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Running for their life: How students, residents helped raise awarness against sexual trafficking

Harrison’s technical causes Lady Vols to lose footing down stretch, fall to Vanderbilt

‘Her’ impresses by telling introspective, in-depth love story in today’s tech-age

NEWS >>pg. 3

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

Folk band Ten Bartram brings soulful backporch blues to Square Room

SPORTS >>pg. 6

ARTS & CULTURE >>pg. 5

Monday, January 13, 2014

Issue 04, Volume 125

Tennessee ‘Space’s out Copy Editor

Contrary to expectation, the 2014 Corporate Equality Index shows a general improvement for LGBT rights in Tennessee companies. However, these corporations remain far from egalitarian. A national benchmarking tool used to evaluate corporate policies and practices regarding lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual employees, the CEI has been released annually by the Human Rights Campaign since 2002. This year, Tennessee companies received scores ranging from 15 at Nashville-based Vanguard Health Systems to 35 at Regal Entertainment Group in Knoxville. Nissan, headquartered in Franklin, Tenn., represents the state’s only company that scored a perfect 100. Major companies are graded on a scale of zero to 100 based on the “10 principles” outlined by the HRC. Corporations receive high scores if they have a written policy of non-discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, include sexual orientation issues in diversity and sensitivity training and provide equal benefits to all employees. This year, 304 American companies received perfect scores, a number larger than any previous year. In the past two years, Nissan has increased its score by 70 points. “The two biggest factors that catapulted us to a perfect score were the implementation of a company-wide diversity training program and the launch of Nissan’s LGBT affinity group, the Gay-Straight Alliance at Nissan,” Robert Wilson, director of Diversity and Inclusion, said at Nissan in a Dec. 10 press release. Companies based in Southern states tend to score lower in comparison with other regions, with companies like Chick-fil-A making headlines for anti-gay policies. “I think Tennessee, like most other states in the Deep South, have historically been socially conservative and leery of change,” Donna Braquet, director of the OUTreach Center, said. “This was true for the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s and it is true today.” See LGBT on Page 3

Leadership Conference, Day of Service to help students embrace volunteerism Sage Speaks Contributor Every spring, the Vols earn their title. On Saturday, UT’s Center for Leadership & Service will host the annual Clifton M. Jones Student Leadership Conference and MLK Day of Service. Composed of three breakout sessions covering 35 different programs and speakers, the conference will cover topics including servant leadership

and social change, growing in leadership, leading in a diverse world, creating your leadership brand and impact careers and professional leadership. The information learned in the sessions is then applied in a “service” component following the conference in which students volunteer at local organizations. Storyteller Steve Whitby will serve as the scheduled keynote speaker and is best known for his lessons and stories about average citizens facing extraor-

dinary opportunities. Alicia Price, coordinator of CLS, explained that the event seeks to underscore the importance of leadership and human potential. “Leadership is demonstrated through every aspect of the day, from the breakout sessions to the keynote speaker,” Price said. “Our office believes that leadership and service are indispensable to one another.” See DAY OF SERVICE on Page 3 Janie Prathammavong • The Daily Beacon

Hayley Brundige Assistant Photo Editor

Playing in front of the most raucous crowd ThompsonBoling Arena has seen this season and sporting a 14-point halftime lead, Tennessee had all the makings of another inspiring sweep to continue the season’s longest winning streak. Good thing Vol fans are getting used to gut punches. Texas A&M’s Antwan Space hit a game-winning 3-pointer with 4.4 seconds left to lift the Aggies to a 57-56 comeback win over the Vols in Tennessee’s SEC home opener. For the third time in Cuonzo Martin’s basketball coaching career at UT, the Vols failed to start out the conference slate 2-0. “Tough loss,” Martin said after the game. “Give A&M credit. They made the big shot down the stretch to win the ball game. It was a tough shot. But a big shot.” Tennessee senior guard Jordan McRae had a chance to win the game on a buzzer-beating attempt from about 35 feet out. It came up short. Texas A&M’s bench jubilantly raced onto center court in celebration of the improbable win. The Vols, once again, were left heartbroken. “As a coach, it’s hard to say a lot of things in a situation like that,” Martin said, reminiscing on the locker room mood. “The pain will take care of that.” Two Antonio Barton free throws with 36.9 remaining put UT up 56-52 and sent a handful of fans heading toward the exits. Then, Aggies guard Alex Caruso

quickly scored to make it 56-54 in the blink of an eye. UT inbounded the ball to McRae, who was called for an offensive foul while trying to advance the ball past half-court. Caruso was fouled on the resulting possession and went to the line with a chance to pull the Aggies even with 17 seconds left, but he missed both free throws. Jeronne Maymon pulled down the board and was immediately fouled. Maymon failed to ice the game, missing both of his free throws. The Aggies pushed forward in the final seconds, and Space drilled the game-winner. “It’s very hard,” Maymon said about missing both free throws in the final seconds. “It’s very upsetting. But you have to get back in the gym and work on it.” In incredibly rare fashion, the Vols’ three leading scorers — McRae, Maymon and Jarnell Stokes — were all held in single digits. Stokes had just six points and five rebounds, while McRae had nine points as both stars struggled through foul trouble. Maymon admitted how tough it is for his team to win when the leaders aren’t putting the ball in the basket. “We look for Jordan to really lead the way with (scoring), and me and Stokes come up with the rear,” Maymon said. “It was just an off night.” Perhaps the most staggering aspect of Saturday’s Vol loss was the way the game flowed early on. UT was dominant in the first half, entering the locker room Senior guard Jordan McRae drives for a layup against Texas A&M on Saturday with a 32-18 halftime lead. at Thompson-Boling Arena. A last second 3-pointer pushed the Aggies past UT, giving the Vols a 57-56 loss in their SEC home opener. See RECAP on Page 6

Jeff Robinson, left, portrays Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Wesley Lawrence Taylor, right, plays Malcolm X, during “The Meeting” as part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration at the UC Auditorium on Jan. 21, 2013.

