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ISSUE:008

the university of texas at austin : school of architecture

working between diagram and detail

IN TRANSITION : ADAPTATION IN TIME AND SPACE

What is the status of the public institution as a physical entity when the borders between object and landscape are blurred?

using psychoanalytic developmental sensibilities


TABLE OF CONTENTS 6

foreword Sowell, Weinthal, Heymann

10

studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Benedikt, Milovanovic-Bertram Interior Design Three : Glass featured project Elizabeth Ashley Thompson studio abstracts Design Five : Udovicki-Selb Advanced Studio : Alford featured project Alberto Rodriguez featured course Prototype : Siddiqui studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Benedikt Advanced Studio : Danze, Sonnenberg featured project Garrett Jones

12 14

16 18 20

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26

28 30

32 34

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42

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46 48 50

52

56

studio abstracts Landscape Architecture One : Sowell Design One : Rosner featured course Wood Design : Maˇ cek studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Birdsong Design Five : Sanders featured project Johanna Spencer, Tristan Walker studio abstracts Advanced Interior Design : Weinthal Technical Communications : Alter, Cragnolino featured project Taylor McNally-Anderson, Tyler Noblin studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Benedikt Advanced Studio : Pezo, Von Ellrichshausen studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Bucek, Stern Vertical Studio : Rosner featured project Kate Bedford featured course Public Interest Design studio abstracts Design Five : Doll Vertical Studio : Fajkus featured project Andrew Green studio abstracts Advanced Interior Design : Glass Design Three : Blood (coordinator)


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76 78 80

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studio abstracts Interior Design Six : Matthews Advanced Studio : Wang featured project Beau Frail featured course Collaboration Studio : Joseph Boyle, Brian Rome, Jonathan Schwartz, Alexer Taganas studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Furlong Interior Design Four : Siddiqui featured project Rose Wilcowski studio abstracts Interior Design Five : Matthews Design Two : Milovanovic-Bertram (coordinator) featured project Barron Peper studio abstracts Advanced Landscape : Shearer Vertical Studio : Gomes featured project Nick Steshyn studio abstract Design Six : Dangel (coordinator) featured project Kim Villavicencio studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Moreno, Saez Design Five : Lara studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Snyder Landscape Architecure Two : Hasbrouck studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Coker Landscape Architecture Three : Shearer featured project Chris Murton, Annie Palone, Kat Phillips, Kevin Sullivan featured paper Jenna Dezinski, Todd Ferry Amy Freedberg, Molly Purnell studio abstracts Technical Communications : Baldridge Advanced Studio : Coker

studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Coker Comprehensive Landscape : Sowell 102 featured project Noah Halbach, Beau Pesa 104 studio abstracts Design Five : Shortall Technical Communications : Snyder 100

106 110 112 114 116

118 120

124

128

130 132 136

138 140

142

146

148 150 152

156 158

featured project Michael Beene, Conner Bryan studio abstract Advanced Studio : Hasbrouck, Heymann featured project Laura Grenard, Alisa West featured course Urban Land Institute Hines Competition studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Almy Technical Communications : Fajkus, Gomes featured project Blake Smith, Laura Wagner studio abstracts Technical Communications : Garrison Advanced Studio : Almy masters design study Shawn M. Balon studio abstracts Advanced Travel : Milovanovic-Bertram Advanced Travel : Blood, Danze, Udovicki-Selb featured project Hector Garcia-Castrillo, Julie Huynh featured paper Andres Galindo studio abstracts Advanced Studio : Moore Design Four : Wiedemann (coordinator) featured project Madison Dahl studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Dangel Advanced Studio : Miro featured project Shawn M. Balon, Clay Callahan, Ashley Craig, Mari Michael Glassell studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Garufo Vertical Studio : Doll featured project Michael Beene masters design study Ashley Craig studio abstracts Vertical Studio : Garrison Advanced Studio : Bonfig index acknowledgements


FOREWORD : Why studio?

6

“It’s like if you wanta learn about cows, you go milk one, see?” — Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird In contrast to contemporary education models predicated on object-oriented results and standardized testing, studiobased learning pursues uncertainty in lieu of the singular, "right" answer. The immersive, dynamic lab environment imparts a process-oriented framework that translates cultural concerns and ecological systems into a set of spatial relationships. Each studio’s ideology thereby sets up various tropes to promote synthetic thinking, rigorous testing, and joy in making as the means by which design ideas are articulated and defended. The projects representing the Landscape Architecture program in this volume evolve from the above aims. Situating design as a process of inquiry, the program’s coordinated design curriculum introduces a set of representation, spatial, theoretical, and material practices by which to manipulate form and experience. Increasing in scale and programmatic complexity by semester and year, the six studios incorporate knowledge from history, theory, technology, ecology, and media coursework into a mode of investigation predicated on iterative, rather than linear tests. Understood as a foundation for a life-long praxis, the pedagogy cultivates a precision with conceptual, spatial, and communication skills. Toward these ends, landscape design studios probe the discipline’s elastic limits. Unhindered by the prospect of "failure," the design

chris murton

studios initiate methods by which to evaluate one’s design thinking and affect its rewriting; by extension, the studios assess the discipline’s thematic or topical concerns in order to critique methods of practice. Working from measure to agency, data to decision, the studios position design as a synthetic endeavor that evolves as much from speculation as it does from technique. jason sowell : assistant professor, landscape architecture

Where else can one undertake the simple act of folding a textile and have it critiqued to no end other than in studio? Interior designers have been folding textiles over the course of the discipline's history, taking the form of draping, tufting, pleating, and cinching. More recently, the fold has acquired new interpretation in interior design, mostly as a product of evolving technologies. The evolution of tools in the School of Architecture has changed the traditional act of folding and is slowly permeating interiors, much like the way the discipline is continuously changing in practice because of cultural and aesthetic shifts in response to economics and the environment. If we were to take an evolutionary look at how textiles have been folded and represented in the history of interiors, it would provide a lens onto the peripheral forces that shape the discipline, whether as advancements in textile production, tools, or practice. Studio is the same. Interior design is a discipline that bridges a multitude of fields and scales, resulting in a fuzzy boundary that overlaps with related design disciplines. Studio provides the setting for students to synthesize core curriculum topics

joanne kim


specific to interior design by integrating construction techniques, history, theory, human behavior, professional practice and fabrication, to name a few. These topics influence what happens in studio, and in turn, studio contributes to their rewriting. “Why studio?” Because the next fold made in studio might be a representation of the external forces that shape the ever-changing interior. lois weinthal : associate professor, interior design

Most architecture students avoid making models unless assigned. Compared to drawings, with their tawdry "I’ll reveal secrets rapidly" come-on, models just take so long. But many architects know models are, in the ratio of time invested to information uncovered, the most efficient means (by far) to uncover, to understand, to know — to design. Architecture is a patient search, quoth the master, and nowhere is the necessary patience more richly and abundantly rewarded than in the flotation tank that is making model after model. The best design studios I’ve been in as student or teacher or critic shared this counterintuitive relationship between apparent inefficiency and overall discovery. Studios are without compare as a pedagogic format for clarifying the impossibly complicated relationship between one’s own evolving design capacity, larger cultural ambitions and discourses, and the specific limits and possibilities of architecture to bridge these all. For "clarifying" in the previous sentence, you could substitute activating, inculcating, or indoctrinating. The dark underbelly? No other profession transmits its knowledge by sacrificing, from some of its more accomplished (often at the expense of their own architecture), so many hours for so few. For this reason, students who treat studio as a form of punishment rather than the ridiculous luxury it is — you can see it in their eyes — mystify me. Why are you even here? I am not fool enough to believe they might not succeed as professionals, but I harbor the secret belief their success will come in the important task of verifying draw applications from subcontractors. david heymann : professor, architecture


10

ORDERING SYSTEMS and Burnet, and one a Zen retreat

The studio has as its thrust the relationship of ordering systems, the language of construction and how those systems are inhabited in an environmentally sensitive context. During

the

first

session,

led

by

Professor

sited on Bull Creek Road. The second session, led by Professor made

use

Milovanovic-Bertram, of

analog

tools

for

thinking and making architectural

production.

There

are

many

ways

in

which

Benedikt, students were asked to choose among

abstract thoughts are translated into artifact —

several proposed projects specifically tailored

a building. Rather than thinking of form as

to

intellectual

a first step, the studio engaged in multiple

interests. Three students elected to tackle the

transformations of a unit, where aggregation

design and (detailed-model) construction of a

generated the artifact (building). The projects

large, wood-structure open pavilion, suitable

address

for weddings and sited along Shoal Creek.  Two

stasis in an urban context. The action is the

chose to design a Museum of Forgeries sited

projection of a Video Gallery, and stasis is the

next to Laguna Gloria Art Museum. One tackled

layers of materials that form enclosure in an

a new Benjamin Moore paint store on Hancock

ecologically sensitive area of Austin.

their

educational

needs

and

the

relationship

between

action

and

michael benedikt, smilja milovanovic-bertram : vertical studio, su2011

This pavilion belongs to no client. It has no program. Why is it here? The goal is to pause, look up, and explore one’s imagination. This space is anonymous but it encourages personal ownership even for just a fleeting moment. nathanial muhler

The building is based on a triangular module inspired by the branching and peeling elements of trees. The interior transitions from a dark, compressed space, to a bright hall with views to the park and creek, ending in an open air pavilion. beth arnold


AUSTIN POETRY AND LITERATURE CENTER How can the design of interior space address the physical and psychological needs of inhabitants? How do interior designers approach the conceptual process, and what diagrammatic tools do they use?

11

materials. addressed

The the

main

conversion

project of

a

vacant, two-story site, located at 912 Congress Avenue, into a new Poetry and Literature Center for Austin. Its goal was to serve as a special collection of the

dedicated

Austin Public Library, supporting its mission

interior design studio in the program sequence,

to foster and enhance the public’s appreciation

provided a focused and informative investigation

of literature. In addition to a circulating

into designing interior space. The structure of

collection, the center needed to house multi-

the course dismantled this practice into its

purpose function spaces, administrative areas,

constituent parts, with a particular emphasis

as well as a small studio for the Poet Laureate,

on issues of building re-use, human behavior,

who is appointed annually by the State.

This

studio,

programming,

which

is

the

representation,

first

lighting,

and tamie glass : interior design three, fa2011

Thresholds serve not only as transitional but also as occupied elements. The thresholds are essentially slatted wooden boxes with a deep mahogany finish to contrast the existing rough limestone wall. Each box sits just shy of the walls to emphasize this contrast. lily mccourt

Extracting the texture from the ridged edges, mimicking the movement of pages lifting off of each other, and observing the qualities of density, rhythm, and patterns are techniques that become tools in organizing an interior space. jessica yong


With

CONGRESS POETRY & LITERATURE CENTER

12

elizabeth ashley thompson

the

advancement

technology

and

popularity

of

the

of

growing

e-books,

the

concept of the library has been

forced

into

revision.

Students were asked to design a literature and poetry center

in response to the changing ideas of how literature should be presented. They were given a preexisting limestone building unit on Congress Avenue from which to work, and designs were required to allow for quartering the state-appointed poet laureate for an unspecified amount of time. Research over the course of the semester focused on the collaborative and social aspects of poetry and literature. Students interviewed amateur poets, poetry majors, and bookstore employees. In addition, the studio collected case studies of literature-related institutions, such as idea stores and storytelling centers, and paid close attention to material choices. While developing my design, I chose to focus on the social aspects of poetry and literature. From a basic perspective, literature is a means of one person expressing himself to another person, regardless of whether that expression takes on an oral, physical, or electronic form. Therefore, the interaction of one person with another became the utmost concern in my space. Spaces focused on interaction take precedence both physically and visually. Even the stacks, located on the second floor, are directly accessible to the poet and overlook the cafe area. The most unique aspect of the project was the presence of the poet laureate and the relationship between him and the public. Therefore, I utilized diagonal lines throughout the space, which pull attention toward the poet's wall, with the poet’s window becoming a central point against which the design reacts. From his desk, the poet may view almost all of the building, most notably, through a small opening, the performance area. From the street, the backlit performance area is the showcase, drawing in the public’s attention. The visual difference between the copper shell of the performance area and its fractured, glowing interior further emphasizes the space as a point of focus. tamie glass : interior design three, fa2011


14

THE POETICS OF ARCHITECTURE The studio departed from the premise, enunciated by the Russian Formalist Viktor Šklovskij in 1925, that “a new form creates a new content.” Paraphrasing his claim about art, we tested the position that architecture is not an object, not a material, but a relationship of materials tectonically assembled in space.

the

hidden

“excess

of

meaning”

of an artifact by extracting it from

its

habitual,

conventional

associations, like a flame that bursts out of a dying fire when the log is turned. In the course of our investigations of some methodological aspects of architectural design (composition, tectonics, structure, mass, materials,

“The artist is the instigator of the revolt of

texture, color, volume, space, light—light as material)

things against a reified universe.”

we were more interested in the process of making than

 — V. Šklovskij, 1922

in the achievement of some assumed “final product.”

In the search for the “poetic language” that

tested and modified digitally to obtain suggestions

the

Work was executed through models that can be sought

for further model refining: a continuous circular

in architecture, we, in a sense, walked in the

process, typical of the method used by practitioners

footsteps of diverse contemporary and modern

such as Frank Gehry or Jacques Herzog & Pierre De

architects, such as Rem Koolhaas, Zaha Hadid,

Meuron.

Suprematists

and

Constructivists

Peter Eisenman, and even Frank Lloyd Wright and

The study of architectural examples with

Le Corbusier, who all found solid inspiration in

on- site visits to important and accessible

the work of the Soviet architectural avant-garde.

buildings, such as Louis Kahn’s Kimbell, enriched

We

investigated

the

understanding

that

our discussions and informed our investigations.

architecture, like art, is engaged in “subverting

Most importantly, every effort was made to

everyday banality.” So, far from indulging in

allow for the students’ full expression of their

the frenetic pursuit of “novelty” for novelty’s

abilities and personalities. In so doing, the

sake, we rather looked for ways the familiar,

instructor tended to avoid imposing ideas, and

the given, “the trash of everyday life,” can be

created conditions for such self-expression to

“de-familiarized.” We asked how can we find, in

occur.

the world of reified objects that surround us, danilo udovicki-selb : design five, fa2011

This was an exploration of the use of pattern within architecture. I was interested in studying spatial configurations given a rigid set of mathematical conditions. kate bowers jorge martinez jr.

I had not previously had the opportunity to explore form through music; I loved the freedom that we had to discover and create our own boundaries. megan mowry


OPTICAL MASS

15

to digital, hand building to CNC

What new possibilities for concrete cladding are opened up by new capabilities in CNC milling? Can a building be designed from the inside out?

routing. These studies focused on concrete used as cladding through investigations of tile, shingle, screen,

and

interlocking

block.

Based on these physical studies, This studio took an interdisciplinary and hands-

associated drawings explored repeat tiling and

on approach to design through a process of

interlock as well as properties of use at larger

material development and sampling in relation

scales—like proportions, openings, cropping.

to architectural form. The material subject

In architectural practice, buildings are

of investigation was concrete. In particular,

more typically designed from the inside out, or

we focused on optical effects in concrete — a

from massing to detail, with the façade in some

slightly paradoxical endeavor.

way expressing or revealing structure and space effective

inside. In this studio we tested working from

and malleable material and presents enormous

the outside in: beginning with material effect

opportunity for architects to shape and define

of the cladding of the building and working back

their own building components. It can be adjusted

from there.

Concrete

is

an

incredibly

per performance criteria and to control effect. 

The effects and techniques discovered were

Concrete has no inherent form; its shape is

tested in an existing urban context. Our site

defined by the process of molding. Its surface

was a lot in the changing urban corridor around

picks up texture and detail very precisely and,

the Saltillo Plaza Commuter Rail Station on

as such, is particularly wonderful in sunlit

East 5th Street and Waller in East Austin. The

conditions.

building program was an artist residency program

We began with a period of research into

based on ArtPace in San Antonio.  Program spaces

all aspects of concrete as a building material,

included

followed by a series of cast concrete samples

community room, and exterior space for relaxing

investigating

and socializing.

formwork,

pouring,

molding,

and casting. These exercises employed a full range of model-making techniques from analog

artists'

studios,

exhibit

space,

a

Final projects consisted of both complete building design and specific material tests.

elizabeth alford, michael young : advanced studio, sp2011

Spaces interact and boundaries are made ambiguous through sectional intersections of the repeating concrete unit. On a larger scale this ambiguity is broadened into programmatic and spatial blending between public and private, gallery and studio. jola pieslak

The aggressive use of applied and integral ornament — germinated from the action of pleating — served both experiential and functional purposes throughout the building. angelo gomez


The primary goal of the first part of the semester was to develop a pattern and module 16

ART BLOCK alberto rodriguez

that

could

be

create

an

element.

The

repeated

to

architectural patterns

were

generated through orthogonal projections that were influenced by a notion of relief. Relief was used as a way to interact with light and shadow and as a means to create depth and texture on a surface. As these patterns were translated into pieces of cast concrete a language began to emerge as a way to explore and investigate modularity. BLOCK MODULE : From the previous investigations, a system of modules were developed that would inform a load bearing wall system. This wall system consisted of four unique concrete block modules that, when aggregated, created an overall pattern. This pattern appears to evoke a notion of randomness but is controlled through the underlying structure of the block module. The resultant aggregate wall system contains mass and void, which allows light to penetrate while shadows articulate the relief pattern. This wall system constructed through the four block modules continuously interacts with the changing light and shadow throughout the day making it an active participant of the architectural experience in this project. PROGRAM / DESIGN : The program of the final design phase was an artist studio and exhibition complex. The guiding principles of relief and interaction with light and shadow were also employed throughout the design of the building. The main goal of the design was to maximize daylight within the artist studio’s and main gallery. This strategy gives the artist ample light during the day while allowing them to notice the passage of time through their studio space. The artist complex was designed around a courtyard scheme where the studios surrounded the main gallery space which was elevated twelve feet from finished grade to create a shaded courtyard space. This courtyard space was critical in fostering the artists as a community as well as individuals. It allows for internal reflection as well as social interaction, which are both key elements in the development of art. All activity revolves around the main gallery, which acts as the crux of the project. Placement of the relief wall system was critical for the success of the architectural experience. The wall bisects the courtyard and the main entry, which allow this dynamic element to be perceived from the interior and exterior. This wall system is activated through light and shadow, and as lighting conditions change throughout the day and year this wall becomes a canvas for daylight. elizabeth alford, michael young : advanced studio, sp2011


EAST SECTION PERSPECTIVE


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practice. The research agenda of the course was

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of full-scale fabrication not as a final delivery

afforded participating students an opportunity

method, but rather as a set of techniques through

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PROTOTYPE

18


5 in

3 in

12 in

9

5

10 1

2 7

Plan 5/8 in = 1 in 12 in 4 5

8

9

10

1 1/2 in

12 in

1

3 2

brian anderson, chris bennett

Section 5/8 in = 1 in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fabric Formwork Pattern

3/4 in diameter PVC piping 3/4 in diameter PVC elbow 3/4 in threaded-to-friction PVC connection converter 1 1/4 in diameter PVC piping ring 5/16 in x 1 in thumb screw 1/8 in diameter threaded steel dowel 1/8 in steel nut 1/8 in steel washer thread polyester/cotton blend fabric formwork

Casting Chassis

Prototypes

Prototypes

seth brunner, travis cook, blake smith

between mass-production and mass-customization

Given the seminar’s interest in the relationship

formed the basis for the treatment of repetition

between analog and digital processes, students

and difference in serialized production.

were expected to be actively engaged with the

As an advanced seminar, it was expected that

digital media and fabrication resources at the

students would bring in their own expertise and

School; regular use of the woodshop was also

experience in the areas of visual and digital media.

expected. The final project was an opportunity to

Students were encouraged to take advantage of the

apply, develop, or in some other way react to the

discussion and individual assignments as a way of

fabrication investigations from the first

advancing their own design-research objectives

half of the semester.

within the parameters of the seminar topic. igor siddiqui : emerging technologies, sp2011


20

ARCHITECTURE AND MUSIC (October 18–22). Introduced to the

Explore the synergies between architecture and music.

site before then and with early sketches in hand, students finally returned to designing The Austin

After preparatory design exercises involving

New Music Center on East 11th street with client

2-D and 3-D abstract visual compositions based

Travis Weller, president of the Austin New Music

on mathematical ideal-complexity calculations

Coop, using techniques borrowed from musical

and

scoring as well as performance and acoustic

musical

aleatory

procedures,

students

became deeply involved in designing and building

parameters

three

construction, and social function.

major

installations

Architecture–Architecture

for in

the

Music

Music

in

and

design

sense

about

program,

Symposium michael benedikt : advanced studio, fa2011

kayla smith

music in architecture symposium : "low close vast" "the infinite space between" [below]

The Austin New Music Center utilizes a grid based on the harmonic series to reexamine how musical and mathematical principles may be used to organize and define space in a contemporary cultural context. robert claude gaspard


ARCHITECTURE | PSYCHOANALYSIS

21

with students to investigate and

Understanding and using psychoanalytic developmental sensibilities provides a rich opportunity to explore how design is informed and how space is perceived. Recognizing that growth is a plastic phenomenon, we ask how the design process promotes growth in the designer even as it fosters growth in the user of a building.

discuss the client and architect relationship, identify potential sites and

for

with

architecture

facility,

and

infused

conceptual

motivation. Architecture

was

considered

as the container of, and medium personal

empowerment,

freedom, and growth. The goal was to create an

relationship between the realms of architecture—

environment where the architecture participates

the outer, material world of tangible places—

in this process. Similarly, introspection and

and psychology—the inner world of the human

reflection were both subject of, and method for,

mind. Guided by an architect and psychoanalyst

design.

team, design for

a

center

and

examined

Students

studied

existing

buildings

the

architectural

that functioned as the primary provider of well-

psychoanalytical

possibilities

being, awareness, and growth of the individual.

multi-disciplinary fosters

sense

and

The

Erik

Erikson

Model

of

psychosocial

interconnectedness, and hope within an urban

physical and digital model to allow for more

community. Bill Strickland, CEO and founder of

nuanced assessments of human development and

Manchester Bidwell, and members of his staff

better explain the principles in the model.

acted as clients. Manchester Bidwell provides

This model was used in the class. Students

education programs for disadvantaged youth and

examined

adults in transition. Strickland’s work is based

boundary,

on

spatial

belief

of

learning

development was adapted to a three-dimensional

fundamental

a

arts

belonging,

the

that

addressed

a

prototype

the

students

studio

a

personal

for, The

locating

design

that

environment

issues

of

publicity

threshold,

phenomena.

bodily

and

privacy,

sensation,

Exploration

included

and the

changes lives. For the class, he and his staff

marriage of the experiential and physical to

developed

the psychological.

the

building’s

program

and

worked

elizabeth danze, stephen sonnenberg : advanced studio, sp2011 Through the overlay of multiple pavilion systems that stake claim on existing buildings, both the interior and exterior transform to satisfy Manchester Bidwell’s conviction that personal value and learning can be derived from beautiful space. amanda prin

The design assembles the program to maximize interactions between mentors and students along an interior corridor. Concurrently, the building’s form suggests a cloister, evoking the introspective nature of personal development sought by Bill Strickland. aaron sleator

Design is most effective when it embraces honesty and naivety; this manifests itself in spaces and experiences that speak to our common understanding of beauty and wonder. joshua jow


MISSION : The primary goal is to

AUSTIN CENTER FOR ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY

22

garrett jones

empower

underprivileged

students and communities to realize and build confidence in their ability to thoughtfully engage the world around them. PROGRAM : The National Center

for Arts and Technology (NCAT), a non-profit founded by McCarthy Genius Grant recipient Bill Strictland, operates through the idea that developing an understanding for the process of creative "thinking through making" is an imperative characteristic of success. The proposed program for the new NCAT facility in Austin plays an active role in facilitating this philosophical methodology. Students in Austin would be exposed not only to ceramic production and music making (staples of the NCAT program) but also to film-making, filmediting, and video game design. These programs serve as creative outlets and offer students opportunities to become involved in Austin’s burgeoning technology industry. The programs within the enclosure overlap and interlock in every direction. Boundaries are blurred, and the possession of space becomes communal, allowing minds to mingle and disciplines to cross-pollinate. The dissolving of boundaries is both physical and psychological. The centrallylocated culinary program allows for the smell of nourishing food to permeate the building. Many of the students have irregular or nutritionally lacking meals, so lunch is prepared daily for all students by the culinary program, and the smell of food throughout the building provides a sense of psychological comfort and stability. FORMAL LANGUAGE : The formal language of the facility is based on the philosophy that space has the capability of informing behavior. Meandering circulation emphasizes the act of wandering. An artery, open to the community, bifurcates the site and allows for inspection by the community. A public rooftop plaza over the building gives ownership of the program to everyone who passes through it. Student work is displayed here, making it a living gallery, while the public gallery communicates its abundant potential to the community. elizabeth danze, stephen sonnenberg : advanced studio, sp2011

OPEN / ENCLOSED


A

THO

MPS

PROGRAM LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

ON

STRE

ET

LOBBY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS EDUCATIONAL MANAGER DEVELOPMENTAL DIRECTOR CONFRENCE ROOM WATER CLOSET STORAGE DAY CARE FACILITY CAFETERIA CULINARY KITCHEN LECTURE SPACE LIBRARY / FLEX SPACE ADULT COMMON SPACE COMPUTER LABORATORY DIRECTOR OF ADULT PROGRAMS STUDENT SERVICES COORDINATOR MEDIA LABORATORY INSTRUCTOR OFFICES PHARMACY LABORATORY DIRECTOR OF YOUTH ARTS STUDENT SERVICES COORDINATOR ART / CERAMIC STUDIO DIGITAL AND DESIGN ARTS STUDIO GAMING DESIGN STUDIO FILM MAKING / EDITING STUDIO PUBLIC GALLERY SERVICE SPACE OUTDOOR KILN / STORAGE

27

D

UP

28

B ROOF TOP CANOPY ABOVE

8

C

8 8 DN 22

DN

26

19

19

25

7

7

24

19

19

15

21

23

13

14

UP

16

18

17

20

19

DN

UP

C

UP

UP

12

29

7

DN 8 7

11

8 8

7

2

10

3

4

5

7

6

7

7 8

9

8

1

B

D

UP

NEA

L ST RE

ET

MANCHESTER BIDWELL FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’

N

NATIONAL CENTER FOR ARTS & TECHNOLOGY A


24


"experimental buildings at shoal lake" : april 6–29, curated by herb enns


26

PERFORMANCE GROUND With West Texas as a geologic and

Methods of representation affect how landscapes are interpreted and designed.

geographic laboratory, the studio examined

tools

and

techniques

utilized in the mapping, modeling, The studio is the first of four studios in

and manipulation of the contemporary landscape.

the

Undertaken

Landscape

Architecture

design

sequence.

at

various

scales

—

territory,

and

city, and body — a series of five assignments

theoretical practices, the studio introduces the

investigated spatial relationships established

fundamental elements of landscape architecture.

between systems, surfaces, and simple programs.

