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Issue 2, Volume 122

Thursday, January 10, 2013

‘Sex Week’ to break silence on sexuality, assault at UT Blair Kuykendall Editor-in-Chief One day on her way to class, Brianna Rader overheard three young men selling each other “roofies” on Pedestrian Walkway. She decided it was time to take action. Rader and Jacob Clark, both juniors in College Scholars, founded SEAT (Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee) to host “Sex Week” this spring. “The students (selling the roofies) were not hiding the fact and were completely unashamed,” Rader said in a statement. “ ... I decided to bring a sexuality speaker (Megan Andelloux) to campus through the Issues Committee in the spring of 2012. The event was a success, so I thought about expanding the idea. I researched Harvard and Yale’s ‘Sex Weeks’ and approached Jacob.” UT’s first Sex Week will come on the heels of the alleged sexual assault that took place in Hodges library last semester. “In light of the (alleged) sexual assault from last semester, it is obvious our campus needs to lend its voices to this crucial conversation and emphasize the importance of transparency and communication when dealing with sexual assault,” Rader said. “‘Sex Week’ provides the platform needed to discuss the ‘rape culture’ and will certainly promote a safe environment for dialogue. Sensitivity is needed when discussing sexual assault but not silence.” Clark hopes the week will be a learning experience. “I hope, firstly, that each student that attends any of our events will learn something about themselves and about someone different from them,” Clark said in a statement. “Ultimately, I would hope that this week can bring some health to our sex culture at UT. I want students to feel comfortable in their sexual and gender expressions, and I would like to see an attitude among students that embraces open dialogue over resorting to silence or hateful behavior when disagreement or uncomfortableness arises.” “Sex Week” kicks off on Sunday, April 7. Students who want to help out are still welcome to apply online. “It is never too late to get involved with ‘Sex Week’ or SEAT, which is the student organization that puts on ‘Sex Week,’” Rader said. “We’ll be building our volunteer base much more this semester. If students would like to get involved, then we ask them to fill out (a) short form, which can be found under our ‘Get Involved’ tab on our website, sexweekut.org. Also, we encourage students and other Knoxville community members to contact us at sexweekut@gmail. com for questions.” See SEX WEEK on Page 3

‘Resolutionaries’ Vols disappointed by conference opener take over gyms Lauren Kittrell

Sports Editor

Sam Hardin Contributor From India to Indiana and everywhere in between, losing weight, eating better and working out are at the top of the list of many new year’s resolutions. The Internet is abuzz with the latest tips on where and when to work out, how to keep your goals and why the beginning of a new year is a perfect time for personal change. This is nothing new, however, and during January, as many as 57 percent of yearround gym patrons dread the influx of novice exercisers. Shortly after, these selfimproving newcomers disappear. Come February, the number of gym patrons who claim to start as per a resolution falls to just 12 percent. Here on campus, TRECs is a veritable sea of exercise equipment. A fleet of treadmills merges seamlessly into a large weight lifting area; it takes a large crowd to make it feel crowded. At the beginning of the spring semester, however, finding an open treadmill becomes nigh on

impossible; even Apple stores see smaller lines at the release of the latest iPhone. Alicia Faciane, a graduate student in art, explains the crowding with her own term: “resolutionaries.” “I thought I was going to have to fight for equipment,” Faciane said. These fledgling gymrats are not the bandwagon lightweights many regulars despise. Faciane understands their desire to change. “I hope it’s (going to the gym) in their heart; sometimes I feel they’re just doing it (at) the beginning of the year and it falls apart pretty quickly,” she said. “Resolutionaries” have varying reasons for what they do. Some students find the beginning of a new year to be an optimal time to start a new habit, while others strive to restart an old habit. Katherine Galpin, a freshman in kinesiology, frequented the gym in high school but found the transition to college life left little time for fitness. See CROWDING on Page 3

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In their conference opener, the Tennessee Volunteers couldn’t keep the Old Miss Rebel Black Bears off the board. Rebounds, field goals, fouls and free throws all played a part in the 92-74 loss at Thompson-Boling Arena Wednesday night. Junior guard Jordan McRae led the Vols with 26 points for the night. Regardless of his personal performance, McRae shook his head over the outcome of the game. “It’s embarrassing,” McRae said. “At the end of the game they were laughing and having fun and it was embarrassing.” The Rebels took the lead early in the first half. While the Vols managed to keep up with Ole Miss for the majority of the game, the Rebels took the lead five minutes into the game and never let go. Key to the Rebel win was Ole Miss junior Marshall Henderson. Henderson’s field goal percentage was nothing to speak of, but the Vols couldn’t stop fouling him, giving him easy opportunities at the foul stripe. The guard finished with 32 of the team’s 92 points. McRae said it was tough to see the team make an effort and not see the results.

“We were getting the stops we needed to, and then they would get an offensive rebound or a foul every play down in the second half and that can’t happen,” McRae said. Head coach Cuonzo Martin said he thought the team needed to focus on identifying shooters, forcing the tough shots and taking pride in doing just that. Martin said to give Henderson the props he deserved. “Give him credit for being creative on the offensive side of the ball,” Martin said. Sophomore forward Jarnell Stokes said he felt it was important for the team to hit shots and keep guys out of the lane, but still not lose confidence in themselves and their teammates. “We feel like we can win every game here on out,” Stokes said. McRae’s performance as a starter caught Martin’s eye. He said the junior earned his spot in the lineup. “I thought Jordan played well again,” Martin said. “Very assertive.” Junior guard Trae Golden went 3-10 with only seven points and two rebounds for the night. Martin said Golden needs to work on playing more confidently. See BASKETBALL on Page 8

Parker Eidson • The Daily Beacon

Coach Cuonzo Martin expresses his disgust at the Vols’ performance during the Ole Miss game on Nov. 9.