Samantha Smoak • The Daily Beacon

Scores for LGBT benefits on rise for UT blows 14-point halftime lead, A&M stuns Vols with GW 3-pointer Steven Cook Tennessee companies

Music Center to welcome MTSU faculty quartet Jessica Karsten Contributor Since the opening of the Natalie L. Haslam Music Center, UT’s School of Music has worked to enhance its presence on campus. To start off the spring semester, the school is collaborating with a Middle Tennessee State University faculty quartet to offer a unique performance. The Stones River Winds faculty quartet will perform Monday at 6 p.m. in the Sandra G. Powell Recital Hall at the Natalie L. Haslam Music Center. The Stone River Winds, named after a civil war battlefield in Murfreesboro, is a woodwind quartet consisting of MTSU faculty members Deanna Little (flute), Laura Ann Ross (oboe), Todd Waldecker (clarinet) and Gil Perel (bassoon). The quartet

was formed this past fall after the members had been playing together for the last five years. Little, professor of flute at MTSU, said she has enjoyed her time in the group and appreciates their unique sound. “We enjoy rehearsing together and traveling together,” Little said. “This makes our ensemble experience something we all look forward to.” The quartet has performed for the MTSU and University of Memphis Schools of Music, traveled to high schools, given masters classes and spoken to students around Tennessee. “We have a fun and varied concert,” Little said. “We not only play quartets but also trios and duos to mix things up and give you a chance to really hear the different colors each wind instrument makes alone and blended together.” See QUARTET on Page 2

INSIDE THE DAILY BEACON

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In Short News Opinions Arts & Culture Sports

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, January 13, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

IN SHORT QUARTET continued from Page 1 MTSU professor of clarinet Todd Waldecker said he also enjoys the group’s distinct sound and believes people should expect to witness a variety of music at the concert. “Our sound is colorful, flexible, energetic and soothing,” Waldecker said. “We offer a variety of tonal sounds as well as various pieces, styles and moods.” The quartet became close with UT bassoon professor Keith McClelland at the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts. McClelland has been given opportunities to perform chamber music with

In Case You Missed It: After then-Tennessee head football coach Lane Kiffin bolted for USC in the middle of the night in January of 2010, most UT supporters never thought they would see the coach inside Neyland Stadium again ... until now. On Friday, reports confirmed the unimaginable for UT fans: Alabama coach Nick Saban had brought on Kiffin as his offensive coordinator. As expected, Tennessee fans weren’t thrilled.

these members, musicians that he would not normally perform with at UT. “Unlike in a brass quintet with five very homogeneous instruments that blend well, the woodwind quartet is four very different sounds,” McClelland said. “Each line will be distinctly heard. It’s fun that way.” McClelland said students should attend the concert out of curiosity and to experience the rare occasion of a woodwind quartet on campus. “When you go to one of these concerts, especially if you play one of the instruments there, it’s great to follow your own line,” McClelland said. “I am looking forward to the concert; they are good friends and great players.” The concert will offer a

rvogt@utk.edu

Managing Editor Melodi Erdogan merdogan@utk.edu

variety of pieces, including the works of Malcolm Arnold and Robert Muczynski. They will showcase combinations of flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon musical lines. “The last piece is a beautiful piece,” McClelland said. “It is a piece that will, at times, sound like circus music that jumps around. However, it also has some sections that are very mellow and laid back with beautiful lines.” McClelland said it is important for universities to collaborate on events such as this. “The group wanted to play in our new recital hall, and I was able to make that happen,” McClelland said. “It gives all sorts of support for what we are doing here.”

Beacon Flashbacks

Jan. 13, 1993 In the first issue of the 62nd volume of The Daily Beacon, the sports desk reported on the beginning of Phillip Fulmer’s head coaching tenure. Fulmer began his career at UT as a blocker, playing on the field for the Vols from 1969-1971. During his time as a player, the Vols won an SEC championship, a Sugar Bowl and a Liberty Bowl. After several stints coaching other programs, Fulmer returned to Rocky Top as an assistant coach in 1980. After jumping from offensive line coach to offensive coordinator, he was named interim

head coach during the fall of 1992, replacing the iconic Johnny Majors. He was officially promoted to head coach Nov. 29, 1992. Vol fans everywhere know the rest of the story – the rise to national prominence, the arrival of Peyton Manning, the National Championship. It all began in 1993, when Fulmer kicked off recruitment season with a sound beating of Boston College in the Hall of Fame Bowl on New Year’s Day. Unfortunately, Fulmer’s legacy became tainted by three SEC championship losses in the new millennium, and he was eventually fired after a 5-7 2008 season. His replacement? The infamous

Lane Kiffin. Friday, the Alabama Crimson Tide announced the hiring of Kiffin as offensive coordinator, setting the stage for a raucous return to Neyland Stadium next fall. Fans and sportswriters alike have speculated that the crowd may turn unpleasant at the sight of Kiffin, the once-glorified coach who left UT behind for the allure of the southern California coast. Since his departure, the Vols have suffered through four straight losing seasons. This Beacon Flashback was compiled by Editor-inChief, R.J. Vogt