Emphasizing

design,

representation,

jason sowell : landscape architecture one, fa2011

Representational modeling revealed how peels might direct movement, invite occupation, or delineate edges and centers. Discrete surface manipulations served to emphasize programmatic intentions or connect the sites to their larger context. stephanie kopplin

julia weese-young

kimberly harding


DESIGN IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES

27

For a beginning design student, it is important to eliminate design preconceptions and encourage an understanding of the interdependence of the body, light, and form. How can the foundation studio provide a basis through which to view, assimilate, evaluate, and implement design ideas while addressing these dependent variables?

own investigations and to form a foundation

on

their

values.

own

which

to

develop

Additionally,

the studio introduced the students to the concept of design in the realm of the senses; investigating how form is a consequence of other variables such the body (program) and light. Self-motivation was necessary

The projects and exercises explored during the

to succeed in this class as it is in subsequent

course of this term were intended to provide the

design studios. As a creative endeavor, the

student with a foundation in the perceptual,

process of design is one of exploration rather

conceptual, subsequent

and

manual

design

work

necessary

for

than explication; as such, it is defined by

architecture

and

questions, not answers. Class time was intended

skills in

interior design. Sequentially linked projects

for

began by introducing a question, tested through

The students were asked to look for ways to

a series of variables, and ended with a possible

bring something extra to their studio work. In

design

to

addition to pursuing the paths laid out by the

allowing

instructor, the students were expected to seek

response.

encourage

many

Projects

avenues

of

were

devised

inquiry,

students to take responsibility in framing their

the

exchange

of

ideas

and

approaches.

additional inputs to their design process. joyce rosner : design one, fa2011 The concept was to use a repeating system of linked simple geometries (the square) to create a multi-tiered sun breaker that would distribute natural light among varying depths. cruz mendez

cheryl mcgiffin

The goal of the public music space was to arrange three programmatic volumes (leisure, pathway, performance) to create new perspectives at their intersections and develop the resultant geometries to create seamless seating, circulation, and views between spaces. travis schneider

This is a public performance space designed as a tunnel, channeling sound and light toward the stage, while addressing the open nature of live venues and providing a variety of functioning spaces. michael rahmatoulin


WOOD [WORKING AND FURNITURE] DESIGN

28

beth arnold

jennifer kerrick

daniel morrison

The course is rooted in the DIY ethic. Making

helps designers to make better choices with

things with one’s own hands achieves several goals

construction details, to viscerally understand

at once. With limited means, do-it-yourself is

how assemblies resist load and torque, and,

often the only way to get something done. Tactile

hopefully, to be more effective as designers.

experience with the material — failure and

Wood Design starts with six weeks of basic

success — becomes a living, embodied knowledge.

woodworking techniques. No previous experience

Talking about techniques can never replace the

is required. I emphasize solid wood joinery using

actual practice and the particular lessons that

a combination of hand tools and power tools,

each person derives independently. Placing the

always with safety in mind. We discuss the

responsibility on one’s own shoulders promotes

engineering qualities of wood in depth, the names

self-sufficiency and a proactive attitude toward

and configurations of traditional wood joints,

the task at hand.

and their strengths and weaknesses. We work with

The designer, who is also the maker, adds

several species of wood and become familiar with

design content to every decision that goes into

their qualities. We look at examples of furniture

making an object, no matter how small. Learning

design history and visit the shops of Austin

a craft, and learning one material very well,

craftsmen to see where and how they work.


katia davidson

parker thompson

travis cook

The final project is a piece of furniture of the student’s choice of program. The requirements of the final project are: at least 50% solid wood, no digital fabrication, and no plywood unless

the

student

makes

it.

Final

project

design assignments include multiple iterations of sketches, scaled drawings, models, and fullscale mock-ups. The class participates in schoolwide final reviews. mark macek : wood design, sp2011 and fa2011


30

TROPING GHOSTS Can immaterial exigencies provoke a generative and material response that can “finally be adapted in architecture”?

were

explored

through

exercises

intended to foster an engagement with the tangible and the material. The

two

project

sites

further

underscored the studio’s premise. “For it is always the idea of place, and hence

Seider’s Springs has a violent history known to

light and time and imagination, that recurs in

us only through stories; the site itself has

the treatise-writers as that which can modify

been washed clean of all physical traces by

and finally be adapted in architecture.”

the repeated flooding of Shoal Creek. Evidence

— Aldo Rossi

of the history of Norcliff Estate overlooking Lady Bird Lake, on the other hand, is almost

The ephemeral attributes of the trope, or "theme-

entirely

image," organizing this studio (the ghost) can

using the remnants and fragments that still

also be ascribed to architecture. Tethered to

exist on the site as guides. In either case, to

a

through

see the landscape again — and for the first time

the agencies of light and shadow, ghosts, like

— through the naïve lens of prior occupation

architecture, are conduits to the realm of the

allows us to recognize the specific merits of

imagination

and

that site that first inspired an architectural

time; like architecture, the experience of a

response. The projects, a constellation of simple

ghostly encounter is apprehended sensually and

landscape

cannot be empirically substantiated.

chapel, respectively, required students to give

particular

However

location

and

and

connectors

insubstantial

perceived

across

the

space

topical

theme

of the studio may seem to be, the principle

corporeal

elements

and

and

can

a

be

reconstructed

non-denominational

the cultural and natural particularities of each site a material voice.

concerns of light, shadow, place, program, etc. judy birdsong : vertical studio, fa2011 The series of prayer pavilions offer worship spaces that explore the cycles of celestial bodies. By connecting visitors to something beyond Earth, they are not bound to this world, but become otherworldly. laura edwards

Architecture emerges as an experiential lens, giving life to previously unrealized yet intrinsic qualities of space. nicholas belkowski

With the advantage of an extended exposure time, I was curious to investigate portraiture. Ultimately, I hoped the photographic exchange would generate an intimacy between the camera and the subject — one that allowed for self-awareness, patience, and calm. jessica mills


A DESIGN BUILD ADVENTURE

31

art,

What makes a building or construction artful?

sculpture,

“architecture”

and

even

of

temporary

the

communities (e.g., refuge camps This

design

of

and Burning Man). Discussions investigated the

construction” in a series of iterative design-

materials, methods, and tools used to create not

build exercises or experiments.

only the physical end product, but also how the

The

studio

concept

explored

was

to

the

“art

acknowledge

the

interaction between the designers, materials,

educational foundation from previous semesters

methods,

and “practice” that foundation in relationship

than a physical product — emotion, surprise,

to the students’ instincts — and to exercise,

community, horror, comfort . . .

practice,

and

develop

confidence

in

those

instincts. The of

and

tools

produce

something

other

Design-build is not simply a construction project delivery system. It can also be an

studio

explored

a

architects,

large

spectrum

problems. We design, we build, then we reflect

artists, temporary and permanent structures,

on the successes and failures and start the

video

whole process over again. Design Build Design

installations,

street

art,

land

designers,

exciting process to discover solutions to design

and

or

contemporary

interventions, art,

film

graffiti

and

video

Build Design Build. jack sanders : design five, fa2011

An inflatable structure exemplified and encouraged ideas of instant structure, flexibility, and rapid production. The structure relies on its repetition: inflation, experience, deflation, and relocation, to impart visitors with a sense of wonder. samantha anderson and ryan rasmussen

An 8' x 8' x 8' cube embraces the simplicity of a stretched sheet and of Donald Judd's nearby concrete boxes. Visitors reach the cube's dark interior by crawling through a passageway where backlit panels throw silhouettes onto the outer walls. samantha anderson, ben haschke, jessica painter, josh wier

jackie lieck, johanna spencer, ben walker


Our goal for the experiential nature of this design was to create a space where people 32

CAMPFIRE johanna spencer, tristan walker

could gather and connect. We decided that the campfire was an ideal interactive space, because it is a phenomenon

deeply and fondly ingrained in the human collective consciousness and because the design would be exhibited for Project Loop, a Bastrop Fire Relief Benefit. We realized that a large part of creating an interactive experience lay in encouraging people to share in an unfamiliar experience. Since the campfire was something familiar, we needed a device to encourage interaction. To accomplish this, we arranged six benches in a circle and devised a system by which sitting on a bench illuminated the seat immediately opposite. For an individual to turn on his own light, he had to directly across from another person. Once all six benches were lit, a seventh, central fire lit, which symbolized the act of working together to build the fire. Our project was able to fill the void left by the statewide fire ban. We helped raise $2,500 for Bastrop, and our campfire was a very successful part of the evening. The trash and beer cans surrounding the circle at the end of the night were a testament to its popularity. jack sanders : design five studio, fa2011


34

HOUSE LAB : THE DINING ROOM meal, and being in a dining room

Dining is an everyday ritual. This studio investigated the dining room in order to uncover subtle nuances that have become second nature. Investigations were undertaken at full scale, where students designed and constructed a dining room in the Goldsmith Hall loggia.

was designed over the course of the semester. Because the interior realm is profoundly understood at full scale with its tactile and phenomenal

qualities,

all

final

work for the studio was constructed at full scale. Therefore, as a whole studio, the dining room was

Conversations held around the dining table are

designed and pieced together as a collection of

sometimes

fragments coming together to make a whole.

remembered

as

fragments

that

flow

from one topic to another and one person to

The semester began with each student making

another. Similarly, the material accoutrements

a plaster cast of their typical table setting.

at the table such as utensils, napkin, table,

Following the castings were case studies to

tablecloth, chair, lighting, and view across to

provide examples of nuances found in dining

a guest—or even the room beyond — are remembered

rooms. Case studies included Leonardo da Vinci’s

as fragments that constitute a whole. These

The Last Supper, products by Droog Design, Emily

material elements leave traces, such as coffee

Post’s

or wine rings on a table, while the immaterial

dining rooms by Frank Lloyd Wright.

manners,

Japanese

Tea

Ceremony,

and

— often in the form of a conversation — leave no

Each student worked with a chair from UT

trace except for what we care to remember and

Surplus as a base for reconstructing a new one.

take with us.

Afterwards,

This studio investigated the poetic and

addressed

students

the

dining

broke

into

table,

teams

table

that

setting,

the material, the phenomenal and the pragmatic

textiles, lighting, and centerpiece. The teams

by looking at the gathering of people around

worked together to construct a full-scale dining

a dining table. The montage that constitutes

room in the Goldsmith Hall loggia.

the experience of sitting at a table, eating a lois weinthal : advanced interior design studio, fa2011

edelyn putri

esra goken akdag, joanne kim, jennifer mcgowan, rachel meyer

The material accoutrements at the table such as utensils, napkin, table, chair, lighting, and views are remembered as fragments that constitute a whole. The immaterial are left in the form of a conversation, which leaves no trace except for what we remember and take with us. esra gokcen akdag, jinhyok eum, yijiao gao, mona miltenberger


WHATEVER HAPPENED TO GREAT ROOMS?

35

array of events — from lectures, to

One might measure the consequence of an architect’s work in the legacy of rooms that s/he leaves behind. Modernism changed what we understood about rooms, and consequent developments have often taken our collective focus elsewhere. In contrast, this studio focused on extraordinary rooms as a locus of meaning for the field.

meetings, to weddings. Together, the facilities and events provide opportunities to connect with old friends and make new ones. The site for the new facility was the southeast corner of 11th Street and Colorado — currently the site of a parking lot. The proximity of this site to the Texas State

Capitol,

the

Governor’s

The project is the design of a new facility

Mansion,

for a university club: a private, independent

Congress Avenue sets the stage for an engagement

organization

dedicated

historic

foundations

along

the

with the larger city as well as the Texas state government agencies. A central question to the

club is established to encourage and cultivate

studio was how a building might encourage a

free

compelling integration of the institution into

social

furthering

the

interests of the university and its alumni.  The interchange,

to

and

activity,

and

good

fellowship among alumni, faculty, staff, and

this rich community.

students of the University, and to assist and

While

promote the interests of the University and

affordability,

its alumni in Texas, and Austin in particular.

security, and durability, the focus of this

Additionally, it is intended to strengthen the

program was to design a place where public

University’s infrastructure for alumni affairs

and

and fundraising activities, while furthering the

Designs should instill a sense of pride in

University’s educational mission. The clubhouse

the University and capture the spirit of the

is also intended as the hub of an extraordinary

ambition intrinsic to the institution.

private

students

considered

sustainability,

social

occasions

issues

of

flexibility,

are

paramount.   

kevin alter, ernesto cragnolino : technical communications studio, fa2011

Contrasting qualities of place unfold along an ascending sequence of program. Exterior spaces and adjacencies of remarkable rooms elevate daily social life and the spectacle of a vibrant university club. andrew carr, brittany cooper

Modernism siphoned attention from many crucial elements of good architecture and became lost in its own myriad polemics. This project refocuses attention on one of Modernism's greatest casualties—the great room—and exploits stark contrasts as a design strategy. marisa love, jeffrey mccord, bryon pigg


The University of Texas Club provides a space that allows members to connect with fellow

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CLUB

and

taylor mcnally-anderson, tyler noblin

the

the

community,

traditions

University

of

of

Texas.

The This

unique program calls for both insular, private spaces, as well as transparent, open spaces. The building plays with the fertile ground between these two conflicting sides. The site is surrounded by three of Austin’s most iconic attributes: the Texas Capitol building to the north, the Governors Mansion to the west, and Congress Avenue to the east. To provide a strong urban presence, the building is organized vertically with a cohesive massing. The vertical organization of the building minimizes the building footprint and allows for a generous extension of the preexisting public park located to the east. The building is located on the northwest corner of the site, providing a strong corner presence, and pulls away from the Governors mansion, opening up a large visual corridor from Congress Avenue. Rather than a collection of anonymous facades, the building reinforces specific site conditions with a hierarchy of windows, creating four unique facades. The skin, comprised of precast panels, is the antithesis to the interior world of saturation. The thick, subdued exterior provides a threshold between the city and the exciting interior world of the building. The skin dissolves as it moves upward, allowing for a pool terrace and the exposure of the glass hotel block. The interior of the building is an assemblage of paths, volumes, and voids, creating a Parnassian space, where the unexpected is celebrated. Within this stimulating environment, there are distinct moments of clarity, as exhibited by the significant rooms: the great hall, the dining room, and the hotel rooms. These spaces have a large degree of exposure to the exterior, promoting visual links to the Capitol, University Tower, and the city. While the great hall and dining room are grand in size, a series of smaller spaces are attached to the main room to provide a more intimate feel. These adjacent spaces are more transparent, exposing the innards of the building to the city and providing a unique relationship of seeing and being seen. kevin alter, ernesto cragnolino : technical communications studio, fa2011

4

3

2

16'-2"

1

22'-10"

25'-6"

10'-6"

EL: 128'-6" LVL 10

HOTEL

10'-0"

EL: 118'-0" LVL 09

HOTEL

10'-0"

EL: 108'-0" LVL 08

HOTEL

19'-0"

EL: 98'-0" LVL 07

ROOF TERRACE

EL: 79'-0" LVL 06A EL: 76'-0" LVL 06

15'-0"

POOL

SPA

MASSAGE

MECHANICAL

EL: 61'-0" LVL 05

16'-0"

PROJECT

EL: 45'-0" LVL 04

0001

13'-0"

GREAT HALL

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CLUB 100 W 11TH STREET AUSTIN, TEXAS 78701

EL: 32'-0" LVL 03

CONSULTANTS

KEVIN ALTER ERNESTO CRAGNOLINO

20'-0"

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 1 UNIVERSITY STATION B7500 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78712

DESIGNERS

REAR TERRACE DINING TYLER NOBLIN TAYLOR MCNALLY-ANDERSON

12'-0"

EL: 12'-0" LVL 02

LOBBY

11TH STREET

EL: 0'-0" LVL 01 NO DESCRIPTION

10'-6"

36

members,

SCALE

1/8" = 1'-0"

PARKING

EL: - 10'-6" LVL B1

SHEET TITLE

SECTION BB SHEET NUMBER

A.202

DATE


38


40


"our landmark library : battle hall at 100" : november 11, curated by utsoa library


42

LEARNING FROM LOU Convey principles of design through understanding the relationship of geometrical compositional principles of architecture to those of music as well as social intention, using three vehicles.

it, inside and out, and another on adding new program to one of six published contemporary houses, interesting

but

non-canonical

students were challenged to design the new Ganzfoort School of Piano

After two preparatory exercises — one on the

for an aging concert pianist, using the life and

theme of designing a window and the space around

work of Louis Kahn as a model. michael benedikt : vertical studio, sp2011

The design focuses on the alignment of structure and space, using a long spanning folded plate to set the spatial and structural order of the building. A rhythm of servant and served spaces organizes the plan, providing mechanical services, programmatic support, and reflected light to the central spaces. brian doherty

rachel bullock

brian bedford

The sacred and profane are separated by a “Qibla wall,” which serves three primary functions: the threshold moment between private residence and school, a gate through which the audience must pass before concerts, and a filter eliminating the human world from view. greg montgomery


DETACHED

43

between the Greek temple, sharply

The studio explores the basic relationship between artifact and nature, figure and background, abstraction and reality. Architecture, in its primordial objectual quality, will be the “reconciling element that enables man to maintain himself in nature” (Van der Laan, 1983).

outlined against its background, and the medieval town, attached like a plant to the site on which it stands. The

brief

is

to

develop

a

retreat for Contemporary Artists as part of the Residence Programs organized

by

Casapoli

Cutlural

In his renowned "Space, Time and Architecture,"

Center in the south of Chile. Students will

Giedion condensed two possible insertions of

initially

an artificial piece in a natural setting. On

individual

the one side, he argues, the Wright’s houses

abstract and unitary object in a rural field.

“demand that we go around them if we wish to

The

work

in

pairs

and

atelier-house

studio

has

then

elaborate

proposals,

three

main

as

an

objectives,

smallest

in correspondence to three different scales:

crevices in the rocks to help bind his houses

landscape, object, and room. As an approach to

still more closely to the earth.” On the other

the landscape, the projects should negotiate the

hand, according to Giedion, “Le Corbusier does

insertion of an artificial piece in a natural

exactly the opposite.” “The city-dweller for

setting based on the definition of its identity

whom it was designed wanted to look out over

ad presence. As objects, the proposals should

the countryside rather than to be set down among

define precise criteria of autonomy or continuity

trees and shrubbery. He wanted to enjoy the

between

view, the breezes, and the sun — to experience

specific

that unhurried natural freedom which his work

rooms, the inner spaces of the buildings should

deprived him of. This is another instance of

have a clear atmosphere in accordance to their

two eternally opposed responses to nature: a

domestic

contemporary

careful constructive and detailing decisions.

understand

their

formation,”

reflection

of

“the

the

difference

interior site

and

and

exterior

conditions

productive

and

according

to

activities.

As

character

through

mauricio pezo, sofia von ellrichshausen : advanced studio, sp2011

The artist’s residence is designed to have a direct relationship with the river and forest to its front and back. The split interior provides living and working space and both open to a raised court on either side that extends into the landscape. daniel shumaker

An exercise in radical simplicity, the project explores the possibility that a thickened wall could provide both ample shelter and a framework for understanding one’s place in the landscape. jeremy babel

Tall walls enclose and delineate three trees from an allée. Within these walls, architecture and landscape compete. At moments architecture controls, at others it bends, and at still others it respectfully frames. diana su Working from spatial and scalar organizing principles of the cell, court, and domain, the organization of the artist’s residence acts as a lens by which patterns of use could expose routines of occupation. The central studio requires users to move through and engage the space; it can no longer act as a retreat. andrew fulcher


44

MOD RECYCLING The greenest building is often the one that already exists. Given the vast number of existing buildings and the perceived or real need to make them more sustainable, the real challenge is in making necessary modifications or alterations while maintaining the value of the original structure.

and documentation of the existing Physical the

Plant

framework

building for

the

to

set

design

exploration. A course

parallel was

to

understanding

goal foster

of

the

of a

the

better

particular

nature of buildings from the postwar years into the 1970s, when

architects

advancements in technology combined with a new

and designers face in rehabilitating existing

reading of spatial relations produced buildings

structures for renovations, adaptive reuse, and

that were both highly systematic and original.

The

studio

examined

challenges

preservation. The program focused on adapting

During the semester the class took a field

a mid-century modern structure for a new use,

trip to Houston to view a variety of modern

while maintaining the original architectural

buildings, including the 1951 de Menil house

integrity of the building. This hypothetical

designed by Philip Johnson, and Mies Van der

study utilized the 1960s Physical Plant building

Rohe’s additions to the Museum of Fine Arts

at St. Edwards University. Students had a choice

and various buildings on the St. Thomas and

of two different scenarios: 1) adaptation for

Rice University campuses. As a corollary to the

a student center or 2) adaptation for a non-

design problem, a select group of significant

sectarian

modern buildings, both regional and national,

campus

chapel.

In

both

cases

the

programs required an addition to the existing

were identified for study and analysis.

structure. The studio began with an analysis david bucek, william stern : advanced studio, fa2011

Effective reuse depends on an effective program and landscape reconsideration. This university mechanical building becomes a theology reading room and chapel that frames an outdoor lap pool. jeffrey blocksidge

With a focus on implied exterior space and contrast from interior to exterior, the existing structure is modified transforming the building and larger landscape from utilitarian support to sacred chapel. kendra locklear


FLATBED STUDIO

45

When designing within a transitional urban context, how can site, program, and materials intersect in a meaningful way to drive the design process? And how does this process impact the outcome?

covered This

gathering/viewing

project

expanded

space.

upon

the

previous investigations, but with the

introduction

program

and

of

site.

a

specific

The

last

project was a new studio space

This semester we used the notion of “intersection”

for

to move through a series of projects, with a

studio, supplemental art studios for visiting

strong focus on the intersection of architecture

artists, gallery space, gathering space, and

with

like

other support facilities. While each project

architecture, involves a very specific process

was discrete, they all reinforced and built upon

of making. And, as with digital fabrication,

one another.

the

visual

arts.

Printmaking,

Flatbed

Press,

including

a

printmaking

printmaking allows for repetition so that one

Additionally, the studio functioned as a

may produce a quantity of multiples that are

lesson in making. As stated by Sanda Iliescu,

more affordable than original high priced art.

“To make means to imagine and design; it also

Whether

means to research and analyze. Making engages

art

or

architecture,

the

material,

technique, and process greatly impact the final

our

product.

Making something as small as a pencil sketch

minds,

bodies,

and

all

of

our

senses.

The semester was divided into three parts.

or as large as a building is a dynamic process.

The first part was comprised of a series of four

Like music or dance, it takes time and often

short exercises about space making and image

requires many interrelated steps.” This was the

making, addressing issues of mass, form, light,

underlying philosophy of the studio. While there

color,

were specific projects on which we focused, the

view,

emphasizing

and how

dimensional the

process

translation, affects

the

outcomes. The second part was the design of a

process was always as important as the final models and drawings — a dynamic process. joyce rosner : vertical studio, sp2011

Monolithic concrete construction blurs the line between structure, skin, fenestration, and work surface. brittany cooper

The context required that the architecture be thought of as a specific and active response — establishing itself within a particular, yet changing, dynamic while maintaining a certain autonomous coherence. cameron kraus todd ferry


Located on the south bank of Austin's Town Lake, this design was for a viewing platform off 46

ILLUMINATING VIEW kate bedford

of

an

existing

urban

lake-

front trail. Moment diagrams explore

user

experiences,

paying close attention to the edge condition where the water meets the land. Site analysis through mapping and research led to an interest in the ambient glow of the city present at night. Currently, the trail is least used during the nighttime due to safety concerns. The proposed viewing platform envelopes a secondary path, which cascades towards the water. The form acts as a sculptural element with its surfaces specifically angled for illumination by the city’s nightlight. The planes reflect the light upward towards the existing trail. By using the light in this way, the intervention aims to increase the perception of safety for the trail’s nighttime users. Relief section watercolor drawings are used to study the perspective from various points of elevation within the intervention, designed to give the user a diverse and meaningful experience of the edge. The illuminated wall at the trail level serves to invite users down to experience the city’s ambient glow. joyce rosner : vertical studio, sp2011


PUBLIC INTEREST DESIGN

48

FIVE MILE FARMS PROJECT shelby blessing, conner bryan, alan bush, kyle engoian, tyler harris, kaziah haviland, carrie joynton, joe junius, jason minter, john paul rysavy, michelle strick

SHED (+) danica adams, emily mcmillan, chris murton, annie palone, natalie thomas, bea vithayathawornwong

In June 2011, the UTSOA, in an award-winning

The summer course engaged an asset-based

collaboration with Design Corps, offered the

design

first

summer

communities’ needs and problems, asset-based

course series which took place in Austin, TX,

design focuses on the positive assets, skills,

which connected advanced students interested

and capacities of communities in order to allow

Public

Interest

Design

(PID)

approach.

Rather

than

focusing

on

in the built environment and public service

residents to become active participants in the

with leading practitioners in public design.

design process. Students learned that during the

An

by

process, in order to create truly important,

including

influential, and meaningful projects, there must

interdisciplinary

students

from

approach

diverse

was

backgrounds

taken

architecture, landscape architecture, planning,

be an ongoing dialogue with and participation

geography, political science, policy studies,

of community members, allowing them to voice

and

undergraduate

concerns and give constructive feedback. This

students from UT-Austin were joined by students

collaborative process empowers others through

from schools including Harvard, Georgia Tech,

design;

Wisconsin, Syracuse, College of Charleston, Iowa

designers in their own right and that they too can

State, and Nebraska.

create positive change in their own environments

economics.

Graduate

and

it

shows

the

public

that

they

are


GREENING ALLEYS lauren bennett, jimena cruz, kelly heyer, stephen klimek, rob parsons, molly williams, jane winslow

HERITAGE FENCE charles amos horn, julie huynh, lindsey jones, jessi koch, michael martin

and communities. Based

on

citizen

the projects has been positively recognized by engagement

and

input,

the City of Austin, which is currently working

four projects were completed: 1)Turning Alleys

on a Greening Alley demonstration project. This

into Assets—transforming a utility space into

inaugural program is continuing in the summer

community space; 2) Heritage Fence — a fence with

of 2012 in the hopes of growing the program in

seating areas to respect the memories of place;

both its scale and scope. The 2012 program will

3) Urban Food Systems—a system of modular mobile

add a new externship option for students where

farm stand prototypes; and 4) Shed + — a modular,

they will have the opportunity to travel to San

outdoor storage unit for individual homeowners.

Francisco and work with John Peterson and the

Staff members from the City of Austin Public

San Francisco-based nonprofit he founded, Public

Works Department and Office of Sustainability

Architecture.

collaborated with the projects, offering advice and support during the process. The success of bryan bell, barbara wilson : su2011


50

A REHABILITATION CENTER FOR URBAN RAPTORS Our project was founded on two contradictions — the site is now an urban wilderness that had previously been an established neighborhood; and the clients are birds of prey (the facility will rehabilitate them to enable them to kill other creatures).

Break room : 150 sf Conference room : 500 sf (possible views of flight cages) SERVICE : (access to Rehab and Cages) Freezer : 100 sf Food storage : 300 sf

REHABILITATION CENTER :

Food “ranch” : 300 sf

(protected area)

Food preparation : 100 sf

Rescue check-in : 150 sf

Garbage : 100 sf

(public interface, near administration) SUBTOTAL : 3800 sf

Treatment room : 150 sf (access by staff, volunteer med techs, vets) Intensive care unit : 500 sf

CAGES :

(staff access, small cages for treated birds)

(part of public face but highly restricted

Orphan care/Intensive care unit : 500 sf

access)

(same but for infants)

Flight cages (2) : min. 10,000 sf

Staff restroom : 150 sf

(flight training with secluded viewing for selected members of public)

ADMINISTRATION :

Acclimation cages (5) : 450 sf

(views of most of complex part of public face)

(living outside but with restricted flight)

Private offices (2) : 300 sf Open office space/Storage : 500 sf

TOTAL : 14,250 sf larry doll : design five, fa2011

In a context that required a unique dialogue between urbanity and fragility, the design ensured that a relationship be established with the public domain, while simultaneously maintaining the privacy necessary to rehabilitate birds of prey. jameson galbreath

Just the birds and the workers, that's it. Learning how to deal with denying access to the public was the most challenging aspect of this course. megan mowry

madison dahl


IN TRANSITION : ADAPTATION IN TIME + SPACE

51

strategies for Bastrop Children’s

As evolution and change are necessary in broad cultural terms as well in the lives of individuals, can architecture respond or even embrace such change? How can design play an integral role in facilitating mental and physical therapy as well as in the possible reality of future outer space colonization?

