himself – are capable of much more. “The last time we won the SEC was the year before I got here and the last time we made the NCAA finals was that same year,” Reese said. “This team has never really done anything to be cocky about. There is always that motivation. We can do better.”

All-Orange Everything In a surprise to many, the Vols will add another uniform option to their repertoire in 2014 as this year’s squad unveiled the brand new, all-orange jerseys at Thursday’s banquet. “It’s a new jersey that we’ll bring in this year,” Serrano said. “The guys wore them the other day in some stuff we did, and I’m really excited about it. “The Tennessee Volunteers are orange, and we’re trying to get more orange into our uniforms.”

break Lady Vols’ undefeated streak vs. Bulldogs, 67-63 Associated Press

Ariel Massengale and Bashaara Graves both scored 13 points, Isabelle Harrison added 10 and No. 12 Tennessee survived a tough challenge from Mississippi State before escaping with a 67-63 win on Thursday night. Tennessee (14-3, 3-2 Southeastern Conference) has won all 35 games in the series against Mississippi State (144, 1-3), but this one was a challenge. The Lady Vols led 26-23

at halftime and never trailed in the second half. But the Bulldogs cut the lead to 64-61 on a pair of Breanna Richardson’s free throws with 26.4 seconds left. Tennessee got a break on the ensuing possession when Mississippi State’s Ketara Chapel committed a foul before the ball was thrown inbounds. Candace Foster made 1 of 2 free throws to put the Lady Vols up 65-61. Tennessee shot 49 percent (24 of 49) from the field, but had 22 turnovers.

63 Miss. State

Tennessee 67

Starkville, Miss. // Humphrey Coliseum // 3,169 25-62 (40.3%)

Field Goals

24-49 (49.0%)

6-18 (33.3%)

3-pointers

1-7 (14.3%)

7-12 (58.3)

Free Throws

18-25 (72.0%)

31-15

Rebounds-Off

35-13

16

Turnovers

22

22

Fouls

16

2

Largest Lead

12

Individual Leaders K. Grant 21

Points

2 tied, 13

M. Alwal 9

Rebounds

5 tied, 5

K. May 6

Assists

A. Massengale 7

D. Dillingham 3

Steals

C. Burdick 3

M. Alwal 2

Blocks

2 tied, 1

01 17 14  

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