Monday, January 13, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Hanna Lustig

CAMPUS NEWS 5K raises awareness towards ending sexual slavery

hlustig@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emilee Lamb

Zoe Yim • The Daily Beacon

elamb1@utk.edu

Zoe Yim Contributor With the names of human trafficking victims written on their arms or taped onto their chest, 800 runners and walkers gathered in Market Square on Saturday morning for the first annual Run for their Lives race. Sponsored by Freedom 4/24 with partners Firewall Ministries and the Community Coalition Against Human Trafficking, the race represents efforts to end sexual slavery in Knoxville, raise local awareness and generate funding. Kelsey Moldrup, sophomore in special education and a race participant, said she was shocked to learn that sexual slavery occurs locally as well as internationally. “It’s crazy that it happens in Knoxville…” Moldrup said. “I think the more people that know about it, the less it will happen.” According to a 2011

Participants sprint through the starting line in the first annual Knoxville “Run for Their Lives” race Saturday in Market Square. The race, which had more than 800 participants, was organized to raise awareness of sexual exploitation and human trafficking of women and children around the world and provide financial support to those affected. Tennessee Bureau of Investigation report , Tennessee’s geographical position and myriad of interstates are conducive to illegal trafficking. Seventyeight counties – 85 percent of the total counties in the state – reported at

least one case of human sex trafficking. In four counties – Shelby County, Davidson County, Coffee County and Knox County – there were reports of more than 100 cases. Ryan Barr, executive race director with Freedom 4/24,

said he believes human trafficking remains a highly lucrative trade because people are a “renewable resource,” unlike other products sold on the black market. “I’m just so compelled. ... It breaks my heart,” Barr

ORNL scientist honored with fellowship Hollie Hughes Contributor Liane Russell’s accomplishments have not gone unnoticed. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is honoring Russell, a former ORNL scientist and a world-renowned scientific scholar, through a fellowship opportunity for future scientific researchers. The Liane B. Russell Distinguished Early Career Fellowship will be awarded to scientists and engineers who have demonstrated outstanding scientific ability and research interests that align with those of the Department of Energy and ORNL. The candidates for the award must have received their doctorate degrees within the past seven years and has an emphasis on women and minority can-

didates. “We’re privileged to have the legacy of someone as scientifically accomplished and socially conscious as Liane Russell to associate with these grants,” Thom Mason, ORNL director, said. Russell’s research and discoveries on the susceptibility of embryos to radiation led to changes in radiological practices for female patients of child-bearing age. In addition, she has contributed to some of the most universally significant Mouse House discoveries, which focused on the role of X and Y chromosomes in humans and sex determination. Bill Cabage, ORNL communications staff member, specified that these fellowships encourage and enable talented newcomers to contribute to cur-

rent talent at the laboratory. Ideally, the fellowships will also establish productive careers. Russell, a native Austrian, and her late husband, Bill, embody such ambitions. Arriving in Oak Ridge to establish the mammalian genetics laboratory, the couple was overwhelmed by the city’s natural beauty. Inspired, Russell and her husband led the movement that resulted in the preservation of the Obed River as a National Wild and Scenic River. Their efforts also gave way to the formation of the Tennessee Citizens for Wilderness Planning. Throughout Russell’s career, opportunities for women in scientific fields were scarce and they often faced discrimination. “In my life, I was very fortunate in being given opportunities to pursue my own ideas in exciting research

areas,” Russell said. “But this is, sadly, not the case for many young women who are hoping for scientific careers and ending up in merely supporting roles, perhaps doing only routine jobs. So, I’m particularly honored to have my name attached to this program.” Cabbage asserted the importance of a diverse team of minds in research and scholarly endeavors. “Scientific research is often a collaborative enterprise, and early career researchers bring new ideas and perspectives to challenging problems,” he said. “ORNL is a major scientific employer in Knoxville, and these are high-quality jobs, and the people who come to the area often contribute enormously to the communities they live in beyond the research they do.”

Samantha Smoak • The Daily Beacon

Around Rocky Top

The UT dance team entertains the crowd before the men's basketball game against Texas A&M at Thompson-Boling Arena on Saturday.

said. “It breaks everyone’s hearts when we find out that it happens.” Barr explained that in Thailand the majority of men who purchase girls are Westerners. “They are people who

DAY OF SERVICE continued from Page 1 Elise Heuberger, senior in English and political science and a Leadership and Service Ambassador, is looking forward to the event’s service component. “For me, serving is the best way to get to know other students,” Heuberger said, “and many times, it is the only chance I get to interact with certain groups such as underclassmen.” Previously, service sites

LGBT continued from Page 1 However, businesses with conservative reputations, such as Cracker Barrel in Lebanon, Tenn., have progressed significantly in recent years. In 1991, Cracker Barrel received criticism for firing gay employees based on a policy that required workers to display “normal heterosexual values.” While Cracker Barrel still lacks a written non-discrimination policy, the company added LGBT content to its employee training seminars and partnered with LGBTowned companies in 2013. Chris Sanders, director of the Tennessee Equality Project, believes companies are learning that adding LGBT rights and protections are good for business. “The driving force is the desire of smart companies to attract and retain the best employees and just a recognition that the workforce and the culture are changing,” Sanders said. “Having a diverse workforce also allows a business to stay in touch with the changes in its markets. Many companies really look at the CEI as a gauge of what their peers are doing and what they should be doing.” Braquet asserted that the increased visibility of LGBT people and issues have also influenced corporate attitudes. “They see that we are people who have families, jobs, bills, dreams and hopes,” Braquet said.