Advocacy legal for

Center,

and

which

provides

psychological

children

who

have

support endured

abuse, creating an improved, more meaningful

transition

for

the

children and their families.  The

final

studio

project

departed from the immediate and local

into

a

speculative

and

new

visionary realm.  As scientists and astronomers

frontier.  An argument can be made that true

speculate upon the possibility that planet earth

sustainability may be measured by flexibility

may be uninhabitable for humans in the distant

and the potential for adaptation. 

The most

future, there exists the need to consider what

successful

fact

actions may be required to sustain human life. 

Mankind

is

constantly

designs

embarking

embrace

upon

this

a

by

transcending trends while also capturing the

An Urban Space Transition Center is conceived

current zeitgeist in nuanced ways.  Thus, the

as a facility in downtown Austin, designed to

role of the designer is complex yet rich, which

accommodate a nine-month physical and mental

is

training transition for civilians for pre- and

underlined

“Architects

by

Norman

design

for

Foster’s the

statement:

present,

while

post-space travel. 

The facility consists of

considering the past, for a future which is

various physical training apparatuses, which

essentially unknown.”  The studio explores ways

prepare the body for changes in gravity levels,

in design plays a role in a rapidly changing

as well as mental training facilities to prepare

world and particularly ways in which design

travelers

for

directly addresses and even influences states

relative

social

of transition.

intended to mark a meaningful transition in the

The

first

assigned

studio

project

took

changes

in

solitude.

light, Designs

sound,

and

were

thus

scope of mankind.

on a powerful transition by offering design matt fajkus : vertical studio, fa2011 The Center's diagrid structure accommodates broad psychological and physical experiences necessary for training. Fostering a civic experience celebrating space, non-training visitors never encounter a door along the journey from ground floor galleries to the top floor education deck. nicholas allinder

Design must create familiarity between the mind and the vastness of space as we move toward the inhabitation of space. molly purnell

An architecture suited to human movement can attenuate the physical / psychological stresses of space travel. Importance was placed on contrasting sunlight and darkness, as well as the expression of enclosure and modularity. benjamin morris

Continuous Synthetic is based on the idea of continuous space and the synthetic environment necessary for space travel. The building mitigates the experience between space and earth and allows the public to have a similar experience to astronauts. monica sanga


The

recent

emergence

of

a

new industry, space tourism, demands an architecture for 52

SPACE TRANSITION CENTER andrew green

which we have no precedent. Considering the potential for architecture both to inspire the future and connect to the

present, this project is meant to imagine the consequences of the industry and define a new iconography which responds to those consequences. upLIFTING : 1: to lift up: elevate; especially, to cause to rise above adjacent areas 2: to improve the spiritual, social, or intellectual condition of In space travel, the physical transition from familiar to unfamiliar, and vice versa, is characterized by an immediacy that enhances the inherent contrast between our world and universe. As civilian space travel becomes more common, philosophical and theological evaluation of our perceived significance will captivate society. This two-part project encourages and uplifts space travelers before and after their adventure. URBAN : The Urban Training Facility focuses on the physical and perceptual aspect of uplifting. The building sits on a 25-foot by 125-foot site in downtown Austin. Here, travelers will prepare for the physical and mental demands they will soon encounter. Progression through the building is a metaphor for space travel. From the street, a massive block levitates thirty feet in the air, visually supported by nothing but a glass facade. A long, narrow entry portal funnels visitors from the open street to a tight, individual threshold at the other end. Inside, a vast atrium expands vertically in the positive and negative directions. Cut from the floor, a seemingly endless abyss falls forever into the darkness. Directly above, a deceptive light feature refuses to define an upper limit to the space. The entire building circulates through this atrium, and every level is connected to its infinite vertical extensions. REMOTE : The Remote Recovery Center focuses on the philosophical, spiritual, and intellectual aspects of uplifting. A shared dining facility and collection of individual living pods radiate from the site’s southeast corner near Spaceport America in the New Mexico desert. These facilities house returned travelers as they transition from the infinite to the finite and reconcile a new understanding of our place in the universe. Each pod provides the necessities of functional life on the ground floor, while the mezzanine is reserved for writing, meditation, and observation. matt fajkus : vertical studio, fa2011


54


"low close vast" : oct 21 music in architecture symposium


56

TOMS DESIGN STUDIO – A NEW RETAIL MODEL What is the physical manifestation of a new retail model that reflects today’s ethically concerned customer?

can help prevent them. The company is not only concerned with giving but also education regarding the importance of wearing shoes. As a relatively newcomer to the world

TOMS, which is derived from the word “tomorrow,"

of retail, TOMS is part of a developing trend

is a footwear company that was established in

toward conscious consumerism, where customers

2006 and sells shoes designed in the spirit

make “positive” purchases in favor of less

of the traditional South American “alpargata."

ethical

Founded by Blake Mycoski, an entrepreneur with

clothing line are only available for purchase

Texas roots, the company is based upon a new

online or through other retailers. This studio

business model called “ONE FOR ONE." For every

focused on comprehension and analysis of the

pair of shoes sold, TOMS donates a new pair of

TOMS brand, its core values that have led to the

shoes to a child in need. According to TOMS,

company’s success, current retail trends, and

there are over one billion people at risk of soil-

how this knowledge could play a role in shaping

transmitted diseases around the world, and shoes

the future of TOMS as a new retail experience.

choices.

Presently,

TOMS

shoes

and

tamie glass : advanced interior design studio, sp2011

The new retail model hinges on the idea of “curated retail.” This relieves customers of discerning between green-washed and authentic goods through trusted shop-owners who use their retail spaces as an opportunity to educate and to introduce alternatives to the mainstream market. sarah miracle

alix bulleit The design uses smart, sustainable, “green” building materials and ideas while developing a space that fits the client’s image, brand, and goals for a new flagship retail space. heather wright


LIBRARY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY The book as a traditional source of information is now one piece within a rapidly expanding network of accessible information. Concurrently, the spaces generally associated with the access and storing of books are changing too as a result of digital influences. Information can now be accessed anywhere, from our computers, from our cell phones, What implications does this have on the traditional library?

57

in

navigating

and

analyzing

tremendous amounts of information with a variety of digital tools. So

as

to

avoid

becoming

obsolete, what happens with the leftover

square

footage

that

once belonged to a purely analog system? The library is a civic building. It is physical, and it has place in a community. There is an opportunity to expand the interface of the library with its

a

users in both a physical and digital sense.

collection of sources, resources, and services,

Roles traditionally defined outside the scope

and the structure in which it is housed; it is

of the traditional library become necessary in

organized for use and maintained by a public

order to encourage public participation.

The

Wikipedia

definition

of

“Library�:

body, an institution, or a private individual.

This project specifically asks the students

In the more traditional sense, a library is a

to develop an understanding and attitude about

collection of books.

a small building with a civic identity located being

in a changing community. The program is for

redefined as places to find unrestricted access

a branch/neighborhood library. While serving

to information in many formats and from many

a traditionally defined role, there resides

sources.

services

in the program an opportunity to explore and

beyond the physical walls of a building, by

investigate the potential for the program to

offering

respond to evolving needs and uses.

Modern

libraries

Libraries material

are

increasingly

are

extending

through

electronic

means,

and by providing the assistance of librarians john blood (coordinator), elizabeth danze, sarah gamble, juan miro, peter raab : design three, fa2011 In order to attain a small footprint, an Automated Library System was utilized. This ALS system can reduce the traditional stack footprint by up to 85%. Therefore over 4,000 square feet were given back to the site in the form of green space. clifton harness

jessica glennie

By creating architectural elements such as book-shelved walls, my design turns a visit to the library into an engaging experience of discovery. elizabeth le blanc

john bodkin

Iterative diagramming guided the design process of spatial arrangement and choosing significant moments within the site. I focused on the entry moment and how light might play a dramatic role in defining loosely-configured space. victoria carpenter


58

DESIGNING FOR DIABETES HEALTH AND WELLNESS within the surrounding community.

How can interior design positively affect the treatment and prevention of diabetes?

This

studio

was

developed

to

provide a focus on the technical integration necessary to realize a

The

Diabetes

Health

and

Wellness

Institute

successful interior design. Students

at Juanita J. Craft Recreation Center is the

followed

a

rigorous

agenda

of

result of collaboration between the City of

site analysis, program development, barrier-

Dallas Park and Recreation Department and the

free

Baylor Healthcare Southern Sector Healthcare

specification,

Initiative. It’s designed to treat and prevent

detailing.

diabetes

design, In

systems

integration,

construction addition

to

materials

documents, technical

and

aspects

diagnosis,

of the studio, students explored the elements

treatment, education, and physical activity.

of spatial volume, tactile surface, light, and

Seamless

Wellness

materials. Throughout the semester, students

Program and Recreation Center allows the two to

worked with professionals from Perkins + Will,

coexist and support each other while maintaining

Dallas—the actual architects/designers of the

and

facility — to develop their design proposals.

holistically interaction

expanding

the

through between

existing

the

facility’s

role

carl matthews : interior design six, sp2011

Just as Juanita J. Craft provided unity and hope for her community through her life, so this center shines as a beacon of hope to revitalize the community. mona miltenberger

The health and wellness center translates ideas related to community through an elliptical architectural addition and the aggregation of juxtaposing forms, materials, and programs at the core of the pre-existing building. rachel sackinger


COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE CENTER IN QUITO, ECUADOR Rather than to believe in complexity as the goal of an architectural design, the studio explored profound aspects of the day-to-day as encountered in the building type of a health care facility for Quito, Ecuador. This insight was gained by all, including the instructor, with the studio’s visit to Quito.

59

those unable to travel to these, or for whom a large hospital is an

additional

psychological

threshold that they would rather not

cross,

unless

absolutely

necessary, a proactive visit to a health facility that might have taken care of an acute or hidden illness is often foregone.

and

The task of the studio was to design a

agreeable health care facilities in residential

community health care facility to be located in

neighborhoods are essential in ensuring that the

Quito, Ecuador.

Comprehensive,

convenient,

accessible,

general standard of health amongst a population

Ecuador and Quito were chosen because these

is at a high level. While Ecuador has seen

offer seemingly unusual contexts for what are

major advances in the provision of primary and

universal issues: the integration of a public

secondary educational facilities, it lacks in

facility in a grown context — UNESCO World

the provision of primary health care. Amongst the

Heritage Downtown — which requires a high design

population, there is a preference for hospitals

standard to be reached in order for the facility

for

to operate effectively and successfully. 

their

higher

standards

of

hygiene.

For

wilfried wang : advanced studio, fa2011 katherine russett

The challenge of responding to the pervasive need to amend deficiencies in health care, cultural alienation, and architectural quality in rural and third world communities is the primary focus in the design of the Quito Health Center . phil zimmerman

The design strategy facilitates a health services generator into the historical urban context and responds to medical demands of local communities. The goal is to cure patients not only physically but also psychologically through their experience of the medical facilities. gordon lee travis avery


Quito

is

Ecuador’s

high-

altitude capital located in a valley between two mountain 60

COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE CENTER beau frail

ranges,

whose

physical

barriers have shaped the city’s axial growth. Emerging at the southern periphery of Quito is

a community of social housing known as Quitumbe. This planned community of perimeter blocks currently has an incomplete identity and lacks public service space. Introducing a “Centro de Salud” will establish a precedent for developing public spaces and give Quitumbe’s residents access to local and accessible health care, which is a national challenge for Ecuador. The central site of the health care center mediates between the more orthogonal world of housing and public buildings to the east and the natural edge of the stream to the west. The building’s geometry arises from the interface between the orthogonal and natural while the inner spaces are organized around the psychology of experience sculpted from the exchange between patient and healer. Quitumbe has a growing, young population with many mothers and children; thirty percent of children in Quito live in the district of Quitumbe. Malnutrition is an especially pressing health challenge for city dwellers since access to fresh food and acquiring the knowledge to prepare healthy meals proves to be difficult in urban settings. A program combatting malnutrition, “Nourish Ecuador,” found that fifty-eight percent of children under age five in Quitumbe suffer from anemia in some way. Quitumbe is located on a former agrarian site where any form of agriculture is ad hoc and not premeditated. The health center reintroduces healthy eating and living by becoming an urban farm. The courtyard is a terrace of productive plants that can be grown by the residents and used in the healthcare center’s cafeteria for consumption and demonstrations. Rammed earth was chosen as a building material because of its low embodied energy and its ability to give the building a direct connection to the landscape. Throughout the health care center murals are embedded into the rammed earth walls in public spaces, which display healthy living/eating and also display an ideal interaction between patients and healers. These visually didactic tools encourage empowerment and responsibility for being in charge of one’s own health. The presence of a healt hcare center, which operates as a cultural meeting place at the heart of Quitumbe, has the ability to create a healthy and vigorous identity for its residents. wilfried wang : advanced studio, fa2011


COLLABORATION STUDIO

62

Moscow’s public realm is in the midst of a

translucent curtain, while re-energizing its

disfiguring transformation. Over the last two

once great cinematic experience. The curtain,

decades, the city’s precious urban spaces have

which adapts and responds to Moscow’s extreme

been enveloped rapidly by corporate branding

climate conditions, is entirely suspended from

and media sponsorship. Changing the face of the

a new public rooftop park, restoring the entire

marred Pushkinsky Cinema is an ideal moment to

footprint of the theater to the public domain of

re-examine a memory of the once iconic building,

the Boulevard Ring.

its urban presence within the public Boulevard Ring

Park,

palace

and

for

its

the

role

Moscow

as

a

contemporary

International

Film

Made of strands of woven Kevlar® fibers, the curtain acts as a brise-soleil during the summer to provide shade while allowing air to circulate

Festival. Destructive billboards now mask many

throughout the cinema’s raised gallery. During the

of Moscow’s most historic buildings, including

coldest months of the year, moisture accumulated

Barkhin’s neighboring Izvestia building. The

within the curtain’s cords freezes, transforming

proposed

the once lightweight façade into a solid barrier

new

face

of

the

Pushkinsky

Cinema

will invoke a memory of the building’s iconic

against

silhouette, filtering it through a neutralizing

the theater’s gallery from Moscow’s freezing

the

wind,

protecting

moviegoers

on


winter weather. Integrated into these hanging

offer outdoor seating for their guests. The

Kevlar cords are clusters of fiber optics, which

theater now preferences full pedestrian access

passively transfer light from the roof to the

from the park, as well as direct access from

level of the street, illuminating the pedestrian

the adjacent Metro station, with its new main

zone beneath the curtain and acting as a new

entrance

marquee for the movie theater inside.

this new face, a series of fully public exterior

located

along

the

Boulevard.

Along

The vehicular street that once disconnected

elevators, highlighted by red SentryGlasÂŽ, allow

the cinema from the adjacent Pushkin Square, as

guests without tickets to ascend within and above

well as the bridge required to cross it, have

the curtain to take full advantage of the newly

been removed. The park now flows uninterrupted

elevated public park above the cinema, offering

up to and around the theater’s curtain, allowing

a unique and unobstructed view of the surrounding

restaurants and cafes on the ground level to

cityscape.

joseph boyle, brian rome, jonathan schwartz, alexer taganas : independent studio, sp2011 critics: kevin alter, francisco gomes


64

INTERVENE task faced by society to determine

The fading value of a series of modern residence halls may be mitigated by reconceiving their meaning and purpose — effectively renewing worth through preservation and evolution. Architects, interior designers, and preservationists may collaborate and foster this archive and museum studies laboratory.

the value and future of aging midcentury

modern

buildings

to critically assess the Trinity site and buildings. Consideration was

given

that

to

brought

the

circumstances

them

longevity

their

materials

quarry that divides the upper academic campus

potential

future,

and the lower residential campus of Trinity

define their historical importance.

buildings

and

their

grounds

and

of

systems,

the

into

being,

their current state including the

Distinctly sited at the edge of a long-forgotten

University,

across

the country, the studio attempted

construction

detailing,

ultimately

and

their

attempting

to

The inclusive studio sought to parallel

offer a long-range prospect south of downtown

contemporary

San Antonio. Designed by O’Neil Ford between 1950

the particular but complementary objectives and

and 1962, they are noted for their innovative

skills of architects, interior designers, and

lift-slab construction, consequent horizontal

preservationists. Acknowledging that buildings

orientation,

height.

rarely come into being through the efforts of an

In giving the new program this site and these

isolated individual, students explored how the

buildings, the university hoped to express the

combined efforts of an interdisciplinary team of

importance of the new museum, archive, school,

professionals might result in a strong, multi-

and

academic

faceted, design and building “intervention."

community but also to the city of San Antonio and

Undergraduate and graduate students worked in

the art world in general.

teams of three, each bringing their individual

and

laboratory,

Acknowledging

low

not

the

floor-to-floor

only

to

the

formidable,

real-world

design

practice

by

integrating

skills and perspective to the problem at hand.

kim furlong, assisted by fran gale : advanced studio, sp2011

Our intervention maintains the distinguishing characteristics of these archetypal modern buildings—linear slabs and curtain walls—while incorporating elevated corridors for artwork transport and slab incisions for taller, interior workspaces. emily effland, elise king, emily ray

Using a gradient of values (historic integrity, etc.), exterior fabric was largely preserved while additions drew from characteristics of the historic buildings: transparency, standardization, planar surfaces, and a visual utilization of environs. thomas garcia, amalia leifeste, justin oscilowski

In order to effect the drastic changes called for by the program, our approach led us to alter O’Neil Ford’s buildings from within and below while maintaining their original exterior form. erin brown, andrea hamilton


THE IMMERSIVE INTERIOR

65

client-given content (continuity,

The studio considers fashion and interior design as intersecting practices and frames the retail environment as one in which form, color, lighting, and material are synthesized into a fully immersive experience. In that context, how can the contemporary interior be tailored by considering atmosphere not only as an outcome but also a starting point in the design process?

contrast, sion,

amplification,

redefinition,

exten-

etc.)

and

examined how one’s design work can be in dialogue (and perhaps even debate!) with that from another creative

field.

difference

What

between

is

the

inspiration,

interpretation, appropriation, and simply knocking off? The

studio

consisted

of

The studio considered the notion of immersion

a series of focused weekly assignments. The

as operative to the design, construction, and

final

experience

immersing

demonstrated each student’s ability to frame,

ourselves deeply into the culture of the design

synthesize, further develop, and finally present,

studio, we investigated ways in which design

at a high level of finish, these assignments as a

techniques — digital, analog, two-dimensional,

cohesive and personally processed body of work.

three-dimensional, conventional, experimental —

The final project is sited in the historic mid-

produce spatial effects (as well as subjective

century Starr Building at the southeast corner

affects). Keeping in mind the legacy of decoration

of West 6th and Colorado streets in downtown

in interior design, we considered the various

Austin. Currently home to the advertising firm

roles that pattern geometries play in relation

McGarrah Jesse, the building’s interiors were

to material tectonics, spatial organization, and

originally

surface ornamentation.

building was recently renovated and its ground-

of

Throughout

interior

the

space.

semester,

By

we

project,

a

flagship

designed

by

fashion

Florence

boutique,

Knoll.

The

researched

level commercial spaces are still vacant. Our

various aspects of fashion from the bodies of

studio hypothetically takes over approximately

work by specific designers to the branded spaces of

fashion

retail.

We

considered

different

strategies that an interior space may relate to its

2,200 sf of the space with a storefront facing West 6th Street. igor siddiqui : interior design four, sp2011

dylan draves

I worked mostly with the ideas of transformation of spaces, how volumes can make space, and the idea of clothes and objects being hidden from you until you discover them. kristin amundsen


This focused

design on

the

studio

was

development

of the brand of up-and-coming 66

FLAGSHIP FASHION BOUTIQUE rose wilkowski

fashion designer Duro Olowu. We began by looking at the designer's latest collections and designed a wallpaper drawn

from concepts and patterns found in his clothes. The wallpaper was rendered into three different spaces using Photoshop as a marketing tool. From the wallpaper, we developed a wall, a 3-D object that could identify the fashion designer to the public. The form of the wall was derived from the pattern and visual effect of the wallpaper. The next step in the brand development of Duro Olowu was the design of a volume or pop-up-shop. The pop-up-shop is a small facility that would be inserted into a larger retail space and includes one dressing room, display and storage for clothes, seating, and a cash wrap. The form of the volume reflects the concept of piecing the clothes together, commonly seen in Olowu's collections, and also reflects the pattern frequently used in his Spring 2010 line. The semester-long process, spent developing the brand of the young fashion designer, Duro Olowu, culminated with the design of his flagship retail boutique in downtown Austin, Texas. The programmatic requirements of the boutique included display space and storage for clothes, four dressing rooms, a cash wrap, a restroom, an office/conference room, a utility closet, and seating. Textural elements from the wallpaper and wall are seen in the boutique dividing walls, while the abrupt angles of wall segments used in the volume also appear in the plan and sections of the boutique. The interior color scheme remains neutral in order to highlight Olowu's colorful fashion collections. igor siddiqui : interior design four, sp2011


68


latitudes3 symposium : march 31–april 1


70

RECLAMATION What is the designer’s role in the use of reclaimed materials throughout a broad range of project types?

aspects or conditions found in the modified

shirt

design.

Students

then remade a salvaged chair into another piece of usable furniture using only found materials. For

The course was organized into four projects to

the final project, students created hospitality

explore the topic of reclamation. Students began

suites around a pond in southeast Austin using

the semester by recreating a cotton thrift-

shipping

store shirt. Plaster casts were made of certain

material.

containers

as

the

basic

building

carl matthews : interior design five, fa2011

aurora villalpando

I took something that was inherently stiff and structured and redesigned it to evoke whimsy, movement, and texture. The organic forms are simple in construction, but when arranged repetitively, create a dynamic cluster that adds texture and depth. butool jafri

Through twisting, tying, stretching, and weaving, the tough rubber has been morphed into a lacelike screen and woven seat cover that resembles the parquet floors of Victorian design. hannah berryhill


DESIGN IN THE REALM OF SCIENCES

71

precedent.

The objective of this studio is the introduction of context. Students are introduced to the various components of the built environment and the relationships between them.

the

Students

implications

within

and

consider

of

between

context different

scales, including the intimate scales

of

the

detail

and

of

the human body, and the larger

Building on the fall semester, the spring

scales

semester further develops a foundation in

environments.

perceptual, conceptual, manual skill, and,

first understand the various components of

in addition, analytical abilities necessary

the built environment and the relationships

for subsequent design work in architecture

between

and interior design. Students begin to apply

achieved through analysis that is a process

an understanding of design within the context

of investigation by way of taking things

of the built environment. Point, line, and

apart,

plane are now understood as column, beam,

at different scales and through different

or wall, for example — or place, path, and

media.

threshold

within

through production, as a process of weaving,

through

of folding, and of multiple considerations

the

—

context

climate,

and

are

also

of

time

and

materiality,

engaged space,

perception,

and

of

building,

them

both

To

do

landscape, this,

(architectonics).

physically

Students

then

and

urban

students

and

This

must

is

conceptually,

practice

assembling

throughout the process.

smilja milovanovic-bertram (coordinator), april clark, allison gaskins, david heymann, lois weinthal : design two, sp2011

higinio turrubiates Designed in response to revealed views on the site, this birding/nature center utilizes the shape of the roof to accentuate these views, directing movement through and beyond the building. nichole markrim

By reacting to the changing conditions of the slope, the nature center intends to heighten the awareness and experience of an extremely diverse and previously inaccessible part of the site. reid joslin


Upon

visiting

the

site,

I

traveled down a path, across a

72

VANTAGE POINT AT HORNSBY BEND barron peper

meadow, and descended to where the trails met, leading to beautiful views of the river. I was intrigued not by the final meeting point of these

trails, but by the beginning of the trail, which descends down into the heavily-wooded area. The change in elevation is drastic and ideal for creating an experiential space with views looking out through the trees and over the trails, creating a sense of place and an understanding of the site. This is where I chose to locate my building. I began by designed a water catchment system that worked as a single plane, folding to channel water to one area. This segued into a steel roof design for my project that catches water but also folds over the trailhead in one continuous piece. This canopy over the trail encourages circulation and has apertures cut out and replaced with glass, allowing people to experience the building from both within and outside of the conditioned area. The views down this hill captivated me, so I emphasized those scenes in my design through large glass windows that look out and over the various levels of vegetation. After entering the main information room, the visitor has the opportunity to go through these glass doors onto the deck that is projecting out into the site. Even the conference/employee room has a large glass wall that allows the employees to enjoy the site while at work. The apertures on the trail-covering canopy gradate in size, creating an enhanced perspective when returning to the meadow, but negating the natural perspective when approaching the building. This enhances the experience of walking on the trailhead. Additionally, I wanted to make apparent to the visitor the way that the roof works. From a distance, an observer can see the roof projecting into the site and the way that it would channel water. This helped achieve clarity of purpose with my building, allowing the structure to be appreciated for its connection to the site and allowing visitors to experience the building at different scales. april clark : design two, sp2011


74

DEMONSTRATION GARDENS : POLITICS,PROSPECTS, AND PLACE-MAKING ON THE NATIONAL MALL The Mall in Washington, D.C., is iconic, yet the details of its physical form have been transformed over the years to engage an ever longer national history, changing needs of the present, and emerging perceptions of the future. In looking to the coming century and its pressing questions related to sustainability and to security, how can this landscape continue to serve as “the nation’s front lawn” and “the country’s democratic stage”?

an opportunity to learn about a topic

of

national

significance,

contribute their own ideas, and help of

shape creative

a

national

innovative

debate ideas.”

Separately, the recently released NPS Plan for the Mall calls for the updating of the Olin plan, including the replacement of the Sylvan Theatre and the addition of amenities to better serve the large number of visitors to the

of

site. The second site is Union Square, located

topics relevant to the discipline of landscape

at the eastern end of the Mall. Once the home

architecture.

studios

of the National Botanic Garden, the site is now

foster collaboration with architecture, urban

dominated by a reflecting pool created as part

design, community and regional planning, and

of the 1966 design by Skidmore, Owings, and

interior design studios.

Merrill. Both the National Park Service and the

Advanced

Design

Studios

When

examine

appropriate,

a the

range

This studio considered the redesign of two

National Capital Planning Commission call for a

locations on the Mall. The first site is the

national design competition to envision a plan

landscape of the Washington Monument. In 2003,

that would better connect the Capitol grounds

this area was redesigned by the firm of Laurie

to the Mall, improve circulation, provide a

Olin. In late 2010, a national ideas competition

platform that will reduce demand on the Mall,

was launched to “give Americans of all ages

and provide needed visitor amenities.

allan shearer : advanced landscape architecture studio, sp2011

Designs reflect social needs (function) and cultural values (form). The more specific we are about our needs and values, the higher the opportunity for integrated design. And the more integrated our designs become, the more authentic they are to our reality. agustin cepeda

The Metamorphic Socialscape conceptualizes landscape as the embodiment of a flexible government able to change based on the needs of the people. The redesigned Union Square changes in terms of program, scale, and seasonality throughout the year to meet the needs of diverse users. james yan

julie mcgilvray

veronica stephens


SPATIALITIES OF CONSTRUCTION : ENCLOSURE

75

Students

In the physical world, edges are where the action is. The consequence and value of the boundary condition is particularly true in buildings. The design challenges of contemporary buildings, in spatial, material, and technical terms, are substantially greater with regard to enclosure than structure.

the

were

asked

massing

of

to

the

accept building

and approach the design of the surrounding

apartments

and

shared spaces by beginning with the

spatial,

constructive,

and

experiential

conditions

of

enclosure

the

crusts.

built

the

The elaboration of the boundary The studio focused on the generative design

between inside and out was considered relative

potential of building enclosures, the experiences

to the recreational lifestyle of the existing

latent in the elaboration and inhabitation of

inhabitants.

crusts, and the design of threshold conditions.

