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Portfolio Design

This guide provides design and technical information for portfolios that are used for placement in the profession. Prepared by the UT School of Architecture Professional Residency Program, 2015.


Portfolio Design

A. Designing Your Portfolio Getting Started 4

Book Size & Binding

6 Orientation 8

Elements of a Portfolio

10

Choosing Content

Design Elements 14 Grids 16

Hierarchy vs. Fields

18

White space

20

Color vs. Grayscale

22

Title Pages

24

Model Photos

Typography 26 Fonts 28 Text 30

Designing Your Text

32

Page Numbers


B. Making Your Portfolio in InDesign Setting up Your File 36

Workflow for Photoshop, Illustrator & InDesign

38

Starting a New InDesign File

40

Master Pages

46 Guidelines 48

Page Numbers

50 Styles 52

Paragraph Styles

54

Character Styles

56

Object Styles

58 Swatches 60

Swatch Libraries

62

Align palette

64

Photoshopping Models

Preparing your File to Print 66

Spell Check

68

First, Packaging

70

Image File Rules

72

PDF Settings for Printing

74

PDF Settings for Email


4

Getting started

Book Size & Binding Standard Book Sizes 8x10 portrait [1] and 10x8 landscape [3] are the most common book sizes. Unless you have a driving reason why you need a book that is taller in portrait orientation [2] or longer in landscape orientation [4], it’s probably best to stick with the 8x10/10x8 size. 8x10 looks professional and is easy to print either on blurb.com, at Dynamic, or by hand-trimming 8.5x11 sheets. You can go a bit smaller or a bit larger, but don’t go to extremes. If your portfolio is too small, it will probably get lost in a large pile of other submitted portfolios. If it’s too large, you run the risk of annoying the person who is trying to sort and store the firm’s portfolios.

Binding There is no shame in the silver spiral binding—it is a classic, safe bet. It won’t count against you. In fact, some HR reviewers prefer it because it’s sturdy and all the pages will lie flat. If you want to be more original, make sure it’s not too difficult to open and close, and that the portfolio is still able to lie flat. Originality is good, but ultimately, you want the portfolio reviewers to focus on your work, and not have to figure out your binding. The computer lab has silver spiral bindings you can buy and a binder machine you can use. Also, you can print through blurb.com. With blurb, be aware that they only have certain bindings and sizes available, and there’s a wait time to receive your book. Dynamic Reprographics, here in Austin, also does high quality binding and printing.


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The act of becoming enlightened is about breaking away from the mundane earthly experience. The same metaphor is used through the entry sequence. The zendo is about breaking your connection to the ground and making the connection ambiguous. From the exterior, you approach at an oblique angle so that the reflective glass along the bottom makes it appear as though the wildflower field continues uninterrupted beneath the zendo as it floats gently off the ground.

back, so as you enter the building, you step through a sliver of light and feel as though you’re stepping over empty space. This is your second indication that you’re leaving mundane life behind, and prepares your thought for meditation.

GRAND DINING

The porch is pulled back from the zendo by 6", with a small threshold to carry you into the building. The roof is also pulled

Jonestown City Center Spring 2014| Professor Cisco Gomes Technical Communication Studio

ENTRY SEQUENCE

State Highway1431, Jonestown, Texas design team: Claire Edelen, Alexandra Krippner OFFICES

LECTURE HALL

MANICURED GARDEN

The city of Jonestown, Texas, Gateway to the Hill Country, was formerly an access point to Lake Travis until lake levels dropped, leaving a dry valley winding through the community. Seeking a new identity in the face of drought and encroaching suburbia, Jonestown has struggled to define itself as a destination. The design aims to draw upon Jonestown’s significant topographical assets as a way to refocus attention on a positive resource.

WORKSHOP LOUNGE

APPROACHING VIEW OF FLOATING ZENDO

The new city center, comprised of the town’s library, city offices, a dance hall, 11-room hotel, and market space, positions itself along Ranch to Market Road 1431 as it cuts through Jonestown. The project makes its own cut into the topography, revealing a raw limestone wall that visually becomes part of the building itself. The spaces most utilized by the residents of Jonestown are both visible from the road and accessed by this path, embedding themselves into the hillside. A thick masonry wall along RM1431 blocks sound from the road while turning views away from the dry riverbed and up to the hillside, offering glimpses and frames of the surrounding topography.

ZENDO

SITE PLAN

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25

1 8x10 portrait

Visitors to Jonestown, however, take advantage of the long-range vistas from the run of hotel rooms suspended off the side of the hill. Tucked away from the road, the hotel allows visitors access to the city center while it remains hidden from the everyday functions of the town. In the rare event of rain, the water that has been so absent in Jonestown is celebrated, filtered through the layers of a green roof and directed through a large scupper. A long swimming pool beneath the hotel takes advantage of this collected water as it parallels the dry riverbed, offering visitors a new kind of waterfront access. 4

5

2 extra-tall portrait

THERMAL BATHS + INFRASTRUCTURE Vertical Studio. Fall 2013

14

15

3 10x8 landscape

4 extra-long landscape


6

Getting Started

Orientation

Portrait domestic grounds “Domestic Grounds is an ongoing research project that seeks to disclose the potential for tactile stimulation of floor design. In the shoeless paradise of the domestic environment, alternating rugs, wood boards and tiles: softness and hardness, warmth and cold, the floor plane is already a celebration of tactility. If we strategically reconsider the way we apply material and form in the design of floors and floor coverings, we can radically increase the performance of these surfaces to include restorative properties and amplify the sensory experience of domestic circulation. As an ideal site for a case study, we chose a corner unit in one of the high-rise towers of 860-880 Lake Shore Apartments in Chicago by Mies van der Rohe. Located at the heart of the dense urban Chicago center, and therefore surrounded by miles and miles of heavy traffic, pavement and asphalt, this site, automatically draws attention to the home floor as a secluded oasis for the feet in the midst of the city.” (from Nerea Feliz)

Portrait vs. Landscape

For this project, I assisted in researching walking patterns in the home; produced 3D models and drawings; iterated designs for the floor tiling, and cast a full-scale mock-up of the tile using the CNC router. design assistant fall 2014 professor: nerea feliz team: mark nordby, david heaton

Either choice is fine, just make sure it’s appropriate to the orientation of the images you use. Landscape spreads tend to be very long and are better for long, horizontal images. They also usually allow a bit more content on each spread. Portrait spreads end up a bit more square, which usually lends itself to a more minimalist layout with more white space or with fewer images per page.

rendering of three-dimensional floor tile 12

13

diagramming walking in the home

tiling pattern based on most frequent movement

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15

16

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to live on lady bird lake The Lady Bird is an 80’ x 80’ point tower in Austin. What we love about our homes is being inside them. What a tower design lacks is a focus on the interior of these spaces. We have towers smothered in curtain walls but with no sense of interiority. In rendering of our cities of the future, what we see is either a depressingly desolate landscape with the tower as ruin, or we see the tower as an exhibit of innovative structure. 80’ 80’

But the tower doesn’t have to be forboding or futuristic. The tower can be classic. Michael Benedikt challenged us to think that the tower can even be for those with vertigo, a fear of heights. For those people, it’s important to emphasize interiority. My goal for this tower was to design a system in which the interior of the tower flows out freely from the structure. It’s like when the cheese gushes out of your grilled cheese sandwich. The cheese is supposed to be inside, but it’s spilling out of the bread, and the bread is just trying to hold it together. If the bread, in this case, is the tower’s structure, then the cheese is the tower unit’s interior. And in this tower, the cheese lets in light without sacrificing the interior. advanced studio fall 2014 professor: michael benedikt

West 5th Street: site color study 18

19


7 Landscape

MANIPULATING THE ARCHETYPE Vertical Studio. Spring 2014

2

3

1. geometric analysis of existing residence 2. formal manipulation of archetypal home 3. sketches illustrating approach to addition

6

7

1. drainage + storage at intersection of gables 2. site model showing connection to existing 3. oor plan showing repetition of single mass 4. sections of variety of indoor/outdoor living 8

9

1. process models showing evolution of gable 2. nal model with specic focus on materiality 10

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12

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8

Getting started

Elements of a Portfolio

C

Portfolios typically have: COVER TABLE OF CONTENTS PROJECT 1 2 3 4 5 ...

TOC

P5

P1

RESUMÉ BACK COVER

P6

Cover • Must include your name May include title or date. Date may be its published year (ex. 2015) or year range of projects (ex.2012–2015).

Table of Contents

P2

P7

• Include project titles and page numbers Should include contact info here or on inside cover. May include project images.

Projects • Typical range is 36–60 pages • Choose between 5–8 of your best projects (typically 2-3 spreads each, but adjust per project) • Put your best projects first and last

P3

Quality is your goal, not page count. It is better to have a short portfolio with high quality work than a longer mediocre portfolio. Choose just your best work. You may want to use more spreads for comprehensive projects like Tech Comm or Sound Building. Better to add a few pages or cut a few images than to crowd them.

Resumé Include your resumé/CV at the end. Career Services can provide guidance and feedback on its order and content.

P4

RESUME


9 Front cover

suNNY K sChNeBerger sunnyks@utexas.edu http://sunny.schne.org 404.408.9602

Table of contents TREEHOUSE COMMUNITY

4

FLOATING ZENDO

10

WOVEN BOWIE STREET COMPLEX

16

FOUR ROOF CLOVER

22

FLUTTERING FACADE

26

BASIC INITIATIVE: LOS PILETONES

32

CRESCENDO

36

TREES IN PEACE

40

2

3

Project 1

WORK: CABIN first floor plan ( beyond )

LIVE: 1 BEDROOM first floor plan

LIVE-WORK: UNIT ONE, 1 BEDROOM first floor plan, ADA-Accessible unit

second floor plan

LIVE: 2 BEDROOM first floor plan

UNIT TWO, 1 BEDROOM second floor plan, second unit

second floor plan

The Treehouse live-work community is designed for those who want to get away and focus on their work, such as writers or introverted freelancers. Living here, you are able to work in your own writer’s treehouse propped up on stilts. By getting out of your house and into a small room with a wall of glass that faces nothing but canopy, you can take advantage of the isolation to really focus on whatever your project is.

Treehouse CoMMuNITY Live-Work Community Red Bluff Rd Austin, TX, 2012 academic

Writers cabins and 1-bedroom upper units can be FABRICATED OFF-SITE to halve construction time RAINWATER COLLECTION RADIANT HEATING AND COOLING with VERTICAL HEAT LOOPS

section A

PILE FOUNDATIONS

4

5

0

20'

section B 8

9

Project 2 (etc…) The act of becoming enlightened is about breaking away from the mundane earthly experience. The same metaphor is used through the entry sequence. The zendo is about breaking your connection to the ground and making the connection ambiguous. From the exterior, you approach at an oblique angle so that the reflective glass along the bottom makes it appear as though the wildflower field continues uninterrupted beneath the zendo as it floats gently off the ground.

back, so as you enter the building, you step through a sliver of light and feel like you’re stepping over empty space. This is your second indication that you’re leaving mundance life behind, and prepares your thought for mediation.

The porch is pulled back from the zendo by 6", with a small threshold to carry you into the building. The roof is also pulled

roof plan

skylight

Once you enter the building, you see a giant slatted pod that GRAND DINING seems to float easily within the room. This is the meditative space. At the opposite end of the building sits a statue of Buddha at the same height as the meditating pod. You remove your shoes, grab a cushion, and step up onto the slatted shelves of the pod—the final break from earth before meditating while sitting mostly on air.

go? The slotted pod allows your breath to move the wall in front of you. This breaks down the physical barrier in front of you, rendering it irrelevant, and further reinforces the zendo’s concept of breaking away from this world.

As your facing the wall, thinking about the act of meditating, and concentrating on your breathing, where does your breath wooden roofing

OFFICES

mechanical systems

The practice of zen is quieting your mental state and clearing your thought until you reach enlightenment. During meditation, it is common practice in the zendo (meditation hall) to remove your shoes and sit cross-legged facing the wall with your eyes open and your hands resting on your knees. While meditating, you concentrate on your breathing to clear your mind.

FloaTINg ZeNDo Zen Meditation Retreat Center Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Austin, TX, 2012 academic

For designing the zen center, I concentrated on the zendo and two parts of the meditation experience: preparing and practicing.