live in our towns, so raising awareness is getting people to stand up,” Barr said. “Once people realize that slavery still exists, sexual exploitation is happening in our own backyards, the word of mouth spreads against this.” According to the United Nation’s Children’s Fund, human trafficking is a $32 billion industry, with children being particularly vulnerable. For Robert Craig, the 5K represents the culmination of a seven-year goal to eradicate sexual slavery in Knoxville. During a 2006 trip to Cambodia, Craig witnessed children as young as 3-years-old sold into prostitution. “I want to see our children safe,” Craig said. “As a community, we need to educate our community on the evils of (sexual slavery) and how divisive these traffickers are in capturing our children.”

have included the Beardsley Community Farm and the YWCA of Knoxville. The conference is open to UT students and faculty as well as to the Knoxville community. “Students always unload the buses from service after a full day of leadership education and volunteering, and they are truly impacted and enthusiastic about their next step on campus and in the community,” Price said. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m on Jan. 18. Online registration can be found online at leadershipandservice.utk.edu. “The marriage equality movement has been huge in this shift.” Although LGBT equality has seen an upward trend in the workplace, Sanders holds that Tennessee businesses still lack certain essential provisions for LGBT employees. “Many Tennessee based companies still need to catch up on the basics: inclusive nondiscrimination policies and partner benefits,” Sanders said. “In particular, I think there is low awareness in the Tennessee business community of the value transgender employees bring to the workplace and, hence, there is a low level of protection for these employees or potential employees. The transgender jobless rate tends to be significantly higher than the general population around the country.” Along with the 2014 index, the HRC also released a new set of criteria for the 2016 index. This index will set higher standards for U.S. corporations. Among other reforms, the 2016 index will require businesses seeking a perfect score to explicitly include sexual orientation and gender identity protections in all operations, in the U.S. and globally. “I think it is pretty simple,” Braquet said. “No one should have to worry about not being hired or losing their job just because of who they are or who they happen to love. “If you have good employees, why wouldn’t you want to treat them fairly and make (them) want to stay?”


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, January 13, 2014 Editor-in-Chief R.J. Vogt

OPINIONS

rvogt@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Living life through an iPhone lens misses the point Chiefly Speaking by

R.J. Vogt

This weekend, when my roommates and I elected to launch water balloons from our second-story balcony in Fort Sanders, it wasn’t enough to simply shoot them out over the houses of our neighbors. We had to Snapchat ourselves in the act. And so, as I watched multicolored balloons explode in the Knoxville sky, I watched through the screen of my iPhone. Later, one of my fellow artillery men asked me to send him the video, presumably so that he might use it to communicate the episode to his friends. You know what they say – pics or it didn’t happen. The phrase seems silly in print, but it should ring familiar to my classmates. British higher education company UCAS found that 82 percent of college freshmen used smartphones in 2013, and those students weren’t just using them for the touch-screens. Outside of texting and calling, 75 percent of the polled students listed taking photos as the most popular phone function. Anyone in college today probably isn’t too shocked. Armed with megapixels and high definition resolution, we university students roam campuses around the world, Snapchatting and Instagramming and Tweeting and Vining our lives away. If we have to talk on the phone, we talk to the phone, using FaceTime or Skype to see each other through the digital reality of a screen. The pictures and videos are more than keepsakes when we post them to social media. Instead of memorializing our experiences, the images tell their own stories. In a Darwinian way, photography as interpersonal communication makes sense. It’s evolution, the same progress that turned grunts into grammar and transformed newspaper to television to online media. Taking a picture of something is much simpler than describing it in words, and now that we all have cameras in our pockets, it follows that we’d move away from traditional language. Video recording takes things one step further, allowing us to eschew the limitations of the written verb for its more authentic expression – recorded action. The predictable result of this image-focused culture, however, is that we have all become reporters. As a journalist, I’ll be the first to warn you of the consequences. Recording life as we live it takes a necessary toll in its living. A journalism professor once warned against becoming a film critic because it would rob you of your ability to enjoy film uncritically. The iPhone effect poses the same threat; if every hike up the mountain is no more than an ascent to the ideal picture backdrop, then the inherent value of the climb is somewhat discarded. Posting our lives to social media also introduces the threat of a disorder I’ll call Like Obsession. When every moment can be casually rated by our Instagram followers and Facebook friends, it can be easy to judge the value of our moments by the number of public affirmations it receives. Facebook even encourages this sort of ranking psychology, compiling our most-liked moments of the year into a “Year in Review.” My 2013 boiled down to a boxing tournament, a trip to Costa Rica, my sister’s wedding and a newly-discovered resemblance to Stephen Colbert. These moments were selected in part by me, the poster; their value, however, was determined by the number of times someone clicked a button of appreciation. No matter the moments of personal growth I experienced in the anonymity of unphotographed events. I can forget them as easily as if they never happened; for all intents and social media purposes, they never did. And when we don’t have a picture or video to express our mood, we have the pictures and videos of others. The definitive bard of our time may not hold up to comparison with Billy Shakespeare or F. Scott Fitzgerald, mainly because our definitive bard is a collective. We, the iPhone-laden elite, are telling the stories of our generation. Where Shakespeare wrote plays, using repetition and iambic pentameter to express universal truths, we make Tumblr posts, using .gifs of Barney Stinson and Jennifer Lawrence to express our Friday night disasters. I don’t mean to say, “Stop Snapchatting,” or “Don’t post on Instagram.” I certainly don’t think I myself will stop scrolling through .gifs of animals doing funny things or sending stupid selfies. But every once in a while, it’s nice to launch water balloons for the sheer enjoyment of watching them fall. And if you’re the only one who sees it or likes it, that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. It just happened only to you. R.J. Vogt is a junior in College Scholars. He can be reached at rvogt@utk.edu.