The

second

project

extended

the

design

So many of the common terms used to describe

investigation of boundary conditions into an

building enclosure today — skins, envelopes,

urban environment and engaged horizontal as

membranes,

and

well as vertical crusts.

physical

and

Conceptual

dematerialization

curtains

deemphasize

material

their

characteristics. is

a

curious

The site, in the central square of Bay City, Texas, has experienced four successive

strategy to pursue for architects who design

courthouse

buildings, given that buildings are made of

city.

materials.

spatial

buildings

Students

were

organizations

over

the

life

encouraged from

to

ideas

of

the

derive

conceived

The first project undertook a redesign of

at the boundary condition between inside and

an approximately twenty-unit garden apartment

out, between public and private, and between

on Bee Creek just west of Austin. Built in 1962,

individual and collective occupation.

these apartment flats are arranged in an arc on

The project anticipates the addition of

two levels with each unit extending between the

an annex adjacent to or contiguous with the

contrasting street face and creek face of the

existing 1965 Matagorda County Courthouse. In

building. The apartments are a true community,

addition to containing a public meeting hall

with some inhabitants having lived there for

with associated support spaces, the annex houses

over thirty years.

administrative offices and records storage. francisco gomes : vertical studio, fa2011

The proliferation of "objects’"within the central square and the strategic alteration of the courthouse create a cohesive composition while maintaining hierarchy, and introducing sectional complexity and greater specificity of place within a site that is both non-descript and unwelcoming. kyle engoian

The building occupies the street edge, reshaping the ambiguous, vast space surrounding the existing courthouse into a welcoming, active public space between the two structures. nathaniel schneider

Differentiating site edges and activating outdoor spaces enhances the public realm of the existing courthouse. The support building is pulled away from the original courthouse, framing a raised courtyard between the two structures. lisa feldmann


The populace stasis in Bay City is presumably linked to a lack of adequate common urban 76

MATAGORDA COURTHOUSE ANNEX nick steshyn

space, or an environment in which a community participates as a whole. At its core, the project seeks to cultivate a

new urban environment that is designed to stimulate the present stagnant fabric by transforming the urban void into a lively and desirable public environment. Initial decisions for this project were made with emphasis on the importance of existing features and conditions of the site. The site is located at the intersection of HW-60 and I-35, the most significant intersection of infrastructure in the region. As a means of presenting the annex and addressing the intersection, the project is located in between the courthouse and this intersection at the northwest corner of the site. The north-south entry axis remains a prominent condition of the courthouse and the annex treats this circumstance as a line of sensitivity to be kept intact. The second feature is the existing ground condition. The courthouse sits atop tiered that raise it substantially from street level and allow for a lower parking garage to sit beneath. This horizontal crust inspired a unique subterranean strategy that sought to cultivate a newly activated and lively courtyard space without abusing or disregarding the existing courthouse profile. Using such an undulating scheme called for a nonholistic space. By breaking up the annex program and sinking the volumes, the annex virtually floats between the street level and subterranean. As a result, the roofscape of the programs below become the undulating landscape for the courtyard above and the diagrammatically segmented program protruding through the plinth reconnect the scalar break between the courthouse and its surrounding context. In effect, the floating roofscapes become the new contours to a previously vacuumous and unresponsive courthouse block. francisco gomes : vertical studio, fa2011


78

THOMAS C. GREEN SWIM CENTER Plant.

An understanding of how systems work independently, as well as a whole, is critical to the creation of a working building.

Swim

3rd-year

comprehensive

studio studio

is to

designed

allow

as

students

aspects

to

Center

included

acoustics,

daylighting and artificial lighting,

This

Important

explore in the design of the new

space

planning,

indoor/

a

outdoor relationships, assembly, and materiality

to

among many others. Based on energy-efficient

complete the conceptual development of a building

construction

with consideration of structural, mechanical,

Austin’s reputation as a progressive community,

electrical, and site integration needs while

the design was not limited to envelope and

simultaneously designing an exemplary work of

structure, but extended to an energy concept

architecture. This year’s studio focused on the

that made maximum use of renewable resources.

design and development of a new Swim Center for

The goal was to develop a building with aesthetic

Austin located on Lady Bird Lake.

and tectonic qualities that are reflected in

The building is located in downtown on Lady Bird Lake, across the street from the former

and

to

remain

in

keeping

with

its structural efficiency, functionality, and energy performance.

site of the Thomas C. Green Water Treatment ulrich dangel (coordinator), john blood, danelle briscoe, ernesto cragnolino : design six, sp2011

The aquatics center serves as an urban gesture to the division between city and natural context while implementing a "bands" system that allows for multiple passive environmental functions as well as a thoroughly integrated building system. charleen chae

The arched trusses link the urban edge of Austin to the Hike and Bike trail and form a subtle wave to reflect the progressive depth of the pool below. megan marvin


The synergy of conceptual and pragmatic components as a design challenge results in the creation of fluid modular patterns that allow light and passive ventilation into the 21st-century aquatic center. hector garcia-castrillo

A fluid glass roof embodies the dynamic qualities of water and connects the swim program with Town Lake, becoming a performative structure as it enables daylighting and passive ventilation in the aquatic center below. william lewis

The constructed landscape, allotted to recreational pools, draws its language into the roof-scape of the competitive pool allowing for a sectional richness that blends the realms of "work" and "play." brittany milas

lauren richter


The purpose of this project is to design a swim center for the Austin community on the shores 80

THOMAS C. GREEN SWIM CENTER kim villavicencio

of Lady Bird Lake. The lake is a venue for many outdoor sports, including water sports, and serves as a focal point for

many other activities in Austin. Surrounding the lake is the hike and bike trail, which connects the many green spaces and parks of Austin. Juxtaposed against this relaxed, oudoor-oriented space is the fast-paced atmosphere of downtown Austin. This building addresses these diverse, urban conditions that intersect at the site. A competitive lap pool is located below ground, pulling the water of the lake into and under the site. The entire south-facing façade is open to the lake, visually connecting the indoor water sports to the outdoors. The extensive landscaping, located along the west portion of the site, transitions into the occupiable roof and merges the identity of the building with the land itself. The dive tower pushes the roof of the building up to announce the swim center to the cross street, connecting it to downtown Austin. Located a level above is a leisure pool for casual visitors that overlooks the competitive zone of the swim center. A small gym, a locker room, and grandstands complete its list of amenities. This swim center accommodates many types of users. Families can enjoy the leisure pool or watch high school swimming competitions. Serious competitive swimmers have 25-meter and 25-yard lanes to practice laps, and divers can ascend the 30-meter dive tower to hone their skills. Users of the hike and bike trail still have access to the trail extension that goes over the roof. Those who work downtown have easy access to the facilities before or after work. The Thomas C. Greene Swim Center is a building that merges city, water, land, and people — a building that truly integrates into the city of Austin. john blood : design six, sp2011


82


pinhole camera image : loren muirhead vertical studio : judy birdsong


84

IDEA, FORM, AND MATTER The purpose of architecture is to connect us with reality and with ourselves. Time, matter, ideas are all elements that constitute architecture. Abstraction connects us with our minds, but it detaches us from reality. Reality imposes the concrete and the changing and we must interpret it through perception and abstraction.

to

build

in

the

become

instrumental

intensification

of

the

architectural result. The

construction

system

refers to the elements and rules of conjunction that are determined by

conditions

as

material,

of

reality,

gravity,

weather,

earthquakes,

etc.

formal

The

system

such

nature, economy, refers

We endeavor to reach a synthesis between ideas

to the elements and rules of conjunction that

and reality, through a process of abstraction

are determined by conditions of abstraction,

that

such as coherence, proportionality, geometry,

connects

us

with

reality,

and

through Our

etc. When formal and material decisions in the

objective is the definition of architectural

design process become interrelated operations,

form as a materialization of ideas. Structure and

we can obtain a specific solution that is, at

technology are incorporated from the beginning

the same time, coherent and viable (abstraction

of the architectural project. Gravity, matter,

and reality). The course thus proposes, as a

the effect of time on materials, and structural

working

forces

last

formal system with the construction system. The

minute considerations in the design process. The

filtering of elements that don’t belong to either

architectural parti that generates the guidelines

system and the use of tools like abstraction

for the architectural project derives from an

and systematization (repetition, serialization,

integral

modulation, use of the generic, standardization)

realities

and

intensified

are

starting

process

geometry

by

points

that

instead

embraces

simultaneously.

simplification

of

elements,

constructive

and

abstraction.

the

number

of

construction

Reduction of

and

materials,

actions

methodology,

the

unification

of

the

allow us to achieve an architecture that is more and more universal.

employed

josÉ marÍa sÁez, adrian moreno : advanced studio, fa2011 Water is a precious but misused resource, and our efforts to preserve it must defy convention. The physical form of the community center is directly tied to its water usage through cisterns that structurally support the building. ken dineen

The new bridge over Town Lake connects the community and provides a filter and level gauge, raising community awareness of the availability of water in Austin. raquel basilico

The aim of the project is to make citizens aware of the water shortage problem in Austin. The form of landscape and architecture depends on the level of water and changes accordingly. arman hadilou


DESIGN FOR RESILIENCE

85

climate. In the first few weeks

Design for Resilience looked at creative ways in which we can prepare our cities for a more hostile climate. The disruption of planetary air flows will bring stronger storms, longer periods of drought, colder winters, and much warmer summers. How should we design for that?

we

researched

different

cities

across the Americas, looking at historic rainfall data and urban permeability.  Moving

to

the

landscape

scale, we worked on Boggy Creek in East Austin, exploring design strategies to deal with waterways

Climate change is upon us. If there was any

that will be dry for most of the year, then

doubt about the severity of the changes, please

flooded when stronger storms come. How do we

look at the number of pipes that broke here in

plan for a resilient park that doesn’t consume

Austin when Central Texas froze for several days

excessive resources (therefore contributing to

last February. Texas has also experiencedfour

a carbon-neutral city)? This work was exhibited

billion dollars in agricultural losses as a

at City Hall from November 28th–December 3rd,

result of the current drought. Or on a much more

2011.

dramatic scale, look at the deadly mudslides

Focusing

even

more

on

the

scale

of

that happened in Southeastern Brazil in January

architecture,

after fifteen inches of rain (twice the monthly

approximately 10,000 sf with a program of medium

average) fell in twenty-four hours.

complexity: a daycare facility with the mandate

This is the scenario in which we will spend

we

designed

a

building

of carbon neutrality as a pedagogical tool.

the rest of our lives: disruption of planetary

On top of the environmental mandate, the

air flows will bring stronger storms, longer

studio also deals necessarily with the social

periods of drought, colder winters, and much

mandate.

warmer summers.

environmental crisis if we don’t tackle the

The

studio

invecreative

ways

in

which

There’s

no

way

we

can

solve

the

social crisis also.

we can prepare our cities for a more hostile fernando lara : design five, fa2011

The program, a care center with a pedagogical component, is broken into components to generate a suitable scale for teaching sensitivity toward climate and climate change to children. jorge faz

The objective of the Clifford Street Community Gardens is to take an abandoned swath of land and transform it into both a site activator and a natural water filter. greg street

The school building makes sustainable design visible as well as teachable to attending children. Furthermore, it offers ecological advantages to all of its surrounding neighborhoods such as rainwater collection and release. taylor massey


86

PARK PLAYCE The primary pedagogical intent of the project is to engage scale, both dimensional and relative, and to investigate the nature of play within its relative production and possible role within the iconic landmark area of the Barton Springs.

always

a

variety

of

design

activities

during

the

project

creation / problem

course

described as generating / refining, researching / producing, and creating / replicating. of

a

3-dimensional design exercises with emphasis

to reorganize and introduce new facilities to

on

representational

Zilker Park adjacent to the Barton Springs.

methods of production. All of the exercises are

The designs interweave a new playground with

in support of the primary project.

a wading pool, ice rink, restrooms, and train

evaluation

“four

streams”

2-dimensional

project

Children’s Facilities (Park Playce) is intended

The

both

primary

and

critical

considers

in

solving experience, some may be

The The

involved

and

of

Vertical

Studios

(ordering systems, human factors, construction, and

contexts)

are

addressed

equally

depot. The primary project considers the complexity

since

between recreational/park space and its urban

they are all required in the production of

condition through a series of objects, artifacts,

architecture. However, the “weighting” of these

and edifices, such a children's train station

categories vary depending upon the particular

and playground, children’s swim structure, and

student’s interests.

ice rink. Supporting and preliminary exercises

This project and all of its constituent

consist of site analysis and documentation, logo

exercises engage the primary design experiences

design, and children’s park train design. The

and requirements of a design professional at

exercises and projects are intended to create

a variety of scales. Whereas an architect is

elements that have an interconnected dialogue. vincent snyder : vertical studio, sp2011

Zilker Park is a culmination of exciting elements. A dynamic, flexible and playful building adds to the already diverse environment. taylor mcnally-anderson

My response is an investigation of multiplicity — of meaning, interpretation, and use — highlighting architecture as both playful and pragmatic. beth arnold

I chose to develop a gondola style train for Zilker Park to connect the spread out programs within the park together. The train becomes an interactive part of the park through changing shape in response to the people riding in it. jenna dezinski


MIST, PLAY AND FLOAT

87

Place in the designed landscape registers meaning, social processes and regional geographies.

project

in

the

second

semester

design studio. Studio participants are asked to organize a set of three

interventions

within

Introduction to Design and Visual Studies in

Austin’s beloved Zilker Park. The form of each

Landscape Architecture Two is the second of

intervention,

four core studios in the landscape architecture

shall

design sequence. The studio examines the issues,

site

theories, and methods of the designed landscape,

contexts. The three interventions are to be a

with a focus on the conceptual and technical

competition boat launch, cooling station, and an

requirements of site planning.

intergenerational play area.

respond

be

it

point,

line,

or

to

the

individual

constraints,

and

cultural

field,

programs,

and

social

"Mist, Play, and Float" is the terminal hope hasbrouck : landscape architecture two, sp2011

The fluid and fluctuating datum of vegetation, path, and water connects seemingly disparate programs, activates new areas of the park, forms the volumes of programs, and augments the existing pedestrian circulation system. jessica zarowitz

A series of sequential sectional profiles were taken along the shore’s length then abstracted by aligning the water’s edge to unveil the character of the shore. kevin sullivan

The topographic language of graben, horst, and escarpment is used to define the required programmatic areas and facilitate interactions between water and people. Three distinct landscape nodes — rock island, drainage depression, and shoreline island — provide orientation. chris murton


88

RISING STREAM To investigate Austin’s central business district emergent phenomena and develop a communitybased project to increase public activity along Shoal Creek’s corridor. These small-scale designs are meant to be serial in nature and embrace the creek’s dynamic relationship with the expanding downtown environment to advance diversity and engender a more thriving downtown community.

To

understand

ationships

through

locale,

focus

we

these a on

rel-

specific the

Shoal

Creek corridor in downtown Austin. In both ecological and cultural terms,

it’s

ecotone the

a

right

city.

rugged, in

Like

the

other

vibrant heart

of

ecotones,

this one has its own dynamic edge where

difference

aggregates,

so

that greater diversity develops, The studio focuses on the relationship that

and something new emerges. We explore these

cities offer between the nature-made and the

qualities of the creek area and its relationship

human-made artifact. On the urban scale, our

to the urban fabric as it meanders through the

generally reductionist approach often regards

central business district. We investigate its

human

conditions of connectivity, porosity, boundary,

and

ecological

processes

as

separate.

Cities indeed foster and act as a repository of

heterogeneity, and similarity.

culture, but cities are also an indicator of our

From

relationship with what is not directly made by us

strategy

humans — nature. The city as emergent phenomena

embraces its dynamic relationship within the

can

provide

expanding

an

integrated

us

with

a

dynamic

interaction,

there,

we

along

the

downtown

develop creek’s

an

intervention

corridor

environment.

that

Integrating

and

into the city’s continuing densification and

ecological processes. Looking at the city this

working with the natural forces that make the

way, as a complex whole, we begin by studying

creek what it is, the goal of the studio is

its interactive biophysical environment, which

to develop a series of public projects along

is

the corridor that adapts to an ever-changing

constantly

framework

for

undergoing

both

human

disequilibrium,

fluctuation, and change. We examine the city

urban

as a concentrated locale of energy input/output

of diversity necessary for a thriving livable

environment,

while

embracing

the

type

“flow" — open, dynamic, and variable.

downtown community. coleman coker : advanced studio, sp2011

daniel morrison Tying together the new and old fabric of Austin creates an entry point to Shoal Creek where it can then be woven into the existing conditions. ross galloway

The ecological laboratory of the creek paired with a passively designed preschool encourages urban children to grow up with an innate understanding of sustainable living strategies and the importance of our environment. johanna reed


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN : THE WALLER CREEK addition

How can green infrastructure be shaped to provide technical solutions that are also cultural expressions?

to

89

maintaining

(near)

constant stream flow during nonstorm events, it will narrow the hundred-year floodplain and allow new development on approximately

"Landscape Architectural Design" is the third of

twenty-eight acres of land. In association with

four core studios in the landscape architecture

the tunnel, a plan is being developed to re-

design

the

envision the corridor as a public amenity and

issues, methods, and theories central to the

as a locus for new development. As described

representation

in reports by public officials and statements

sequence. and

The

studio

planning

engages

of

large

scale

by stakeholders, the central concern is how

landscapes. The lower reach of Waller Creek currently

the channel corridor might be engaged and the

invasive

water experienced along its course. In addition

species, and other forms of benign neglect;

to engineering questions about the primary and

however,

secondary inlets to the tunnel and water levels

suffers

from as

erosion, a

result

pollution, of

new

flood

control

measures, there is the opportunity to re-imagine

during

this area of the central business district and

about stream bank restoration and stabilization,

storms,

there

are

technical

concerns

provide news ways to experience nature in the

water quality, and vegetation along the flood

city.

bench. Students are asked to develop a posture to

Recently, the City of Austin decided to

the idea of a managed ecosystem and, informed by

proceed with a plan to construct a one-mile

the City’s existing design goals and guidelines,

long,

develop a design.

twenty-two

foot

diameter

tunnel

to

manage the volume of water in the creek. In allan shearer : landscape architecture three, fa2011 Formalizing the metaphor of Waller Creek as Wellspring at four sites of intervention, the design concentrates a myriad of programs, flora, and path along the creek. A bosque overlays the Waller Creek District, carved out to accommodate various wellness programs. michelle bright, tim campbell, meredith entrop, jessica zarowitz

The Waller Creek Constellation envisions the 21st-century urban creek by creating centers of dense activity linked by threads of nature and path. These centers act like stars which can reorient future development. eliza bober, travis glenn, francis peterson, wen zou


Waller stream,

Creek deeply

is

an

urban

channelized,

polluted, and subject to water 90

BRAID WALLER CREEK chris murton, annie palone, kat phillips, kevin sullivan

flow extremes: during summer droughts, it is little more than a trash-filled trickle, but heavy rains can quickly swell it to flood stage. The

danger of flooding and the contamination of the creek’s water have fuelled a pervasive reluctance to invest in creek-front properties. The City of Austin and Waller Creek Conservancy hope to improve development conditions through the construction of the Waller Creek Tunnel Project, which will take creek water into a 1.5 mile–long tunnel, carrying it downstream to be mixed with water from Lady Bird Lake. With its contamination diluted, water will be piped back upstream from the Lake, resulting in an engineered creek, with improved water quality and controllable flow. The project opens twenty-six acres of floodplain property to new development, setting the stage for the stream to become a downtown amenity. The goal of the studio was to design the new Waller Creek District as a catalyst for downtown growth and to establish site designs that improve access, use, engagement, and environmental quality along the creek corridor. Context-content feedback loops are fundamental to the development of the design: analysis of the physical, social, cultural, environmental, and infrastructural context of Waller Creek ties design content to the adjacent urban landscape. The design proposes to braid the threads of movement, activity, environment, and phenomenological experience into a sustainable Waller Creek District. Just as a braid is characterized by individual strands, which intertwine to create a recognizable whole that is greater than the sum of its parts, the project creates a dynamic district from the overlapping of these threads. For example, paths at the water’s edge are built upon habitat-providing gabion structures; the aquatic vegetation that grows between these structures defines areas of rest and movement. The braid tightens and loosens in response to corridor width and is anchored by four distinct parks, which respond to increasing downtown density by capturing critical open space. Engagement with the creek is emphasized. allan shearer : landscape architecture three, fa2011


a concrete foundation, and home building can begin. Columns are often left unfinished, with steel

FORMALITY/INFORMALITY

92

jenna dezinski, todd ferry, amy freedberg, molly purnell

With increased attention in public interest design, architects are giving more consideration to informal architecture and the proliferation of informal communities around the world. Much of the difference between the formal and the informal lies in foresight. The formal is predetermined while the informal is just the opposite; it does not include the work of the architect, engineer, or planner. The informal community is built without an urban infrastructure — little to no access to sewage, trash removal, electricity, public amenities, or clean water. This research study is the culmination of theoretical, historical, and practical analyses of Los Piletones, an informal community in southern Buenos Aires, Argentina. It serves as a contribution to the complex discourse on informality in architecture, using Los Piletones as a case study for critical examination. Our focus lies on the intersection of the formal and informal as we investigate the successes and failures of a wide range of strategies for development and improvement of conditions in the community.

rebar sticking out of their tops — an acknowledgement of additional stories

to

come.

While

this

process of building allows many of the housing needs to be met, the absence of design before building almost ensures that problems will arise. The economic crash toward the end of the twentieth century led to an increase in the population of informal communities in Argentina. In addition, the city of Buenos Aires lost much of its industrial activity, people

leaving

without

thousands

work

and

of thus

unable to maintain their economic status. This, along with a new wave of

immigrants

from

neighboring

countries as well as from within Argentina

to

Buenos

Aires,

led

to numerous informal settlements within the fabric of the city and on its outskirts. The villa — the Argentinian term for a slum — of Los Piletones began its settlement in 1984 in the southern half of Buenos Aires on one of these tracts of land along the main highway that divides the city. The community sits on two man-made piletones (or

Starting in the middle of the twentieth century,

small pools), bordered to the north by a lake

mass

most

that once regulated the city’s water system and

widespread response to the issue of housing

is now a polluted wetland area. Before people

the poor, located far from the valuable land in

inhabited the land on which the community is now

the well-developed economic center of the city.

built, the piletones helped regulate overflow

At this time, the notion of social housing and

from the highly contaminated Riachuelo river,

housing

blocks

emerged

as

the

mass housing were interchangeable. As it became apparent that a mass housing solution would not produce the desired results because informal communities continued to materialize, academics began to turn back to the informal framework itself to study the needs of the people. The informal home was found to be not an eyesore but an object of relational value between the owner/ builder, the material, the land, and the final built object. Although

informality

can

often

appear

sporadic and without reason, there is a logic behind

the

building

process.

The

squatter

obtains land by first setting up a tent structure surrounded by a fence. This precarious state is followed by a more sturdy shack built of more

durable

materials,

such

as

wood

and

corrugated metal. Eventually the squatter builds

INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS, BUENOS AIRES LOS PILETONES, VILLA SOLDATI


while the lake served as an intake for the city’s

to be “the producer of their own habitable space”

liquid waste. As such, the soil, air, and water

by accommodating variation and individualization

at Los Piletones have always been, and remain,

based on the dweller’s desires and needs. Projects

highly polluted. In 1996, community members of

by Ana Elvira Velez in Colombia suggest a shift

Los Piletones organized themselves and achieved

in understanding about where housing for the poor

recognition from the city government as a villa.

is best located, and from this, a shift in the

While this designation did not grant Los Piletones

role these projects play in the urban, economic,

legal

neighborhood

status,

it

served

as

an

and cultural fabric of the city. Velez’s project,

important step in the process of development, as

Urbanización La Playa, was built in the center

it made possible the establishment of utilities

of the city on land leftover from the demolition

in the community and land tenure for those who

of a textile factory. Another of Velez’s social

lived there.

housing projects, Urbanización Caña—veral, sits close to the cable car that brings people into and out of the city during the day, as well as trash out of the community at night. No longer are the urban poor relocated to where they will not be seen. These recent projects highlight the intersection of the formal and the informal and offer new visions for how that intersection may be addressed. They place the architect in unfamiliar territory. In engaging in the discourse on informality, we are confronted with questions: Have architects acknowledged their changing roles in informality? Will the presence of the informal within the formal grid be accepted as the status quo? Now that the architect, the developer, the government official can wear a number of hats in the future of the informal community, the collaboration of the community itself seems imperative. We

madres de plaza de mayo prosur fundacion margarita barrientos basic initiative

The

role

of

the

and as

use

the a

the

community

various

means

to

of

projects analyze

Los

Piletones

underway

critically

there several

different methodologies of working in informal architect

in

informal

communities.

A

number

of

organizations

have

to

established themselves as participants in the

collaboration. New ways of thinking about the

continued development of Los Piletones. With

development of informal communities pinpoint

distinct methods, goals, and relationships with

and

bureaucratic

the community, these organizations offer a range

issues as well as inherent design problems. Some

of strategies for addressing the challenges and

architectural interventions, such as the Brasil

possibilities within an informal community like

44 project in Mexico and the Teatina-Quinta

Los Piletones. In looking critically at these

Shelter in Peru, utilize typical local housing

organizations, the work presented in this study

typologies for social housing. The Brasil 44

offers a new method of discussing an increasingly

project redeveloped a typical courtyard-style

important

building with a number of surrounding low income

challenge.

communities

seek

apartments,

is

to

shifting

resolve

while

from

imposition

specific

maintaining

a

storefront

presence to create economic opportunity. The Teatina-Quinta Shelter combines an indigenous construction technique called quincha with the design of a vernacular ventilation shaft called a teatina. The resulting design is used as relief housing for victims of Peruvian earthquakes. Both the Teatina-Quinta project and the social housing of ELEMENTAL in Chile rely on a userbuilt model and take into consideration readily available,

affordable

materials.

The

Quinta

Monroy housing of ELEMENTAL allows the dweller

architectural

subject

and

spatial

93


MADRES DE PLAZA DE MAYO : La

Asociación

Plaza 94

de

Mayo

Madres has

help residents establish tenure. Prosur adds

abandoned

formality to Los Piletones in order to improve

addressing

what

favor

presenting

it

of

believes

exists

should

formalizing street names and house numbers to de in what

be;

living conditions, while maintaining some of the spirit of the community as it has developed.

its

Prosur’s work in Los Piletones provides

work is classified in this study as a formal

a rich example of approaches that are being

approach. The organization is responsible for

employed by architects in informal communities.

the construction of a new housing development

The

at the southwestern edge of Los Piletones, which

threaten

began construction in 2007 and which employs

fact that it is a government organization means

many residents of Los Piletones. The development

that frequently there are competing agendas,

consists of thrirty-six three-story apartment

obstacles

buildings, with a total of 340 two-, three-,

and most significantly, the potential to have

and four-bedroom apartments. In almost complete

funding and positions cut altogether with the

contrast to Los Piletones’ pre-existing spatial

changing

and constructional informality, this new housing

volatile political climate.

organization to

found

of

is

impede

not

without

future

with

any

flaws

improvements.

large

administrations

in

that The

bureaucracy,

Argentina’s

project sits on a rigid orthogonal grid and shows no informality; from street width, to apartment

FUNDACIÓN MARGARITA

color, to unit layout, there is no deviation in

BARRIENTOS :

the formula.