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2 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, January 10, 2013 Associate Editor Preston Peeden

IN SHORT

ppeeden@utk.edu

Managing Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

HISTORY

THIS DAY IN

1945 — Gusher signals start of U.S. oil industry in the mid-1920s when more oil was discovered at deeper depths. In the 1950s, Spindletop was On this day in 1901, a drilling derrick at mined for sulphur. Today, only a few oil wells still Spindletop Hill near Beaumont, Texas, produces operate in the area. an enormous gusher of crude oil, coating the land2008 — World’s cheapest car debuts in India scape for hundreds of feet and signaling the advent of the American oil industry. The geyser was disOn this day in 2008, at the New Delhi Auto covered at a depth of over 1,000 feet, flowed at an initial rate of approximately 100,000 barrels a day Expo in India, Tata Motors debuts the Nano, billand took nine days to cap. Following the discovery, ing it as the world’s cheapest car: The anticipated petroleum, which until that time had been used in price tag is around $2,500. Tata, India’s largest the U.S. primarily as a lubricant and in kerosene automaker, called the four-door, bubble-shaped for lamps, would become the main fuel source for mini-vehicle (it was just 5 feet wide and 10 feet new inventions such as cars and airplanes; coal- long) the “People’s Car” and declared that it would powered forms of transportation including ships be a vehicle for families who previously hadn’t been able to afford a car. (At the time, it wasn’t and trains would also convert to the liquid fuel. Crude oil, which became the world’s first tril- uncommon to see an entire family precariously lion-dollar industry, is a natural mix of hundreds packed onto a single motorbike.) The Nano was originally scheduled to go on sale of different hydrocarbon compounds trapped in underground rock. The hydrocarbons were formed in October 2008; however, production delays arose millions of years ago when tiny aquatic plants and because of a land dispute in West Bengal, where animals died and settled on the bottoms of ancient the car’s production plant was being built. The waterways, creating a thick layer of organic mate- company opted to move its production facilities to rial. Sediment later covered this material, putting another part of India and the Nano officially went heat and pressure on it and transforming it into on sale across the country in April 2009. The basic the petroleum that comes out of the ground today. model carried a starting price of approximately In the early 1890s, Texas businessman and ama- $2,000 (not including taxes) and came without teur geologist Patillo Higgins became convinced a radio, air conditioning, airbags, power steering there was a large pool of oil under a salt-dome or power windows. It had a body made of plastic formation south of Beaumont. He and several and sheet metal and a 32-horsepower, 624cc twopartners established the Gladys City Oil, Gas and cylinder rear-mounted engine, and it could reach Manufacturing Company and made several unsuc- speeds of 65 miles per hour. In another nod to cessful drilling attempts before Higgins left the cost-cutting, the car had just one windshield wiper. Tata received more than 203,000 pre-orders for company. In 1899, Higgins leased a tract of land at Spindletop to mining engineer Anthony Lucas. the Nano--a strong number, especially considering The Lucas gusher blew on January 10, 1901, and that at the time there were only about nine cars ushered in the liquid fuel age. Unfortunately for for every 1,000 people in India. However, because Higgins, he’d lost his ownership stake by that Tata was only able to produce an initial run of 100,000 Nanos, the cars’ first owners were chosen point. Beaumont became a “black gold” boomtown, by lottery. The Nano was initially sold only in its population tripling in three months. The town India, although Tata said it eventually intended to filled up with oil workers, investors, merchants launch the car in other parts of the world. Tata Motors is part of the Tata Group, one of and con men (leading some people to dub it “Swindletop”). Within a year, there were more India’s largest and oldest business conglomerates. than 285 actives wells at Spindletop and an esti- And Tata does not just make inexpensive cars: In mated 500 oil and land companies operating in March 2008, the company purchased the venerthe area, including some that are major players able British brands Jaguar and Land Rover from today: Humble (now Exxon), the Texas Company the Ford Motor Company for $2.3 billion. (Texaco) and Magnolia Petroleum Company — This Day in History is courtesy of History. (Mobil). Spindletop experienced a second boom starting com.

Around RockyTop

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon XXXXXXXXX • The Daily Beacon

The UT Dance Team performs during a break in the Lady Vols vs. UGA game on Jan. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 6. The team will be competing at the UDA Nationals next week. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


Thursday, January 10, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 3 News Editor Preston Peeden

CAMPUS NEWS

ppeeden@utk.edu

Assistant News Editor Emily DeLanzo edelanzo@utk.edu

US talks Afghanistan troop removal The Associated Press

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

TRECS Facility

GYM CROWDING continued from Page 1 Galpin said that she is now “starting back up again,” and that going to the gym for the new year is a fresh start. While there exist people on both extremes — gym rats who turn their finely chiseled noses up to the casual patrons who clog the machines in January and soccer moms looking for social acceptable places to show off their span-