MANICURED GARDEN

LECTURE HALL

WORKSHOP LOUNGE

meditation pod

exterior wall slats exterior wood wall with clerestory

ZENDO

window screen with devotional niche manicured rock garden

10

11 site plan reflective low-e glass wooden floor

WoveN BoWIe sTreeT CoMplex 12

Retail, Offices, Hotel, and Residences Bowie St Austin, TX, 2011 academic zendo axonometric

While developing a more urban area near Whole Foods on Lamar, I became very interested in “reasons to stay.” While other successful public spaces in Austin, I saw that people inhabit spaces by both pausing and exploring the sites, creating a very personal experience. There are the same possibilities here. There are many opportunities to sit and pause, as well as wander. Visiting the complex should never become routine, but always open to exploration, new paths, and new views.

13

zendo studying

14

15

site plan 16

17

resumÉ CurrICuluM vITae UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AUSTIN

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

VOLUNTEER

Austin, TX, expected 2015 M.Arch I candidate GPA: 3.62/4.0

Basic Initiative Design/Build Los Piletones, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2012

Graphic Designer and Assistant Editor The Writings of Mary Baker Eddy Boston, MA, 2006–2010 Did print design and typesetting work, and supported the Senior Graphic Designer. In charge of providing editorial content and support for my department’s projects. Also in charge of all facets of our presence on the web—on both internal and external sites. In charge of all advertising, including domestic and international. Honors: Awarded the entire Merit Increase for the department, 2009

AIA Austin Home Tours Austin, TX, 2010, 2011, 2012

PRINCIPIA COLLEGE

Architectural Theory Intensive Study Argentina and Uruguay, 2012

Elsah, IL, 2006 B.A. Hispanic Studies (major), Studio Art (minor) GPA: 3.7/4.0

Art studies with Principia College Northwest USA and France, 2005

HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN

Victoria University Wellington, New Zealand, 2004

Cambridge, MA, 2006 Career Discovery Architecture student

Intensive Spanish language and cultural training Playalingua, Playa del Carmen, Mexico, 2004

ACADEMIC HONORS

A. B. Lucas Secondary School London, Ontario, Canada, 1997–2001

Chapel design won for design/build group project, UT Austin and Dulce Agua Farms, 2012

ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES

Full-tuition academic scholarship Principia College Trustees, 4 of 4 years

ISSUE:009 Editor, UT Austin, 2012–2013

ISSUE:010 advisor, UT Austin, 2013–2014 ISSUE:008 editorial committe, UT Austin, 2011–2012 Writing Center Tutor, Principia Writing Center, 2006 Photo Editor, Principia Pilot, 2005–2006 Teacher’s Assistant, Principia College, 2005 Brooks House Board, Principia College, 2004

50

back cover

Graphic Designer pro bono, Lucky Mutts Austin, TX, 2010 Habitat for Humanity Kennesaw, GA, 2006; Austin, TX, 2011

MEMBERSHIPS American Institute of Graphic Arts 2007–2008 Daughters of the American Revolution 2009–present

Corral Counselor, Adventure Unlimited Ranches Buena Vista, CO, 2003 Planned, organized, and carried out recreational programs. Supervised the day-to-day activities of 18 people, created reports for supervisors, and maintained ranch equipment. Operated independently of supervision during multi-day expeditions. Web Designer, freelance 2000–2006 Built websites for professors from Appalachian State University and Georgia State University, the Garden Club of London, and A. B. Lucas Secondary School.

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GETTING STARTED

Choosing Content Most people will spend less than 10 seconds looking at your portfolio. Your first job is to make them want to look at it again and for longer. Present your best work in a way that makes it easily understood.

Choose Each Project with Purpose Know your audience. Know yourself. Choose a variety of projects that will appeal to the type of firm you are interested in and will demonstrate your strengths and capabilities. Each project you choose should be essential to showing your diversity.

Creating a Visual Story Just like presenting your project for Final Review, you need to create a story about your project. Narrate your story through images in a way that explains the original problem posed by the studio, your thesis, and then how your project solves the problem and fulfills the thesis. Many people won’t read your text, so make this visually clear. Your written narrative should add extra meaning by placing the reader into the experience your project creates. LAWN FERTILIZER

CHEMICAL DISPOSAL

AUTO POLLUTANTS

R UN O F F

Editing Out Drawings It’s easy to be tempted to include every drawing you created for your project. However, try to use the least number of images to tell the most about the project. You should include a variety of types of images, including process work, renderings, model photos, ortho drawings, diagrams, etc., but each of the images you present should be essential to explaining the project. If you can remove the image and not lose any vital information about the project, do so.

S EWAGE ANIMAL WASTE

FERTILIZER

N U T R IEN T S

Identify the image that shows your big idea and then feature it in your design. [See the Hierarchy section]

HYPERTROPHICATION

O2

H E AV Y M E TA L S

Heavy metal contamination in the Derwent Estuary resulted from decades of pollutants being dumped into the river by nearby industries, the primary offender being a local zinc smelter. This dumping of toxins into the estuary halted over 25 years ago, but heavy metal contamination of marine life persists. However, the metals have begun to sink down to the estuary floor and are slowly being trapped by a sediment cap. Eventually, they will no longer enter the food chain. The only danger to this slow process of healing is the persistence of human activities which exacerbate the problem. Stormwater runoff and effluent stations cause an excess of nutrients to enter into the estuary. This sudden rush of nutrients causes algae blooms which result in the depletion of oxygen in the water. Hypoxia not only kills marine life, but causes changes in ionic charge in the water which draws heavy metals up out from the sediment and back into the food chain.


11

HEAVY WATER is a permanent installation to be built in the fall of 2014 for Tasmania’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA). It is part of a series of installations for MONA’s River Derwent: Heavy Metals Festival, in which architecture students from the University of Texas, MIT and MONASH work with local Tasmanian scientists and artists. The projects attempt to educate the public on the river’s heavy metal contamination via a built object which actively remediates the Derwent Estuary. The design evolved from collaborations between students in Coleman Coker’s design|build studio. A large portion of the studio was devoted to researching the complexities of this ecological issue and determining where to insert our intervention. The final product features a platform over the estuary with walls of falling water and a seemingly suspended mass above. The estuary is literally drawn up to greet the visitor, creating an intimacy with the surrounding elements. The turbidity aerates the estuary water which works to keep heavy metals trapped in the sediment. “A G O O D S O L U T I O N I S G O O D B E C A U S E I T I S I N H A R M O N Y W I T H T H O S E L A R G E R PAT T E R N S - A N D T H I S H A R M O N Y W I L L , I T H I N K , B E F O U N D T O H A V E A N A T U R E O F A N A L O G Y. . . A G O O D S O L U T I O N AC T S W I T H I N T H E L A R G E R PAT T E R N T H E W A Y A H E A L T H Y O R G A N A C T S W I T H I N T H E B O D Y. WENDELL BERRY S O LV I N G F O R PAT T E R N INSTRUCTOR:

YEAR:

STUDENTS:

COLEMAN COKER

THREE

LOCATION:

C L I E N T:

HOBART, TASMANIA

MONA

S H E L L E Y E VA N S SHELBY BLESSING DAV I D S H A R R E T T KYE KILLIAN M O R G A N PA R K E R

THE STARTING IMAGE ExPRESSES WHAT THE “BIG IDEA” IS AND ALSO SHOWS WHAT THE PROJECT LOOKS LIKE

4580

2150

4900

2750

1730

300

250 700

250

410

1250

3900

render by kye killian section by morgan parker

THE REST OF THE PROJECT’S SPREADS TELL THE STORY OF ITS CONSTRUCTION AND ExPERIENCE


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GETTING STARTED

Cactus Greenhouse Austin, TX Fall 2012

Professor Danelle Briscoe

04

05

THE INTRODUCTORY IMAGE GIVES AN OVERALL LOOK AT THE PROJECT. SUBSEQUENT IMAGES ExPLAIN THE PROCESS AND DESIGN WITHOUT OVERLOADING THE GRAPHICS

Cactus Greenhouse Austin, Texas

The natural internal architecture of cacti inspired the study of voronoi systems. Cacti create micro-systems as their spines and form utilize wind to collect water while blocking the sun. Studying how a structure could mimic this complex yet ordered nature led to the design of an extruded voronoi greenhouse. The large greenhouse is comprised of an extruded space-frame system acting more like a column and beam system. The complexity of the greenhouse is met by the ordered system of the educational and administrative program. While the greenhouse rises two stories and jaggedly wraps around the entrances the additional program is disguised under a berm allowing the greenhouse to be the focal point of the structure. The cactus exhibits are housed within the structure as visitors are guided in and through the building. Leisure seating is provided within the center of the building for visitors, students, and administration. The educational program includes laboratories and classrooms with direct access to the greenhouse.

06

Cactus Greenhouse

07

08

Cactus Greenhouse

09

10

Cactus Greenhouse

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13

4HYMH1LSS`ÄZO

FALL 2011 CRITIC: JACK SANDERS >P[O2`L2PSSPHU,[OHU4LULIYVRLY 9HJOLSSL Simon

In this project, we were instructed to design interactive screens for the Trans-Pecos Festival of Music and Love in Marfa, TX. The screens were to be used as a projection surface MVYZOVY[ÄSTZWYV]PKLKI`]PKLV artists. From the start, we were captivated by the idea of creating a NOVZ[S`HTVYWOV\ZZOHWLÅVH[PUN out in the desert. To accomplish this, we needed semi-translucent sheets suspended over an upward-facing projector. Our initial idea was to create a kinetic sculpture in which the sheets, suspended by crankshafts, would behave in wave-like patterns as the cranks were turned. Due to logistics, we decided to both simplify and strengthen the design by harnessing the abundance of desert wind already present in Marfa.

We designed a rigid 10’ x 10’ x 10’ frame of bamboo, fastened together with zip ties in forms borrowed from traditional bamboo lashing techniques. In order to transport the bamboo easier, the vertical elements were cut in half to be rejoined on site with axially loaded lapped joints.

The first spread shows the experience, conception, and construction, while the following spreads fill out the rest of the story. The strongest aspect of the design was an accident. We had dug a deep OVSL\UKLY[OL1LSS`ÄZO[VOV\ZL[OL projector. Night fell and we were still ^VYRPUNVUÄUPZOPUN[OLHZZLTIS` so we stuck a shop light down in the hole to give us light. It ended up JYLH[PUN[OLMLLSVMHJHTWÄYL>L watched as festival goers saw it in the distance, and with eyes transÄ_LK^HSRLKV]LY[VPU]LZ[PNH[L[OL glowing hell pit in the desert sand. By the end of the night, a sizable group of strangers made up of all ages were sitting in a circle around the pit, talking amongst themselves and tugging at the tendrils hanging MYVT[OLNLU[S`\UK\SH[PUN1LSS`ÄZO

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Design Elements

Grids There are two basic composition techniques in photography and graphic design: the rule of thirds and symmetry.

Rule of Thirds This is included in every beginning photography and graphic design class because it is a quick and easy way to create a good composition. (Both Instagram and VSCO Cam include an option to show this grid in their camera view.) Divide your layout into thirds and then put your focal point at grid line intersections. Large images will take up multiple points, and if you want to include smaller, less important pieces, they can be placed at remaining points. Be careful to balance the visual weight of the page. This composition creates hierarchy between the elements. The larger the image, the more important it should be. Usually best for landscape layouts.

Symmetry Symmetry places equal weight on a page by centering the object in the composition along either axis or both. There’s usually not much hierarchy displayed in this type of composition and is best for showcasing a single piece at a time. Best for portrait layouts. However, notice how portrait layouts designed with symmetry can create a Rule of Thirds composition when seen as a spread.

Drawing Alignment There may be instances in which you design to eschew the rigid grid system in order to create a different relationship between your images. For instance, you may have section drawings that seem to unfold from the related edge of a model photograph. Or you may wish to imply other relationships through visual proximity.


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structural Glulam column

The manufacturing facilities are composed of Glulam col column and beam. The beam and column are connected with steel connections. The 98’ long span beam is connected with steel connections. Steel tension wire truss is used to reduce the depth of the beam to provide more space for manufacturing.

CLT roof structure

The 23-story timber high-rise tower is consisted of four CLT (Cross Laminated Timber) structural cores and 12 glulam horicolumns for vertical structure, and CLT floor panels for hori zontal structure.

structural CLT cores MANUFACTURING: Glulam column and beam

conThe mixed-use block is a proposal for an active way of con necting manufacturing to arts, technology and further to difhousing. Timber is one of the best materials to connect dif ferent programs into one for actualizing the new identity of Redhook and the best way to build and sustain it.