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

It’s time to raise the bar in cinematic gender equality Struggling to be Heard by

Andrea Richardson Originally conceived in 1985 by American cartoonist Alison Bechdel and friend Liz Wallace in the comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For,” the Bechdel test has taken on a life of its own. It asks of a movie, “Are there at least two female characters? Do they speak to each other? Do they speak to each other about something other than a man?” If the answer to all of these questions is yes, then congratulations! Your movie passes an extremely basic test and is maybe not too shabby when it comes to gender representation. The Bechdel test has gained a great deal of steam — in Sweden, cinemas have begun to incorporate it into their film ratings system. In Sweden, passing the test will earn an “A” rating. Unfortunately, despite the very — very — low bar the test presents, maybe half of all Hollywood films would earn that grade.

Editor-in-Chief: R.J. Vogt Managing Editor: Melodi Erdogan Chief Copy Editor: Gage Arnold News Editor: Hanna Lustig Asst. News Editor: Emilee Lamb Sports Editor: Troy Provost-Heron Asst. Sports Editor: Dargan Southard Arts & Culture Editor: Claire Dodson Asst. Arts & Culture Editor: Cortney Roark Online Editor: Samantha Smoak

Additionally, the Bechdel test doesn’t address other issues of representation that should be taken into account. What about people of color, the disabled or members of the LGBTQ community? I know, I know. It seems ridiculous that the people of these marginalized groups have the nerve to desire proper positive representation of themselves in films. What a raging world of political correctness we live in. The film world needs to radically change if it is to remain culturally relevant, and if there’s a exam to be taken, the standard needs to be something far greater than the Bechdel test. I, for one, am tired of disposable tokens, stereotypical misrepresentations and white guys being the default hero of almost every movie ever made. What we see on the big screen is a reflection of our society. Right now, what I’m seeing is a society that only values one type of person as one who is capable of having an interesting, relatable story. Can we change that, please? BRB; making a Richardson test. Andrea Richardson is a sophomore in anthropology. She can be reached at aricha43@utk.edu.

Man-hating feminists are setting the movement up for failure School of Sarcasm by

Kaila Curry Whether you enjoy Beyoncé’s music or not, it’s safe to say that we were all “bowing down” to the Queen B when she released her selftitled surprise visual album over the break. Feminist Beyoncé definitely strove to make a statement in this new album, especially through her song “Flawless” which featured a TED talk speech by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. For those unfamiliar, here is a quote from Adichie’s speech, “We Should all be Feminists,” which is included in the song: “Marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same?” This quote has spread across social media as women take a stand and join in the feminist movement. HBO “Girls” writer Lena Dunham’s tweet, “There is no bad feminism,” won the record for most retweets I’ve witnessed in my short Twitter life. However, contrary to Lena and her followers, I do think there is bad feminism, and I believe I’ve found a flaw in Beyoncé’s flawless feminist movement. In my opinion, the definition of feminism

sets the movement up for failure, and before you begin to smolder with rage, allow me to explain. The internet (read: Wikipedia, because where else do college kids start their research?) defines feminism as a collection of movements and ideologies aimed at defining, establishing and defending equal political, economic and social rights for women. Let me put emphasis on the “for women.” If feminists strive for equal rights for women – a goal I share – should they not also seek to maintain those rights for men? Here in America, women have been taught to view men not as equals but as medieval villains who sit around conjuring up schemes to further subjugate women. We women have gone from climbing the ladder of equality to outright misandry, manhating our way to the top. Women rage against men, claiming that they no longer want to live in man’s patriarchal society. But when filtered through a feminist screen, this claim is blind to the inequalities shown toward men. For example, most men never decide to undergo circumcision; it is decided for them at birth. The religious practice has successfully transitioned to a necessary social custom that arguably poses little medical benefit. What if it were commonplace to submit women to female circumcision? In many African countries it is, but what we consider commonplace to boys is an atrocity for women. Then there’s this fact; according to a University of Michigan study, men face a 63 percent higher prison sentence than women

convicted of the same crime; women are twice as likely to escape incarceration. Though there are no statistics, also consider the untold stories of men who would rather not have drunken sex with someone they don’t know. If you scoffed, you prove my point; a man is considered weak and feminine if he isn’t trying to get laid every time he goes out. Feminism isn’t really about girls or boys, or at least it shouldn’t be. It should be focused against the gender roles society has built for girls and boys. Women are judged by their outward appearance and are told, as Adichie said, to “aspire to marriage.” Men are judged by the equally unfair criteria of their apparent masculinity and the number of zeros on their paycheck. Last semester I may have joined the rally of man-haters, blaming all of them for all of the injustices that face women. However, I soon came to find that I was being irrational. When we point fingers at men for their wrongs, such as the favorite scapegoat crime of cheating, we hardly ever consider the wily temptress who first led him astray. To truly reach equality, we do not need to put men down. We need to put gender roles down, and allow equality to flourish for both sexes. Maybe if we make it less about hating men and more about working with them, the feminist system can be as flawless as Beyoncé. Kaila Curry is a freshman in English. She can be reached at kcurry6@utk.edu.