SEX WEEK continued from Page 1 The week’s events will include a wide variety of activities on the mental, physical, spiritual and emotional significance of sexuality. “I’m most excited about our Faith and Sexuality panel and our keynote speakers, “ Clark said. “Our Faith and Sexuality panel will be a large discussion, presentation and debate on how different faiths treat sexuality. I personally believe that one’s faith and choices and beliefs regarding her or his sex-

dex — most fall somewhere in between. January might be an inconvenient month to work out, but veterans understand this and move on. Similarly, most “resolutionaries” recognize that they might not be on the treadmill by Valentine’s Day, but the feeling of accomplishment they derive from starting works for them. Others may stick to their resolution, and this time next year they may find themselves griping about all the new “resolutionaries” crowding their gym. uality often intersect heavily, so I am excited to hear the input of religious leaders and fellow students at UT.” Megan Andelloux, a registered sexologist, will serve as the keynote speaker for the opening event. “...(She) is one of the most engaging, fun and interesting speakers I have ever seen,” Rader said. “She has created a talk specifically for (UT) based on a survey Jacob and I created and released five months ago. It will discuss general sexuality topics such as gender, college hook-up culture and orgasms. Additionally, she will be dis-

The Obama administration says it might leave no troops in Afghanistan after December 2014, an option that defies the Pentagon’s view that thousands of troops may be needed to contain al-Qaida and to strengthen Afghan forces. “We wouldn’t rule out any option,” including zero troops, Ben Rhodes, a White House deputy national security adviser, said Tuesday. “The U.S. does not have an inherent objective of ‘X’ number of troops in Afghanistan,” Rhodes said. “We have an objective of making sure there is no safe haven for al-Qaida in Afghanistan and making sure that the Afghan government has a security force that is sufficient to ensure the stability of the Afghan government.” The U.S. now has 66,000 troops in Afghanistan, down from a peak of about 100,000 as recently as 2010. The U.S. and its NATO allies agreed in November 2010 that they would withdraw all their combat troops by the end of 2014,

cussing the importance of ‘Sex Week’ and Tennessee’s specific sex education laws.” Other events will include more active student participation. “I’m also excited for our Virginity Conference, Golden Condom Scavenger Hunt, and Faith & Sexuality events,” Rader said. “The week should have a festival atmosphere to it, where events are happening all day, every day, all week. Some events are meant to have thirty people, and some events are meant to have 300-500 people. Our schedule will be released later this month.”

but they have yet to decide what future missions will be necessary and how many troops they would require. Those issues are central to talks this week as Afghan President Hamid Karzai meets with President Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta. At stake is the risk of Afghanistan’s collapse and a return to the chaos of the 1990s that enabled the Taliban to seize power and provide a haven for Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida network. Fewer than 100 al-Qaida fighters are believed to remain in Afghanistan, although a larger number are just across the border in Pakistani sanctuaries. Panetta has said he foresees a need for a U.S. counterterrorism force in Afghanistan beyond 2014, plus a contingent to train Afghan forces. He is believed to favor an option that would keep about 9,000 troops in the country. Administration officials in recent days have said they are considering a range of options for a residual U.S. troop presence of as few as 3,000 and

as many as 15,000, with the number linked to a specific set of military-related missions like hunting down terrorists. Asked in a conference call with reporters whether zero was now an option, Rhodes said, “That would be an option we would consider.” His statement could be interpreted as part of an administration negotiating strategy. On Friday Karzai is scheduled to meet Obama at the White House to discuss ways of framing an enduring partnership beyond 2014. The two are at odds on numerous issues, including a U.S. demand that any American troops who would remain in Afghanistan after the combat mission ends be granted immunity from prosecution under Afghan law. Karzai has resisted, while emphasizing his need for largescale U.S. support to maintain an effective security force after 2014. In announcing last month in Kabul that he had accepted Obama’s invitation to visit this week, Karzai made plain his objectives.

“Give us a good army, a good air force and a capability to project Afghan interests in the region,” Karzai said, and he would gladly reciprocate by easing the path to legal immunity for U.S. troops. Karzai is scheduled to meet Thursday with Panetta at the Pentagon and with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the State Department. Without explicitly mentioning immunity for U.S. troops, Obama’s top White House military adviser on Afghanistan, Doug Lute, told reporters Tuesday that the Afghans will have to give the U.S. certain “authorities” if it wants U.S. troops to remain. “As we know from our Iraq experience, if there are no authorities granted by the sovereign state, then there’s not room for a follow-on U.S. military mission,” Lute said. He was referring to 2011 negotiations with Iraq that ended with no agreement to grant legal immunity to U.S. troops who would have stayed to help train Iraqi forces. As a result, no U.S. troops remain in Iraq.

Around Rocky Top

Beacon Flashbacks

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Members of the Flying Houndz Frizbee group perform during halftime of the Memphis game on Friday.

File Photo • The Daily Beacon

Five-time drum major of the Pride of the Southland Band, Hugh Little stands with a young female during a game in the 1949 season. Little was one of only two members to serve as drum major for five consecutive years.