BIKE SHARE + LEARNING CENTER: Heavy Timber column and beam

CLT floors

RESIDENTIAL: 23 story timber high rise residential building: Glulam column and beam, Cross Laminated Timber walls, and structural cores

axonometric diagram

6 | PRODUCING HOUSING | academic work | spring 2013

mech. room

storage

loading

storage

CLT/GLULAM PRODUCTION LINE

7

loading

storage

on site training room / office

DIGITAL FABRICATION showroom

small scale wood fabrication

art + fabrication store (co-op)

lobby info center

cafe

seminar room

BIKE SHARE

BIKE SHOP

BIKE SHOP

0

N

ground floor plan

LEARNING PATHWAY

8

16

32

second floor plan

community gallery studio studio studio

class room

2bed

class room

2bed

N

0

8

16

32

typical residential tower floor plan

N

0

8

16

32

community gallery, residential tower

8 | PRODUCING HOUSING | academic work | spring 2013

2

RULE OF THIRDS

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The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014

The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014

3

8

The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014

The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014 42.48

9

42.08 41.83

47.00

41.70

47.20 47.26

42.00

B 47.25

38.16

41.70 47.50

38.70

OFFICE

A 42.00 6AM-11AM

41.90

RETAIL

C 11AM-4PM

HOUSING

46.60

46.29 46.00

SCHOOL

4PM-7PM

GYM

7PM-6AM

6m=18ft

+

5m=15ft 4m=12ft 3m=9ft

0 height

height of each microprogram 15m 10m 5m

dŚĞ>ŝŶĞǁĂƐĂƐĞǀĞŶͲǁĞĞŬŵƵůƟͲƵƐĞƉƌŽũĞĐƚ with the goal of designing a ZAC or a city block in the ninth arondissement of Paris, France, between a park and a railway line. The program included 300 units of housing, ĂŶĞůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJƐĐŚŽŽů͕ĂŶŽĸĐĞďƵŝůĚŝŶŐ͕ĂŶĚ retail. tŝƚŚŝŶ ƚŚĞƐĞ ůĂƌŐĞƌ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ ǁĞ ŝĚĞŶƟĮĞĚ microgroprams that were shared (such as ƐŽĐŝĂů͕ ŵĞĞƟŶŐ͕ ĐŽƉLJ͕ ĂŶĚ ďƌĞĂŬ ƌŽŽŵƐͿ and those which were more individual and ƌĞƉĞĂƚĞĚ ;ĂƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚƐ͕ ŽĸĐĞƐ͕ ĐůĂƐƐƌŽŽŵƐͿ͘ We organized all of the shared programs into ŽŶĞĐŽŶƟŶƵŽƵƐƐŝŶŐůĞͲůŽĂĚĞĚůŝŶĞ͕ĂŶĚƚŚĞŶ ǁƌĂƉƉĞĚ ƚŚŝƐ ůŝŶĞ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐŝƚĞ͕ ĮƫŶŐ ŝƚ into a general massing plan we made based ŽŶ ƐŝƚĞ ŝŶŇƵĞŶĐĞƐ ƐƵĐŚ ĂƐ ƐƵŶ͕ ǁŝŶĚ͕ ĂŶĚ noise.

46.70

42.00

38.60

45.00 45.00 47.00

47.50

44.00

41.90 4% 43.00

0 10m

50m

100m

42.36

200m

N

0 width 5m

+

8m

10m 12.5m

12.5m 15m

15m

width of each microprogram

Partners: Bernardo Jimenez, David Castellano, Helene Mancaux

ƐĞĐƟŽŶͮƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŚŽƵƐŝŶŐĂŶĚƐĐŚŽŽů

ƐĞĐƟŽŶͮƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽĸĐĞ

final model

CENTERED

Problem 1: CHANgE Located at the entry to Big Stacy Pool, the new changing rooms define the boundary between the city (street) and nature (park). While the proposed interior, defines the space of personal transformation from city dweller to swimmer.

Exercise 2+3: WAtEr (right) 1. Consider the flow of water. How can a surface shed water? Beading? Pooling? Rivulets? Attempt to create a specific character of water as it moves. 2. Consider the collection of water. How can water be held? Vessel? Bladder? Hold the same amount of water in different ways. 3. Combine water flow and collection. How can the initial experiments inspire water harvesting? 44

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DRAWING ALIGNMENT


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Design Elements

Hierarchy & Fields Visual hierarchy is important because it guides the eye and therefore creates a better layout.

Hierarchy Start with your most important image and make it the largest one on the page. This makes it the dominant focal point. Then add smaller supporting images that are complementary to the main image, and use them to balance the weight on the page. Be sure not to crowd the page. Use white space to enhance the hierarchy.

Fields There are times when you have a series of images where you don’t want to assert a hierarchy of importance. For these, create a field by arranging them in a grid where they are all the same size. This treats the field as a single graphic element and removes any hierarchy between the parts of the field.

2 3

1


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Rebuilding homes, schools, and lives after disasters can take many years. Adaptive Classrooms are intended to last the length of this waiting period. Many areas that have suffered these natural disasters are likely to experience similar types of storms in the future. By lifting the classroom buildings off of the ground on piers, the height of these modular units can vary and adapt to the existing terrain. Those schools that are near coasts can be lifted above the flood level, preventing possible damage in the future. As rebuilding begins, Adaptive Classrooms will be aggregated together to form an entire school complex. In the case of Briarwood Elementary, two linked shells will support an entire grade level. Connecting the shells at the hinged science and art classroom creates enclosed courtyards which can be used for outdoor activities. As rebuilding continues, more people will move back to Moore and the school can be expanded by the addition of more units. Slight modifications can occur in the shell to accommodate support facilities such as a library and offices and to adjust to solar orientation. ADAPTIVE CLASSROOMS will also incorporate a reinforced storm shelter into the aggregated complex in order to prepare for possible future tornadoes and storms.

1

2

3

I I I I I I I I I I I I 10

9 IIIIIIIIIIII

Dominant focal point

Secondary & tertiary elements

2 1 Iterative process models beginning with massing and progressing towards articulation of space

Printmaking studio with view of light well exterior work spaces

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Field as secondary element

Dominant focal point

1

2 3

This project involved analyzing and manipulating the archetypal gable house to achieve a modest, picturesque addition to a prominent residence designed by architect Steven Ehrlich in the hills of west Los Angeles. By playing off the archetypal house the addition invokes a sense of “home” while also tying into the existing structure’s Japanese inspiration through its earthy materiality and focus on the outdoors.

4

5

Field of images as dominant focal point


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DESIGN ELEMENTS

White space White space is the portion of the page left blank of information—it is usually white, but can be another solid color. White space balances your composition between the positive elements (graphics) and negative space.

2

ND

STREET MARKET

2nd STREET MARKET is a fusion of an artisanal market and live-work community. The project responds to the city’s rapidly increasing population by offering density, while still preserving public green space. Program includes a sixteen story residential tower comprised of live-work units, an interior and exterior artisanal and fresh market, as well as industrial shops and kitchens for resident and community use. The bridge, which creates an exterior promenade lined with market stalls, serves as a connector between the existing 2nd Street shopping district and the future Seaholm commercial development and Austin Public Library

White space is essential because it gives your eyes a place to rest and creates a hierarchy of your images.

The market’s form is derived from two local subcultures; the linear shopping district of South Congress and the sloped gathering spaces surrounding Barton Springs. By fusing the two, 2nd STREET MARKET creates a unique and engaging space while providing a valuable commodity in retail and housing.

L O C AT I O N : AUSTIN, TX

A portfolio that is too crowded and dense will fatigue a reviewer’s eyes more quickly, causing them to put it away sooner. There are a number of ways to utilize white space. Here are some examples: • White space as emptiness [1]

INSTRUCTOR: LARRY DOLL YEAR: TWO; SPRING 2013 C O L L A B O R AT O R S : S H E L L E Y E VA N S LARUEN JONES S H E L L E Y M C DAV I D

1 WHITE SPACE AS EMPTINESS

• White space as texture or lightened image [2] • White space as color [3] • White space on a full spread using a variety of visual weight [4] • White space contrasted with full bleed [5] • White space as a full bleed image [6] You can use a variety of these in your portfolio. Keep your design simple and use plenty of white space. Your layout should showcase your work, not itself.

“It’s not about your greatness as an architect, but about your compassion.” [ Samuel Mockbee ]

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2 WHITE SPACE AS TExTURE OR LIGHTENED IMAGE


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3d Model U+V-sections

3d Model U-sections

Scatter Point Model

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3 WHITE SPACE AS COLOR B

A

A’ 2

1_ Entry 1

Ground Plan

B’

2_ Lobby entrance

3

3_ Walkway connection

Section perspective of entry and meeting space

Second Floor Plan

4 WHITE SPACE ON A FULL SPREAD THROUGH A VARIETY OF VISUAL WEIGHT

Top: Section through roof structure Bottom: Perspective from meadow Facing Page: 1/8” model 32

5 WHITE SPACE CONTRASTED WITH FULL BLEED

*HTWÄYL

FALL 2011 CRITIC: JACK SANDERS With Johanna Spencer WINNER OF DESIGN EXCELLENCE AWARD

Project Loop’s Bastrop Fire Relief )LULÄ[YLX\LZ[LKPU[LYHJ[P]LPUZ[HSProject Loop’s Bastrop Fire Relief SH[PVUZ9LÅLJ[PUNVU[OLZ\JJLZZVM )LULÄ[YLX\LZ[LKPU[LYHJ[P]LPUZ[HS[OL4HYMH1LSS`ÄZO^LYLHSPaLK[OH[ SH[PVUZ9LÅLJ[PUNVU[OLZ\JJLZZVM [OLO\TISLJHTWÄYLPZ[OLWLYMLJ[ interactive space. It is[OL4HYMH1LSS`ÄZO^LYLHSPaLK[OH[ an object so [OLO\TISLJHTWÄYLPZ[OLWLYMLJ[ deeply and fondly ingrained in the interactive space. human collective consciousness. We It is an object so deeply and fondly ingrained in the ^HU[LKHJHTWÄYLMVY7YVQLJ[3VVW collective conciousness. We Unfortunately, due tohuman the 2011 ^HU[LKHJHTWÄYLVY7YVQLJ[3VVW ;L_HZ^PSKÄYLZHI\YUIHU^HZZ[PSS Unfortunately, due to the 2011 Texas PULɈLJ[:PUJL^LJV\SKU»[OH]L ^PSKÄYLZHI\YUIHU^HZZ[PSSPULMÄYL^L[YPLK[VKLZPNU[OLUL_[ILZ[ MLJ[:PUJL^LJV\SKU»[OH]LÄYL^L thing. tried to design the next best thing. We realized that a large part of creating an interactive experience laid that in a large part of creatWe realized getting people to share unfainginananinteractive experience laid in TPSPHYL_WLYPLUJL:PUJL[OLJHTWÄYL getting people to share in an unfawas something familiar, we needed TPSPHYL_WLYPLUJL:PUJL[OLJHTWÄYL a device to encourage interaction. was something familiar, we needed To accomplish this, we arranged six a device to encourage interaction. benches in a circle. We a this, we arranged six To devised accomplish system in which sitting on a bench benches in a circle. We devised a illuminated the seat across you. sitting on a bench systemfrom in which To turn your own lightilluminated on, you had the seat across from you. to get someone to sitTo across fromown light on, you had to turn your you. Once all six benches were lit, to a sit acoss from you. get someone ZL]LU[OJLU[YHSÄYLSP[;OPZZ`TIVSOnce all six benches were lit, a sevized the act of working together enth, centraltolight lit. This symbolized I\PSK[OLÄYL the act of working together to build HÄYL

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6 WHITE SPACE AS A FULL BLEED IMAGE


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DESIGN ELEMENTS

Color & Grayscale

zen MediTa TaT Ta aTion cenTer

vertical studio | spring 2012 michael benedikt location: the ladybird johnson wildflower center | austin, texas The ladybird Johnson wildflower center is a public botanical garden and research unit of the University of Texas at austin that consists entirely of plants native to central Texas. it is located ten miles southwest of downtown austin on 279 acres of undeveloped land that contains walking trails and educational exhibits. The wildflower center was chosen as the location for the project because of its serene quality and natural beauty, which aid in the practice of meditation. we were to pick a specific site anywhere on the grounds of the and design a zen Meditation center that included a meeting hall, cafeteria, guest rooms, apartments for staff, and a zendo for the practice of meditation.