Get Fuzzy • Darby Conley

Non Sequitur • Wiley

EDITORIAL

However, that may change: last year, films that passed the test made billions more in the box office than those that did not. Maybe this will make filmmakers pay heed to the fact that women comprise half the population and deserve films that accurately portray this. More likely, it will draw their attention to the fact that women, too, have wallets with money inside. But let’s be honest. Using the Bechdel test as a metric is a bit unsubstantial. We could call it a safe kiddie pool for filmmakers before they have to set foot into the vast ocean of scary things like “diversity,” “equal representation” and “basic decency.” First of all, even when a movie passes the test, it can still have misogynist themes or undertones. Take “Mean Girls,” for example. It passes the test, sure, but I’d be hard-pressed to say it does anything in the way of female empowerment. In movies starring women, the heroine’s journey is often centralized around the pursuit of a man. When a man stars, his romantic interest is usually an afterthought, a reward for after he completes his own self-actualizing task. Works that adhere to these tropes can pass the Bechdel test, even with their problematic messages.

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Monday, January 13, 2014

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Claire Dodson

ARTS & CULTURE

pdodson@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Cortney Roark

croark4@utk.edu

Bluegrass, folk musicians ‘Her’ brings original, passionate bring life to Knoxville area love story set in high-tech world Hannah Moulton Staff Writer What better way to spend an evening than with music legends? The Steep Canyon Rangers, along with Sam Bush, flooded the Bijou Theatre with the sound of bluegrass Thursday night. “We’re excited to be here, it’s been too long,� Woody Platt, guitarist of the Steep Canyon Rangers, said. They started the show off with “As I Go,� a fast-paced song which got the crowd clapping and stomping along. The Grammy award-winning band didn’t miss a beat as they moved to an all-instrumental piece, which showcased the talents of mandolin player Mike Guggino. Once the cheers from the crowd calmed, the band switched to a more somber tune, “Bluer Words Were Never Spoken.� Midway through the show, the band welcomed to the stage Sam Bush, a fellow bluegrass musician. The band members spoke of the honor for them to be performing with Bush – a legend in the bluegrass community.

“It’s great for me to share the stage with Sam Bush tonight,� Guggino said. Bush and the Steep Canyon Rangers came together to play a number of each other’s music and even performed one of Bush’s songs, “Girl from the North County,� which is typically played by Bush alone. The musicians joked about narrowly avoiding a musical disaster, which was completely oblivious to the audience. The unnoticeable mishap didn’t affect the rest of the performance. The musicians kept the audience on their toes as they dished out complicated instrumental pieces. Bush and Guggino played together in an effortless mandolin duet. Bass player, Charles Humphrey III, dished out a bluesy bass solo. Bush even traded his mandolin for a fiddle and challenged Nicky Sanders, player for Steep Canyon Rangers, to a duel. Bush’s ability to shift from instrument to instrument prompted a question from banjo player, Graham Sharp. “Which is harder Sam: fiddle or mandolin?� To which Bush replied with a humorous, “yes.�

After Bush exited the stage, the Steep Canyon Rangers continued to shock the audience with their musical abilities. Sanders was praised by the band as being “the best fiddler in North Carolina,� as he gave an impressive fiddle solo, even losing a few strings during his performance. Michael Ashworth, a new member of the Steep Canyon Rangers, showed off his guitar skills as the other members harmonized in barbershop quartet fashion. The Steep Canyon Rangers kept their performance fun and upbeat. With not one dull moment during the show, they had the audience’s full attention and praise. “There’s no such thing as too much fun, y’all, this is great for us,� Sharp said. The band finished their set with “Auden’s Train,� and after a thunderous standing ovation, the Steep Canyon Rangers asked their audience, “You want more?� Sam Bush rejoined the group on stage to play one last time. Together they played Bush’s “Bringing in the Georgia Mail.� It, along with the rest of the night, gave Knoxville a heavy and thorough dose of bluegrass.

Ten Bartram strum whimsical melodies inside Square Room Megan Lange Contributor As Ten Bartram took the stage Friday night at the Square Room, the audience grew hushed, eagerly anticipating the folksy, bluesy sound they’d come to love from the Knoxville band. Ten Bartram, named by the group’s founders after the road where the two’s grandmother lived, was started by sisters Eleanor Angel and Rebekah Angel Rapp. Band members include Angel on guitar and vocals, Paul Canestrari on drums, Peter Hagemeyer on cello and banjo, Rapp on mandolin and vocals and Ashton Williams on upright bass. Openers Garrett Sale and David Platillero set the mood with a unique mixture of jazz, folk and blues before Ten Bartram took the stage. The band started with a set of toe-tapping songs from its selftitled EP and culminated with a medley of popular songs and a reggae-inspired tune called “Cecilia,� which brought the

crowd to their feet and even inspired impromptu dancing. With the growing Knoxville music scene, bands like Ten Bartram are playing a big part in growing that exposure. Gideon Klein, senior in music composition, thought the band brought a unique sound to the table. “Their performance was very authentic to original Knoxvillian style – it was a show like none other,� Klein said. “It was an amazing concert.� The diverse selection of songs attracted an audience of multiple generations. Ranging from folk to jazz to blues to Americana, each song had a distinct sound that was brought to life by the powerhouse vocals of Eleanor and Rebekah. Although each song had its own individual sound, the overarching theme seemed to be one of triumph, with one song in particular that said, “He comes knocking on my door, telling me to sing no more, that I’ve been here before, I ain’t scared anymore.� This triumphant energy was key to the success of the group’s show. Beth Aaser, junior

in speech pathology, said she thought the energy brought to the stage by the Angel sisters is what made the concert so entertaining. “Their music just has such a great beat,� Aaser said. “Everyone had their foot tapping, and there were even people swing dancing in the back.� As the show progressed, the sisters shared anecdotes about some of their music, ranging from songs about their mother to lyrics written by Rapp about her husband called “Daily Berries.� The evening drew to a close with a standing ovation and cheers from the audience clamoring for one more song. Aaser explained why the show had been such a pleasant departure from typical concerts. “The relaxed feel of the concert made me wish it didn’t have to end,� Aaser said. “It was like I was sitting on someone’s back porch in a rocking chair and listening to them play guitar.� When it comes to music, Ten Bartram has done something that many strive for: making each listener feel comfortably at home.