4 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, January 10, 2013 Editor-in-Chief Blair Kuykendall

OPINIONS

bkuykend@utk.edu

Contact us letters@utk.edu

Going

Somewhere...Hopefully Clothing fails to define individual Preston Peeden Associate Editor Two days ago, I was sitting on my family’s couch watching television when a commercial for a department store came on. The ad asked, “Do you need new clothes? Do you want nice clothes? Come here for great deals, because you are what you wear.” I looked down at my outfit and wondered what it made me. I was wearing an old band shirt, grey sweatpants and footy socks with a Kermit the Frog pattern. So obviously I am a childish and closeted hipster, who has given up on trying to look halfway nice in public. Part of that isn’t far from the truth. The majority of my iPod is filled with bands that most people would never want to listen to (Voxtrot anyone?), and I have stopped trying to dress nicely since my girlfriend went out of town for an internship, but I’d like to think I’m more than just a crusty and derelict person. I never really had control of what I wore until I graduated high school. When I was little, my parents always looked over and preened what I wore. My closet was filled with Kid’s Gap and Talbots Kids until I was around the age of 12. The only time I ever attempted to get a cool accessory for my wardrobe was when I tried to buy a pair of Air Jordans. Unfortunately, my parents weren’t a fan, steering me instead towards a pair of BK Knights, because the soles of the Jordans would have scuffed up the court when I attempted to play tennis. Once I got to high school, my school had a strict dress code, so for four years I was bedecked in a button-down, slacks and a solid

color tie. It wasn’t really the best circumstance for me being able to express myself through fashion. Some of my friends from high school used college as the opportunity to truly express themselves through what they wore. They bought new wardrobes, changed their hairstyles, and, for lack of a better term, cut loose. I, instead, invested heavily in clothes that were comfortable. I have plaid shirts, loose khakis, wool socks and long-sleeve T-shirts in abundance. Does that define me? I hope not. I’ve never been a person that liked labels. I don’t think small words and categories can define who we are in totality. So in my mind, how can what I wear define me? I never put much stock in the clothes I wear. If it’s comfortable and looks acceptable enough that my girlfriend will go out with me without being embarrassed, then there’s a chance I’ll wear it. So by the defining qualities of my clothes, am I simply lazy? I don’t like to think that I am what I wear (and I am definitely not what I eat, because in that case I am Zaxby’s and scones). I’d like to think I am more than the simple garments I put on. I realize nothing I’m saying is a revolutionary idea. I’m simply a jumped-up college kid who spews out random ideas from whatever existential writer I have my hands on at that moment. But that doesn’t make me feel any less strongly about it. Clothes definitely say something about me, but not the whole story. So I’m sorry HH Gregg, JC Penney and every other department store that tells me that my clothes define me. I’m not. I am what I am, regardless of what I wear. Though I do think that the Kermit socks add a nice je ne sais quo to my overall palate. — Preston Peeden is a senior in history. He can be reached at ppeeden@utk.edu.

SCRAMBLED EGGS • Alex Cline

THE GREAT MASH UP • Liz Newnam

Columns of The Daily Beacon are reflections of the individual columnist, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Beacon or its editorial staff.

Gun laws need timely reform Urban Landscape by

Lindsay Lee On Friday, December 14 I was waiting in my room to be picked up by my parents and taken home for the holiday when I saw the news of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. I couldn’t help but watch the news unfold the rest of the day. It was captivating in the most sickening and heartrending way. Twenty first graders were killed, along with six adult school employees and the shooter’s mother. After every mass shooting like this, our politicians and the media hang their heads and cry, “Why?,” lamenting the situation as if America is somehow cursed by an inevitable violent fate. They always say, “Now is not the time for partisan politics, now is the time to grieve.” But that is the biggest insult to the memories of the thousands of victims of gun violence over the past years: to cry and do nothing. Now it feels as though the voices calling for change are louder, and maybe something will actually happen this time. Perhaps the slaughter of a bunch of children was enough to push people over the edge. When attempting to solve some of these issues, there are plenty of people who try to spread misinformation. Some will say that ending gun violence is simple, blaming one thing for the whole catastrophe. But the solution to ending our pandemic of gun violence in this country is not simple. It must be multifaceted and comprehensive to truly have a long-lasting effect of drastically reducing the number of shootings. Gun violence is not just about guns. It is not just about mental health. It is not just about violent video games and mov-

ies. Gun violence is about all three: a culture that celebrates power, independence and violent force, and stigmatizes and delegitimizes people who do not fit the norm. Another piece of propaganda is that restricting gun sales is some huge infringement on the Second Amendment of the Constitution. The amendment was formulated in a time when a gun could kill maybe two people a minute, if the gunman was skilled. And no one ever mentions that the amendment talks about the right to bear arms in relation to maintaining a “well regulated Militia.” The Constitution is not some holy, infallible document. It has been changed throughout the years to reflect progress. And even though we have the Bill of Rights, there are still restrictions. For instance, we have the right to free speech, but you can’t yell, “fire” in a crowded theater. So it would not be some unprecedented, malicious infringement on our liberties to restrict the sale of mega-destructive weapons. But it is important to keep in mind throughout all of this that gun violence doesn’t just happen when you see it on the news. There aren’t always a handful of victims at a time. Since the Newtown shootings, the U.S. has averaged 18 gun deaths per day. That’s a total of more than 400 in less than a month. Mass shootings like the one at Sandy Hook Elementary catch people off guard because they are so violent and seem out of place. People say, “This wasn’t supposed to happen here.” But then where is violent gun murder “supposed” to happen? We are privileged to feel so disconnected from gun violence when actually for some, it is a gruesome frequent reality. If 18 people a day were dying from plane crashes or roller coasters or food poisoning, the government would intervene, doing everything possible to bring that number down. Why should death by gun warrant a different reaction? — Lindsay Lee is a junior in mathematics. She can be reached at llee26@utk.edu.

