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the uts alumni magazine | spring 2008

Tackling Climate Change UTS Student Azra Shivji represents Youth and Canada at UN Conference

30 years of co-ed 1978 at UTS: A Pivotal Year

alumni dinner Also:

Our Paparazzi were there – were You?

class of ’47 reunion | student achievements | Alumni News


Upcoming UTS Events

Mark Your Calendars Wednesday, April 23 to Wednesday, April 30

Arts & Music Week

Art Show/Reception: UTS Gym, Saturday, 5 to 7 p.m. Senior Arts & Music Night: Saturday, 7.30 p.m., Café Bleu afterwards. Junior Arts & Music Night: Wednesday, 7 p.m. Contact: jkay@utschools.ca and jwilliamson@utschools.ca Saturday, May 2

Rejuvenation

Hart House, 6:30 p.m. Contact: utsrejuvenation@utschools.ca

UTS Alumni Association Board of directors President

George Crawford ’72 (416) 499-9000 vice president

Peter Neilson ’71 (416) 214-5431 past president

Tom Sanderson ’55 (416) 604-4890 Treasurer

Bob Cumming ’65 (416) 727-6640 Secretary

Phil Weiner ’01 (416) 868-2239

Thursday, May 1 to Sunday, May 4

Classics Conference

Brock University. Contact: edisante@utschools.ca Wednesday, May 28

UTSAA Annual General Meeting UTS Library, 6.00 p.m. Contact: alumni@utschools.ca Thursday, June 24

Annual Alumni Golf Tournament St. Andrews Valley Golf Club, 11.30–1.30 Tee-offs Contact: Peter_Frost@canaccord.com, 416-867-2035

Honourary President

Michaele Robertson (416) 946-5334 Honourary Vice President

Rick Parsons (416) 978-3684 Executive director

Don Borthwick ’54 (416) 946-7012 directors

Gerald Crawford ’52 (905) 271-0445

Rob Duncan ’95 (416) 809-2488

Lisa Freeman ’95

FRIDAY, October 24

Alumni Dinner

UTS – 5.30 p.m. Reception, 7.00 p.m. Dinner. Special Anniversary Year Celebrations: 1948, 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973,1978, 1983, 1988, 1993,1998, 2003 All years are welcome! Contact: alumni@utschools.ca

(416) 923-5000

Peter Frost ’63 (416) 867-2035

Dana Gladstone ’80 (416) 643-4766

Sharon Lavine ’84 (416) 868-1755 x224

Bernie McGarva ’72 (416) 865-7765

Nick Smith ’63 (416) 920-0159

Jennifer Seuss ’94 (416) 654-2391


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Contents

IN SHORT

UTS Student Azra Shivji represented UTS, Canada and Youth in Bali.

Class of ’47

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Remembrance Day

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Photos from November’s service

President’s Report

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Principal’s Message

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Alumni’s role in the ‘new’ UTS

 our one-stop source for everything you need to know Y about plans for the UTS Centennial in 2010.

Vision accomplished!

Advancement Office 12 Everyone’s chipping in

22 Annual Alumni Dinner

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Reports

In 1978, UTS fledged its first female grads.

21 Centennial Notebook

Bits & Pieces

60th Reunion Celebration

18 The First Co-ed Class: 30 Years On

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Interesting happenings in brief

14 UN Climate Change Conference

Calendar of Events Upcoming alumni & school events

the root | fall 2008

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UTS Board Report

A 4-page photographic extravaganza from this past year’s event!

Supporting the vision

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26 Alumni News

 ll the latest in the lives of your classmates. In Memoriam and A tributes to the lives of several distinguished alumni. Our thanks to this issue’s contributors: Copy: George Crawford ‘72, Michaele Robertson, Bob Lord ‘58, Azra Shivji S6, Chuck Tysoe ’75, Martha Drake, Luke Stark ‘02, Carole Bernicchia-Freeman, Gerry Crawford ’52, Lily McGregor, Donna Vassel, Brian Livingston ’72, David Weiss ’86, Rob Duncan ’95, Ron Royer, Don Borthwick ’54. Photography: Cover: Victor Yeung. Victor Yeung, Caroline Kolch, UTS Archives, British Council of Canada, Jonathan Bright ’04.

University of Toronto Schools Alumni Association 371 Bloor Street West, Room 121, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2R7 Phone: (416) 978-3919 Fax: (416) 971-2354 E-mail: alumni@utschools.ca, Web: www.utschools.ca/alumni The Root is published Spring and Fall and is available to all alumni, parents and friends of UTS. Contact us at the above addresses to receive a copy or to change your address. This issue is also available on the website: www.utschools.ca/alumni/magazine.