Your portfolio should be visually cohesive, and the use of color is a large part of that.

i was drawn to an area of the wildflower center that is away from the walking trails and fairly remote. it is accessible to visitors, but is in an area that has not been managed or developed, and is unlikely to see many pedestrians. To access the site, i chose to bypass the main entrance to the wildflower center, and use one of the old ranch roads that run across the property. Visitors would enter off Mopac expressway through a gate, and then travel down the ranch road to a parking lot, where they would leave their car and approach the Meditation center on foot.

Portfolios may be vibrant, neutral, or grayscale. Your use of color may have changed over time, so after compiling the projects you’ll present in your portfolio, you should review them together and edit some pieces to aesthetically unify your portfolio. You may also choose to use color as a design element in addition to your drawings.

The form of the Meditation center is long and thin, which emphasizes the horizontality of the site. The grouping of buildings is on a plinth that is flush with the ground at the entrance and remains level as the landscape slopes away towards the rear. i chose to create a definite boundary without making a complete enclosure. The entrance is through a large slot opening in a gibeon wall, which is offset by another wall. The boundary at the rear of the site is created by the plinth, which lets visitors to the wildflower center see in but prevents physical access. For the guests of the Meditation center, this suggests a vanishing point that blends in with the horizon line of the surrounding trees. i included water as a main feature of my design because of its calming qualities. a large reflecting pond divides the program of the Meditation center into three distinct zones – residential, public, and meditation. The zendo, where group meditation is practiced, is the focal point of the center and is placed in the middle of the reflecting pond to emphasize this. i also use the water to create a boundary around the zendo to minimize distraction for the meditators in the interior. The rest of the site is covered in grasses that are allowed to grow naturally. The Meditation center is joined together as a whole with a thin and lightweight saw-toothed roof structure that shades the buildings, but also lets indirect light in. 14

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BOYS + GIRLS CLUB SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN SPRING 2013 The Boys and Girls Club organization exists to inspire and enable young people to realize their full potential by providing a safe place for learning and growth. Although this San Francisco Boys and Girls club would stand as one of eight other clubs in the San Francisco area, it is unique in its complete program and place within the city. It stands at the intersection of socioeconomic and neighborhood boundaries and within a tract of land that previously was home to a freeway. This location along with the aim of a safe environment that also promotes and encourages learning creates a rich opportunity to form a space that promotes a series of discoveries for children and visitors to the Boys and Girls club. By incorporating different programmatic elements within a simple envelope the program spaces become free from the envelopes restraints, as well as create an opportunity for interaction between activities and people. This then creates different experiences and opportunities for discovery within and outside the envelope boundaries.

_Knowledge / Transparency / connecTion AXIS_one blends spaces as it infiltrates them. Beginning at the notoriously underused ‘hi-ggia’ between Goldsmith’s second floor studios and ending in the heart of Battle Hall at the foot of the grand stair, the proposed surface will thread together resources that have been unknowing neighbors for years

Goldsmith

MatLab

BattleHall

Construction Section

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Southern Elevation

zen MediTaTion cenTer


21

reflecting pond

section a section c

section B

1

4

3 2

c

groUnd leVel d

section d

B

a 17

[ 1 ] guest rooms [ 2 ] staff apartments [ 3 ] lobby [ 4 ] cafeteria [ 5 ] zendo

5

zen MediTaTion cenTer

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zen MediTaTion cenTer

21

Fifth_Sixth Floor Plan

Section A-A’

Section B-B’

Section detail

NEUTRAL PALETTES

Plan

Elevation

Axonometric Plan

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Section

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Facing Page: Perspective of downtown from boardwalk 10

COLORFUL SPREADS


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Design Elements

Title Pages Distinguishing Between Projects To provide structure to your portfolio and help guide people through it, make sure that you use design to signal the start of a new project. Whichever method you use should be consistent for every project. It should be visually clear through your design that you’re introducing a new project.

of the site to maintain privacy. They are made of monolithic bamboo-formed concrete and feature recessed planters. The effect of the indentations and the pattern of the bamboo breaks up the scale of the faade so the volumes don’t feel as overpowering. Tall sliding decorative steel gates are set on the outside of the public entrance, private entrance, and the two loading zones.

The bottom layer of the pale concrete fins on the courtyard roof are angled to the sun angle of the Winter Solstice. This means that the courtyard receives its maximum amount of direct sunlight during the Winter, and is almost entirely shaded during the blazing Austin summer.

As part of film production, there is a set of spaces that require isolation from light and sound. We pushed these below To counterbalance the sequestered nature of the complex, we ground, achieving this isolation and also creating the grand inserted a large courtyard in the middle to act as a public plaza courtyard above. We inserted smaller courtyards that pierce for those working on site. It is large enough to be used by big the building to the lowest level, acting as lightwells for the groups, but it is also articulated and shaded to provide peaceful supplemental dressing rooms, greenrooms, and offices which respite from the stress of filming and editing. are also on the lower level. 12PM

GREENROOM STUDIOS

Nature is man’s primitive source of existence, and is endlessly creative and fantastic; and Austin is structured by a system of public trails and parks that act as an active recharge zone for residents. Likewise, Greenhouse Studios is centered around a large courtyard carpeted with grass, bounded by flowering walls, and covered by a protective screen roof. Immediate access to Nature from every part of the complex ensures that everyone can escape, recharge, and refresh whenever they need.

FILM PRODUCTION STUDIOS AND CAMPUS AUSTIN, TX, 2014 ACADEMIC; COLLABORATIVE 1PM CONCEPT: Nature is infused into all aspects of the filming process, enhancing filmmakers’ creativity by rejuvinating them at every turn.

Filming is an intensely productive and intensely private endeavor. The massive soundstages are placed on the edges WINTER SOLSTICE

EQUINOX

SUMMER SOLSTICE

SHADE & SUNLIGHT IN COURTYARD 4

This can be done many ways:

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• Using a full bleed image on title pages • Placing entire project description on title page • Placing nothing but your title and project description on the title spread

The act of becoming enlightened is about breaking away from the mundane earthly experience. The same metaphor is used through the entry sequence. The zendo is about breaking your connection to the ground and making the connection ambiguous. From the exterior, you approach at an oblique angle so that the reflective glass along the bottom makes it appear as though the wildflower field continues uninterrupted beneath the zendo as it floats gently off the ground.

• Keeping the left page blank while showing a title and a parti on the right • Using grayscale throughout your portfolio, but putting a full-color introductory image on the title spread Some people use simply the text block first on the spread (i.e., on the far left) to indicate the start of a new project. However, you can also treat the entire spread as the announcement.

back, so as you enter the building, you step through a sliver of light and feel as though you’re stepping over empty space. This is your second indication that you’re leaving mundane life behind, and prepares your thought for meditation.

GRAND DINING

The porch is pulled back from the zendo by 6", with a small threshold to carry you into the building. The roof is also pulled

ENTRY SEQUENCE

OFFICES

MANICURED GARDEN

LECTURE HALL

FLOATING ZENDO ZEN MEDITATION RETREAT CENTER LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER AUSTIN, TX, 2012 ACADEMIC

The practice of zen is quieting your mental state and clearing your thought until you reach enlightenment. During meditation, it is common practice in the zendo (meditation hall) to remove your shoes and sit cross-legged facing the wall with your eyes open and your hands resting on your knees. While meditating, you concentrate on your breathing to clear your mind.

CONCEPT: This zendo enhances one’s meditation by physically and visually lifting meditators off the ground and breaking their connection with the earth.

For designing the zen center, I concentrated on the zendo and two parts of the meditation experience: preparing and practicing.

WORKSHOP LOUNGE

APPROACHING VIEW OF FLOATING ZENDO

ZENDO

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23 SITE PLAN

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In addition to the title, you may also want to include site location (Aspen, CO); studio level (Design IV, Advanced Design); project duration (5 weeks); professor (Bernard Voichysonk); and/or design partners (Peter Crow). Make sure to attribute the work of others. This can be done on a title page for collaborative projects, or with captions under specific images.

Spread Count Generally, try to keep your projects to 2–3 spreads, with exceptions for longer projects like Tech Comm and Sound Building, or shorter design projects like introductory design exercises or special drawing projects. When placing your projects in an order, put your best project first and your second best project last. Establish a rhythm with the different length projects, alternating between longer and shorter sets of spreads.

On the equinoxes and solstices, plywood coffins will be brought to the cemetery with the unclaimed. They can easily be assembled on site—each sheet cradles one of the bodies of the unclaimed. The plywood pieces interlock without fasteners and the system extends above the ground plane to create a small circular chapel. This chapel will be slightly elevated above grade and will both hold the unclaimed in its walls and form the chapel space. At the dedication, a tree will be planted in the middle as a memorial, creating a place where visitors can have a moment of protected silence for the dead. From their death, beautiful and peaceful life is grown. In this way, the tree will both metaphorically and literally reclaim the people—their bodies and plywood coffins will decompose and be renewed into the life of the tree. The coffins and chapels are made of plywood because it is easily manipulated, decomposable, and structural.

FOREST CEMETERY CITY CEMETERY FOR THE UNCLAIMED CHICAGO, IL, 2013 ACADEMIC EVERY the 3 MONTHS CONCEPT: By burying unclaimed dead in the ground with minimal60 BODIES plywood coffins and marked 60 PLYWOOD COFFINS with a tree, we can create a cemetery that bring them from the edge of society to a beloved centerpiece of their community.

COFFIN ASSEMBLY

5 FT

BURIAL DATES

SPRING SOLSTICE SUMMER EQUINOX AUTUMN SOLSTICE WINTER EQUINOX

PLANT BODIES

CHAPEL DEDICATED WITH TREE

RED MAPLE BEECH PIN OAK BIRCH BLACK TUPELO YELLOW POPLAR RED OAK BUTTERNUT HICKORY

TREE MATURES AS BODIES AND CHAPEL DECOMPOSE

Each month in Chicago, there are roughly 20 people who 12 FT remain unclaimed at the city morgue. Often they remain unclaimed because they died at the edge of society— elderly, socially, or economically. I believe that, regardless of circumstances, each person deserves dignity, respect, and peace both during life and afterwards. The conceptual question driving my project is: How do we assert the precious value of the unclaimed? Nature renews itself constantly in cycles of growth and decay, and there could be a way for Nature to reclaim and assert the value of these unclaimed people. Operating at multiple scales, from the scale of the grave to the overall site, there is a strategy of renewal through natural processes, using trees as the main driver of this renewal process and plywood as the only building material.

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8–12 YEARS FULL DECOMPOSITION

BURIAL SEQUENCE

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Full bleed image across both spreads above project title signals new project


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poetics of building Design-Build Studio Location : Goose Island State Park, TX Awards : UTSOA Design Excellence 2015 Collaborators: Coleman Coker, Thomas Johnton, Luke Stevenson, Katherine Eastman, Rachel Duggan, Kuan Liu, Huiming Zuo, Ruihua Cai, Teng Li, Celine Pinto

Located on the Texas Gulf Coast, Goose Island State Park is a popular destination for all sorts of wildlife and outdoor enthusiasts, as well as an active oyster restoration site. The clients on this project needed an outdoor space to act as a focal point for youth and community educational programs that would work just as well as a fire circle for a large group of campers. The final design reflects that need for flexible space by providing a minimal yet stable form.

1

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material studies in graphite Location: Austin, TX These drawings are the result of a careful analysis of existing walls for pattern, texture, and composition of material palette. The process of drawing in such a detailed process forces the mind to constantly shift between the macro and the micro, exploring relationships at all levels of composition and understanding.