Many perils in graduate applications Committee of Infractions by

Greg Bearinger

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Welcome back! As we begin the new semester, fully rested after a month-or-so vacation, and return to the messy roommate and the dead feeling of waking up early, I am reminded of what this semester was once and will be again for me: the big, long wait. You see, spring semester is a time of realization. The English majors realize that while their job prospects are nearly as good as they have been telling their parents, to really pursue their careers they may have to move: Nashville or Atlanta is most likely, New York or LA for the bolder among them. Business majors slowly realize that they have become rather proficient at tying ties or realize this isn’t true and that they probably should work on making it so. But life is an even more stressful thing for those among us jumping into the shark-infested waters of graduate school. Mostly, we’ve finished the lion’s share of class work and, without job interviews to worry about, will seem remarkably even-keeled as applications have been submitted. Randomly, we will alternate between being calm and confident and being self-deprecating and nervous. In mid-February, a lucky few will experience the soul-calming experience of getting the random email from some part of the university, like the graduate school, letting them know they have been accepted into one of their programs. It will probably not be their dream program, but anxiety will have long ago replaced some arbitrary hierarchy of schools with the frightening possibility that grad schools will shut them out altogether, and this email offering apartment

hunting advice will be sweeter than all but a handful of experiences. Those of us yet to receive such comfort will begin applying for jobs furiously, that same possible future of no more school and no preparation for a real job hanging over us like a dark cloud. Early March brings the first of the letters and emails; the first is almost always a rejection. We will hear stories of intelligent people we know being rejected outright from every school; some yokel of dubious qualifications gets into Florida State and our confidence is shattered. Some of the less-confidant among us will become downright arrogant at times; all who get accepted will wish to tell everyone they see. Finally the letters of acceptance come, and most begin planning for grad school, not realizing yet that they are plenty good enough for the challenge. Still others, often intelligent and even deserving, don’t get in. They are forced to deal with the prospect of reapplying a year later after a vacuum of time and activity has left them out of the game. Of course, I am speaking mainly about those of us applying to schools in the humanities. Med school applicants, long past the MCAT, have interviews and worries of their own, naturally being more competative than other disciplines. Those heading to get their masters in teaching or their MBA have the most natural and direct path to employment of all of us. Outside of those lucky few, we are all told by our mentors and advisors not to do it and, halfway through the tempest, I understand why. It’s hard, stressful, often confusing, and the job prospects are slim. Of course, it is always important to remember that not getting accepted may be a blessing. Not everyone with a terminal degree leads a happy and fulfilled life. — Greg Bearringer is a graduate student in history. He can be reached at gbearrin1@ utk.edu.


Thursday, January 10, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 5 Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

ARTS & CULTURE

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Rob Davis

rdavis60@utk.edu

‘Django Unchained’ lives up to expectations Victoria Wright Arts and Culture Editor “Django Unchained� is a classic Quentin Tarantino movie — violent, uncanny music choices, a bizarre way of storytelling, and a brilliant performance by actor Samuel L. Jackson spewing plenty of curse words and epithets. But it’s the little things that make this movie so spectacular and make a film based in one of the most sinister periods of history watchable. The film, released Christmas Day, grossed more than $108 million since its premiere. But why would a movie about slavery have audience members in tears of giggles rather than sadness, or at least a little more pissed off. Perhaps this is due to the fact the movie wasn’t meant for the serious-minded at all, or at least those who flocked to the theater expecting a more humorless film. To put Django in that category would be absurd because Django isn’t a movie to receive a standing ovation from the documentarians, as it’s a slapstick comedy. The film tells the story of a Django (Jamie Foxx), who was freed by the eccentric German dentist Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) and turned into a pistol slinging, fast-talking bounty hunter in order to save his wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), from a demented slaveowner named Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). As Django and Schultz venture through the pre-Emancipation Proclamation South, Tarantino does take time to focus on character development and even open up some interesting themes of revenge and who are the victims and perpetrators of human violence. Though Washington, Schultz and Foxx gave rave

performances, DiCaprio really stole the show. The actor, who is rare to play a villian role in film, managed to maintain character as the deranged plantation owner, even continuing his performance despite cutting his hand in one scene (did I mention he smears it over Washington’s face just to add some pizzaz?). It’s these performances and Tarantino’s cult style that make the movie so epic. But before anyone can wrap his or her mind around new philosophies, the film presents another joke and absurd scene. Uses of the n-word didn’t have people flinching and pondering who was right in the argument of its use between Nas and Rev. Al Sharpton. No, people found the uses of the word hysterical, not for its meaning, but by the way Tarantino used it in the film. It’s those little things that take the nuances out of the subject and replace it with a way of translating a horrific period in history into something that can reach a modern audience. Most intelligent and moral people agree that racial supremacists are a stain on humanity, but the movie doesn’t use that fact as a crutch. So how does he introduce the Ku Klux Klan when they descend upon Django and Dr. Schultz’s wagon in hopes of killing them? He makes them seem stupid, some incapable of producing a five-word sentence and with poor sewing skills. Uses such as this make scenes easier to watch. Will the movie win the hearts of the strictly moral or one’s stiff grandparents? No, probably not. But the film will have you chuckling and in suspense. If you feel really bad about laughing during the film, refrain from exiting the theater and instead head toward the next showing of “Lincoln.�

• Photo courtesy of Andreas Laszlo Konrath

Bruno Mars releases strong album Melodi Erdogan Assistant Arts and Culture Editor Bruno Mars first came to fame after his vocals were featured on the song “Billionaire,� which he worked on with Travie McCoy in 2010. Fast forward two years and Mars has released his second studio album, “Unorthodox Jukebox�, on Dec. 6. Incorporating influences of R&B, soul and reggae into the ten new songs off the record, Mars builds on his musical creativity while still perfecting the art of chart topping singles. “Unorthodox Jukebox� is a bit more mature for “The Lazy Song� artist. The album takes a more serious note to the majority of songs and only a few mimic the mood of his freshman album from 2010, “Doo-Wops and Hooligans.� It’s common for artists to expand more creatively with their sophomore albums. Mars builds on the tunes he is known for and expands his horizons by mixing in more acoustic and ballad like characteristics. Mars, who co-wrote all of the songs on the album, has a lot of talent which shines through in the album ballads. The first single, “Locked Out of Heaven,� topped the Billboard 100 chart for a whole month when it was released, and for good reason — the song is

catchy without being repetitive and the tune is influenced by soul and reggae music, a quality Mars tries to emulate during performances with an old-school band always behind him on stage. The first song off the album is “Young Girls.� This track isn’t the happiest of tunes, but the way Mars sings the words and hits the high notes gives one goose bumps — he isn’t simply singing a song, he’s telling a story and does it so well that it’s hard to not like the rest of the album. “Young Girls� will probably be the next single off the album and will probably hold the number one spot for a while. Fans of the first album may

not entirely like “Unorthodox Jukebox� because of its deeper, more mature perspective, but most will likely enjoy the track “Treasure.� This song is so upbeat and fun, it’s hard not to enjoy it. This song is so easy to dance to, with lyrics such as, “I know that you don’t know it but you’re fine so fine/ Oh girl I’m going to show you when you’re mine oh mine,� stuck in your head in the best way possible. With “Unorthodox Jukebox,� Mars has built a solid foundation for his music in the industry. Pop singers normally arrange their music in a way they know their fans will enjoy, but Mars really stepped out of his comfort

zone with many of these new songs, and it definitely works in his favor. The music on this album is soulful, original and well-done and shows that even pop musicians can push musical boundaries. The record isn’t the longest of records, with only ten tracks and a few songs that fall below three minutes, but every second of the album is quality work by Mars, his band and his producers. It’s hard to find an album that truly maintains its merit from the first strike of a chord to the last pull on a guitar string. But through relatable lyrics and emotional ballads, with “Unorthodox Jukebox,� Mars does just that.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD • Will Shortz

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6 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, January 10, 2013

ARTS & CULTURE

Thursday, January 10 Who: Jamaican Queens Where: Pilot Light When: 10 p.m. Price: N/A Victoria’s View: Detroit electro-dance duo Jamaican Queens makes some good music. If you’re a fan of MGMT tunes, then this band will be easy on the ears. Singer/songwriter of the group Ryan Spencer’s voice is distinct–it’s hard to compare his to another artist. Need to hear their music for yourself? Check out their song “Kids Get Away” on YouTube. You won’t be disappointed. Who: Yonder Mountain String Band Where: Tennessee Theater When: 8 p.m. Price: $25 Victoria’s View: An alternative string bluegrass band? You don’t hear of that too often, but Yonder Mountain String Band is a progressive sound in string music. Now, that doesn’t mean I’m adding them to my playlist, but those who already enjoy the genre should definitely check these guys out. Think blue grass with a tinge of soul and jam band qualities. Judge for yourself and check them out on YouTube.

• Photo courtesy of Dorthy St. Claire

Yonder Mountain String Band

Friday, January 11 Who: Milktooth Where: Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria When: 10 p.m. Price: N/A Victoria’s View: Named after a word that means “baby tooth” in some countries, Milktooth is a trio, indierock band with a familiar sound that almost any music lover could enjoy. Like Tokyo Police Club or Phoenix? Then you would enjoy this show. Check out their song “Your Arrows” on YouTube to get a preview of this group. Enjoy a ntight out in the Old City in your best hipster garb.

Arts & Culture Editor Victoria Wright

vwright6@utk.edu

Assistant Arts & Culture Editor Rob Davis

rdavis60@utk.edu

Who: Midnight Voyage Live: Love and Light with Kaminanda, SubSqwad, and J Mo Where: NV Nightclub When: 10 p.m. Price: $7-$12 Victoria’s View: The Valarium may be closed but that doesn’t mean Friday night dance party Midnight Voyage has ceased. Featuring tons of lights, live dance music from notable DJs and a laid-back crowd, these electronic parties are a good way to shake any stress accumulated from the week. Bring friends or dance by yourself—no one’s judging.