Margarita

Barrientos,

a

The Madres’ contribution to Los Piletones

resident of Los Piletones and

represents what could be considered a step in

one of the most influential

the right direction in public housing, providing

and accomplished people in the

many different types of spaces in well-built and

neighborhood, provides services to the community

well-lit apartments, but it falls extremely short

and is completely embedded within its informal

of what might be most desirable for the specific

fabric. Operating under her foundation, Fundación

community.

involve

Margarita Barrientos, Margarita's soup kitchen

organizations already engaged with the community

serves over 1,500 hot meals each day and runs a

prevented learning valuable information, such

home for the elderly, a medical clinic, a wood-

as the area’s role in future plans for the

working shop, a sewing center, a library, and a

larger community and existing skills of its

preschool. She receives no help from architects

residents. Comparing this housing development to

in building her facilities. Her buildings are

The

Madres’

failure

to

Elemental’s often-cited projects in Chile, for

occupied in much the same pattern as any informal

example, which allow for users to expand when and

building in the community: spaces are used as

how they choose, illustrates just how isolated

they come into existence, regardless of their

the Madres design and planning process was. What

condition. Yet, her “compound” is a veritable

is more, there is concern among citizens that the

heart of the community, and the positive results

extreme contrast in housing between old and new

of her work are tangible, visible, and effective.

will create divides in the community that will

It

could

be

argued

that

the

Fundación

fracture some of the positive social aspects of

is successful largely because it is part of

the neighborhood.

the community in every aspect, including its informal architecture. The very informality of

PROSUR : The

work

its buildings, however, has created problems of

Programa

Prosur

Hábitat (Prosur), a government organization created to address issues of poverty in southern Buenos Aires, takes a hybrid approach and suggests that the most productive and effective way to work in an informal community is to find ways of inserting improvements — such as infrastructure, community spaces, increased security — without bulldozing the fabric already present.

Prosur

layers

formal

interventions

over informal existing conditions, including street-widening, strategic repurposing of the most dangerous spaces in the community, and


that are now being addressed retroactively at

vision for the future. BaSiC also partnered with

an often unaffordable expense. This provokes the

Margarita Barrientos in order to make immediate

question, is it possible to plan formally for the

contributions to the community through design

informal as a primary generator of architecture?

and based on her needs. These built projects,

Is it worthwhile? How should architects approach

which include lighting improvements for the

working

soup kitchen, a renovation of the library, and

with

informal

communities

through

furniture prototypes, exist within the informal

architectural intervention?

fabric in which they are inserted. BASIC INITIATIVE :

As

BaSiC

Initiative

looks

towards

the

a

five years it has committed to working in Los

nonprofit organization founded

Piletones, the organization faces challenges

by Professor Sergio Palleroni

that are familiar to many architects who work

which offers students design/

in other countries: learning a culture of a

build opportunities with the

community and gaining its trust as a foreigner,

aim of employing sustainable design principles

particularly tight time and budget constraints,

and strengthening communities throughout the

and, specifically in the case of BaSiC Initiative,

world

maintaining

The

through

BaSiC

public

Initiative

interest

is

architecture.

relationships

once

established,

BaSiC's approach to working in Los Piletones

despite working within the community only one

is best classified as a hybrid, a combination

month out of the year.

of a Master Plan providing an overall structure that

weaves

together

both

the

formal

and

IMPLICATIONS OF EFFORTS :

informal, and several built projects serving

With

as interventions within existing informality.

informal

The Master Plan created by BaSiC gives the

informal communities in the world, and a growing

aforementioned organizations a way to coordinate

interest in public interest architecture, it

long-term solutions and establish a cohesive

is likely that new approaches and techniques

architects

paying

architecture,

more the

attention

to

proliferation

of

to working with the informal will continue to emerge. What is certain is that the role of architects in informal communities remains full of possibility, providing a valuable service to underserved communities. For those professionals who believe that good design can have a positive impact on quality of life, there is the potential to introduce design solutions at all scales in informal communities. Even the architects’ ability to transfer basic drawing skills and structural knowledge to members of an informal community can lead to better, safer, and more versatile buildings, still designed and built by residents themselves in an informal manner. Not only do architects have this to offer, but with the understanding that working in informal communities is best realized by an exchange of knowledge in both directions, architects have the opportunity to learn from the underlying logic that exists — though often hidden — within the informal. The informal community has a logic that

is

not

readily

apparent

and

seemingly

random. In a time when so many architects are interested in finding logics that seem random, it is worth considering informal architecture a manifestation of this same type of logic. fernando lara : independent study, su2011 [this body of text is an exerpt from a longer report]

95


96

THRESHOLD HOUSING the

The studio places a strong emphasis on the design implications of technical issues and constraints and their relationship to and impact on the ultimate effect. This project calls for the design of mixed-income retail.

In

addition,

the

program

income

occupants.

To

moderate success with its Mitchell Lama program. Importantly, in that system, developers are granted the right to flip the use in twenty

years’ time. The program of this studio incorporates

housing paired with public park space and limited active-life

lower

some extent, New York City has had

twenty-five

residential

units,

of

which

ten

calls for a direct connection to be made between

should be for lower or middle income occupants.

the University area and Pease Park. The site is

It must provide some public/park space and a

a threshold; the project should provide a door.

direct connection to Pease Park as well as

The central focuses of the studio will involve

some nature of active-life retail (hospitality,

questions of threshold, privacy and publicity, as

sports retail, exercise facilities, etc.). The

well as the balancing of competing agenda.

studio leaves the particulars of the program up

Reflecting

the

concentration

of

homeless

to the studio teams, but it should be conceived

individuals currently occupying the park and the

of

currency of assisted housing in the local news,

occupants. Students should assume the client for

as

providing

jobs

for

the

lower

income

the studio is focusing on the primary program

the project is a developer receiving a stipend

of mixed-income housing. Given the prominence of

from the City to accommodate the lower income

the site, there is a certain utopian perversity

portion of the project.

successful

For the purposes of this project students

precedents. While opinions differ with respect to

are to assume that (1) the City has made the

the desirability of mixed-income housing, a 1997

necessary

study of this type of program (by Paul Brohpy and

project, (2) the City has opted to bury the

Rhonda Howard) indicated that the most successful

utility lines running along the eastern edge of

mixed-income

something

Pease Park as a portion of its beautification of

more than income mixing. It suggested that there

the corridor and (3) that the City’s floodplain

be minimal differentiation between unit types, a

designations

desirable location, and work opportunities for

designations differ).

to

the

choice,

but

there

developments

exist

required

zoning

changes

govern

(in

to

the

accommodate

event

the

the

FEMA

burton baldridge : technical communications studio, sp2011 "Trail Mix" is a mixed-income facility on Shoal Creek for live, work, and play. Varying unit-types are interlaced throughout the buildings to maximize social integration and capture the best views into the surrounding greenbelt. janice abrams, ben bowman

A series of twenty-one mixed-income homes on a public landscape, populated with retail space, allows everyone to share a front lawn. The lawn also serves as a threshold between the UT student housing and the single family homes on opposite sides of Shoal Creek. rebekah broadfoot, sam turner


PHASE SHIFT – LOSING GROUND

97

not designed for the inescapable

Along the harbor’s edge bordering Galveston’s central business district, we develop a series of public projects that amplify the historic community while responding to environmental conditions brought about by climate change. Design is intended as a vibrant intervention that accommodates the port’s needs while investigating the city’s need for flexibility and resiliency.

contingencies of an unpredictable, sub-tropical coastal environment. Established on a barrier island, its

very

adaptation,

efficiently

acclimatize

contingent.

This

emerge,

allows

sometimes

ecological by

being

new

systems open

and

were

shifting

sands

alter the landmass to create a state of constant shift. Couple this

with

increasingly

patterns

of

active

devastating

hurricanes on a periodic basis, and the result is a community perpetually on the verge of ruin.

to

The goal of the studio is to develop a series

without

of public projects that effectively respond to

conditions

unpredictably

and

on

where the ocean’s steady currents

weather Through

foundations

constructed

Galveston’s ever-changing environment. Students

precedent. The intricate human-made fabric of the city,

will work in the city’s CBD along the harbor side

however, is typically far less yielding to the

port area. The design is intended to investigate

ebb and flow of dynamic change, less responsive

the city’s need for flexibility and resiliency

to the sometimes forceful and less-predictable

in the light of climate change. A successful

environment. Because of inflexibility, a city

approach

may receive the full brunt of unwanted change

effective

and

systems and shifting environmental conditions,

unforeseen

transformation,

occasionally

would

express

interaction

the

accommodates environmental change. Approaching

such events because of escalating global warming

work this way, as an integral part of the complex

with accompanying sea-level rise, increasingly

whole

intense weather systems, and their aftermath of

students will draw on the region’s interactive

greater storm surge.

biophysical environment, which is constantly

like many other communities around the world, was

rather

undergoing

a

than

multivalent

through design’s

Coastal communities are ever more vulnerable to

we will focus on Galveston, Texas. Galveston,

being

the

manifesting in destruction and loss of life.

To better understand these relationships,

aim

adaptability between

isolated

disequilibrium,

and

scheme

that

defensible,

fluctuation,

coleman coker : advanced studio, fa2011

My proposed solution is New Galveston: a Floating City, an urban design that can adapt and survive any level of inundation while meeting the identified city priorities. wei-pei cherng

huong nyugen

The project introduces soft edges and permeable ground as a way to mitigate storm surge, but also recognizes that rising tides may be inevitable. rachel bullock

The existing city is one layer, to which I added three more — the boardwalk, drainage, and wetlands. These layers work in harmony with each other and help improve the development and enhancement of Galveston. siqi liu

and

change.


98


"englischer garten" : andrew davis advanced travel studio : milanovic-bertram


100

FILLING IN THE BLANKS constant flux. Couple this with

Using an urban project in Galveston’s central business district to investigate opportunities to accommodate increased environmental contingencies brought about by climate change, the inquiry centers on strategies that are multivalent and resilient; it is an approach that is adaptable through effective interaction of design’s systems and its ever-shifting environmental conditions.

dynamic

weather

include

patterns,

inevitable

which

destructive

hurricanes on a periodic basis, and

the

result

perpetually

is

on

a

the

community verge

of

devastation, which for designers, is an incomparable laboratory to research the relationship between the human-made conditions of the city in a dynamic environment of

The studio focuses on Galveston, Texas, and its

consistent change.

immediate surroundings. In both ecological and

Research takes place in the city’s central

cultural terms, Galveston and its environs is in

business district, an extended swath straddling

flux. Just over a hundred years ago, Galveston

the heart of downtown and stretching across

enjoyed the distinction of being one of the

the city proper. The design is intended as a

most energetic cultural and economic forces in

dynamic

the country. While still a vibrant community,

city’s needs for flexibility and resiliency. A

its former dominance has now been overshadowed

successful intervention expresses adaptability

by other cities, due in large part to the

through

unavoidable

environment

design’s systems and its shifting environmental

that wreaked havoc on the inflexible human-made

conditions. The aim is to design a work that

construct of the city. Galveston, like many other

accommodates contingencies and is multivalent.

communities around the world, was not designed

Designing

for the unavoidable contingencies of a dynamic,

complex

sub-tropical coastal environment where it was

properties of self-organization. This approach

built. Established on a barrier island, its very

establishes

foundations were constructed on shifting sands.

emergent properties of the design would adapt to

Here the ocean’s steady currents inescapably

a multitude of vibrant conditions, both human-

alter the barrier island to create a state of

made and natural.

impact

of

a

dynamic

intervention

effective

with

that

responds

interaction

contingencies

adaptive

systems

opportunities

to

in

between

mind

foster

where

to

the

the

allows

emergent

potentially

coleman coker : advanced studio, su2011

An ‘urban estuary’ along the water’s edge allows Galveston to absorb and adapt to storm surges and rising sea levels while also providing a zone of filtration for runoff re-entering the Bay. jennifer kerrick

As an architectural intervention for interactive systems education: conventions considered native to building (shelter) are suspended for a higher cause. The intervention, designed with elevational variation, is allowed to fill with bay water and offer ever-changing experiences of the CBD in response to the effects of climate change. kate bedford Sea level rise, extreme numbers of vacated or abandoned buildings and the fragility of life on a barrier island led toward this memorial of Galveston. In effect, returning the island. brian bedford


FIELDS OF REMAINS

101

Working between diagram and detail, the studio examines how material assembly influences a landscape’s performative characteristics.

shortage of disposition space, the studio addressed the environmental impacts cemetery

"Comprehensive

standards,

the

studio

fourth and final core studio in the landscape

assembly, and detail questions (marker and plot)

architecture design sequence. Comprehensive in

to frame the project’s organization strategies

scope, the studio examines a landscape project

and spatial experiences (site). From this, the

from

studio employed hybrid programs, ecologically

and

site

is

individuals

utilized a series of material investigations,

research

Studio"

by

the

initial

Landscape

imposed

once they die. Challenging current

design,

to

material assembly and technical detail.

sensitive disposition practices, and sustainable

In this semester, the studio proposed a

management techniques as a means of embedding

regional cemetery for the Austin area. With central

the transformation of body and memory into the

Texas facing population growth and an impending

city’s ecological and cultural systems.

jason sowell : comprehensive landscape studio, sp2011 The experience of visiting a loved one and one's position with respect to the body and marker was considered in terms of the programmatic scheme of the site. yvonne ellis, nelly fuentes

dimitra theochari, nicole vance

laura bryant, chelsea vargas Design elements transition the visitor from the city scale to an intimate and introspective experience. In addition to development as a cemetery, the site provides an opportunity for large-scale habitat restoration. sarah pierce, robin winter


Designing a cemetery required us to confront our beliefs regarding human mortality and 102

PASSING THRESHOLDS noah halbach, beau pesa

to question what it meant in the emotional, cultural, and ritual sense. We ultimately came to understand death as the

ultimate transition, from a state of motion to one of rest. Often a death shakes us out of our normal, everyday state of mind and causes us to contemplate our lives, why we are here, and what we should do with the time we have. We approached the project with the idea of death producing an alternative mindset and asked ourselves how it could inform our design decisions on multiple scales. Our working method was bottom up; we began at the detail-level scale by designing individual grave markers, a mausoleum, a crypt, and a scattering ground. In each instance, visitors were presented with the option of whether or not to cross a subtracted void by stepping onto a seemingly levitated granite platform. This subtle move signaled the transition from an everyday mindset to one of quiet meditation that the visitor would choose to make when they visited the site of a lost loved one. When we transitioned to the site scale (a 190-acre site, twenty miles east of Austin) the detail concept continued to inform our process. Since burial space was already restricted by the Colorado River flood plain, we introduced a system of swales to further subdivide the large site into a series of burial zones. The subtracted ground formed divisions between each zone, which must be transgressed (physically and mentally) in order to visit a grave site. At the same time, this created a system that would allow the cemetery to develop in phases as needed over its lifetime and created a solution for problems associated with floods. The site’s overall circulation program became about how visitors experienced these spatial and psychological transitions as they moved from the edges of the cemetery towards the burial zones in the center. The necessary contemplative tranquility within the burial zones was achieved by keeping vehicular movement to the outside and by allowing only foot traffic in the interior, the hope being that these moves simultaneously produced the background and sequencing necessary to facilitate the grieving process of each visitor. jason sowell : comprehensive landscape studio, sp2011


104

LOGISTICS | AIR CARGO FACILITY How can we eliminate preconceived notions of what the end product of design should be? Intense research into the mechanics, movement, geometry, and business model of the proposed structure drives the design process from investigation through to realization.

against which students test all assumptions, decisions, and forms. Through

manipulation

of

the research performed, one can generate what can be conceived as architecture. The design is based on an abstraction directed by a phrase/word/rules

derived

from

research. Research

centers

on

any

number

of

areas,

The

concept

of

Repetitive

Parametric

including nature, aspects of Air Cargo, and the

takes two conflicting ideas — repetition and

site itself. The research topics are established

customization based on established parameters

by

research

— to try to develop a system that allow the

culminates in the creation of a word or phrase

architect to adapt repetitive elements to new

that synthesized the research findings into a

sites and buildings. With the advancement of

guiding concept.

the computer, one can start to input repetitive

the

students.

Each

student’s

Students next developed a set of rules based

values but can translate those values differently

on the word or phrase. These “rules” are not

by parameters. The difference here is that the

the traditional physical brief for designing

parameters

a building, rather they are guiding concepts

different ways.

arrange

the

repetitive

parts

in

clay shortall : design five, fa2011

Through manipulation of control points according to data, different morphs were created according to a specific input. In order to sort these contradicting forms, one can begin to simplify the form into planes, the planes into frames, and the frames into points. In this way, one can begin forming a rational form from contradicting elements. maria garza salinas jeff ziemann

The phrase "tracing movement" applied to site, aircraft, and volume of Austin's air cargo facility generated a system for synthesizing variables to determine hundreds of thousands of optimal massing combinations. andrea gonzalez

The premise of my project was based on the idea of nonstandard organization techniques utilizing computation as a means of exploration. Rather than conceiving systems holistically, I sought to define local behaviors that would allow the system to grow in an organic fashion. christopher chang


AIRPORT OF THE FUTURE

105

that are present in any type of

A special emphasis of this comprehensive studio is to reconsider early modernist investigations of possible relationships between the machine and the building. Therefore, the economies of production — intellectual and physical — required for the assembly, construction, craft, and function compared between the two were prioritized.

construction, such as expansion and contraction, moisture penetration and

evacuation,

ventilation,

primary and secondary structure, logic of connections, differential settlement, etc. Although the most significant issues were addressed, particular attention was given to the

nature

of

detail

drawings,

Tech-Comm Advanced Design is a comprehensive

and the final product produced by the students

studio bridging many of the issues typically

resulted in a presentation package that combined

addressed in any advanced design studio — such as

aspects of all phases of the course. Airport of the Future is an international

design methodologies and particular pedagogical intents as filtered through topical projects

competition

— with a strong focus on the integration of

worldwide in the exploration of future design

created

to

engage

students

technical issues and on the nature of presentation

possibilities for air travel by considering how

documents at all phases. Pragmatically, the

airports may be envisioned in the decades ahead.

scheduling of production for the course project

The studio project therefore was to design

began with a research component to generate

the “Airport of the Future” as proposed by

discoveries and to posit linkages. A schematic

the

design was produced in model and in 2-dimensional

by

drawing formats, followed by design development

that no site, program, or future date for its

with 3-dimensional components and a sampling

consideration was issued or required by this

of detail drawings that might be included in a

conceptual

construction documents set.

student team was to select their own project

Naturally,

issues

of

construction

and

assemblies were framed within a set of concerns

competition. the

However,

organizers

was

competition.

the

project

extremely

To

that

brief

limited

end,

in

each

site anywhere throughout the world and develop their own program.

vincent snyder : technical communications studio, fa2011

The line between the space of the city and the space of the airport becomes blurred, encouraging public inhabitation of the airport building as it negotiates the physical characteristics of the site. laine hardy, amarantha quintana-morales

The airport begins from the metro level, providing seamless access to the airport. The structure of the waiting spine follows the path of the traveler, ascending and descending at the three cores: one central departure core and two peripheral arrival cores. christine kim, cameron kraus


Emerging

manufacturing-based

megacities

require

a

new

airport typology: the first

AIRPORT OF THE FUTURE

106

michael beene, conner bryan

airport dedicated to non-human travel. The Pearl River Delta (PRD)

Air

located

Cargo

in

Terminal,

China’s

busiest

manufacturing city, allows for unparalleled efficiency in the transportation of cargo while removing industrial waste from the delta itself. This rapid expansion of manufacturing facilities in the region has caused tremendous environmental repercussions. There are twenty-eight industrial parks in the Guangdong Province, and none of them utilize sewage treatment facilities; they simply dump their waste into the water and allow it to wash downstream. The PRD airport is positioned to facilitate the clean up of industrial wastewater

through

a

natural

phytoremediation

process.

Plants

called

hyperaccumulators have the ability to tolerate large quantities of heavy metals, carcinogens, and other toxins. By implementing a hydroponic treatment system with these plants on site, the river water can be treated without the use of carbon-intensive industrial equipment. Once the river water enters the site, it flows through a series of constructed wetlands, where the hyperaccumulators absorb the toxins through their root structures. Once the plants have become saturated with heavy metals, they can be collected and incinerated, whereby the heavy metals can be captured, recycled, and re-used, eliminating them from the natural ecosystem of the region. In this way, the PRD airport can serve as a model for the entire region, addressing the rising need of cargo transport for the manufacturing sector, while also alleviating the environmental issues facing China today. The building itself consists of two main elements: a series of modular processing bays and an elevated network of administration bars. This loosely defined network provides space for both administrative uses and workers’ facilities. The confined nature of the bar-shaped rooms, paired with views of the horizon, creates a more personal experience to complement the working spaces below. The modular bays can be expanded when the airport reaches capacity, clipping onto the elevated taxiway structure above. vincent snyder : technical communications studio, fa2011

2 5

1

1

1

1 2.0.0

3

4

6

1 1 2 3 4 5 6

SITE PLAN 1 : 2500

PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

aircraft loading bay maintenance/operations parking bus dropoff filtration system intake filtration system output

1.1.0 HUMENZHEN, PEARL RIVER DELTA, CHINA

MICHAEL BEENE

SITE PLAN CONNER BRYAN


2 4.0.1

1 4.0.1

+ 90’0”

+ 58’0”

+ 43’0” + 32’6”

1 3.0.0 + 0’0” F.F.E.

1

2 4.0.1

8

6

7

2

8

6

7

2

14

8

1 : 300

1 4.0.1

6

7

2

14

BUILDING SECTION

8

6

7

2

14

8

6

7

2

14

8

+ 90’0”

9

+ 58’0”

14

+ 43’0” + 32’6”

1 3.0.0 10

+ 0’0” F.F.E. 4

5

1 4.0.0

4

5

3

16

3

4

5 1 5.0.1

1

5

1

3

16

4

5

1

2

1

3

16

3

16

16 1 3.0.0

2 4.0.1

1 : 300

1 4.0.1

13

13

13

13

13

12

12

12

12

12

PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

15

4.0.0

11

BUILDING SECTIONS

2 4.0.0

2 4.0.0

BUILDING SECTION

1 4.0.0

4

1

HUMENZHEN, PEARL RIVER DELTA, CHINA

MICHAEL BEENE

CONNER BRYAN

1 5.0.0 2 3.0.0

2 4.0.1

1 4.0.1

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

cargo staging meeting uld prep outgoing elevator incoming elevator women’s restroom men’s restroom mechanical

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

storage outgoing prep area loading dock secured entrance filtration pond entrance building exit cargo x-ray filtration pond

LEVEL 1 FLOOR PLAN 1 : 300

PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

2.0.0 HUMENZHEN, PEARL RIVER DELTA, CHINA

MICHAEL BEENE

LEVEL ONE FLOOR PLAN

CONNER BRYAN


BOEING 247 (1933) BOEING 247 (1933) wingspan: 7474 ft ft 1 in1 in wingspan: 5 in length: 51 51 ft ft 5 in length: 8,921 empty weight: 8,921 lbslbs empty weight: 188 mph cruising speed: 188 mph cruising speed: 745 miles max range: 745 miles max range: seating capacity: 1010 seating capacity:

DOUGLAS DC-3 (1936) DOUGLAS DC-3 (1936) 0 in wingspan: 9595 ft ft 0 in wingspan: 5 in length: 6464 ft ft 5 in length: 18,300 empty weight: 18,300 lbslbs empty weight: 150 mph cruising speed: 150 mph cruising speed: 1,025 miles max range: 1,025 miles max range: seating capacity: 3232 seating capacity: 2,400 required runway: 2,400 ft ft required runway:

1941: Japanese occupation 1941: Japanese occupation

PEARL RIVER DELTA

Population and Area Population and Area

PRD vs China

PRD vs China

Rest of China Pearl River Delta

Population (500,000 people)

HONGKONG KONG HONG

Area (500 km²)

Rest of China Pearl River Delta

Population (500,000 people)

1945

1950

1960 1960

1955

1961: First manned space flight 1961: First manned space flight

1940

1946: First production commercial jet airliner 1946: First production commercial jet airliner

FORD TRIMOTOR (1926) FORD TRIMOTOR (1926) wingspan: wingspan: 7777 ft ft 1010 in in length: length: 3 in 5050 ft ft 3 in empty weight: 7,840 empty weight: 7,840 lbslbs cruising speed: 9090 cruising speed: mph mph max range: max range: 550 miles 550 miles seating capacity: 1010 seating capacity: required runway: 5,300 required runway: 5,300 ft ft

1935

1946: First super-sonic flight 1946: First super-sonic flight

1930

BOEING 377 (1953) BOEING 377 (1953) wingspan: 3 in wingspan: 141141 3 in ft ft length: 4 in length: 110110 ft ft 4 in empty weight: 83,400 83,400 lbslbs empty weight: cruising speed: 301 301 mph cruising speed: mph max range: 4,200 miles max range: 4,200 miles seating capacity: 8484 seating capacity:

1946: End of Japanese Occupation 1946: End of Japanese Occupation

AVIATION AVIATION

1925

1937: Hindenburg Disaster 1937: Hindenburg Disaster

1920

1919: First transatlantic flight 1919: First transatlantic flight

1915

1917: First airline 1917: First airline

1903: Wright Flyer 1903: Wright Flyer

1898: China leases Hong Kong to Britain for 99 years 1898: China leases Hong Kong to Britain for 99 years

108

1910

1908: first aircraft manufacturer 1908: first aircraft manufacturer

1905

1900: First zeppelin flight LZ1 1900: First zeppelin flight LZ1

1900

1928: Chang Kai-shek 1928: Chang Kai-shek

MACAU MACAU

0.8 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.2

Macau

Area 0.0

Population

FDI GDP (Foreign Direct Investment) Area Exports

Exports Population

Dongguan

Shenzhen

Guangzhou

4.9

13.7

8.8

3.9

16.9

2.7

20.1

14.9

38.7

1.0

0.06

2.21

Hong Kong

5.6

4.9

5.6

13.7

3.9

8.8

2.7

16.9

20.1

14.9

38.7

0.0

Dongguan Shenzhen Guangzhou CHINATOTAL TOTAL CO2EMISSIONS EMISSIONSFROM FROM FOSSIL-FUELS(THOUSAND (THOUSANDMETRIC METRICTONS TONSOF OFC)C) CHINA CO2 FOSSIL-FUELS 12.1

1.0

Macau

14

Hong Kong

0.06

2.21

12.1

14

0.2 2626

FDI (Foreign Direct Investment)

en.wikipedia.org

GDP

GREAT GREAT LEAP LEAP FORWARD FORWARD

1.0 0.8

1943: Mao Zedong 1943: Mao Zedong

1.0

Density (500 people per km²)

CHINA CHINA

SECOND SECOND SINO-JAPANESE SINO-JAPANESE WAR WAR

Density (500 people per km²) Area (500 km²)

212,906 212,906

70.35 70.35

71.62 71.62

CHINAGDP GDP(BILLIONS (BILLIONSUSD, USD,UNADJUS UNADJU CHINA

en.wikipedia.org

Floating Population Floating Population

Population and Area GrossDomesticProduct GrossDomesticProduct

H

2 6.0.0

+ 56’ - 7” top of beam

PRD vs China

+ 48’ - 7” top of beam

AIRCRAFT TAXIWAY

Population and Area

PRD vs

Rest of China Pearl River Delta

Population (500,000 people)

Population (500,000 people)

Area (500 km²) [500,000 people] Population

Area (500 km²)

[$5 billion] DensityGDP (500 people per km²)

Density (500 people per km²)

Population [500,000 people]

GDP per Capita [$5,000]

SOUND + DEBRIS GUARDS

1.0

GDP [$5 billion]

Rest of China Pearl River Delta

GDP per Capita [$5,000] 0.8

0.6

0.4

+ 45’ - 11” F.F.E.