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pod hotel Undergraduate Design Studio Location: New York City, NY Humans are creatures of comfort over efficiency, except when it comes to the bottom line. Pod hotels are tiny, spatially efficient hotels that offer the bare minimum of space while still providing amenities. Our the taskhotel was to design our own The individual Podfullunits that shape version of these on ofthe NYC Highline were inspired by the gentle, flexiblehotels shelter hand drawings in plan and perspective, a willow tree and through the restrictive yet efficient keeping human protection of a contact case.theThe Podsscale haveas the guideline for our design. individual a bisected plan with thickThe opaque planesunit that developed first, then wasstructure repeatedand andprovide arranged to create a massing. contain most of the The resulting hotel accomodates 42 guests, and privacy. Circulation is achieved through sits through on top ofa sliding a restaurant glazed planes, either door situated behind the lobby, a banquet hall, and a cafe that sits at in front of the wash station or a side door in front of the bed. the level of the Highline, allowing for a visual dialogue at a close proximity. The massing of the units is shaped by an idea of a diptych of obstructed views working together to make a whole. R: Elevational study

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CENTERED TITLE AND TExT SIGNAL NEW PROJECT


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Design Elements

Model Photos There are 4 styles:

FLASHING PVC VAPOR BARRIER MULTI-PLY MEMBRANE

CUSTOM STEEL FASCIA BLOCK AS NEEDED 4” STRUCTURAL STEEL STUD 3 1/2” BATT INSULATION CUSTOM DRIP GUTTER

RIGID INSULATION AIR BARRIER 3” COMPOSITE STEEL DECKING

• Black background [3]

SPRAY INSULATION

W12 X 35 STEEL SECTION, 16’-0” O.C. MC8 X 20 STEEL SECTION

• White background [4] BLOCK AS NEEDED

• Neutral background [1]

IRRIGATION PIPE DRIP EDGE STEEL GROMMET

SUSPENDED WOOD CEILING

• In context [2]

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

Do not use photos that show your studio or other clutter in the background. The background needs to be either neutral or contextual. 1” INSULATED GLASS

WT3 X 4.5 STEEL FIN, 4’-0” O.C.

2” X 8” STEEL TUBE COLUMN, 16’-0” O.C.

You should retouch every model photo in Photoshop. (More about that in the Photoshopping Models section.) SOIL AND GRAVEL MIX INTERIOR TRAY BENT STEEL TRAY INTERNAL TRAY DRAIN

1/4” STEEL PLATE 3/4” WOOD FINISHED FLOOR CUSTOM STEEL CHANNEL 3/4” PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 2” X 4” SLEEPER WATER BARRIER 4” CONCRETE SLAB 3” COMPOSITE STEEL DECKING

2” STONE FILL LIMESTONE PAVER BOND COAT 1” STEEL GRATE CUSTOM STEEL TRENCH DRAIN

DETAIL OF GREENROOM WALL WITH WATERING SYSTEM & DRAINAGE 14

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1 neutral background

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2 IN CONTEXT


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Left: final presentation model showing the site context Opposite page: S-N section model 14 | GALVESTON MARITIME MUSEUM | academic work | fall 2012

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3 Black background: Color and Monochromatic

4 WHITE background


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TYPOGRAPHY

Fonts Typography is an essential part of your portfolio’s design, but there are a couple of basic rules to follow to keep it looking professional.

Serif vs. San Serif There are two major types of font faces for text: serifs and san serifs. (There are also other decorative types like scripts, gothic, etc). Serifs are fonts with decorative flourishes, like Times New Roman, Garamond, and Georgia. San serifs are plain, like Helvetica, Arial, and Century Gothic.

Serif San Serif

Traditionally, serifs are best for paragraphs of text because the flourishes help our eyes understand the shape of the characters more quickly. San serifs are traditionally used for larger lettering. However, they can both be used for either text or headings.

Use Only One or Two Font Faces Using multiple fonts visually complicates your design. It’s the sign of an over-excited amateur. • If you choose to use two font faces, pick one serif and one san serif.

Project Title

Location

Professor, Semester

Project Title Location Professor, Semester

Project Title Location Professor, Semester

earchil iquiducia sequ aut as eaque enimilla issequi teste pos ut la enienduntio voluptur Ellande dic tota volo

Seattle, WA 200 OMA/Rem Kool

Seattle Publi


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poetics of building

[ rolling ]

Design-Build Studio Location : Goose Island State Park, TX Awards : UTSOA Design Excellence 2015

Spring 2014 I 18 weeks Design VI Professor Judy Birdsong

This comprehensive studio dealt with programmatic, environmental, and structural design, all while creating a responsive form. The building is defined as a bowling alley/roller rink, with supplemental programs. The resultant design is of prominent sectional quality, due to the dynamic movement of the programs. Massive folded volumes, interacting through shears and connectivity, follow programmatic and building function. Materials play a dominant role: thick, dark, smooth concrete as defining volumes, wood as bowling/roller skating designation, and lighter, textured concrete as exterior space. Solar studies, HVAC calculations, exit path strategies, structural grid explorations, and detailed wall sections are some examples of topics covered.

Collaborators: Coleman Coker, Thomas Johnton, Luke Stevenson, Katherine Eastman, Rachel Duggan, Kuan Liu, Huiming Zuo, Ruihua Cai, Teng Li, Celine Pinto

Located on the Texas Gulf Coast, Goose Island State Park is a popular destination for all sorts of wildlife and outdoor enthusiasts, as well as an active oyster restoration site. The clients on this project needed an outdoor space to act as a focal point for youth and community educational programs that would work just as well as a fire circle for a large group of campers. The final design reflects that need for flexible space by providing a minimal yet stable form.

1

ONE FONT FACE: SAN SERIF

TWO FONT FACES: SAN SERIF TITLE, SERIF TExT

ui doluptaque solorum rectat eum fugiae. pedNim fuga. Rum quam ut fugia vendunt a pro veliquos simus. Acit, tempos adios r, quo te pe litam sequia nemolor aut quat oreperion pelibus. Am, cusa vel ellacit

04 lhaas

ic Library

2

Seattle Public Library

Seattle Public Library

Ellande dic tota voloreperion pelibus. Am, cusa vel ellacit enienduntio voluptur, quo te pe litam sequia nemolor aut quat issequi teste pos ut la pro veliquos simus. Acit, tempos adios aut as eaque enimilla pedNim fuga. Rum quam ut fugia vendunt earchil iquiducia sequi doluptaque solorum.

Ellande dic tota voloreperion pelibus. Am, cusa vel ellacit enienduntio voluptur, quo te pe litam sequia nemolor aut quat issequi teste pos ut la pro veliquos simus. Acit, tempos adios aut as eaque enimilla pedNim fuga. Rum quam ut fugia vendunt iquiducia sequi doluptaque solorum rectat.

OMA/Rem Koolhaas Seattle, WA 2004

OMA/Rem Koolhaas Seattle, WA 2004

ONE FONT FACE: SAN SERIF

TWO FONT FACES: SERIF TITLE, SAN SERIF TExT

Seattle Public Library

Seattle Public Library

Ellande dic tota voloreperion pelibus. Am, cusa vel ellacit enienduntio voluptur, quo te pe litam sequia nemolor aut quat issequi teste pos ut la pro veliquos simus. Acit, tempos adios aut as eaque enimilla pedNim fuga. Rum quam ut fugia vendunt earchil iquiducia sequi doluptaque solorum rectat eum fugiae.

Ellande dic tota voloreperion pelibus. Am, cusa vel ellacit enienduntio voluptur, quo te pe litam sequia nemolor aut quat issequi teste pos ut la pro veliquos simus. Acit, tempos adios aut as eaque enimilla pedNim fuga. Rum quam ut fugia vendunt iquiducia sequi doluptaque solorum rectat.

ONE FONT FACE: SERIF

TWO FONT FACES: SAN SERIF TITLE, SERIF TExT

OMA/Rem Koolhaas Seattle, WA 2004

OMA/Rem Koolhaas Seattle, WA 2004


28

TYPOGRAPHY

Text Make it Legible (i.e. Larger than you’d think) Feedback from the men and women who hold the keys to the internship castle: “Have mercy on us and our older eyes!” • Make your text dark (if not black) and readable (if not 11pt). Some offices will photocopy your resumé, so use font colors that copy well. Small text may look better to you and fit your design better, but make sure to run it past a variety of people to make sure it’s legible to eyes a couple of decades older than yours. • Make sure your text is large enough to be legible when read as a PDF on-screen.

Basic Rules • Don’t make text boxes wider than 5 in. When text blocks get too long, our eyes have a difficult time going from the end of a line and finding the start of the next line quickly. • Turn off hyphenation in your paragraphs! • Where possible, try not to leave single words alone on a line at the end of a paragraph. Those are called orphans. • Both justified and ragged text are ok, and the decision comes down simply to preference. • Do not center align large bodies of text. It makes it hard to read, and generally looks sloppy with the lines all ending differently. If you want your text to feel centered, justify the text and then center it. • DO NOT MAKE YOUR TEXT ALL CAPS. • Do not expand the kerning or tracking. • Do not use italics for large bodies of text. Caps, kerning, and italics can be okay for titles or short quotes, but not for bodies of text—they make your text too difficult to read.


29

Heavy Water Fall 2013 | Professor Coleman Coker Hobart, Tasmania, Australia website: heavywater-mona.com studio design team:

Alexandra Krippner, Shelby Blessing, Danuta Dias, Shelley Evans, Andrew Houston, Lauren Jones, Kye Killian, Jorge Martinez, Morgan Parker, Mitchell Peterson, David Sharratt, Katie Summers The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Hobart, Tasmania is situated on a peninsula surrounded by the Derwent Estuary. Once one of the most contaminated estuaries in the world, its shores are the site of multiple manufacturers who had formerly considered the estuary a dumping ground: Nyrstar Zinc, Cadbury Chocolate, Norske Skog Paper Mill, and the Hobart sewage treatment plant. Residents cannot swim in much of the water along the Derwent, and the government issues regular warnings to prevent people from eating the fish in the estuary due to the heavy metals in the water. MONA’s yearly festival of music and art, MONA FOMA, sought to address the issue of heavy metal contamination, calling artists, architects, scientist, and heavy metal musicians together to create works to address this issue. Heavy Water was designed to reconnect visitors to their environments through multi-sensory experience. A dark zinc box appears to float above the estuary, suspended above walls of water that hide a wooden deck and bench inside. The falling water creates an edge of turbulence, oxygenating the water. As one approaches the curtain of water, sensors part the wall to allow passage into the interior. At only seven feet above the floating deck, the proximity of the box overhead is designed to convey the sense that the estuary is suffocating. An oculus at the center provides a moment of relief, bringing light and air into the room of water walls. The concrete surface of the bench references the 8cm of sediment that currently holds a large percent of the contaminated metal capped at the bottom of the estuary.

Observation Blind Buildings shelter people. This structure was designed to strategiacally cover it’s users so that viewers can observe birds without being disruptive. After researching bird tendencies and discovering where different species perch and what they fear, I was able to design appropriately for the bird blind as it progressively approached water. Bird inhabitation changes due to, plant vegetation, soil conditions, and connection to water. At the water’s edge, the bird blind conceals the user most heavily. As the blind gets further away from the water, the covering dissipates, allowing for more open views on the site where birds are less skittish. A grid was placed in the design in order to create a system that could provide logic, while allowing for manipulation and variation. This grid guided me in designing both the structure and the aesthetics of the birding shelter.

MONA has plans to build a versionBLIND of Heavy Water with a projected OBSERVATION + BIRDING CENTER completion date of late 2014/early 2015. Model: David Sharratt Photograph: Alexandra Krippner Render: Shelley Evans

18

19

THE SPREAD ON THE LEFT IS EASIER TO READ THAN THE LONG ONE ON THE RIGHT. YOUR EYES HAVE A HARD TIME TRACKING ACROSS WIDE PARAGRAPHS TO FIND THE NExT LINE TO READ.

Austin nAturAl History MuseuM South Harbor Competition

The natural history museum on town lake, housing special dinosaur skeletons found locally in Austin, takes advantage of the urban downtown and the activity of the natural landscape at town lake. The museum uses existing paths to create intersections between parking different types of pedestrians, leading them through and around the exterior of the museum. The building is a dynamic extension of the dichotomy of downtown Austin, using variation of section to root itself into the ground and become the mediator between the street, the hike and bike trail, and the lake.

Helsinki, Finland

The competition called for ideas on how to redesign the historic, cultural and commercial area of Helsinki’s South Harbor. Working with Impossible Productions Ink principle, Veronika Schmid, we envisioned bringing the people to the sea and the sea to the people through elongated piers and shoreline water features. Using paracloud, a paneling program, parametric designs for the water pools, piers, parking, trams, bikes, and cars were generated. The entire site was then mapped and built in 3dsmax. Finally the proposed design was built in UDK, a video game software, to create an interactive experience for the competition’s jurors. The final design’s complex network of bridges and piers hoped to enliven the area with pedestrian traffic while navigating cars above and around the area. Boat access was a top priority and parameter on the design. The final product was a vibrant network of all modes of transportation efficiently woven together.