Saturday, January 12 Who: Comedian Gilbert Gottfried Where: Sidesplitter’s Comedy Club (ages 18+) When: 8 p.m. Price: $25 Melodi’s View: Feeling under the weather this week? Well, people always say laughter is the best medicine. Comedian Gilbert Gottfried has an IMDb profile filled with voice-overs from various television shows and films including “Family Guy” and even the children’s movie “Aladdin,” where he was the voice of the evil parrot Iago. Having been a huge fan of “Aladdin” when I was younger, Gottfried’s appearance in Knoxville is extremely exciting. His type of humor should appeal to all and be even better in stand-up form. Even though the tickets are a little pricey, treat yourself to some laughs now because there won’t be many more as the semester progresses. Who: Wallace Coleman Where: Laurel Theatre When: 8 p.m. Price: $14 Melodi’s View: Wallace Coleman style is laid back and simple, as opposed to other intricate blues artists. His music is super easy tolisten to and blues fans are sure to enjoy his original compositions at this small, intimate venue which is only a stone’s throw from the Strip. If blues music isn’t usually your thing, you may want to sit this one out. But anyone who wants to try something new and keep true to that new year’s resolution, take a chance on Coleman — he may just surprise you.

• Photo courtesy of Leslie K. Joseph

Wallace Coleman

Sunday, January 13

• Photo courtesy of Jon Karr

Milktooth

Who: The Knoxville Symphony Orchestra Chamber Classics: “Hail Britannia” Where: Bijou Theatre When: 2:30 p.m. Price: $24 Melodi’s View: Chamber music may not be every college student’s forte, but if you’re willing to try something different and get away from the noisy campus for a bit it may be just what you need. The Knoxville Symphony Orchestra is an extremely talented group of musicians, and conductor Lucas Richman does a darn good job of leading them; this orchestra could make anything sound awesome and their “Hail Britannia” will probably leave you craving fish and chips by the end of the performance. Tickets are a little expensive, but save up your pennies because this English adventure should be worth it.


Thursday, January 10, 2013

THE DAILY BEACON • 7


8 • THE DAILY BEACON

Thursday, January 10, 2013 Sports Editor Lauren Kittrell

SPORTS BASKETBALL continued from Page 1 “But it gets tough when you have consecutive games where you don’t feel like you’re playing the way you’re capable of playing. You start thinking, you start doubting and you start second guessing. Trae should be fine, but he just has to be aggressive and stay

lkittre1@utk.edu

Assistant Sports Editor Austin Bornheim abornhei@utk.edu

focused.” McRae said that looking forward, the team just needs to compete and play hard. He said it’s important that they don’t let the Ole Miss game hurt their confidence on the court. “We keep playing,” McRae said. “We talk about 17 games left and most important is the next game.” After Thursday, the Vols

will be focusing on Saturday and their upcoming opponent. “We’re not really gonna think about this game after tomorrow. We’re gonna learn from it, watch film on it and then it’s on to the next,” McRae said. The Vols head to Tuscaloosa, Ala. on Saturday for their next SEC matchup. Tipoff is at 1:00 p.m.

Fifty Shades of Bray

Warlick finds her style Austin Bornheim

tor between them and Summitt. After they are yelled at by the head coach, they could go to Warlick for a more laid-back approach to coaching. These days Warlick is the one yelling at prac-

them, and it’s hard for me sometimes, but the end result is the most important.” The key to Warlick’s new approach? Meanness, according to some. “Holly is still our head coach so she’s

Assistant Sports Editor Transition is rarely an easy thing. When you are transitioning from a coach who has been at the forefront of your program for nearly four decades, it is even more difficult. But the Lady Vols and head coach Holly Warlick have calmed any doubts and currently sit in a familiar place for the women’s basketball program, the top 10. Being the righthand of Pat Summitt put Warlick in a terrific position to succeed, and when time came for Tennessee to choose someone to replace the Hall of Fame coach, Warlick was the clear choice to make the transition after Pat as smooth as possible. That didn’t mean there still wouldn’t be difficulties though. “She’s been in the program for 27 years and she knows the ins and outs, but stepping into a new role as a coach and leader was an adjustment period for all of us,” senior Taber Spani said. As an assistant, Warlick was the fun, joking coach who the players could go to and be the media-

Matthew DeMaria • The Daily Beacon

Holly Warlick reacts during a play against Davidson on Dec. 28.

tice and in the locker room. “When you’re an assistant coach you are a go-between from the head coach and the players. That’s your role and I understood that,” Warlick said. “Now I am in a different role. I still have a great relationship with them, but I have to make sure things get done. As difficult as it is for

going to be strict and bring that meanness that a head coach can bring,” sophomore Isabelle Harrison said. “She’s really gotten into that and learned the role that we can have fun at times but being strict at times, and I think she’s done a great job at that.” The Lady Vols (113, 2-0 SEC) started as poorly as one

could imagine with a 80-71 loss at the hands of University of Tennessee Chattanooga in the season opener. It was obvious there were still things that needed to be worked out on the practice floor. “We run a similar style to what we have during my time here, but there were still wrinkles, intensity and mentality things we still needed to work on early in the season,” Spani said. “At this point I feel like everyone is on the same page and we are moving nicely.” Tennessee then won seven straight games before falling to No. 3 Baylor and No. 1 Stanford in the same week. Since then, the Lady Vols have won four straight and are 2-0 in the SEC. “We can’t look at the outside factors because we know we lost to Baylor, we lost to Stanford and those are the teams we want to be able to play with and hopefully beat down the stretch,” Spani said. There has only been half of a season played so far, but the first-year head coach appears to have found the coaching tools to bring the best out of her team. “We feel that Holly is very capable, she’s done a great job with this team and we’ve really bought into her system,” Spani said.