Sam Nessim Contributor It is the intelligence found in “Her� that provides some kind of provocative loneliness which is common to the cinema of Spike Jonze. Set in Los Angeles in the slight future and starring Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Rooney Mara and Scarlett Johansson, this modern noirish romantic comedy is an attempt to analyze not just the nature of our love affair with technology but also each other. Production designer K. K. Barrett creates a sort of utopian world in which characters find distant comfort in internet porn, video games and operating systems. A world in which the prickliness of Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner� and men in high-waisted pants and mustaches meet. With one stunning sequence after another, it is almost as if the lens of Hoyte van Hoytema and Spike Jonze’s originality were meant to be. One does not have to look far into the future to find Jonze’s world; dependence on iPhones and intimacy with laptops are almost

becoming necessities. The panic experienced by Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) when he is unable to communicate with Samantha (Scarlett Johansson’s voice), his operating system, is reminiscent of the helpless terror experienced when smart phones die or when laptops

Her Cast: Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Scarlett Johansson Director: Spike Jonze Genre: Comedy, Drama Rating: R

are unable to download. This film reflects on the very essence of what it is to be in love in an unnervingly mature way. “It’s like a form of socially acceptable insanity,� says Amy (Amy Adams) about falling in love. Later in the film, the artificial intelligence known as Samantha

mentions that we are all made of the same matter and reminds Theodore that everyone is “under the same blanket,� even operating systems, hinting that A.I. simply parodies things in the same manner as the human mind. Jonze takes us on an imaginative adventure to discover questions of humanity, love and relationships. Phoenix’s performance was not his best, but his slumped shoulders leave one wanting to give him a hug throughout the entire film. Johansson’s voice, which was added in post production due to Jonze’s realization that Samantha Morton’s (the original voice of Samantha) was not right, brings a tiring but sultry sexiness to the program. In addition, Hoytema’s droll camera work combined with Arcade Fire’s melancholic score adds the final touch of hopeful desperation. “Her� is an outstanding movie because of its artistic originality, beautiful design, thorough execution and its reminder that in the end we are operated by chemicals, biology and electricity, whether they love, grieve or watch movies.

Beacon Correction In the Friday, Jan. 10 issue of The Daily Beacon, the article headlined “Female musician presence now rising among Knoxville bands� reported that Elizabeth Whitehead is a member of local bands Dude Fuckin Whatever and The Gone Bads. The source was misnamed, in the article and the accompanying photograph, and the correct name of the performer is Elizabeth Wright.

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Monday, January 13, 2014 Sports Editor Troy Provost-Heron

SPORTS

tprovost@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Dargan Southard msoutha1@utk.edu

Vanderbilt upsets Free throws, foul trouble contributes No. 8 Lady Vols to second-half collapse against Aggies in front of strong home crowd, 74-63 Sports Editor

Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The eighth-ranked Tennessee Lady Vols are loaded with size, talent and athleticism. The Vanderbilt Commodores know exactly what they need to do to win. They stuck to the plan Sunday and did just that. Jasmine Lister scored 22 points and Christina Foggie added 21 as the Commodores upset No. 8 Tennessee 74-63 for a very rare win over their in-state rival. How rare? Well, the Commodores now have nine victories in the 70 games they count having played against Tennessee. Vanderbilt coach Melanie Balcomb said she reminded her Commodores not to do anything different than normal just because of a big crowd or the opponent. “The discipline that they showed to be able to do that I’m really proud of that,” Balcomb said. “That makes me smile because that’s a lot to look forward to. This is very early in the season.” Vanderbilt (14-3, 3-1 Southeastern Conference) snapped a three-game skid against Tennessee with its first win in the series since Feb. 9, 2012. Marqu’es Webb added 12 for Vanderbilt, which now has won 11 of its last 12. Tennessee (13-3, 2-2) now has matched the two SEC losses from all last season. Isabelle Harrison snapped a schoolrecord streak of double-doubles at seven as she scored 10 points and had only five rebounds

before fouling out. Not having Harrison for 30 minutes hurt, but coach Holly Warlick was more upset with the Lady Vols’ poor defense. “We get up, and we can’t stop anybody penetrating so it has nothing to do with Harrison,” Warlick said. “It’s about what’s important on the other end ... Until defense is important to us, we’re going to struggle.” Meighan Simmons led the Lady Vols with 19 points. Jasmine Jones had 13 and Cierra Burdick 11. The Commodores had the seats at Memorial Gym filled with a majority of black and gold instead of the usual Tennessee orange. They looked very comfortable from the start as they outhustled and outplayed Tennessee most of the game. Balcomb remembers her teams being booed early in her 12-year tenure when hosting Tennessee. She credited the marketing staff, her teams and fans for helping flip that edge. “Tonight I felt like this was our home court,” Balcomb said. “I thought we had more black and gold, and I could feel it in the crowd. That’s the neatest thing for me after 12 years. ... It didn’t happen overnight.” Vanderbilt played only three 6-foot or better but none taller than then 6-1 Webb. Tennessee’s dramatic size difference included five Lady Vols 6-2 or taller. The Lady Vols used that size in outrebounding Vanderbilt 40-31, but the Commodores outshot them 49.1 percent (26 of 53) to 42.9 percent (27 of 63). They were at their best in the second half as they hit a sizzling 62.5 percent (15 of 24).