The museum is comprised of three main exhibits: living botany and plant origin exhibit, aquatic dinosaurs, and finally the land dinosaur exhibit. This chronological organization allows the inhabitant to descend from the street entry into the dim lobby, enter into the low-lit realm of the greenhouse, and emerge back out of the ground as the exhibits continue to the large, open and day-lit land dinosaur exhibit. The exterior circulation surrounds the exhibits and allows the pedestrian to interact with the building and as well as with the Water pools exhibits indirectly, serving not only the paid customer,

ALL CAPS ARE FINE FOR TITLES AND CAPTIONS, BUT THEY FATIGUE YOUR EYES FOR LONG PARAGRAPHS. THIS IS BECAUSE OUR EYES DON’T ACTUALLY READ EACH LETTER IN A WORD, EYES RECOGNIZE WORDS BASED ON THEIR SHAPE. ALL CAPS DEFY YOUR EYE’S ABILITY TO DO THIS AND THEREFORE TExT IN ALL CAPS TAKES LONGER TO READ.

4

Piers


30

TYPOGRAPHY

Designing Your Text Organizing with Paragraph Styles You shouldn’t need more than 5 types of text in your portfolio: • Main title [1] • subhead [2] • text [3] • caption [5] • label [4] The best way to handle these 5 types of text are with Paragraph Styles, which will keep your portfolio consistent and make your life a lot easier. You can find more information on them and how to use them in the second half of this guide in the section on InDesign.

Consistent Labels If you used the same font for all of your graphic work throughout school, congratulations! Your labels are probably very consistent. However, if you took the opportunity to use a different font on every project, your portfolio may look a bit chaotic. It is worth the time to go through and re-label your drawings, either in the native drawing or in InDesign, with a consistent label style. It will unify portfolio, as opposed to looking like a collection of independent projects.

1 MAIN TITLE 2 SUBHEAD

FLUTTERING FAÇADE EXTERIOR WALL ASSEMBLY AUSTIN, TX, 2012 ACADEMIC; COLLABORATIVE CONCEPT: Wall assembly reacting to and displaying immediate microclimate conditions, similar to leaves in the wind and rain.

3 TExT

28

One of my fav bed, watchin rainstorm out an innovative a façade that giving the im summer leave

The shingles a at a 30° angle nut allows rot These are the Copper sheet little flashes o


31

SHINGLES DOWELS EYELETS

2X4 R=4 BONDED LOGIC INSULATION R=19

LABELS 4

FABRIC NETTING WHITE FLANNEL R=5 1X2

COPPER SHEATHING R=2 VAPOR BARRIER R=2 PLYWOOD R=0.63

CAPTION 5

ASSEMBLY

vorite memories of summer is laying in my warm ng rain filter through the forest canopy after a tside my window. When we were asked to develop e wall assembly, my partner and I chose to create would respond to wind and rain in a similar way, mpression of a fluttering faรงade mimicking the es and showing the weather.

are made of two shingles glued to a coupling nut e and then threaded onto a zinc rod. The coupling tation, and the threads prevent lateral movement. en set into eyelets drilled into the main structure. ts are screwed on top of the rain barrier, reflecting of light as the shingles move. RANGE OF MOTION 29


32

TYPOGRAPHY

Page Numbers Your portfolio must include page numbers. The two best places are in the outside corners. However, if you’re trying to establish a datum across the page, anywhere along the outside edge will do. If your entire layout is centered, you may want to center the page numbers along the top or the bottom. Do not put page numbers along the gutter (the inside of the spread)! No one will ever see the page numbers, and you’ll just frustrate anyone trying to find them.


33

2

The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014

3

OFFICE

The Line | Danilo Udovicki and Larry Doll | Fall 2014

RETAIL

6AM-11AM

[ THE LINE ]

HOUSING

11AM-4PM

dŚĞ>ŝŶĞǁĂƐĂƐĞǀĞŶͲǁĞĞŬŵƵůƟͲƵƐĞƉƌŽũĞĐƚ with the goal of designing a ZAC or a city block in the ninth arondissement of Paris, France, between a park and a railway line. The program included 300 units of housing, ĂŶĞůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJƐĐŚŽŽů͕ĂŶŽĸĐĞďƵŝůĚŝŶŐ͕ĂŶĚ retail. tŝƚŚŝŶ ƚŚĞƐĞ ůĂƌŐĞƌ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ ǁĞ ŝĚĞŶƟĮĞĚ microgroprams that were shared (such as ƐŽĐŝĂů͕ ŵĞĞƟŶŐ͕ ĐŽƉLJ͕ ĂŶĚ ďƌĞĂŬ ƌŽŽŵƐͿ and those which were more individual and ƌĞƉĞĂƚĞĚ ;ĂƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚƐ͕ ŽĸĐĞƐ͕ ĐůĂƐƐƌŽŽŵƐͿ͘ We organized all of the shared programs into ŽŶĞĐŽŶƟŶƵŽƵƐƐŝŶŐůĞͲůŽĂĚĞĚůŝŶĞ͕ĂŶĚƚŚĞŶ ǁƌĂƉƉĞĚ ƚŚŝƐ ůŝŶĞ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐŝƚĞ͕ ĮƫŶŐ ŝƚ into a general massing plan we made based ŽŶ ƐŝƚĞ ŝŶŇƵĞŶĐĞƐ ƐƵĐŚ ĂƐ ƐƵŶ͕ ǁŝŶĚ͕ ĂŶĚ noise.

SCHOOL

4PM-7PM

VOID

GYM

7PM-6AM

6m=18ft

+

5m=15ft 4m=12ft 3m=9ft

0 height

height of each microprogram 15m 10m 5m

0 width 5m

+

8m

Partners: Bernardo Jimenez, David Castellano, Helene Mancaux

10m 12.5m

12.5m 15m

15m

width of each microprogram

PAGE NUMBER OUTSIDE TOP CORNER

“ d r aw i n g s s p e n d t h e i r l i v e s i n t h e da r k ” This project is a museum design for the new Drawing Institute at the Menil Campus in Houston, Texas. I was inspired by something the director said to our studio while she was giving us a tour of the museum. She was explaining how drawings usually don’t get the attention they deserve in the art and exhibit world because they are usually treated as preliminary sketches for other works, like painting and sculpture. Thus, she said, “Drawings spend their lives in the dark.” This studio was also an exploration in light, and strategies to achieve different light qualities. For these exercises, I focused on achieving high contrasts of light and shadow. I was highly influenced by Jun’ichiro Tanizaki’s In Praise of Shadows, which extols the beauty of darkness. If drawings spend their lives in the dark, what better condition to study than shadows--the absence of light? The vision for the Menil Drawing Institute focuses on this exhuming of drawings from darkness--forgotten archives and collections--and bringing them to the light--exhibition. The contrast of light and shadow creates the dramatic experience of the museum. vertical studio spring 2013 professor: joyce rosner

modeled studies of light and shadow 4

5

PAGE NUMBER OUTSIDE BOTTOM CORNER

Materiality played a large role in the development of formal strategy. Shellcrete is a historic building material on the site, and the remaining structures within the park are deteriorating quickly. Our formal strategy was heavily influenced by the desire to showcase our updated version of the material, as well as the oyster shells themselves.

3

4

PAGE NUMBER CENTERED BOTTOM


Examples excerpted from prp portfolios by: Jeffrey Blocksidge Brooks Cavender claire edelen Tess English jamie epley Shelley Evans mary hohlt june jung K. alexandra krippner joshua lambden gordon lee Caitlin mccunney shelley mcdavid claire miller mark nordby ariel padilla barron peper anna roe sunny schneberger tristan walker andrew wilson


B. Making Your Portfolio in InDesign Setting up Your File 36

Workflow for Photoshop, Illustrator & InDesign

38

Starting a New InDesign File

40

Master Pages

46 Guidelines 48

Page Numbers

50 Styles 52

Paragraph Styles

54

Character Styles

56

Object Styles

58 Swatches 60

Swatch Libraries

62

Align palette

64

Photoshopping Models

Preparing your File to Print 66

Spell Check

68

First, Packaging

70

Image File Rules

72

PDF Settings for Printing

74

PDF Settings for Email


36

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Workflow for Photoshop, Illustrator, & InDesign Adobe products were created to work together in a certain order. Your work will look better if you work this way, and it’ll be easier on you.

Revit, Rhino, AutoCAD, etc

ExPORT

Workflow for Drawings • Revit/Rhino/AutoCAD/etc creates the line drawing • Line drawing gets imported into Illustrator and edited • Illustrator drawing gets copied into Photoshop as a Smart Object

IMPORT

• Photoshop lets you add texture, photos, color, etc • Place Photoshop image into InDesign to arrange your portfolio • Print

Smart Objects Smart Objects are the keystone to the whole process, and a brilliant solution by Adobe to mesh vector and raster information without degradation on either side. Smart Objects contain all your vector information and keep it as vector information that is saved within your Photoshop file. It is not saved as a separate file. • Export from Revit, Rhino, AutoCAD, etc., to either a PDF format or a .dwg that can read by Illustrator • Open drawing in Illustrator, apply line weights, add color, etc., • COPY (Cmd + C for Mac, or Ctrl + C for PC) everything you want to move to Photoshop • Open Photoshop and create a new document • PASTE (Cmd + P for Mac, or Ctrl + P for PC) • In the dialog window, select “Smart Object” [1] • Photoshop your image If you need to edit the vector portion: • Double-click on the Smart Object Layer • Edit it in Illustrator and SAVE Do not edit the original file since it is not linked, and do not try SAVE AS to save it somewhere else, unless you’re meaning to save a back-up copy

Illustrator COPY


37

EDIT & SAVE DOUBLE-CLICK TO EDIT

PASTE AS SMART OBJECT

Photoshop

SAVE

PLACE

1

InDesign PDF

PRINT

Printed Portfolio


38

Setting up your file

Starting a New InDesign File Facing Pages • Yes. [1] This allows you to print double sided and have spreads.

Page Size

1

This is up to you. [2] 2

Columns You can set up columns here [3], which can act like guides, but I recommend using actual guidelines (see Guidelines section), which are much easier to edit and use. (Columns would be best used when designing something that is text-heavy, like a newspaper.)

Margins

3

4

• No smaller than 0.25in. [4] • Inside margin needs extra room for binding [5] You can let images bleed off the edges if you’d like, but anything you don’t want cropped off the page should be 0.25in or more from the edge. Leave the inside margin (official name: gutter) wide enough to accommodate for binding. This amount varies depending on binding: spiral bound, perfect bound, or some other type.

Bleed • No smaller than 0.125in. [6] If you have ANY images that bleed off the edge of the page, you need them to bleed at least 0.125in. This is to account for chopping/aligning errors when printing. If you never print your portfolio and only PDF it, you don’t need bleed. However, better safe than sorry, right?

Slug You don’t need this [7]. (This is for typesetters to leave notes for the printers in a designated space that won’t be printed.)

6 7

5


39

SLUG [7]: DON’T NEED BLEED [6]: AT LEAST 0.125"

PAGE EDGE MARGIN [4]: AT LEAST 0.25"

INSIDE MARGIN [5]: ExTRA SPACE FOR BINDING


40

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Master Pages WINDOW > PAGES Master pages make your life easier! Use them to make your portfolio structured and cohesive. Master pages are templates for your normal pages. You can create as many Master pages as you need.

Use Master pages for: • Guidelines: so all your images will be aligned correctly—especially important for PDF portfolios where shifts in alignment are especially noticeable • Your text boxes: ensuring their placement will be consistent • Page numbers • Any other elements you want to show on multiple pages

How to Create a Master Page • Click the menu button on the PAGES palette [1] • The menu [2] will pop up • Click on “New Master…” [3] • In the dialog window that opens [4}, name your master pages and choose whether or not you want it based on another master page, press OK • InDesign will automatically open the new master pages for you to edit • As you edit, you’ll notice that box edges are dotted instead of solid, indicating it’s an element from a Master page

How to Apply a Master to a Page • Either open the page you want to change, or just select it (or multiple pages) in the PAGES palette • Click the menu button on the PAGES palette [1] • Click on “Apply Master to Pages…” [5] • Choose which Master you want applied, edit page selection if needed [6] On the next page, I show an example of how you might want to use multiple Master pages for your portfolio.