3 5 Million Migrants 6.0.0

2.4

Guangzhou

Shenzhen

19.2

2.4

5

FDI (Foreign Direct Investment)

Exports

GDP

4.9

5.6

13.7

3.9

8.8

2.7

Guangzhou

16.9

20.1

14.9

1.0

0.06

Macau

38.7

2.21

Hong Kong

12.1

14

Area

Population

en.wikipedia.org

Macau

13.7

4.9

5.6

Dongguan

19.8

13.7

3.9

0.0

19.2

13.7

2.5

Dongguan

16.9

5

8.8

Shenzhen

24

16.9

16.9

19.8 20.1

Shenzhen

7.26

1.0

Guangzhou

3.84 2.5

20.1

14.9

2.7

24

20.1

58.7

Guangzhou

Hong Kong

8.4

1.0

38.7

0.06

1.0

3.84

Macau

7.26

Macau

Hong Kong

5 Million Locals

14

12.1

2.21

14

Hong Kong

58.7

5 Million Locals

8.4

14

0.2

Dongguan

Shenzhen

AIRPORTS

en.wikipedia.org

Dongguan

The Pearl River Delta contains four internatio est in the world. Due to the steep terrain, th cial islands.

+ 37’ - 10” F.F.E.

5 Million Migrants

CARGO FACILITY

ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAM Floating Population PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

Floating Population GrossDomesticProduct

0.1.0

4 6.0.0

Population [500,000 people]

HUMENZHEN, PEARL RIVER DELTA, CHINA

MICHAEL BEENE

CONTEXT STUDY

Gro

CONNER BRYAN

GDP [$5 billion] GDP per Capita [$5,000]

+ 30’ - 4” top of column

+ 30’ - 4” top of column

Guangzhou

5 Million Locals

14

19.2

2.4

13.7

19.8

Shenzhen

5

16.9

2.5

20.1

24

1.0

3.84

Macau

7.26

58.7

Hong Kong

FILTRATION PONDPUMPS

8.4

5 Million Locals

14

ADMINISTRATIVE ‘BARS’

Dongguan

Hon

5 Million Migrants

5 Million Migrants

MODULAR SHELL

ULD CONVEYANCE

ACCESS WALKWAYS

5 6.0.0

+ 0’ - 0” F.F.E.

+ 0’ - 0” F.F.E.

FOUNDATION AND PONDS CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS - 12’ - 0” top of footing

6

1

- 12’ - 0” top of footing WALL SECTION

1 : 40

2

SITE EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC N.T.S.

SITE EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC N.T.S.

PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

6.0.0 HUMENZHEN, PEARL RIVER DELTA, CHINA

MICHAEL BEENE

WALL SECTION + DETAILS

CONNER BRYAN

PRD AIR CARGO TERMINAL

1.0.0

BUILDING OVERVIEW


110

ARK AND EDEN The Polemic for the Ark : The rhetorical use of landscape in architecture is today profoundly confused. Almost every architect working today claims their buildings are “about landscape." How can that be? What is the role of a building in making landscape, and vice-versa? And what is the status of the public institution as a physical entity when the borders between object and landscape are blurred?

landscape — in culture as a source of

meaningfulness;

pressing

sustainability, of the biological environment as a system at work at scales larger than the individual lot; and the continuing rupture of scale in the marketplace city coupled with a re-densification of the American inner city. Scope the

creep

disciplines

indeterminacy,

The Polemic for the Eden : If landscape architecture is everything, does landscape architecture become nothing?

the

recognition, coming from work in

enabled to

engage

emergence,

and

open systems as design procedures. These

procedures

direct

various

social, cultural, and ecological processes and flows to act upon cities, site, and structure, letting form evolve

"Architecture is landscape in drag." — Antoine Predock

rather than be resolved. Evolving forms demand perpetual calibration of performance measures,

"Landscape Urbanism describes a disciplinary

causing

realignment

puts place and experience at risk.

currently

underway

in

which

spatial

instability

that

eventually

INQUIRY : What is the scope of architecture’s

landscape replaces architecture as the basic

responsibilities? What is the scope of landscape

building block of contemporary urbanism." — Charles Waldheim

architecture’s responsibilities? What is the border between these scopes today, or do the

The task in this thesis based studio, while

professional distinctions mean nothing? How do

working in paired teams of landscape architect

the professions collaborate? THE STUDIO : The architecture and landscape

and architect, is to make sense of the pressing Architecture/Landscape Architecture landscape. THE

POLEMIC

:

architecture studios will work collaboratively

The professions are not

throughout the semester. There will be a series

stable, either in fortune or scope. Circumstances

of independent and collaborative exercises where

might

students will form disciplinary pairs. The final

natural landscape, for example — so those whose

project will be examined collaboratively making

scope this source does not traditionally include

effective use of the interdisciplinary lens.

look on in green envy, calculating their angle,

Investigation will be primarily in section and

resonance, or cut. Or it might just be that

through site and disciplinary transects, where

the underbelly of human cultural desire is to

the building systems are juxtaposed with the

constantly undermine stability. So, if we say:

systems of site.

elevate

a

source

of

meaningfulness

are

THE PROJECT : The collaborative teams will

two entirely different things, you walk away

focus on the spatial and material resolution

thinking: they aren’t going to be when I’m done.

of

Later, your students will disagree with you.

gardens and structures to support the display,

architecture

and

landscape

architecture

a

regional

Botanic

Garden

that

includes

Architecture

and

research, and educational mission of the public

professions

have

institution. The facility is to be between fifty

recently, by intentions fair and foul, motives

and sixty hectares in size and can be located

innocent and opportunistic, actively moved into

anywhere in the world. Site strategies, plant

each other’s territories, that is jumped each

collections, and spatial resolution will be an

others’ claims. Central to this "scope creep"

outgrowth of the team’s collaborative method and

are at least three related phenomena: the rising

conceptual thesis.

Consider Architecture.

Landscape These

two

status of landscape — and especially natural hope hasbrouck, david heymann : advanced architecture and landscape architecture studio, fa2011


111

Musing on the idea of the Forbidden, the Nectarium (garden) is a "flowering quarry" that feeds the Nectorium (conservatory) with the Sacred Nectar; a juxtaposition of the productive landscape with the man-made architectural form. jeanie fan, dimitra theochari

The botanical garden is focused on the collection of invasive plant species. The conservatory is developed as a prison for large invasive species and the garden as a containment of invasive monocultures. The garden and conservatory form bands through the site to layer invasive plants against one another as the user moves through the gardens. jenna dezinski, emily scarfe

Mexican milpas agriculture acts as the vehicle to activate the traditionally closed, static collection of the conservatory and turns productive the traditionally display-only collection of the botanical garden. Ark and Eden together help to diversify crop species in a region overrun with GMO crops. lana denkeler, nicholas jackson


Botanical accumulated

gardens centuries

have of

botanical resources. We are now 112

ICELAND BOTANICAL NETWORK

finding this accumulated data

laura grenard, alisa west

as climatic and significant

vital in conserving plants, conversions

of

land

take

place. Human survival is linked to botanical conservation. Iceland Botanical Network (IBN) seeks to challenge and rethink the idea of “ex situ” collections as the primary conservation type. By relocating vegetation to remote gardens, the stories of particular plants, regions, and the peoples that utilized them become lost. However, the nature of the “in situ” IBN is an ark in its intended Eden. When destruction of the Eden (Iceland) occurs, the IBN becomes a library of all things Icelandic — not just flora. The IBN intends to host an active collection of Icelandic culture woven together through the underpinnings of song, story, and saga. Using the elements of nature and culture, the collection of the IBN aims to tell the story of Iceland and its people as two distinct collections; a story and garden intertwine to create a unique experience. The garden is a living collection of Icelandic flora. This allows for continued biodiversity of the island and a conservation method for education. Additionally, the gardens portray stories of the natural processes and geologic patterns (glacial, thermal, and volcanic). Each location in the network will focus on a specific natural process and related plant species. The buildings create a protected habitat for the rare species of flora and the culture of Iceland. Through the support of a fungarium and lab, the building will house the active processes of maintaining a garden while creating a national repository of flora. The buildings also accentuate the intersection between nature and culture. A geothermal pool facility created from an abandoned quarry reinforces the Icelandic connection to nature. A collection of oral histories and cultural relics will also be housed in an archive that serves both roles of preserving and promoting. This building will protect the collection by acting as an accessible ark, so that flora and culture are continually accessible by both natives and visitors. hope hasbrouck, david heymann : advanced architecture and landscape architecture studio, fa2011


114

URBAN LAND INSTITUTE HINES COMPETITION

jenna dezinski, brian doherty, greg montgomery ryan northrop, sarah sha

This competition is multi-disciplinary and is

strong infrastructure of streets with affordable

run by the Urban Land Institute. Nine teams from

land located close to job markets and the other

the University of Texas at Austin considered

amenities of the city.

challenges in creating more humane, efficient,

Developing a marketable lifestyle in the

and sustainable neighborhoods in the city core,

inner city will not happen through the provision

where a significant sense of place is established.

of housing alone. First, a rich pattern of

There is increasing desire among cities

amenities and attractions are required to develop

in the United States to attract families and

a basis to a lifestyle that can compete with the

individuals of differing ages and economy back

suburbs, followed by the ability to pursue more

to the central city. Over the past ten years,

sustainable modes of living.

most American cities’ downtowns have seen the

The new light rail in Seattle is one of the

development of apartments and condominiums, with

first in the country, which links an international

related art galleries and restaurants, begin to

airport to the downtown and university. However,

take the place of office building development.

Mount Baker, with its elevated rail stop, fast

This inner core to the city presents great

roads, failing businesses, and lack of housing

opportunities for development by providing a

and a pedestrian-friendly environment, results


ashley craig, jared genova, jeremy johnson, christopher smith, wenyu xie

shannon bronson, josh gladding, chelsea larsson emma leonard, natalie ward

in several local problems. Furthermore, adjacent

4.

Neighborhoods

growing

form from

a

pattern

of

the station. The work you see demonstrates ways

infrastructures and establishing a lattice of

to redress this situation. A number of design

choices and opportunities.

criteria present themselves:

relationships,

should

neighborhoods and workplaces are isolated from

existing

5. City blocks need to be small, compact,

1. Cities need to be connected, particularly

mixed-use, and green. Much has yet to be learned

encouraging walking, cycling, and public transit.

about sustainable urban living, but we know that

2. Traffic must be “calmed" and streets

residents require safe, multi-modal access to

made safe so that people feel safe, which in

their neighborhoods and homes, which is both high

turn brings more people to the street, further

quality and energy efficient.

increasing safety.

6. Cities are the future green laboratories,

3. A new generation of urban places needs to

offering opportunities to implement rainwater

be created — places that are democratic, inviting,

harvesting, heat sink reduction, and energy and

multi-generational, and community-based. These

food production.

must be reinforced by high quality amenities and facilities, and provide strong identity.

simon atkinson : competition, sp2011


116

DALLAS URBAN LABORATORY STUDIO : NORTH TEXAS STATION Texas

The City of Dallas has developed an ambitious agenda that endeavors to focus urban development into more sustainable patterns of urbanization. What form might these patterns of urbanization take as they expand ever farther onto the metropolitan periphery? How can urban expansion be balanced against the consumption of ecological resources?

Station

uses

the

transit

system as the central structure of an “urban necklace,” a linear urban corridor that follows the topographical

ridgelines

of

the

district, preserving the sensitive ecological structure of the site. Systems

of

green

infrastructure

connect the urban necklace into the

larger

natural

structure,

Working at the request of the City of Dallas,

establishing a performative landscape matrix,

Dlab© has developed a proposal for the new town

which balances new development patterns with

of North Texas Station, to be located on the

attendant ecosystem services.

southern periphery of the city. North Texas

New

housing

typologies,

organized

into

Station is designed to sustain a population of

dense

30,000 new residents and to bring new investment

located

and economic growth to an underdeveloped sector

enables a diverse system of lifestyle choices

of the city. The project, catalyzed by the

to be established, while providing for social

establishment of the new University of North

and economic heterogeneity. The transit system

Texas at Dallas campus, which will house an

provides

additional 25,000 students, winds through the

districts, linking work, education, recreation,

ecologically

and domestic programs. At the heart of the plan

sensitive

zone

of

the

larger

Trinity River watershed. existing

DART

line

along

districts, the

local

are

corridor.

connectivity

strategically This

framework

between

the

is an urban square, providing a socio-cultural

Organized around a tram loop that extends an

urban

to

the

south,

North

link between the new university campus and the town. dean almy : advanced studio, sp2011


CARS, COMMERCE, AND THE CONTEMPORARY CITY What is the future role of the automobile? Cars have shaped our cities, and as such, they carry the power to change our cities. Here, a critical reevaluation of the automobile helps form an alternative model for the city — one that intelligently and productively incorporates cars and new forms of commerce into the built environment.

117

and

customs

house,

a

farmers'

market or flea market, and abundant and

intelligent

car

circulation

with parking for both car owners and

car

The

shipping

logistics

sharing of

and the

organizations. distribution post

office,

the market, and the car require choreography of flows. The project addresses diverse and multi-scaled

By critically rethinking the future role of

infrastructures that have direct connections to

the

larger networks, yet must operate integrally

automobile,

the

post

office,

and

peer-

to-peer commerce, student projects strove to be

instruments

of

urban

transformation

and

with local cultures and environments. The building aspires to alleviate climatic,

catalytic examples with potential to project

circulatory,

an alternative model for the city.  Each design

challenge is to strengthen public, private, and

is intended to consider the technological and

informal interests and to transform the approach

physical ramifications of automobile evolution,

to infrastructural and urban works. Issues of

exploring ways in which cars can be intelligently

scale, identity, multi-modal accessibility, in

and productively incorporated into the built

addition to tectonic considerations, such as

environment.

structural and material logic, are examined with

The project program includes a post office

and

social

stagnation.

The

thorough sets of drawings and models.

matt fajkus, francisco gomes : technical communications studio, sp2011

Preparing for continual reliance on the automobile, our proposal aimed at doubling parking garages as an extension of public streets provides a convenient and pleasant network of interactions between people and vehicles. vince ho, hanying zhang

To establish continuity and autonomy among fragments, local functions — peer-to-peer commerce and post office — occupy the ground while parallel global functions — stock exchange and customs house — occupy space above. Pedestrian and automobile circulation coalesce the isotropic division. whitney cooper, john paul rysavy


A unique program combines a public parking facility with a post office, customs house, 118

NET[WORK] blake smith, laura wagner

and markets into a communityoriented The

hybrid

intermingling

provide

an

building. programs

opportunity

to

recreate community interaction as both a scheduled and spontaneous event, and to connect the business and tourist districts that have been split by the San Antonio Riverwalk site. Our objective is to enhance traditional ideas of how people commute, shop, stand in line, and converse, while they wait to send letters and packages or cruise along the vertical freeway. Continuity and sequence of exchange, between and within each respective program, fueled a design that focused on movement and adaptability. As space decreases and energy conservation efforts increase, cars will become both smaller and fewer. This trend will encourage Americans to seek alternate means of travel, which requires a more community-oriented mindset. We expect that car sharing, public transit, and other more environmentally conscious modes of transport, such as biking and walking, will grow in popularity as cars dwindle in size and economic availability. Access to the parking spaces in the project will be limited to out-of-towners, weekend tourists, and commuters. A modern trip to the post office means a grueling experience of long lines and slow receptionists. In our project proposal, automated transactions streamline the shipping process with touch-screen displays, package chutes and conveyors, security, backstage workers, and delivery trucks. Market spaces dispersed throughout the building create nodes of community engagement, which encourage users to explore diverse spatial experiences and which provide for the emergence of new uses. A daily farmer’s market selling fresh produce supplies a locally-owned restaurant; creating a continuous and sustainable loop from farm to market. An indoor flea market and outdoor car boot sale provide both structured and unstructured opportunities for local vendors to interact directly with consumers. Designed to evolve with time, the continuous car ramp is made of modular concrete units that can be replaced with pedestrian-friendly modules. Planter and podium modules for market vendors gradually replace parking spaces as need for parking decreases. In time, what once was reserved for machines can be reclaimed by people as parking transforms to a vertical park. matt fajkus, francisco gomes : technical communications studio, sp2011


120


122

MARINE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER saturation

The ACSA design competition for the proposed Salt River Bay Marine Research and Education Center located on the island of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a catalyst to a process that describes the confluence between design and technology in which the nature of building systems affects and informs architecture.

diving

habitats,

Hydrolab and Aquarius, 1977-1989. The

Marine

Research

and

Education Center, a 60,000-square foot

campus,

research for

and

supports education

undergraduate

and

marine programs graduate

university students, in addition to marine science and environmental education programs for primary and

The semester long project was the design of

secondary school-aged students and for adults,

the Marine Research and Education Center, which

and

is located on a 96-acre site on the eastern

highlighting Caribbean Studies. Student designs

edge

includes

an

archeological

field

school

north

were encouraged to provide new and innovative

central coast of St. Croix. Salt River Bay,

thinking for the Marine Research and Education

which extends from ridge to reef surrounded by

Center design, and to produce the most energy-

intact red mangroves and sheltered by coral

efficient

barrier

and

designs

archeological significance, featuring remains

develop

of two prehistoric Taino villages and a ball

strategies for the educational laboratory and

court established more than 2,000 years ago. On

address the off-grid utility infrastructures

November 14, 1493, Christopher Columbus’s party

needed for the campus. The designs responded to

came ashore at Salt River Bay, the only site now

the climatic, geophysical, environmental, and

of

Salt

River

reef,

has

Bay,

along

extensive

the

cultural

and

environmentally

possible.  Students integrated

design

were and

sustainable required

to

engineering

in U.S. territory visited by Columbus’s party.  resource challenges of the site and its location For the last years Salt River Bay has been the

on

site

marine resources in a National Park.

of

NOAA’s

long-term National

marine Undersea

research Research

including

a

tropical

island

adjacent

to

sensitive

Program

michael garrison : technical communications studio, sp2011 With careful climate analysis in the Salt River Bay, we’ve created a master plan that links historical sites, natural habitats, a visitor’s center and our Marine Research and Education Center. maiya lewis, katie west

The building skin is a commentary on the culture of St. Croix. It reduces the scale of the building and increases the esthetic appeal and sustainability of the project. pedram mireshghi, james spence jr., roddrick west

A holistic investigation of systems uses form and structure to achieve net-zero energy usage. The sheltering canopy and multipurpose cores capture and channel flows in a sustainable loop with nature. michael boduch, kathryn cahir, warren fincher, randy maddox


[BRACKETING] AUSTIN

123

The Imagine Austin plan has merged years of public discourse and growth pressure into an ambitious blueprint for Austin’s future. Can this political agenda be translated into the kind of urbanism able to negotiate the contested territory between neighborhood conservation and new urban density so fundamental to Austin’s urban future?

to establish a number of framework principles

to

guide

future

development within the district. The studio, which worked with a range

of

urban

design

tactics,

developed West End 2040 to include: new

landscape

volumetric

infrastructures,

regulatory

envelopes,

development scenarios, and public space frameworks. Overall density

Austin’s West End is one of the few remaining

in the district was increased from five units per

inner-urban terrains left undeveloped in the

acre to forty units per acre in order to respond

central city. The district, centered on the 5th

to the tenants established in the Imagine Austin

and 6th street corridors, is comprised of the

documents, and to support the use of an east-

territory ranging from Lamar Boulevard on the

west transit connection between the downtown

east to Mopac on the west. The unique aspect of

and

the zone of the West End is the political détente

Tract. A public promenade, established along

established between the forces of development and

the ridge overlooking Lady Bird Lake, serves

the OWANA neighborhood organization. The urban

as an important connective linkage between the

design studio worked with these organizations

neighborhood and the park.

future

development

of

the

Brackenridge

dean almy : advanced studio, fa2011

The street infrastructure is designed in anticipation of the extensive transit system critical to supporting a walkable, bikeable, mixed-used corridor. Designing the streets as public space encourages interaction to occur at the human scale. tica chitrarachis

A consensus between potential stakeholders must be reached to form a clear set of rules. The building envelope is created by overlaying all of the forces that regulate urban form; it represents the ideals of the city and neighborhood, creates an agreement between society and investors, and guarantees certainty to potential investors. jose garcia

The promenade is a manipulated ground plane infrastructure that resolves the need to connect the neighborhood to the lake by providing multivalent sequences of movement through the site in the form of public space. samantha whitney-schwarze

With sensitivity to the Clarksville neighborhood north of 6th street and an assertive approach on the exposed southern edge of 3rd street our urban design strategy morphs between these two conditions. lauren vogl


TRANSITIONAL BOUNDARIES : REEVALUATING THE HUTONG

124

While the debate of whether to protect the

evaluation of existing and proposed elements

cultural hutongs of historic Beijing in the

around the site, an overall growth strategy was

midst of rapid development within and around the

developed, displaying the proposed form of new

city center continues, how can a modern strategy

development along the edges of the protected

be created to maintain the historic, informal

hutongs.

hutong neighborhoods while increasing density and proposing new infrastructural elements? By

distinguishing

the

twenty-five

Though many arguments from locals focus on the protection of existing hutongs, the critical question is how to create a plan that maintains

"protected" neighborhoods within the city center,

these

the first step was to understand the growth

reinventing critical areas into infrastructural

and form of infrastructural and architectural

components, challenging the accepted form of

elements adjacent to the hutongs. The hutong

preservation executed within the past decade.

is defined as a street, lane or alley located

Through research and redevelopment of a megablock

within the city center of Beijing, forming the

within the Gulou neighborhood, the evaluation of

necessary

maintaining historical presence along with the

circulation

between

the

siheyuan

(the traditional courtyard home). Through the

structures

while

repositioning

or

addition of modern development has been tested.


126


an exhibit of fabrications produced by a. zahner company : march 2–25, curated by sydney mainster


128

STUDY IN ITALY fascination with depth, autonomy,

The studio addresses contemporary design issues within a small, Italian hill town in the context of a community rich in history, urban form, culture, and materiality.

and continuity across a vast series of scales from personal object to personal space to social space to urban condition. The studio’s design project

This advanced architectural design studio is

for the host city, Castiglion Fiorentino, is a

taught in Tuscany at the Santa Chiara Study

new community center in the heart of the historic

Center. Italy and the Italian city become both

district.

the subject and physical laboratory for a series

involved connecting the ancient Etruscan town

of design investigations. Students draw from the

axis with the medieval town center’s Piazza

local community for rich resources of history,

Comunale and its Renaissance loggia. Mapping

urban form, culture, materiality, and technology

and

— all of which have direct relevance to the

itineraries composed of visual and experiential

studio’s inquiry. While the solution of a design

links to enrich the studio’s design process.

project is the studio’s ultimate goal, students

City

investigate Italian design sensibility and its

participate in studio juries and presentations.

The

visual

community

communication

officials

and

guest

center

requirements

exercises

Italian

develop

architects

smilja milovanovic-bertram : advanced travel studio, fa2011

Confronting the hyper-vernacular typologies of small, Italian hill towns is very challenging. Architectural complexity is often found in detailing and subtle design choices, which can get lost in the larger urban form. andrew davis, amanda mote

With attention to existing infrastructure and local culture, a new axis to the center of Castiglion Fiorentino revitalizes the town by providing tourist attractions, community necessities, and outdoor public spaces. jackie fisher, emily wiegand

kristen stanley


STUDIO PARIS

129

“The Body in the City” : Cultural and gymnastic facilities under the above-ground Metro line # 2, between stations “Stalingrad” and “Jaurès”

from

various

agricultural

areas

of the Ile-de-France; occasional artists

and

general

visitors,

are all thriving under the soft Parisian sky.  

Paris has two Metro lines — one in the North,

TEAMWORK : A comprehensive master plan was

the other in the South — with some of their

to be devised in common by the teams. The key

sections

chosen

issues were  urban context, relationship with

site presents a complex interaction between

the Metro line,  the canal, and the Bassin de la

physical events (the still in operation and

Villette set behind the rotunda. Attention was

visually rich Canal Saint-Martin; one of the

given in particular to the changes of the image

few surviving rotundas, toll gates, by Claude

of the neighborhood. 

running

above

ground.

The

Nicolas Ledoux; the southern tip of the Parc de

Each student in the teams was to develop an

la Villette inspired by Ivan Leonidov’s 1930

architectural project of their choice. Attention

project and designed by Bernard Huet [Place-de-

was to be given to the  effect each particular

La Bastille-Stalingrad] and the suspended Metro

project would have on the total synergy of the

line) and a powerful social scene where ethnic

site.

North-Africans; Black-Africans (mostly recent

INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS : Each student could

immigrants); “situated” homeless people with

choose to work on either a bathhouse, a sports

their camping tents distributed by the city;

facility, or on a performance center, paying

small

attention to the main theme: "the body in the

shop-keepers;

neighborhood

basketball

players; bustling markets with their vendors

city."

john blood, elizabeth danze, danilo udovicki-selb : advanced travel studio, fa2011

A series of underground caves or cities gives the community an entirely new experience. Escape from the busyness of the street provides a new reality in which friends and family can gather to socialize, relax, and rejuvenate themselves. blake naumann

nick angelo, christopher gardner The project contrasts a stereotomic spa with a tectonic dojo. Both buildings are a collection of separate volumes connected with a dynamic relationship to a plane. nik kinnaird, luu mac


Transition

is

defined

by

the process of changing from one

TRANSFORMATION

130

hector garcia-castrillo, julie huynh

state

to

another.

In

transitory spaces, users often pass

through

neglecting the

barren

to

potential

areas,

acknowledge of

their

trajectories. The paths people choose serve as the basis of their experiences. Such an idea was conceptually applied to the intervention of the Stalingrad metro station in Paris, France. Hurried Parisians constantly flow in and out through underground access points, but rarely is there a reason to pause. By mapping these trajectories, bounded shapes become program, and leftover voids become designated paths. When investigating these paths, it is crucial to be attentive about the varied groups of foot traffic. Users are moving in and out of the edges of the site just as frequently as they're moving in and out of the underground metro. The solution for alleviating the tension is simple: the bounded shapes created by mapping the two types of circulation are explored sectionally. The extrusion of each shape at corresponding intersections begins to formulate an intervention and serves as a mediator between the metro traffic and pedestrian traffic. Pavilions are thus formed, housing supplementary programmatic conditions. The issue of transparency is addressed by allowing the pavilions to be enclosed entirely by glass. The space is further equipped with glass benches, which are situated directly above key parts of the underground metro station as they puncture the interior of the ceiling and allow natural light into the space. Secondary to the emphasis on the naturally occurring movement are the buildings

that

establish

the

central

program.