With 17 seconds remaining, Jeronne Maymon stepped to the free throw line with an opportunity to put Texas A&M away. The rest is history as the redshirt senior couldn’t get either of his two attempts to fall through the hoop, and the Aggies would end up winning 57-56 on a 3-pointer by sophomore Antwan Space. “It’s very hard, very upsetting,” Maymon said, “but I have to get back in the gym and work on it.” While Maymon’s attempts carried the most weight in the Vols’ defeat, they were not the only shots from the charity stripe to go begging as UT shot 58.3 percent from the line in the second half. Hot topic: The whistles were frequent, and the boo’s from Vol fans were deafening inside Thompson-Boling Arena. In total, Tennessee saw themselves get whistled 21 times, but the most memorable calls were several offensive fouls whistled due to illegal screens. “That is the first time all year we have been called for that many offensive fouls,” UT coach Cuonzo Martin said. “I thought it was strange, but I have to go back and watch film to be exact. I thought it was a little uncharacteristic because our guys are usually solid in setting screens.”

RECAP continued from Page 1 At that point, Barton said, the Vols just let up off the gas pedal and allowed the Aggies to claw back into it. “I feel that we did (lack intensity in the second half), a lot,” Barton said. “Going from the first to the second half, we were a little bit too happy. We got settled and they started making shots everywhere. “We tried to fight it at the end,

The offensive fouls clearly affected the Vols offense, something senior guard Antonio Barton acknowledged following the game. “We were playing the refs,” Barton said. “We were playing not to commit an offensive foul or foul the ball on defense. We can’t play like that.” Spotlight: Saturday wasn’t the reigning SEC Player of the Week’s day. Jordan McRae found himself watching a majority of the first half – a half in which he scored only three points – from the bench as he picked up two quick fouls in the first 6:24 of the game. The 14 minutes of downtime affected the senior guard’s game in the second half as he went 1-for-6 from the floor – 2-for-8 in the game – and finished with nine points, tying a season-low. As shown by Saturday’s offensive performance in the second half that saw the Vols get outscored 39-24, Tennessee’s offense isn’t the same without their AllSEC guard, but junior guard Josh Richardson said he thinks the team has to do a better job of not always relying on his production. “He’s our best scorer, everybody knows it,” Richardson said, “so we just got to learn how to adjust to it, and we didn’t do it well today.” The other guys: The Aggies were led by junior guard Jamal

Jones, who scored a game-high 23 points on 8-of-19 shooting. Outside the box score: At the 11:18 mark in the first half, football time and basketball time in Tennessee crossed paths. During the media timeout, the 14 early enrollees of the 2014 football recruiting class took to the center of the hardwood, joined by their head coach, Butch Jones, and were greeted by 18,079 Volunteer faithful. Say something: When asked about his thoughts after Space’s three went in, Barton said, “I was shocked, I’d never had that happen to me ever in my life. Just seeing it go into the net didn’t seem real.”

By the numbers: 20.6: The Vols shot 20.6 percent worse from the free throw line in the second half (58.3) then they did in the first half (88.9). 2: The Aggies scored two points in the final 9:34 of the first half. During that span they did not make a field goal. 15: Redshirt senior Jeronne Maymon corralled 15 rebounds in 35 minutes. The next closest to that mark was the Aggies Kourtney Roberson, who grabbed six. Up next: The Vols host the Auburn Tigers on Wednesday inside Thompson-Boling Arena at 7 p.m.

but it was too late.” The Aggies were held without a field goal for a more than 10-minute stretch, failing to make a shot from 9:34 of the first half until hitting a 3-pointer less than a minute into the second half. Things changed on a dime after that. The Aggies came off a 25 percent first half performance to go 14-for-26 (including 6-for-10 from deep) in the second half. The Vols went just 8-for-20 in the final period and 1-for-7 from downtown. The missed opportunities — on both ends of the

floor — were countless. “That’s probably the worst thing about taking this L,” Maymon said. “We had plenty of opportunities to keep them at an arm’s distance.” Three-point shooting hasn’t been a strong point for the Aggies this season — they rank 11th in the SEC even after going 8-for-15 from deep on Saturday. But led by five threes from Jamal Jones, who had 20 of his 23 points in the second half, A&M was hot from the outside against the Vols. “They weren’t a good 3-point

shooting team coming in,” Maymon said, “but they just made shots. When players get their head up, it changes the complexion of the game.” The Vols will regroup on Monday to prepare for Wednesday’s home contest at 7 p.m. with Auburn as UT looks to avoid another ugly, January conference loss. “It’s a tough, painful loss,” Martin said. “It will burn a little bit, but you have to bounce back from it and be ready to go on Monday.”

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Troy Provost-Heron

Tennessee senior forward Jeronne Maymon puts in a layup over Aggie defenders in UT's game against Texas A&M at Thompson-Boling Arena on Saturday. The Vols lost their SEC home opener 57-56 after the Aggies hit a gamewinning 3-pointer with 4.4 second left in regulation.


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