Tara Sripunvoraskul • The Daily Beacon

Tyler Bray prepares for a pass against Missouri on Nov. 10. Bray has decided to forgo his senior year to enter the NFL draft.

Preston Peeden Associate Editor On December 20, 2012, I was sitting in Downtown Grille and Brewery with a group of my friends when the ticker on “SportsCenter” announced that Tyler Bray was going to forgo his senior season and enter the NFL draft. Of the five people at the table, I was the only one who wasn’t upset by the news. Two of my friends promised that Tennessee wouldn’t make a bowl for the rest of the decade, while the other pair started haggling over how many wins the Vols would be able to scrape out of next year’s schedule without the lanky 6-foot-6 gunslinger (they ended up settling on four). As my friends were beginning to mourn the prophetic demise of the Vols, I couldn’t help but be neutral. I, unlike many Vol fans, will not miss Tyler Bray. For starters, head coach Butch Jones does not run a Tyler Bray-friendly system. Whereas Bray spent his career under center or in the shotgun, never straying far from the tackle box, Jones asked his previous two quarterbacks, Zach Collaros and Munchie Legaux, to run a spread-option system based off of short reads and their feet. Collaros and Legaux were truly duel-threat quarterbacks who could make plays on the run. Bray, on the

other hand, has been known to be outstripped by passing butterflies in wind sprints at practice. When people talk about Bray, they only seem to wax poetically about his positives. He has Peyton Manning’s height, Brett Favre’s arm and the passing statistics to backup the first round draft grade many analysts gave him before the season. For those people, it’s hard to argue with what they see. Bray does have the prototypical size and a rocket arm, and he also threw for over 7,000 yards and nearly 60 touchdowns. But to look solely at his positives doesn’t tell the whole story. When you look at Tyler Bray, from the head down, he seems to be everything anyone could want in a quarterback. But ultimately, for me, what Bray lacks will forever outweigh what he has. His numbers are great, but ultimately, what will forever define him is the number 13-11. That’s Bray’s win-loss record as Tennessee’s starting quarterback. His three years will be defined by that 0.542 winning percentage, which includes a 0-1 record in bowl games. For comparisons sake, Manning won 39 games in his career, Erik Ainge won over 20 games and Heath Shuler went 19-5 in only two years as a starter. While Manning could never beat Florida, Bray could barely beat our rivals. Is it unfair to blame those 11

losses on Bray? Or to make him the scapegoat for only 13 wins? Many, my friends included, feel like this is too much blame to put on one person. Manning, Shuler and even Ainge all benefited from better coaches, better position players surrounding them and better defenses. But ultimately, the quarterback is the player who touches the ball the most, and it was Peyton Manning who could never win the big game, not Leonard Little, Marcus Nash, or Terry Fair. Bray had three receivers with first-round NFL talent, and an offensive line littered with a couple players who could have their names spoken on Sundays for a while, and yet all he could muster was 13 wins. Tee Martin matched his career total for wins in one season. Tyler Bray is a controversial name on Rocky Top. In the immediate future, many Vol fans will lament the arm that could seemingly strike from any distance. But ultimately, Bray’s positive impact on the team and the program has been minimal. As a writer, I will miss having an occasion to make beer-bottle-throwing and jet-ski chicken jokes, but as a fan, I’m excited for whatever Justin Worley and Nathan Peterman can do. — Preston Peeden is a senior in history. He can be reached at ppeeden@utk.edu.

Lady Vols adapt to smaller roster Austin Bornheim Assistant Sports Editor With injuries to Cierra Burdick and Andraya Carter, the already short-handed Lady Vols’ bench continues to shrink. “We are very confident in the nine (players) we have right now, but in practice we have to be mindful of our time and what we do,” assistant coach Dean Lockwood said. “We still practice at a high intensity rate, so we have to watch how long our practices are and make sure we don’t grind too much with the numbers we have, but also get done what we need to get done.” With a shorter bench, the Tennessee (11-3, 2-0 SEC) coaching staff is watching how long the stretches of minutes are that the players are in. “It is very, very important that we pay attention to who’s going longer minutes and we get people sufficient rest and blows in the action,” Lockwood said. “As hard as we are playing right now, and we think we can play even a little harder, it is important to get people rest because at some point they do just get tired.” Head coach Holly Warlick is also utilizing timeouts in a way she isn’t accustomed to. “Playing against an uptempo team, we’ve used our timeouts to slow down the game and give our player a rest,” Warlick said. “I am usu-

ally one to sit on my timeouts for late in the game but with a short bench it is important to give our girls a rest and time to breathe.” For the players they are focused on playing sound basketball, staying out of foul trouble and staying conditioned. “I just think each player has to be more mindful of how many fouls they get in a game, especially me, and getting fouls early in the game,” sophomore Isabelle Harrison said. “It really dictates us on the defensive end and I don’t want (that) for our team.” “We feel in great shape,” senior Taber Spani said. “Preseason and everything has really helped us get our conditioning up, and also the coaches are being really smart in understanding that we are down in numbers a little bit with Cierra (Burdick) out. So it is also about recovery, it’s all about doing what you need to do to be out on the floor.” Moving forward, Warlick hopes that this extra time for young players and extended minutes for others will help the team coming down the stretch. “With these late game minutes and the need for others to play more than usual, it is giving them good experience,” Warlick said. “We said in preseason that these girls were going to need to play and they are getting some of those minutes now.”


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