In

instances

where

the

intersections of trajectories inscribe patterns that are much too large for the typical pavilion, larger program was placed. To the west of the site is a dojo for martial arts, while to the east of the site is a dance studio for the performing arts. The shapes that were originally bounded by the trajectory lines also become fenestrational punctures in the façade as skylights and windows. Altogether, the development surrounding Stalingrad forms a cohesive design that is dictated by the interpretation of how its users move. It remains a transitory space but now offers an opportunity for progressive transition — an occurrence that results only from utter TransFormation. john blood, elizabeth danze, danilo udovicki-selb : advanced travel studio, fa2011


surrounding neighborhood’s safety and beautification, and increases

PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING'S EFFECT ON SURROUNDING PROPERTY VALUES

132

andres galindo

This study aims to respond to recurrent concerns raised in various communities about possible negative effects of permanent supportive housing (PSH) programs in Austin, Texas. Using similar methodology to the Furman Center’s Study, this study examines whether impacts vary with distance from the PSH development. We used a dataset with value appraisals of all taxable residential properties located nearby. We selected the three locations and mapped them using Geographic Information System (GIS) software. This study did not account for variables that substantially impact property values such as transportation, proximity to jobs, and quality of schools around the PSH developments. The results of this study have shown that the residential property values in closest proximity to the analyzed developments varied in a way that makes it difficult to correlate them with the existence of these developments. However, when looking at the socio-economic composition of the neighborhood, negative impacts appear to be related to a higher concentration of vacant units, low-income residents, and minorities.

or stabilizes property values in most communities. In

2009,

the

Comprehensive

Housing Market Study conducted in Austin showed that very low-income renters are the most underserved population in the housing market. In order to counteract the impact of

homelessness

Austin

City

in

Austin,

Council

and

the

other

stakeholders began to concentrate efforts

on

permanent

housing

as

a

to

this

City’s

supportive

feasible

long-term Neighborhood

Community

solution

issue.

The

Housing

Development

&

Department

was designated to be the major contributor to the capital funding of PSH. The City is committed to assure that the financed housing units under this initiative are high quality, meet the tenants’ special needs, and enhance hosting neighborhoods. However, whether are

or

the not

detrimentally

nearby

debate

property

lower-income

over values

affected

by

housing

is

not a new one. PSH is commonly seen as

by

the

bringing

host

neighborhood

harmful

effects.

Residents living in proximity to the proposed project fear that it will adversely affect the quality

I.

HOW MUCH DO WE KNOW ABOUT

of the neighborhood, increase crime, and lastly

PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING?

decrease the neighboring property values. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact

Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is a type of

of permanent supportive housing on neighboring

rental affordable housing which is long-term.

property values.

It’s linked to a variety of support services that are intended to meet the needs of people who are at-risk or formerly homeless as well as such

people as

a

with

chronic

EFFECTS OF PSH ON PROPERTY VALUES

conditions, chemical

A substantial body of literature in this regard

housing

has explained the possible spillover effects of

can help homeless people live independently and

supportive housing, as well as many others types of

with dignity in the community. The normalization

affordable housing developments, in neighboring

of the residential environment, accompanied by

property values. Different conditions of host

on-site and specialized care, has been seen by

neighborhoods have been associated with the kind

policy makers and advocates as a therapeutic

of impact of these developments. Based on Nguyen’s

solution for homelessness. An extensive body

analysis, instances in which affordable housing

of literature has demonstrated that creating

appears to have no adverse effects on property

transitional and supportive housing produces

values occur when: (1) it is located in healthy

significant annual savings by reducing the use

and vibrant neighborhoods; (2) it does not change

of public services. By blending in with their

the quality or character of the neighborhood;

neighborhoods,

(3) its management is responsive to problems

dependency,

psychiatric

health

II. UNDERSTANDING THE SPILLOVER

or

disability,

HIV/AIDS.

supportive

Supportive

housing

improves


and concerns ; and (4) they are dispersed. The evidence

reveals

that

rehabilitated

III.

DATA AND METHODOLOGY

housing

always has beneficial outcomes for neighboring

Using

property values.

Center’s Study (in terms of comparing prices

a

methodology

similar

to

the

Furman

Conversely, recent studies tell us that

of properties within two different radii as

affordable housing can likely reduce property

well as the whole census tracts) allows us to

values

(1)

examine whether impacts vary with distance from

the

the supportive housing developments because the

affordable housing are poor; (2) it is located

impact on properties closer to a development

in

contain

might differ from impacts on properties still

disadvantaged populations (i.e., usually low-

affected, but further out, in the half-mile

income and predominantly minority); and (3) they

ring. Data from The Texas Central Appraisal

are clustered.

District on property value and the combined land

the

as

a

quality,

result

of

design,

dilapidated

proximity

and

when:

management

neighborhoods

that

of

PSH developments could either positively or

value were analyzed to calculate the value of

negatively impact the property values in the host

the properties. The database included a list

neighborhood. A substantial body of literature

of property values on selected census tracts

in

around these units for a period of one decade

this

spillover

regard

has

effects

of

explained

the

supportive

possible

housing,

as

(2000–2011). These values were averaged on a

well as many others types of affordable housing

per-square-foot-of-improvements basis for each

developments, in neighboring property values.

property within the defined study area.

Different conditions of host neighborhoods have

The study area was defined as the geographic

been associated with the kind of impact of these

space that includes all the contained and/or

developments. In order to obtain a clear portrait

contiguous census tracts that are within a half-

of the impact of supportive housing facilities,

mile radius of the selected supportive housing.

it is necessary to control for both the level and

United States Census Bureau GIS information was

trend of prices in the neighborhoods surrounding

used to identify census tracts from the 2000

the site(s), both before and after the supportive

Census. Then, the information for all the census

housing is build and in operation.

tracts was collected and grouped as one level of analysis. In many cases there were between three and six census tracts studied for each supportive housing site. These

three

locations

were mapped using Geographic Information System software, and eighth-mile and half-mile radius these Any

buffer sites

parcel

zones were

which

around

created. was

more

than fifty percent inside one of these radial buffers was included in the study area. In order to compare and contrast the

prices

of

properties

around the selected supportive RESEARCH QUESTIONS :

housing developments to neighborhoods that were similar but without any of these facilities,

What are the existing housing price trends in

additional eighth-mile and half-mile buffers

the neighborhoods studied? Does the existence

were set inside the grouped census tracts. This

of the permanent, supportive effect coincide

analysis seeks to compare the price fluctuations

with significant changes in residential property

between properties located within an eighth-

values? Do properties in close proximity to the

and half-mile radius of a supportive housing

permanent supportive housing change in the same way

unit, before and after it is constructed, with

as the rest of the properties? What are the

a similar group of properties located more than

characteristics

supportive

a half-mile away from any supportive housing

housing projects that might influence property

units but inside the same census tracts groups.

values? What are the characteristics of the

Properties' values might continue to rise or

neighborhoods that might influence property values?

fall following the Census Tracts average change

of

the

permanent

133


depending on whether or not they fulfill the neighbors’ expectations upon project completion. Along with distance variables, timing property 134

values facilitates the understanding of market behavior. We examine whether the magnitude of these differences has changed over time and in relation to the supportive housing development completion. IV.

PROPERTIES IN STUDY

In Austin, an important number of permanent supportive housing facilities serve a growing number of people at-risk of being homeless. The PSH provides the services they need to remain in housing and maintain overall well-being. Looking for a broader geographic spectrum, the three sites were selected from three different areas

of

Austin.

The

criteria

applied

to

select the three permanent supportive housing developments among others were based on: (1) Geographic Location: North Central, and South; (2) Year of construction—the selected units must be built within that time period but allowing three or more years before or after to compare changes. In other words, the units must have

c) Glen Oaks by Green Doors. Built in 2008,

been built in 2003 at the earliest and in 2008

Glen Oaks development in Central East Austin

at the latest; (3) Number of Units: Single-

provides permanent supportive housing to over

Family and Multifamily (from 2–100 units and

twenty formerly homeless or disabled adults and

100+ units); (4) Scattered or Concentrated; (5)

children annually. Green Doors also provides

Newly Constructed or Rehabilitated.

residents with a weekly food pantry, computers, community garden, and outdoor playground area.

SITE DESCRIPTIONS :

This development has been recognized with a fivestar green rating for achieving higher level of

a) Garden Terrace by Foundation Communities.

energy efficiency and green building practices.

Completed in 2002,

Its newly built, single-family homes are grouped

Green Terrace represents

the first supportive housing development for

and embedded in a residential neighborhood.

adults in South Austin. A former nursing home was converted into a housing complex of eighty-

V.

NEIGHBORHOODS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND HOUSING COMPOSITION

five energy-efficient, single-room apartments. Many of the green features, such as photovoltaic panels, produce cost savings that benefit vital

In

support services. Each resident of Green Terrace

characteristic of the selected neighborhoods,

order

to

understand

the

socio-economic

must provide personal references and a clean

information from the United State Census Bureau

criminal background record to qualify.

American Community Survey 2005 has been obtained and analyzed regarding population distribution

b) Spring Terrace. Opened in October 2006, Spring

by ethnicity and race, housing occupancy (vacant

Terrace in North Austin is a former extended-

housing units, owner occupied housing units, and

stay motel, which was purchased, renovated, and

renter occupied housing units), and household

transformed into supportive housing by Foundation

income

Community. This facility is the organization’s

with income below poverty level and household

(median

family

income,

population

second project that offers supportive housing

incomes).

services. Spring Terrace’s 140 apartments use energy-efficient appliances, and the building

VI. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS

is equipped with rainwater harvesting and solar panels that reduce utility costs. Modern design

We caution that these results apply only to

and pleasant landscaping make this place both

the

welcoming and architectonically interesting.

surrounding the supportive housing developments.

average

patterns

across

neighborhoods


On a per-square-foot basis, each of these three

sites/census

analysis produced different results. Likewise,

supportive

the property values for neighboring properties

neighborhoods with the highest population of

also vary within the different radii of proximity

residents with poverty-level incomes and that

to the supportive housing developments. For two

are

studies,

the

found

that

minority-occupied,

the

two

located

in

consistently

property

showed a negative value impact in proximate property values. On the other hand, the site in

year period after it was opened, both within the

the predominantly White-occupied neighborhoods,

eighth-mile and half-mile buffers. Additionally,

with the lowest population living within poverty

in

these

change

and the highest median family income, seemingly

in

property

one-eighth-

had a positive effect on residential property

cases, values

appraisal

heavily

we

developments,

values effectively increased during the three-

two

neighboring

tracts,

housing

the

incremental

within

the

mile buffer was higher than within half-mile

values.

buffer. While the average relationship between

There was not a strong relationship between

these three supportive housing facilities and

the

neighboring property values was positive, not

significant drop in property values. External

all site-neighborhood combinations experienced

characteristics,

the same relationship. The third case presented

quality of structures, can lead to a greater

mixed results: during the first three years after

chances of decline in property value.

completion, while there was still an increase

presence

This

of

study

supportive such

as

housing

a

proves

and

a

neighborhood’s

that

neighborhood

in property values within the half-mile buffer,

composition is important when preventing adverse

property values within the eighth-mile buffer

impacts on property values. On the basis of this

declined slightly. Nevertheless, in the latter

paper, apparently negative effects on property

case,

both

the

and

values are more likely to occur when permanent

increase were considerable low

supportive housing is located in disadvantaged

(+/-1%).

and declining neighborhoods.

In

decrease

contrast,

when

On one hand, a high concentration of low-

of

income residents and minorities was strongly

the

associated with a decrease in property values.

supportive housing developments

On the other hand, the site in the predominantly

comparing

the

variation

property

values

near

relative to the average of the

White-occupied neighborhoods, with the lowest

property values at the census

population living below poverty levels, and the

tracks level, the results are

highest median family income seemingly had a

quite

one

positive effect on residential property values.

consistent

Moreover, positive effects on property values

increment in both buffers, and

also occur where the rates of vacant and renter-

the results were even higher

occupied housing units were lower.

site

different. presented

a

Only

within the eighth-mile ring. The

second

abnormally

site low

Although the results of this study are not

evinced

an

conclusive, the evidence obtained can refute

increment

in

the

frequent

claims

that

supportive

housing

property values in comparison

has a sustained, negative impact on neighboring

with the average pattern at the

property values.

census tracks level. Although,

Finally,

because

of

the

inconsistent

in the third case, proximate

variation in the different types of PSH studied

property values variation were

(e.g., newly constructed, rehabilitated, and

less than those shown in the

existing) there is a need for more studies

census tracks during the same

on each of these types to understand their

period, it showed a reduction

differential effects. This study proves that

in

neighborhood

difference

between

the

composition

is

important

when

census tracks average property

trying to prevent a decline in property values.

values.

It is necessary for policy makers to understand

When we disaggregated our

the relationship between socioeconomic status,

study to measure the impacts

race, affordable housing, and property values

for

to craft better policies.

different

clusters

of

kelly nichols, meng qi : independent study, su2011 [this body of text is an exerpt from a longer report]

135


136

RETROFITTING SUBURBIA 1: GENTRIFICATION AND SUBURBAN DIASPORA community in Austin from the near

Is it possible to make a selected existing subdivision both sustainable and desirable to African-American residents?

east-side to Pfluggerville, Manor, and southeast Austin. The reasons for

the

diaspora

African-American This

was

the

Retrofitting Advanced

first

of

Suburbia,

Studio.

This

four an

iterations

of

Interdisciplinary

series

of

studios

is

investigate

how

existing

suburban

Austin’s may

be mixed, but the consequences are certainly environmentally

unsustainable

and

socially

inequitable. The studio is listed as having a “service-

supported by the Meadows Foundation and will generally

of

population

learning”

component.

This

term

reflects

the

sustainable

idea that the collaboration of university and

through the lenses of five related disciplines:

community learners is symmetrical — both parties

Architecture,

Sustainable

have

Preservation,

Landscape

landscapes

can

be

made

more

Design,

Historic

Architecture,

and

will

Planning. This

first

investigated

the

studio

more

related

specifically phenomena

of

knowledge

required

for

the

successful

realization of the project and that both parties benefit

equally.

Our

responsibility

to

serve the community is taken very seriously and provides a pedagogical context that should

gentrification and suburbanization. Comparison

challenge

of census data from 2000 and 2010 demonstrated

culture.”

the

traditional

values

of

“studio

a dramatic relocation of the African-American steven moore : advanced studio, fa2011

The studio intends to improve quality of life for current and future Manor residents in the execution of high quality design intended to enhance human health and well-being while honoring the ecological assets of the site.

To reduce the chance of flooding, stormwater infrastructure such as ditches, retention ponds, and sewer systems must be built and maintained. By harvesting rain for slow release, the cost to the city government and taxpayers is greatly reduced.

Rearranging home lots to create a shared green space in the middle of the neighborhood, accessible from backyards or through walking paths. This space can be used by residents to pursure the shared interests — for instance as a community garden or for children’s play areas — and still increase density.


DENSITY | AUSTIN

137

fastest growing regions in North

Increasing urban density is widely believed to be the most sustainable solution to the problem of a rapidly rising global population dependent on limited natural resources. When increasing density what maintains livability? What is the “urban age” city?

America. With population that has doubled over the past thirty years to its current 786,000 residents (1.7

million

metropolitan

in

the

area),

immediate Austin

is

predicted to double in size again by 2039. In particular, Design Four focused

“Density, as distinct from congestion, promotes

on

engagement.

by

between Lamar Boulevard and Interstate 35, which

proximity, is crucial and far more difficult to

is an ongoing vision and redevelopment project

sustain where things are spread out across great

for the City of Austin. The students proposed

distances . . . ”

significant increases to the density of the

Interaction,

made

possible

— Alex Krieger

a

two-mile

stretch

of

Airport

Boulevard

area, while supporting the city’s initiative to “transform the low-density, auto-oriented

conjures

commercial corridor into a pedestrian friendly

images of compactness or concentration, a tight

linear village with a better balance of uses,

assemblage of elements, it cannot be reduced

quality streetscapes, better connectivity to

simply to units and numbers; it describes a

neighborhoods,

complex relationship between things and people.

options.”

Although

the

term

“density”

first

Austin, one of the five large urban areas

and

greater

transportation

Over the course of the semester, the students

fifteen

analyzed the site, proposed an urban strategy, and

million that comprise the I-35 Corridor (or

designed a mixed-use building, which responded

I-35 Megalopolis), was used as the site for

to the urban design rules developed by each team

study and intervention. It is also one of the

and included no less than sixty living units.

with

a

combined

population

of

over

nichole wiedemann (coordinator), judy birdsong, charlton lewis, clay odom : design four, sp2011

Increasing urban density while maintaining livability means considering not just the spatial qualities of a site, but also the temporal ones. By shuffling programs in all directions and across all times the design achieves a diversity of rich experiences that improve quality of life. ian robertson

The “urban age” city can be defined by accessibility, boundary and diversity. Effective connections between site and context, limits to development, and variety in interactions are key to sustaining livability. hellen awino

Today’s urban sprawl needs to be addressed through densification. However, we need to ensure that by increasing the density of our cities that we still respect the needs of each zone. diana sisk


Airport

Boulevard,

a

circulation remnant of postWorld 138

War

II

development,

AIRPORT BOULEVARD HOUSING

celebrated the height of the

madison dahl

Boulevard exists today as a

automobile in Austin. Airport concrete void not unique in

its continued injury to surrounding residents and businesses. A mixed-use development reinvigorates the street edge, while increasing density within the scale of the adjacent residential neighborhoods. Presence in the site brought awareness of the adjacent railroad and vehicle corridors. A series of maps illustrated porosity, accessibility, and sound as issues to address in urban design. A programmatic weave of the individual and the public creates a new grain along Airport Boulevard, in which highdensity housing coincides with community space. To allow porosity, housing units form parallel bars spanning east to west while public circulation and community spaces weave north to south. Public spaces occur in line with those of neighboring buildings and link the cross-grains occurring on the site. To maintain livability in the increasingly dense city, direct access and control of sunlight fulfill the requisites of the individual. In interest of the individual, light alters experience. Light wells cut down through the building draw light into the center of each unit. The voids pierce the roof, floor slabs, and parking garage, offering diffuse sunlight and an awareness of building organization. Opportunities to claim natural space occur in interior balconies opening to the void, and along the modular, operable screen on the public face of the building. Allowing personal control in the mitigation of southern light, the moving skin registers the individual. nichole wiedemann : design four, sp2011


140

DESIGN FOR FLEXIBILITY Flexible buildings can adapt to the changing needs of occupants, adjust to changing demographics and new living patterns, as well as allow the end users to take control.

universal design and barrier-free design

guidelines.

We

explored

how flexible design concepts can contribute to extend the lifespan of the products we use and the buildings we inhabit, and through

This studio focused on the design of flexible

this contribute to a more sustainable future. From

buildings, spaces, and products. Rather than

the very first sketch idea to the final product,

concentrating on purely formal design concepts,

this studio aimed to serve as an inspiration and

we looked at design strategies that focus on

resource to help us gain a better understanding

functionality,

adaptability,

of adaptable and flexible open building systems

emphasis

was

and how their thoughtful integration into the

put on a multi-generational "Design for All"

design process can significantly enhance and

approach, which included the consideration of

improve the built environment in which we live.

and

performance.

flexibility, In

addition,

ulrich dangel : vertical studio, fa2011

Flexible architecture allows for adaptability over time by the people who occupy it. The change in program or the desire for alterable spatial experiences led the design process in determining how flexible spaces can have a longer shelf life than static buildings designed for a twenty-year life span. emily ewbank The chair incorporates literal flexibility of the hammock-like fabric seat, positional flexibility of the orthogonal frame, infinite flexibility of shapes by the fabric stretched over the frame, and practical flexibility of easy assembly and disassembly. shelby blessing

If you provide a generous base condition — recreation and storage space for the entire building, plenty of light, private balconies, a free-plan and double-height spaces in the units — and allow for customization of the space-plan with sliding interior partitions and exterior louvered screens, the units feel less generic and consume fewer resources over the lifespan of the building. sophia monahon


AUSTIN | MADRID

141

more cosmopolitan population that

How can Austin’s growth successfully incorporate the Compact City model? Can we learn from Madrid? What can we learn from researching and comparing the two cities?

is discovering the benefits of compact urban life. The potential for a viable alternative to the Landscape

City

in

the

central

core of Austin is undeniable and

THE LANDSCAPE CITY: THE AMERICAN MODEL

is, right now, being realized. Can we have it

Austin has been and still is fundamentally a

both ways? Ultimately,

Landscape City: a limitless, low-density city

continuous

cities

balance

are

the

between

result

ambition

of

where the majority of people live in single-family

a

and

houses. The Landscape City model is rooted in a

compromise:  lofty desires are many times scaled

strong American tradition, and we must accept

down, ambitious goals get cut back. But the most

that people like it. Austin in particular is an

successful cities maintain the aspirations that

example of a successful Landscape City, and the

define their identity while managing to adapt

overall beautiful integration with its natural

to new circumstances. Here in Austin, we must

landscape has been an important attraction for

aspire to preserve and continue to create the

people moving here.

best Landscape City possible, adjusting this model of development as necessary so it can

THE COMPACT CITY: THE EUROPEAN MODEL

sustain the balance between nature and human

On the other hand, there is a model of city that

habitation. We must also commit ourselves to

emphasizes higher density, pedestrian-oriented

continue

developments, and multi-family housing. This

a Compact City that thrives, not only in the

Compact

to

support

a

viable

alternative,

in

central core, but also in nodes around the city

Austin, and for good reasons: there is more

and the transit corridors that connect them. As

mainstream awareness about the perils of our

Austin continues to grow, we must embrace the

dependence on fossil fuels, and there is, not

virtues of these two models and find the way to

only in Austin but across United States, a

mesh them together successfully.

City

model

has

gained

momentum

juan miro : advanced studio, sp2011

kendra locklear, benjamin mengden, bryon pigg, yvonne xie

The site is a variable wasteland existing at the nexus of numerous fabrics: historic neighborhood, burgeoning downtown, cultural loop, and Zilker Park. The scheme is a hybrid of the landscape city and compact city models, negotiating disparities caused by deurbanization, suburban exodus, and socioeconomic divide. andrew bell, audrey mckee, nishiel patel, michael wiegmann


Most relevant to our team was the transitional location of

DISTRICT 10

142

shawn m. balon, ashley craig clay callahan, mari michael glassell

the

site,

of

dramatically

the

overlapping different

existing urban fabric, and the abundance space

of

underutilized

primarily

surface

parking lots. This underutilization meant that the site was effectively a “hole” in the urban fabric of Austin, a wasteland between the increasingly vibrant downtown and “SOCO” section of South Congress. It became the goal of our urban strategy to stitch these two areas of the city together in a meaningful and functionally relevant way. By mid-semester, after presenting our initital master plan, our group separated into groups of two, using the initial master plan and density guidelines as a semi-rigid framework to develop distinctly different strategies for our terminal presentation. juan miro : advanced studio, sp2011

shawn m. balon, ashley craig The development of the final plan and block typologies were formulated through further evaluation of proposed and existing green infrastructures. Various bio-streets were developed throughout to maintain water through both cistern and groundwater filtration systems. Interactive parks and infrastructural elements have been strategically located to indicate the flow of the systems from the creek to the river. All transportation related infrastructural components (light rail, parking, pedestrian paths, etc.) are located within the living system allowing for bioremediation throughout the site. The sequence of block typologies addresses the need for diversity of density, scale, and a mixture of commercial and residential programs. Working within the initial proposed framework, the final plan responds to three typologically different zones, the creek, the interstice, and the riverside. Each zone is thought to have a different character creating both physical and programmatic transitions when moving through the site. Strengthening the overall concept, the architectural and block typologies are to be developed in correlation with the functional needs of the living system.


clay callahan, mari michael glassell Our approach from this point was to focus on the specific process of selecting design parameters, which we believed could be used to generate a tool rather than strictly an analysis. The purpose of the tool was to provide a construct to push back against the frequent tendency of urban designers to generate designs from whole cloth without any possibility of accidental moments of collision, overlap, or proximity — the very features which draw us to the great cities of the world. The idea, in brief, was that by establishing fundamental design requirements, we were forced to confront aspects of the design which operated outside of our specific design decisions, and then to re-evaluate the appropriateness of our design as well as the appropriateness of the “parameters� used. The result of this process was an urban design scheme which sought to express the hand of the designer as well as the influence of immutable aspects of the site and city as they exist.