1


41 2 3

4

5

6

ExAMPLE OF HOW MASTER CAN BE APPLIED AND THEN EDITED

A-MASTER PAGE

EDITED PAGE BASED ON A-MASTER


42

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Master Pages Multiple/Inherited Masters

1

Master pages can also be applied to other Master pages. This can be useful when you need multiple Masters in a project.

2 3

In this example, I need one template for my Title Pages and another template for an extended Resume section. But both templates need to have page numbers and the same basic structure.

4

• I created the A-Master to hold my guidelines and the page numbers. [1] • I created T-Title Master and applied the A-Master to it. Then, I added the text boxes and other elements where I wanted them. [2] • I did the same for the R-Resume Master. [3] • I could then apply the T-Title and R-Resume masters to various pages within the portfolio. [4]

1

A-MASTER: SETS UP THE PAGE NUMBERS AND GUIDELINES FOR ENTIRE PORTFOLIO


43 2

TITLE-MASTER: INHERITS PAGE NUMBERS & GUIDELINES FROM A MASTER; SETS UP TITLE AND TExT BOxES & STYLES FOR TITLE PAGES.

3

TITLE PAGES: ACTIVATE TExT BOx TO INSERT CUSTOM TExT; OTHERWISE, LEAVE EVERYTHING IN PLACE.


44

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Master Pages Editing Elements from a Master

LOCKED TO MASTER PAGE

When you’re editing a normal page, elements inherited from the Master page will show a dotted blue outline. These elements are locked and don’t let you edit them unless you unlock them.

UNLOCKED TExT AND EDITED

Leave them locked until you need to edit them. Unlocking them will also detach them from the Master page—meaning, whatever quality of an object you change on the page will become unlinked to the original element on the Master page, and any further changes to it won’t propagate to the layout page. For example, if you unlock the text of a text box and change the text, text from the Master page is no longer linked. Any change to the text in that box on the Master page will not be propagated to that specific text box on the normal page. However, if you don’t move the text box, the location is still linked, and moving the text box on the Master page will still move the text box on the layout page. To unlock an element for editing: • Hold down Cmd + Shift (Ctrl + Shift) while clicking on the element Once the element is unlocked, it will revert to the solid blue outline.

Re-link/Reset Elements to Original State

Reset Entire Page

If you unlock an element to edit and then later need to reset it, it’s easy to do so.

Sometimes you just need to start a page over.

For example, maybe you unlocked an element to make a single spread work better, then later you redesign your portfolio and your Master pages and discover a few elements were unlinked to the Master pages and didn’t move where they should.

There are 2 ways to reset the entire page back to the Master page (deleting all edits you’ve made to the page). Select a spread or page in the PAGES palette (if you select just one page of a spread, it will still apply the override to both pages on the spread)

To reset element:

Then:

• Select the element

• Use the PAGES palette menu to select “Remove Selected Local Overrides” [2]

• Use the PAGES Palette menu to select “Remove Selected Local Overrides” [2] • ALL edits you made to the element will be lost

OR: • Use the PAGES palette menu to select “Apply Master to Pages…” [1] • Choose the Master, designate the pages, and click OK


45

1

APPLIES NEW MASTER OR YOU CAN SELECT SAME MASTER TO RESET PAGE COMPLETELY HIDES ALL ELEMENTS FULLY LINKED TO THE MASTER PAGES UNLINKS ALL ELEMENTS ON A PAGE FROM THE MASTER PAGE

2

RE-LINKS ELEMENT TO THE MASTER PAGE AND DELETES ALL OF YOUR EDITS BREAKS ALL LINKS TO THE ELEMENT ON THE MASTER PAGE


46

Setting up your file

Guidelines This is how you set up your grids and other important datums for your layout. Guidelines are datums, which do not print, that you can use to quickly align images and text. They appear in InDesign as cyan lines across the page, and they disappear when you’re in Preview or Presentation mode. (Use “W” as a quick shortcut to alternate between view modes.) There are two ways to create guides:

1

• Click on the rulers along the edge of your window [1] (press Cmd + R to make them appear), and drag them into place [2] • When selected, you can fine tune their placement in the TRANSFORM palette. [3] OR: • Click the Layout menu at the top [4] • Select Create Guides [5] • Fill in your choices and click OK [6] When you draw or drag new text boxes or object boxes, they will automatically snap to the guidelines as you get close to them. 4

5

2


47

3

16


48

Setting up your file

Page Numbers

1

TYPE > Insert Special Character > Markers > Current Page Number InDesign allows you to insert a special character for the page numbers, which allows it to automatically number each page. This means: you don’t have to manually number your pages or double check them when you move spreads around!

Inserting Automatic Page Numbers Insert your page numbers onto your Master Pages, and that will ensure that they show up on every page in the same spot. Inserting page numbers is very easy: • Open your Master pages • Create a text box where you want your page number to show up [2] • Select the Type Menu [1] • Insert Special Character > Markers > Current Page Number [3] • Format your page number with the right font, color, and size • Double check that your text box is big enough to handle multiple digits and wide fonts as your page count grows. It will show up as the letter A on the Master pages, and show as numbers on the actual pages.

Numbering and Section Options It’s possible to edit the use of your page numbers even further. This probably is unnecessary for your portfolio, but may be useful for another project. You can find these settings under the PAGES palette menu: Numbering & Section Options.

3


49

2 THIS IS WHAT THE PAGE NUMBER LOOKS LIKE ON A MASTER PAGE


50

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Styles Styles let you set up the look and feel of text and objects in a single place. When you edit the format of a style, all paragraphs/text/objects with that style applied will be updated to the new format. This means that you can make edits in just one place instead of going through paragraph by paragraph or object by object in your entire portfolio. This is easier on you and also ensures your entire portfolio will remain consistent, no matter how many times you tweak your design.

Paragraph Styles vs. Character Styles Paragraph styles and Character Styles both apply to text within a text box. Paragraph Styles include all character and paragraph settings in one style and let you apply to it an entire paragraph. You apply the style to paragraphs throughout your portfolio—like titles, text, captions, labels. They include all information about the character and paragraph settings, and will overwrite whatever formatting you have previously applied to the paragraph.

ExAMPLE:

Lauta ipsam vene et rerumet quo te volut magnatas Character style 1 aped quiati berciis aut lit odit magnatet hicit, vit ilis ad ma inum et moluptiam CHARACTER STYLE 2 pa que pratur senem atin reprovit doloreium estibus ium faces idi consequam eumquo id quo il minti ut es nos ilit provit lit deribustem. PARAGRAPH STYLE: TExT CHARACTER STYLES 1 AND 2

Character Styles only include character settings and are applied to small snippets of text within a paragraph. Character Styles include only what will be different. So you can have a character style that is bold and tinted 50%, and it will only overwrite those characteristics that are specified.

Object Styles Object styles are for non-text elements like lines, arrows, boxes, etc. They are helpful for elements you will use over and over again.

ExAMPLES:

THICK GRAY OUTLINE COLOR: BLACK, TINT: 20%, STROKE WT: 2PT

These are explained in depth on the following pages. BLUE ARROW COLOR: CYAN, TINT: 25%, STROKE WT: 2PT; LINE END: CURVED ARROW


51

Text (Paragraph style) DINOT, Regular 11pt no hyphenation space after: 0.125in Character style 1 [font], bold cyan 100% character style 2 all caps tint: 65%


52

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Paragraph Styles

1

WINDOW > STYLES > PARAGRAPH STYLES Paragraph styles are, hands down, one of the very best features of InDesign. Use them for 99% of your text.

How to Set Them Up They’re so easy! The paragraph style will contain all info from the PARAGRAPH and CHARACTER palettes and more. • Set up a paragraph of text how you want it to look • Open your PARAGRAPH STYLES palette [1] • Make sure your cursor is in the paragraph of text you want your style to be based on • Click the “Create new style” button [2] at the bottom • Rename it At this point the style has been created, but isn’t applied to the paragraph you used to create it. When your cursor is in a paragraph with a style applied to it, InDesign will highlight style in the PARAGRAPH STYLES palette.

2

How I’ve Used Paragraph Styles Here This page uses 4 of my 5 paragraph styles for the document: • A Head: “Paragraph Styles” at the top • subhead: “How They Work” etc • text: for normal paragraphs • text list: for these bulleted lists

How to Apply Them • Click anywhere in a paragraph—doesn’t matter if you highlight all of it, a portion of it, or just place your cursor in it • Click on the paragraph style (in the palette’s list) that you want applied

Your portfolio shouldn’t require any more than what I’ve used here.

A Head

• IT WILL APPLY TO THE ENTIRE PARAGRAPH • IT WILL DISCARD ALL OTHER FORMATTING, including italics and bolds... You will need to put those in again after applying the style

How to Edit the Paragraph Style To edit them: • Just double-click on their name in the PARAGRAPH STYLES palette. • Edit in the new window [3] and press OK

subhead text • text list CAPTIONS

ALL PARAGRAPH STYLES FOR THIS ENTIRE DOCUMENT


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SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Character Styles

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WINDOW > STYLES > CHARACTER STYLES This is probably most useful for your resume or CV. Character styles are for small chunks of text within a larger paragraph. The style contains just the info that will differentiate the characters from the paragraph style. Use them for bits of text that will be formatted differently from the text around it. For example, in this document, I’ve used character styles for all the call out numbers: [1] … Just the blue number has a character style applied.

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How to Set Them Up They’re basically just like setting up Paragraph Styles! They will contain only info from the CHARACTER palette and not from the PARAGRAPH palette.

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• Set up a few characters or words of text how you want it to look, using the CHARACTER palette [1]

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• Open your CHARACTER STYLES palette [2] • Highlight the text you want the style to be based on • Click the “Create new style” button [4] • Rename it At this point the style has been created, but isn’t applied to the text you used to create it. Re-highlight the text and click the Character Style you want applied (it will be highlighted in the CHARACTER STYLES palette when it is applied).

How to Apply Them • Highlight the text you want changed • Click on the character style (in the palette’s list) that you want applied [3] • Your highlighted text will change to the new style

How to Edit the Character Style • Just double-click on their name in the CHARACTER STYLES palette. [3] • Edit in the new window [5] and press OK

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55 Character style 1 (Image Number) [font], bold cyan: 100% Character style 2 (Page Category Header) ALL CAPS tint: 65% Examples:

Lauta ipsam vene et rerumet quo te volut magnatas aped quiati berciis aut lit in each, the Font family stays the same, odit magnatet hicit, vit ilis ad ma inum et but case, color and face change. moluptiam pa que pratur senem atin reprovit doloreium estibus ium faces idi consequam eumquo id quo il minti ut es nos ilit provit lit deribustem.

Notice what changes and what doesn’t.

Tum re officitae. Simaxim illani bearum facearc ipicillati dit porepra tiores nonsedi tatur? Onessim inctur? Bis unt voluptaquis voluptas estorpo ruptati id que quiatur, teniet eatest offic tem sendi optae estibus ciliquam ra quam fuga. Nullest et pratet aditam lam, ad magnisq uidenihil in pra quiat. Nam fugiam accabo. Ut vel mollendae quid quam quiasi blam dolorit minctor uptiae cus peror accusandam, qui utem cus, seque consed mo maio omnimin ctorunto ium esed mosantur, qui sunt optio beaquam alique enducienis molorum et pro quo eum fugit lat adit magnatur, cum alitati onsectatur, omnissin cus sum doluptat as etur magnamus, acitati dolupie ndaeperati re, quia


56

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Object Styles WINDOW > STYLES > OBJECT STYLES Object Styles are similar to the other styles in that they save a template for how an object will work. They don’t contain any information about text.

How to Set Them Up • Create a line, box, or other object the way you want it to look

ExAMPLES:

THICK GRAY OUTLINE COLOR: BLACK, TINT: 20%, STROKE WT: 2PT

BLUE ARROW COLOR: CYAN, TINT: 25%, STROKE WT: 2PT; LINE END: CURVED ARROW

• Open your OBJECT STYLES palette [3] • Select the object you want the style to be based on [5] • Click the “Create new style” button [7] • Rename it

How to Apply Them • Select the object you want changed • Click on the object style (in the palette’s list) that you want applied [5] • Your object will change to the new style

How to Edit the Object Style • Double-click on their name in the OBJECT STYLES palette [5] • Edit in the new window and press OK [1]

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How to Make an Object Style the Default Making one of your Object Styles the default means that when you draw a new object, it’ll automatically be in that style. This can save you time from having to change them all afterwards. • Click the palette menu [4]

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• Open the Default Graphic Frame Style submenu • Choose which style you would like to be default [2] Current default is marked with a gray check in the submenu [2], and with a small box in the OBJECT STYLES palette [6].