144

shawn m. balon, ashley craig


145

clay callahan, mari michael glassell


146

DESIGN AS METHOD FOR UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY To view architecture as a way of critically assessing the process of urbanization/urban development and to develop the ability to manage spatial and material form as a response to a complex, multi-use program in a specific context.

the stated policy in the Austin Downtown Master Plan. After analysis,

compiling students

a

site

were

asked

to produce four abstract models, illustrating their attitude toward the site, what it is, and what it

The vertical studio addressed the comprehensive

may become; space, visual representations of

architectural design of a multi-use building

solid and void, path and motion, intensity of

program on a downtown site in Austin. Each student

use; object form — to explore initial ideas about

(student team) developed his/her own program,

design of buildings as objects; and concept — to

based on a site analysis and an understanding of

demonstrate first ideas of a concept form. These

the context of the site. The only restriction

studies were done with found objects, meant to

was

free the students from conventional form ideas

that

street-related

commercial,

retail,

and public uses must remain in accordance with

and to allow the objects be the narrative. carmen garufo : vertical studio, fa2011

This Urban Living Room creates a hub for pedestrians in Downtown Austin. By having an open ground floor plan, opened to Shoal Creek and major entry points, this project increases the connectivity of Austin Downtown. june jung, yoko shimajuko

My thesis, “Reasons to Stay,” is exemplified by how the chosen programs interact physically as woven masses and are connected by layered circulation. Visiting the complex will never become routine, but always open to exploration. sunny schneberger

The project considers Austin’s culture of congestion, answering the needs of each transportation mode by providing a dense integration of interior paths with a rich diversity of program. chad bunnell, jena hammond, james sherman


THE TROUBLE WITH HOUSING

147

The trouble with housing is that it is typically produced by developers and its form is principally driven by notions of universal marketability.

minimize idiosyncrasies. The studio designs housing from two perspectives. One perspective asked

how

external

forces

like

climate and context might influence Therefore, it tends to be generic with character

formal character.  The other perspective asked

aimed at mass appeal. It is frequently ignorant

how

of

formal character.

its

specific

location,

and

it

tries

to

the

internal

morphology

might

influence

larry doll : vertical studio, sp2011

Intended to bring families from the suburbs to downtown, the structure stacks generous single-family residences, affording a sense of individuality on a smaller scale while developing a complex, unified surface pattern on the scale of the building. andrew green

tyler noblin

This project explores advancements in emerging materials and sustainable building systems. It aims to create a unique dialogue between a new mixed-use housing project and an elevated public park in downtown Austin, constituting a new icon for the heart of the city. conner bryan


Many

multi-family

housing

projects since the nineteenth century have used large-scale 148

VOID HOUSE michael beene

massing strategies to ensure that each dwelling unit would receive

adequate

access,

light, and air. Typologies, like the courtyard block and cruciform plan, facilitated the efficiency with which these needs could be met by allowing the architect to design fewer, wellfunctioning units that could be repeated ad infinitum. Today, as the desire for individual expression underlies nearly every facet of our culture, the primary disadvantage of this approach becomes clear: its reliance upon repetition does not recognize the heightened role of the individual in today's society. This project explores an alternative to the large-scale massing approach of multi-family housing. By breaking down each unit into its most primary components (bedroom, kitchen, terrace, etc.) and procedurally reassembling them with regards to access, light, and air, the resultant building provides a limitless variety of experiences without sacrificing functional performance. A computer algorithm was written that begins with the program requirements, site dimensions, and site location (latitude and longitude), along with a desired minimum of direct daylight hours for each unit's living room window. The algorithm proceeds to build units individually, ensuring that each floor plan is completely unique. With each unit, the algorithm monitors whether performance conditions are met (i.e., the unit itself has adequate sunlight and does not impede the sunlight of other units). If conditions are satisfied, the algorithm continues forward with the design; otherwise, it tries a different solution. Service and public programs are interspersed along circulation paths and covered with terraformed park spaces for use by the residents. Like the cells of an organism, the components of the building react to their immediate contexts according to basic rules, allowing larger patterns to emerge naturally. The lack of reliance upon unit repetition creates an environment that fosters individual experiences while excelling functionally. larry doll : vertical studio, sp2011


//adjustable program parameters int numResUnitXL = 25; int numResUnitL = 50; int numResUnitM = 75; int numResUnitS = 100; int numCircCore = 2; //building parameter variables float siteWidth = 340; float siteDepth = 280; float buildingW = 340; float buildingD = 280; float buildingH = 150; float gridSpaceX = 14; float gridSpaceY = 14; float gridSpaceZ = 10; int numGridLinesX = int(buildingW/gridSpaceX) + 1; int numGridLinesY = int(buildingD/gridSpaceY) + 1; int numGridLinesZ = int(buildingH/gridSpaceZ) + 1; float[]gridX= new float[numGridLinesX]; float[]gridY= new float[numGridLinesY]; float[]gridZ= new float[numGridLinesZ]; int[][][] prog = new int[numGridLinesX + 1] [numGridLinesY + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; int[][][]unitID = new int[numGridLinesX + 1] [numGridLinesY + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; int unitStep = 0; int roomStep = 0; int fail = 0; int[][][] numAdj = new int[numGridLinesX + 1] [numGridLinesY + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; //extra large residential unit variables int resUnitXLCounter = 0; int resUnitXLEntranceX; int resUnitXLEntranceY; int resUnitXLEntranceZ; int resUnitXLLive1X; int resUnitXLLive1Y; int resUnitXLLive1Z; int resUnitXLLive2X; int resUnitXLLive2Y; int resUnitXLLive2Z; int resUnitXLTerrace1X; int resUnitXLTerrace1Y; int resUnitXLTerrace1Z; int resUnitXLTerrace2X; int resUnitXLTerrace2Y; int resUnitXLTerrace2Z; int resUnitXLTerrace3X; int resUnitXLTerrace3Y; int resUnitXLTerrace3Z; int resUnitXLKit1X; int resUnitXLKit1Y; int resUnitXLKit1Z; user input for program properties int resUnitXLKit2X; int resUnitXLKit2Y; maximum building envelope int resUnitXLKit2Z; adjacency algorithm int resUnitXLBed1X; int resUnitXLBed1Y; sunlight algorithm int resUnitXLBed1Z; int resUnitXLBed2X; circulation core placement int resUnitXLBed2Y; running track placement int resUnitXLBed2Z; int resUnitXLMBed1X; theater placement int resUnitXLMBed1Y; int resUnitXLMBed1Z; child care center placement int resUnitXLMBed2X; park space placement int resUnitXLMBed2Y; int resUnitXLMBed2Z;

public pool placement

//large residential unit variables int resUnitLCounter = 0; int resUnitLEntranceX; int resUnitLEntranceY; int resUnitLEntranceZ; int resUnitLLive1X; int resUnitLLive1Y; int resUnitLLive1Z; int resUnitLTerrace1X; int resUnitLTerrace1Y; int resUnitLTerrace1Z; int resUnitLTerrace2X;

void draw() { //export .dxf if (record == true) { beginRaw(DXF, “output.dxf�); // Start record the file } background(255); lights(); //draw site lines stroke(0,0,0,50); noFill(); rect(0,0,siteWidth,siteDepth);

//draw building for (int i = 1; i < numGridLinesX; i++) { for (int j = 1; j < numGridLinesY; j++) { for (int k = 1; k < numGridLinesZ; k++) { if(prog[i][j][k] == 1) { //draw resUnitXLEn pushMatrix(); translate(gridX[i - 1], gridY[j - 1], gridZ[ noFill(); stroke(0,150,180); rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, gridSpaceY); if(renderMode == 1) { translate(gridSpaceX/2,gridSpaceY/2, paceZ/2); stroke(0); fill(255); box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY,gridSpac } popMatrix(); } if(prog[i][j][k] == 2) { //draw resUnitXLLiv pushMatrix(); translate(gridX[i - 1], gridY[j - 1], gridZ[ noFill(); stroke(0,150,180); rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, gridSpaceY); if(renderMode == 1) { translate(gridSpaceX/2,gridSpaceY/2, paceZ/2); stroke(0); fill(255); box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY,gridSpac } popMatrix(); } if(prog[i][j][k] == 3) { //draw resUnitXLLiv pushMatrix(); translate(gridX[i - 1], gridY[j - 1], gridZ[ noFill(); stroke(0,150,180); rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, gridSpaceY); if(renderMode == 1) { translate(gridSpaceX/2,gridSpaceY/2, paceZ/2); stroke(0); fill(255); box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY,gridSpac } popMatrix(); } if(prog[i][j][k] == 4) { //draw resUnitXLKit pushMatrix(); translate(gridX[i - 1], gridY[j - 1], gridZ[ noFill(); stroke(255,57,39); rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, gridSpaceY); if(renderMode == 1) { translate(gridSpaceX/2,gridSpaceY/2, paceZ/2); stroke(0); fill(255); box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY,gridSpac } popMatrix(); } if(prog[i][j][k] == 5) { //draw resUnitXLKit pushMatrix(); translate(gridX[i - 1], gridY[j - 1], gridZ[ noFill(); stroke(255,57,39); rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, gridSpaceY); if(renderMode == 1) { translate(gridSpaceX/2,gridSpaceY/2,


150

THE RESEARCH QUESTION : ARCHITECTURE OF URBAN MODIFICATION

In a series of articles published in the Italian

Therefore, the architecture of modification

architectural magazine, Casabella, architects

is born out of the realization of context as

Vitorrio

Brandolini

something perceivable, tangible, and editable.

elaborate on the theory and strategies of what they

By way of this definition, architecture becomes

define to be “the architecture of modification.”

intrinsic

Revisiting this topic in a corresponding chapter

reveal a specific truth of both the present

titled, “On Modification,” from his book, Inside

state of a site and the site in relationship to

Architecture, Gregotti writes that:

its geographical and historical context. These

Gregotti

and

Sebastiano

No new architecture can arise without modifying what already exists, but the interest surrounding the notion of modification in recent years is not based on such an obvious consideration, at least if we view modification as recognizing the importance of what exists as structural material, rather than mere background, during the design process.

to

urban

intervention,

seeking

to

truths, as later explained by Gregotti, are best revealed not through completion or reconciliation of what exists in terms of forms or types, but through disparities and the juxtaposition of context as structural material and the project as a modification of that material. Gregotti also writes:


If we aspire to employ the kind of quality that stems from commitment to the specific situation as the essence of the particular aim and the truth of the site, then not only do differences become values, but project-making comes to mean modifying the very rules of our belonging.

tested and codified through critical analysis and be implemented as the primary device for urbanism? Ultimately, this “project-making” as modification of the “rules of our belonging” is the fundamental structure of this investigation, which

In this investigation the question is: Can the architecture of modification, as a theory

will

aspire

to

employ

the

notion

of

architecture not autonomously but as integral to the process of urban design.

that structures various strategies of design, be ashley craig : masters design study, fa2011, critic : dean almy


152

DAYLIGHT + ARCHITECTURE East Africa.

Environmental design principles should, but rarely do, provide a springboard for innovation in the design studio. Stimulating innovation requires an emphasis on how to integrate technological understanding (know how) and design theory (know why).

The Maasai tribe of Esilalei gave forty acres for the project. Ten acres would be used for the school, and the remaining thirty acres

would

be

planted

with

a

triple crop of maize, sunflowers, and chickpeas as a means of helping the Maasai, who are sometimes food

In the spring of 2011 the School of Architecture

insecure and suffer from malnutrition. The school

at

was

would include a freshwater well and would serve

contacted by Dr. Donna Gunn, Executive Director

the

University

of

Texas

at

Austin

approximately four hundred children, as well as

of Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Promise Village School, seeking

the community, the cattle and goats, and crop

sustainable design assistance for the development

irrigation. The children and residents of the

of a new school in rural Tanzania. This school

village would be educated in crop production;

was to serve the parish of Father Peter Pascal

water from the well would allow them to irrigate

Pinto, SVD, located in the Simanjiro district

and increase crop yields, and revenue from the

in Tanzania, and would serve nineteen Maasai

sale of excess crops will be used to sustain

villages. Simanjiro is one of the five districts

the

of the Manyara Region of Tanzania, located just

classrooms, dorms for students and volunteers,

to the east of the Serengeti National Park and

an outdoor cooking facility, teacher housing,

to the south of Arusha and Mount Kilimanjaro in

and sanitation facilities.

school.

The

complex

would

include

ten

michael garrison : vertical studio, sp2011

Increased frequency of drought has forced the Maasai to adopt a more sedentary, agricultural way of life creating a need for permanent structures. This project investigates the viability of bamboo construction. ana calhoun, kathryn chang, june jung, christine kim, gordon lee

Designing a school in Tanzania was a great opportunity to integrate the Massaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition, local resources, and practical building techniques into functional form and an educational environment for the children. christine kim

The design intent was to mediate the environmental and cultural demands using simple, sustainable solutions that remained sensitive to the site. kaziah haviland


TRANSPARENCY AND PRIVACY

153

The small lot measures 25' x

The rapidly changing global situation forces us to rethink urban concepts and building types in order to significantly minimize the impact on the environment.

120' (3,000 sf) and fits within many suburban American properties (subdivided or not). The units are attached by a party wall that runs over the whole depth of the site.

The class works on a low-rise building type

The walls, eighteen feet in height, guarantee

for urban and suburban areas with high density.

maximum privacy and allow for two-story units.

We systematically explore variations in design

Courtyards or other solutions provide lighting,

approach to understand the inherent laws of an

natural

energy-efficient and flexible building type.

The

We are looking for different strategies, which

outdoor

meet the requirements of three different climate

sequences

zones represented by Chicago, Austin, and Las

horizontally and vertically) can be composed.

Vegas. The solutions have to provide a high

The concept and the layout of the unit should

level of privacy and great spatial experience.

be flexible and adaptable to different concepts

ventilation, relations spaces of

are

and

and

outdoor

ratio

of

essential,

different

spatial

spaces.

indoor

and

and

exciting

zones

(both

and

of life and residential purposes and situations

privacy on a high level, we focus on the envelope

(use for one family, two families, parties,

in general and down to the relevant details.

or other unit-sharing concepts). Professional

Adaptable permeability is the key to reacting

activities such as a design studio or shop could

to fluctuating outdoor and indoor conditions.

also be integrated in the unit to reduce traffic.

To

fulfill

all

aspects

of

comfort

peter bonfig : advanced studio, sp2011

Since building dimensions are predetermined by lot, the project becomes about a cooperative interiority through the use of solids and voids, compression and release, to create a variety of compact spaces and courtyards while exploring notions of public, private, and shared. paul li

The primary element that makes a sustainable community special is not the architecture - it is the people who live there and the potentials for life to fill the atmosphere. yanjing chen

The poetics of transparency and privacy lie in flexibility, in both physical and psychological sense of the term. jing gao


154


"persephassa" : oct 19 music in architecture symposium


INDEX

156

critics Alford, Elizabeth : 15, 16 Almy, Dean : 116, 123, 125, 151 Alter, Kevin : 35, 36, 63 Atkinson, Simon : 115 Baldridge, Burton : 96 Bell, Bryan : 48-49 Benedikt, Michael : 10, 20, 42 Birdsong, Judy : 30, 99, 137 Blood, John : 57, 78, 80, 129, 130 Bonfig, Peter : 153 Briscoe, Danelle : 78 Bucek, David : 44 Clark, April : 71, 72 Coker, Coleman : 88, 97, 100 Cragnolino, Ernesto : 35, 36, 78 Dangel, Ulrich : 78, 140 Danze, Elizabeth : 21, 22, 57, 129, 130 Doll, Larry : 50, 147, 148 Fajkus, Matt : 51, 52, 117, 118 Furlong, Kim : 64 Gamble, Sarah : 57 Garrison, Michael : 122, 152 Garufo, Carmen : 146 Gaskins, Allison : 71 Glass, Tamie : 11, 12, 56 Gomes, Francisco : 63, 75, 76, 117, 118 Hasbrouck, Hope : 87, 110, 112, 125 Heymann, David : 7, 71, 110, 112 Lara, Fernando : 85, 95 Lewis, Charlton : 137 Maˇ cek, Mark : 28-29 Mainster, Sydney : 127 Matthews, Carl : 58, 70 Milovanovic-Bertram, Smilja : 10, 71, 83, 128 Miro, Juan : 57, 141, 142 Moore, Steven : 136 Moreno, Adrian : 84 Nichols, Kelly : 135 Odom, Clay : 137 Pezo, Mauricio : 43 Qi, Meng : 135 Raab, Peter : 57 Rosner, Joyce : 27, 45, 46 Sáez, José María : 84 Sanders, Jack : 31, 32 Shearer, Allan : 74, 89, 90 Shortall, Clay : 104 Siddiqui, Igor : 18-19, 65, 66 Snyder, Vincent : 86, 105, 106 Sonnenberg, Stephen : 21, 22 Sowell, Jason : 6, 26, 101, 102 Stern, William : 44 Udovicki-Selb, Danilo : 14, 123, 129, 130 Von Ellrichshausen, Sofia : 43 Wang, Wilfried : 59, 60 Weinthal, Lois : 6-7, 34, 71 Wiedemann, Nichole : 137, 138 Wilson, Barbara : 48-49 Young, Michael : 15, 16

students Abrams, Janice : 96 Adams, Danica : 48 Akdag, Esra : 34 Allinder, Nicholas : 51 Amundsen, Kristin : 65 Anderson, Brian : 19 Anderson, Samantha : 31 Angelo, Nick : 129 Arnold, Beth : 10, 28, 86

Avery, Travis : 59 Awino, Hellen : 137 Babel, Jeremy : 43 Balon, Shawn M. : 124-125, 142-145 Basilico, Raquel : 84 Bedford, Brian : 42, 100 Bedford, Kate : 46-47, 100 Beene, Michael : 106-109, 148-149 Belkowski, Nicholas : 30 Bell, Andrew : 141 Bennett, Chris : 19, 49 Berryhill, Hannah : 70 Blessing, Shelby : 48, 140 Blocksidge, Jeffrey : 44 Bodkin, John : 57 Boduch, Michael : 122 Bowers, Kate : 14 Bowman, Ben : 96 Boyle, Joseph : 62-63 Bright, Michelle : 89 Broadfoot, Rebekah : 96 Bronson, Shannon : 115 Brown, Erin : 64 Brunner, Seth : 19 Bryan, Conner : 48, 106-109, 147 Bryant, Laura : 101 Bulleit, Alix : 56 Bullock, Rachel : 42, 97 Bunnell, Chad : 146 Bush, Alan : 48 Butool, Jafri : 38 Cahir, Kathryn : 122 Calhoun, Ana : 152 Callahan, Clay : 142-145 Campbell, Tim : 89 Carpenter, Victoria : 57 Carr, Andrew : 35 Cepeda, Agustin : 74 Chae, Charleen : 78 Chang, Christopher : 104 Chang, Kathryn : 152 Chen, Yanjing : 153 Cherng, Wei-Pei : 97 Chitrarachis, Tica : 123 Cook, Travis : 19, 29 Cooper, Brittany : 35, 45 Cooper, Whitney : 117 Craig, Ashley : 115, 142-145, 150-151 Cruz, Jimena : 49 Dahl, Madison : 50, 138-139 Davidson, Katia : 29 Davis, Andrew : 82-83, 128 Denkeler, Lana : 111 Dezinski, Jenna : 86, 92-95, 111, 114 Dineen, Ken : 84 Doherty, Brian : 42, 114 Draves, Dylan : 65 Edwards, Laura : 30 Effland, Emily : 64 Ellis, Yvonne : 101 Engoian, Kyle : 48, 75 Entrop, Meredith : 89 Eum, Jinhyok : 34 Ewbank, Emily : 140 Fan, Jeannie : 111 Faz, Jorge : 85 Feldmann, Lisa : 75 Ferry, Todd : 45, 92-95 Fincher, Warren : 122 Fisher, Jackie : 128 Frail, Beau : 60-61


Freedberg, Amy : 92-95 Fuentes, Nelly : 101 Fulcher, Andrew : 43 Galbreath, Jameson : 50 Galindo, Andres : 132-135 Galloway, Ross : 88 Gao, Yijiao : 34 Gao, Jing : 153 Garcia, Jose : 123 Garcia, Thomas : 64 Garcia-Castrillo, Hector : 79, 130-131 Gardner, Christopher : 129 Gaspard, Robert : 20 Genova, Jared : 115 Gladding, Josh : 115 Glassell, Mari Michael : 142-145 Glennie, Jessica : 57 Gomez, Angelo : 15 Gonzalez, Andrea : 104 Green, Andrew : 52-53, 147 Grenard, Laura : 112-113 Hadilou, Arman : 84 Halbach, Noah : 102-103 Hamilton, Andrea : 64 Hammond, Jena : 146 Harding, Kimberly : 26 Hardy, Laine : 105 Harness, Clifton : 57 Harris, Tyler : 48 Haschke, Ben : 31 Haviland, Kaziah : 48, 152 Heyer, Kelly : 49 Ho, Vince : 117 Horn, Charles Amos : 49 Huynh, Julie : 49, 130-131 Jackson, Nicholas : 111 Jafri, Butool : 70 Johnson, Jeremy : 115 Jones, Garrett : 22-23 Jones, Lindsey : 49 Joslin, Reid : 71 Jow, Joshua : 21 Joynton, Carrie : 48 Jung, June : 24-25, 68-69, 126-127, 146, 152 Junius, Joe : 48 Kerrick, Jennifer : 28, 100 Kim, Christine : 105, 152 Kim, Joanne : 6, 34 King, Elise : 64 Kinnaird, Nik : 129 Klimek, Stephen : 49 Koch, Jessi : 49 Kopplin, Stephanie : 26 Kraus, Cameron : 45, 105 Larsson, Chelsea : 115 Le Blanc, Elizabeth : 57 Lee, Gordon : 59, 152 Leifeste, Amalia : 64 Leonard, Emma : 115 Lewis, Maiya : 122 Lewis, William : 79 Li, Paul : 153 Lieck, Jackie : 31 Liu, Siqi : 97 Locklear, Kendra : 44, 141 Love, Marisa : 35 Mac, Luu : 129 Maddox, Randy : 122 Marciniak, Noah : 18 Markrim, Nichole : 71 Martin, Michael : 49

Martinez Jr., Jorge : 14 Marvin, Megan : 78 Massey, Taylor : 85 McCord, Jeffrey : 35 McCourt, Lily : 11 McGiffin, Cheryl : 27 McGilvray, Julie : 74 McGowan, Jennifer : 34 McKee, Audrey : 141 McMillan, Emily : 48 McNally-Anderson, Taylor : 18, 36-39, 86 Mendez, Cruz : 27 Meyer, Rachel : 34 Milas, Brittany : 79 Mengden, Benjamin : 141 Mills, Jessica : 30 Miltenberger, Mona : 34, 58 Minter, Jason : 48 Miracle, Sarah : 56 Mireshghi, Pedram : 122 Monahon, Sophia : 140 Montgomery, Greg : 42, 114 Morris, Benjamin : 51 Morrison, Daniel : 28, 88 Mote, Amanda : 128 Mowry, Megan : 14, 50, 122-123 Muhler, Nathaniel : 10 Muirhead, Loren : 98-99 Murton, Chris : 6, 48, 87, 90-91 Naumann, Blake : 129 Noblin, Tyler : 18, 36-39, 147 Northrop, Ryan : 114 Nyugen, Huong : 97 Ortiz, Selina : 40-41, 154-155 Oscilowski, Justin : 64 Painter, Jessica : 31 Palone, Annie : 48, 90-91 Parsons, Rob : 49 Patel, Nishiel : 141 Peper, Barron : 72-73 Pesa, Beau : 102-103 Phillips, Kat : 90-91 Pierce, Sarah : 101 Pieslak, Jola : 15 Pigg, Bryon : 35, 141 Prin, Amanda : 21 Purnell, Molly : 51, 92-95 Putri, Edelyn : 34 Quintana-Morales, Amarantha : 105 Rahmatoulin, Michael : 27 Rasmussen, Ryan : 31 Ray, Emily : 64 Reed, Johanna : 88 Richter, Lauren : 79 Robertson, Ian : 137 Rodriguez, Alberto : 16-17 Rome, Brian : 62-63 Russett, Katherine : 59 Rysavy, John Paul : 48, 117 Sackinger, Rachel : 58 Salina, Maria Garza : 104 Sanga, Monica : 51 Scarfe, Emily : 111 Schneberger, Sunny : 146 Schneider, Nathaniel : 75 Schneider, Travis : 27 Schwartz, Jonathan : 62-63 Sha, Sarah : 114 Sherman, James : 146 Shimajuko, Yoko : 146 Shumaker, Daniel : 43

Sisk, Diana : 137 Sleator, Aaron : 21 Smith, Blake : 19, 118-121 Smith, Christopher : 115 Smith, Kayla : 20 Spence Jr., James : 122 Spencer, Johanna : 31, 32-33 Stanley, Kristen : 128 Stephens, Veronica : 74 Steshyn, Nick : 76-77 Street, Greg : 85 Strick, Michelle : 48 Su, Diana : 43 Sullivan, Kevin : 87, 90-91 Taganas, Alexer : 62-63 Theochari, Dimitra : 101, 111 Thomas, Natalie : 48 Thompson, Elizabeth : 10-11 Thompson, Parker : 29 Turner, Sam : 96 Turrubiates, Higinio : 71 Vance, Nicole : 101 Villalpando, Aurora : 70 Villavicencio, Kim : 80-81 Vithayathawornwong, Bea : 48 Vogl, Lauren : 123 Wagner, Laura : 118-121 Walker, Ben : 31 Walker, Tristan : 32-33 Ward, Natalie : 115 Weese-Young, Julia : 26 West, Alisa : 112-113 West, Katie : 122 West, Roddrick : 122 Whitney-Schwarze, Samantha : 123 Wiegand, Emily : 128 Wiegmann, Michael : 141 Wier, Josh : 31 Wilkowski, Rose : 66-67 Williams, Molly : 49 Winslow, Jane : 49 Winter, Robin : 101 Wright, Heather : 56 Xie, Wenyu : 115 Xie, Yvonne : 141 Yan, James : 74 Yong, Jessica : 11 Zarowitz, Jessica : 87, 89 Zhang, Hanying : 117 Ziemann, Jeff : 104 Zimmerman, Phil : 59

type DESIGN ONE : Design in the Realm of the Senses : 27 DESIGN TWO : Design in the Realm of Sciences : 71, 72-73 DESIGN THREE : Library of the Twenty-first Century : 57 DESIGN FOUR : Density | Austin : 137, 138-139 DESIGN FIVE : A Design Build Adventure : 31, 32-33 Design for Resilience : 85 Logistics | Air Cargo Facility : 104 The Poetics of Architecture : 14, 122-123 A Rehabilitation Center for Urban Raptors : 50 DESIGN SIX : Thomas C. Green Swim Center : 78-79, 80-81


158

VERTICAL STUDIO : Daylight + Architecture : 152 Design for Flexibility : 140 Design as Method for Understanding Community : 146 Flatbed Studio : 45, 46-47 In Transition : Adaptation in Time + Space : 51, 52-53 Learning from Lou : 42 Ordering Systems : 10 Park Playce : 86 Spatialities of Construction : Enclosure : 75, 76-77 Troping Ghosts : 30, 98-99 The Trouble with Housing : 147, 148-149 ADVANCED STUDIO : Architecture and Music : 20, 54-55, 154-155 Architecture | Psychoanalysis : 21, 22-23 Ark and Eden : 110-111, 112-113 Austin | Madrid : 141, 142-145 [Bracketing] Austin : 123 Community Health Care Center in Quito, Ecuador: 59, 60-61 Dallas Urban Laboratory Studio : 116 Detached : 43 Filling in the Blanks : 100 Idea, Form, and Matter : 84 Intervene : 64 Italy : 82-83, 128 Mod Recycling : 44 Optical Mass : 15, 16-17 Phase Shift – Losing Ground : 97 Retrofitting Suburbia 1 : 136 Rising Stream : 88 Studio Paris : 129, 130-131 Study in Italy : 126 Transparency and Privacy : 153 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS STUDIO : Airport of the Future : 105, 106-109 Cars, Commerce, and the Contemporary City : 117, 118-121 Marine Research and Education Center : 122 Threshold Housing : 96 Whatever Happened to Great Rooms? : 35, 36-39

INTERIOR DESIGN THREE : Austin Poetry and Literature Center : 11, 12-13 INTERIOR DESIGN FOUR : The Immersive Interior : 65, 66-67 INTERIOR DESIGN FIVE : Reclamation : 70 INTERIOR DESIGN SIX : Designing for Diabetes Health and Wellness : 58 ADVANCED INTERIOR DESIGN : House Lab : The Dining Room : 34 TOMS Design Studio – A New Retail Model : 56 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ONE : Performance Ground : 26 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE TWO : Mist, Play and Float : 87 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE THREE : The Waller Creek : 89, 90-91 COMPREHENSIVE LANDSCAPE STUDIO : Fields of Remains : 101, 102-103 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE STUDIO : Ark and Eden : 110-111, 112-113 Demonstration Gardens : Politics, Prospects, and Place-Making on the National Mall : 74 FEATURED COURSES : Collaboration Studio : 62-63 Prototype : 18-19 Public Interest Design : 48-49 Urban Land Institute Hines Competition : 114-115 Wood Design : 28-29 MASTERS DESIGN STUDY : Architecture of Urban Modification : 150-151 Transitional Boundaries : Reevaluating the Hutong : 124-125 PAPERS : Formality | Informality : 92-95 Permanent Supportive Housing’s Effect on Surrounding Property Values : 132-135 IMAGES : Robert Claude Gaspard : 54-55 Courtesy School of Architecture Visual Resources Collection, The University of Texas at Austin : June Jung : 24-25, 68-69, 126-127 Selina Ortiz : 40-41, 154-155


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We would like to thank the following contributors for their donations toward ISSUE:008. Without them, the publication of this book would not have been possible. Thank you.

kevin alter Director, UTSOA Summer Academy Sid W. Richardson Centennial Professor of Architecture

coleman coker Ruth Carter Stevenson Regents Chair in the Art of Design

elizabeth danze Paul Philippe Cret Centennial Teaching Fellow in Architecture Professional Residency Program

larry doll Margaret McDermott Centennial Teaching Fellow in Architecture

david heymann Harwell Hamilton Harris Regents Professor in Architecture

lawrence speck Lawrence W. Speck Excellence Fund

dean fritz steiner UTSOA Advisory Council and UT Friends of Architecture

nicole wiedemann Meadows Foundation Centennial Fellow in Architecture


1 University Station A6220 SOC #426 Austin, TX 78712 issue.publication @ gmail.com http://soa.utexas.edu/publications/issue/ http://theissuecollective.com/ Printing : The Whitley Group, Austin, Texas Š2012 ISSUE: All rights reserved.


ISSUE:008