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58

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Swatches

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WINDOW > COLOR > SWATCHES Don’t bother using the COLOR palette in InDesign. All you need is the SWATCHES Palette. Swatches are colors that are pre-set for you to use in your document. There are standard ones provided, but you can also create your own. Always use CMYK colors for your portfolio. It will make your print and PDF portfolios consistent. All CMYK values can be converted to RGB, but not all RGB values can accurately be converted to CMYK. More info on Image Rules and PDF Settings pages.

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[NOTE: RGB represents the light in your computer’s pixels and the color mixture is based on light’s additive properties. CMYK represents inks that mix to create color and it based on their subtractive properties. Light has the potential to create many more qualities that just aren’t achievable when mixing cyan, yellow, magenta, and black, such as neons and other vibrant colors. So if you start with CMYK color values for your portfolio, you’re guaranteed to get the color you expect when printing. If you use RGB color values to print, the printer still convert the color anyway, and you’ll probably be disappointed at how dull it looks compared to what you expected.]

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You can set up your colors ahead of time to make it easier to keep your document consistent. You can also import Swatch Libraries from Illustrator so that your colors can be consistent across programs without much effort.

How to Add a New Swatch

How to Edit a Swatch

The easiest way is:

• Double-click the new swatch [3] to open the edit window [5]

• Click the New Swatch button [4] at the bottom of the SWATCHES palette [1] • InDesign will duplicate whichever swatch you had selected at the time • Double-click the new swatch to open the edit window [3] • Adjust the settings and click OK You can also: •

Open the palette menu [2]

• Select “New Color Swatch…,” which opens the edit window [3] directly

• Adjust the settings and click OK


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TINT WILL MAKE IT MORE TRANSPARENT TO THE PAPER IT WILL BE PRINTED ON, BUT NOT TO OTHER OBJECTS IN YOUR DOCUMENT. IF YOU PRINT ON WHITE PAPER, THE COLOR WILL LOOK LIGHTER. IF YOU PRINT ON RED PAPER IT WILL LOOK MORE RED. ETC. ANYTHING WITH THIS COLOR APPLIED WILL NOT PRINT PROCESS COLOR: MEANING THAT IT IS PRINTED AS A PROCESS OF CMYK AND MIxED ON THE PAPER SPOT COLOR WHICH IS MIxED AS A SINGLE INK BEFORE PRINTING CMYK (ALWAYS A PROCESS COLOR) RGB (ALWAYS A PROCESS COLOR) TINT

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60

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Swatch Libraries

INDESIGN

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WINDOW > COLOR > SWATCHES

Importing Swatches from Another InDesign Doc Good news! You can import swatches easily from other InDesign documents. So if you have another portfolio or set of drawings in a different document with colors you like, you don’t have to manually transfer and create them. To import swatches from other InDesign documents: • Open the SWATCHES palette menu [1] • Select “Load Swatches…” [2] • Find the document with the swatches you want to import and click “Open”. [3] NOTE: You will only be able to import from InDesign .indd files and Swatch Library .ase files (not Illustrator .ai files).

Creating Swatch Libraries in Illustrator These instructions are for working within Illustrator. • To use swatches you already have, open an existing Illustrator file; otherwise, create a new document • Open the SWATCHES palette [4] • If you don’t already have the swatches you want to use in your library, create them • Open the palette menu [5] • Select “Save Swatch Library as ASE…” [6] NOTE: If you save it as an AI, you will not be able to import it to InDesign • Name and save your file [7]

Importing from Illustrator To import swatch libraries from Illustrator, it’s the same process as importing swatches from InDesign documents: • Open the SWATCHES palette menu [1] • Select “Load Swatches…” [2] • Find the document with the swatches you want to import and click “Open”. You will only be able to import from InDesign .indd files and Swatch Library .ase files (not Illustrator .ai files).

ILLUSTRATOR

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SETTING UP YOUR FILE 1

Align Palette WINDOW > OBJECT & LAYOUT > ALIGN The ALIGN palette is your friend, and he wants to help you. The buttons on the top half are pretty self-explanatory. The “Distribute Spacing” at the bottom is often overlooked, but is invaluable in your portfolio. Instead of eyeballing the spacing between objects when you place them, use the Distribute Spacing buttons to ensure that all of your spacings throughout your portfolio are the same. It will give your portfolio a sense of polish and precision, which is impressive to HR managers. It seems like a small thing, but will actually make a huge difference in making your portfolio look professional.

Distribute Spacing If you don’t see the “Distribute Spacing” menu at the bottom of the ALIGN palette: • Press the arrows [1] next to ALIGN to cycle through palette expansion options • Designate the spacing you want, and use the buttons to space your selected objects [2]

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EYEBALLED

ALIGNED & DISTRIBUTED SPACING


64

SETTING UP YOUR FILE

Photoshopping Models

PHOTOSHOP

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Curves vs. Levels You’ve probably been using Levels for a long time and think they do the trick. Levels do an okay job, but Curves do better. Levels and Curves are basically the same thing, except Curves give you more control. Instead of only being able to adjust along one axis with Levels, Curves allow you to adjust along two axes. To the right, first I show the baseline: what the adjustment layers look like when you open them up, without any manipulation of your image. You can see the histogram in the background show the same information. The second column shows both black and white inputs moved in an increment of 25. When applied separately, they both produce the same effect on the model photo. The third column shows more refined control in the Curves layer, resulting in a better image seen below. The contrast has been bumped up a lot from the original, and the shadows are lightened to a better value from the straight curve produced by the Levels and Curves in the second column. Both Curves and Levels allow you to adjust along color channels as well—adjusting just the blue or cyan, etc.

To Adjust your Curves PHOTOSHOP > WINDOW > ADJUSTMENTS

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• Click on the Curves icon [1] • Either move the handles at the bottom [3] • Or click on the line and drag to create new anchor points [2] • To delete an anchor point, click and drag them out of the box

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65 1- BASELINE

2- 25 ADJUSTMENT

3- FINISH

CURVES

LEVELS

HISTOGRAM

MODEL PHOTO

ORIGINAL

FINAL


66

Preparing to print

Spell Check Edit > Spelling > Check Spelling

Yes it Exists! Use it!

Options It works a lot like spell check in Microsoft Word. You can change or ignore multiple instances at once. InDesign also gives you the option to spell check only within a set of linked text boxes (i.e. Story) or throughout the entire document.

Change a single instance of a typo


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CHECKS ENTIRE DOCUMENT CHECKS ONLY WITHIN SELECTED TExT BOx, INCLUDING ANY THAT ARE LINKED

CHANGE ALL INSTANCES OF A TYPO


68

Preparing to Print

First, Packaging

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File > Package… Packaging is a life saver! InDesign collects and copies all of your images (and fonts) and puts them in a single folder with a copy of your .indd document. This means you can then edit and resize the images without damaging the originals, thus preserving them for future use and resizing.

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Packaging Your Files Once you have your portfolio laid out, but before you edit the images for print, you want to package it. The copied images are in a Links folder, allowing you to re-size and change the images for printing your portfolio without harming the original images files— which you will be very grateful for later when you redesign your portfolio and inevitably enlarge some of those images. InDesign copies the fonts so you can transfer the entire package to another computer and install the fonts on the new machine if they don’t have them.

How to Package Your Portfolio • File > Package… • InDesign scans your file for its compatibility with printing. A dialog window will pop up [1] with a summary of its findings. It will helpfully tell you if any of your fonts are missing [2], or how many images are in RGB [3]. When you package for the first time, that number will tell you how many you will need to change to CMYK before you print. Sometimes I start to package just to get this dialog warning and double-check to see if I missed any images when converting them all to CMYK • InDesign will prompt you to save your file [4] • Continue past the Instructions window [5], you don’t need it • Locate where you want to save your new packaged folder and click Save [6] • Close the file you’re working in and open the new packaged file to keep working The beauty of the package is that everything is copied and nothing is moved. This is a great way to save backup versions of your portfolio as you go.

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PREPARING TO PRINT

Image File Rules

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The best way to prepare your portfolio is to prepare it for print, and then convert to PDF afterwards. This is because the technical needs for the print versions are more strict than the PDF needs, and starting with the print version will insure that both print and PDF portfolios are consistent to each other and look good. (Refer to the Swatches page where I explain the differences between RGB and CMYK colors and why you should design in CMYK.) Convert all your images according to the “For print” rules listed below.

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You can check most of the info you need on each image within the LINKS palette [1].

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For Print • Flatten all of your PSDs and TIFFs [2]

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• Vector and raster are both ok • All images CMYK [3] • 150-300dpi [4] The standard is 300 dpi, but optically, your eyes won’t notice a difference down to 150 dpi. Any lower than that will be noticeable. • Placed at 100% [5] Anywhere between 80-120% is acceptable. If the image is placed at 100%, the Scale won’t show up on the Link Info list

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ANOTHER, SOMETIMES FASTER, WAY TO CHECK WHAT SCALE AN IMAGE IS PLACED AT IS: • USE THE DIRECT SELECT TOOL TO SELECT THE IMAGE (THE BOUNDING BOx WILL TURN RED) • THE SCALE BOx ABOVE [6] WILL SHOW ITS EFFECTIVE SCALE. THESE SHOULD BE EQUAL AND SHOULD BE BETWEEN 80-120% (BUT 100% IS BEST)


72

PREPARING TO PRINT

PDF Settings for Printing FILE > ADOBE PDF SETTINGS > [PDF/x-1A:2001] The PDF settings for printing will be different than for email because you want a higher resolution and therefore will have a larger file size than what you can send through email. This is a default setting included with InDesign and was designed for publishers to PDF their documents for printing. 1

You shouldn’t have to change too many settings. The PDF can be as large as needed for high quality printing. You are only limited by the size of your thumbdrive.

PDF Requirements • Size doesn’t matter • PDF as single pages, not spreads • Include bleed and crop marks • PDF as CMYK

PDF Settings • GENERAL: No Spreads [1] • COMPRESSION: Use Bicubic Downsampling [2] Downsample to no less than 300dpi [3] Image Quality at Maximum [4] • MARKS & BLEEDS: Check Crop Marks [5] Check Use Document Bleed Settings [6]

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• OUTPUT: Have it convert to CMYK [7]

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PREPARING TO PRINT

PDF Settings for Email FILE > ADOBE PDF SETTINGS > SMALLEST FILE SIZE These settings will make your PDF as small as possible. I will show you how to tweak the settings to get a better quality PDF, but you will have to experiment for the best compromise between quality and file size.

PDF Requirements for Email

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• Your PDF must be under 10mb. • PDF as spreads • PDF as RGB color (I usually convert my images so they print best, and then have the PDF settings convert back to RGB for the PDF. The reason for this is that all CMYK values are convertible to RGB, but not all RGB values are convertible to CMYK. Refer to the explanation on the Swatches page.) • Compress images to 96-300dpi You will have to adjust this to get your PDF smaller than 10mb. 300dpi is full size, but you can go down to 96dpi, which is the resolution of most computer screens. • Vector and raster are both ok You may decide to rasterize all the vector files. Sometimes they look better rasterized, and sometimes they help with file size. You’ll have to experiment to see what works best for you. • No bleed, slug, or crop marks included.

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PDF Settings • GENERAL: Check Spreads [1] • COMPRESSION: Use Bicubic Downsampling [2] Downsample recommended at 150dpi, but minimum is 96dpi (resolution of most screens) [3] Image Quality at Medium if possible, may need to be Low [4] • MARKS & BLEEDS: No Crop Marks [5] No Document Bleed Settings [6] • OUTPUT: Have it convert to RGB [7]

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Be Yourself Don’t aim to make a really beautiful generic portfolio. Aim to make a portfolio that looks like you. Above everything else, make sure that you love your portfolio because the people who also love it will give you a job—and that’s the job you want.

—Sunny Schneberger (M. Arch. 2015)

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