Spring 2008

Editor: Don Borthwick ’54 Design: Eye-to-Eye Design Ad Design: Caroline Kolch, Eye-to-Eye Design Printed by: Thistle Printing Ltd.

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Bits&Pieces A Compendium of Noteworthy UTS Tidbits

Cruising around ‘the Horn’ – a midwinter’s delight!

in stature, maybe 20 inches tall, but long in charm, who make their homes in sand caves that they dig with their stiff wings. Other highlights included the Chilean fjords, among the vast archipelago of islands along Chile’s southern Patagonian coast, although the glaciers have largely receded into the distance. Next stop was the southernmost town on the continent, Ushuaia (“Ooshoowyia”), Argentina, population 50,000 – the South American equivalent of, say, Yellowknife – which survives mainly on government jobs and tourism. At sea again, we passed the Straits of Magellan – like Sir Francis Drake, or was it Capt. James Cook [?], past Tierra del Fuego to ‘The Horn’, the focus of the cruise, which is on the southernmost island among a vast archipelago of Patagonian

If you like cruises, I highly recommend one that may be more exotic in a different sort of way than the Caribbean or Mediterranean – a two week voyage around ‘The Horn’, from Chile to Brazil, in delightful, suspended reality on a luxury liner with unique stops along the way. Go in January, midsummer in the south, when temperatures, even at ’The Horn,’ are tolerably in the mid-teens. Our fascinating trip around Cape Horn started at Santiago, Chile, a thriving capital city of five million, where we spent four days getting a taste of Chile’s wine, before flying to Valparaiso. There, we boarded Infinity, Celebrity Cruises’ flagship liner for about 2000 passengers – a luxurious floating town with a huge sundeck, pools, hot tubs, jacuzzis, casino, movie theatre, stage theatre, Internet café, and many other amenities – a time of utter relaxation! At sea, South America was largely beyond the horizon and out of mind, except for a shore excursion to Arenas Punta at the bottom of the continent to see the Magellan penguins – short



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islands. It was at its inviting best – calm waters, seen at sunrise and 15C. These conditions belied the many stories of misadventure which we have all heard about!. We were lucky; a few hours later the captain told us it was rough and stormy. Going north up the coast of Argentina, we made stops at Buenos Aires and Montevideo, Uruguay, and finally at ‘Rio’. Montevideo is an attractive city and beach resort – many who are tired of Miami are migrating here as a safe and attractive alternative. With the cruise over, we flew from Rio to Iguacu Falls, one of the major tourist attractions in Brazil, to see the breathtaking falls that make Niagara look second rate. We unfortunately did not have time to visit the largest hydroelectric power plant in the world between Brazil

Jerry Crawford ’52 and wife, Gail, in front of Iguacu Falls, Brazil.

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and Paraguay, which has a megawatt capacity roughly equivalent to the entire power generation of Ontario. All in all, the trip rated an 8 or 9 out of 10. We didn’t miss a flight or the boat, lose our luggage, or get sick. I’d recommend it to all who like cruises. Gerry Crawford ’52

My love for composing has been inspired by UTS students. A teacher’s diary... I feel very fortunate to be a teacher at UTS. To be able to share my love and passion for music with eager and enthusiastic students is a meaningful way to spend my days. As well, being able to work with creative and inquisitive students and colleagues has truly inspired and helped me grow, as both a teacher and a composer. Born in Los Angeles into a family of professional musicians, I began my career as a cellist, performing with such ensembles as the Utah Symphony, Pacific Symphony and Toronto Symphony, as well as working in the motion picture and television industry in Los Angeles during the 1980s. While I enjoyed these experiences, I realized my true calling would be as a teacher and


Students Continue to Lead the Way ! UTS hosts a rare discussion panel with Dr. Jane Goodall

I began this new career in 1991 with the Toronto Board of Education. I also started to compose music, an activity I always wanted to try, but wasn’t sure if I had the talent. I soon realized that if I was going to compose to my standards I needed to undertake serious studies, so I embarked on a Master’s Degree in Composition from the

University of Toronto in 1997. That fall, I started teaching at UTS and began my professional composition career. My time at UTS has been a great inspiration for my work, as both a teacher and a composer, with these two activities continually supporting each other. For example, last September, I had the opportunity of traveling to Finland to be involved in the rehearsing and performance of my “Travels with Mozart, Variations [continued on next page]

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r. Jane Goodall, renowned primatologist, led a discussion panel at UTS last September. Organized in partnership with the Centre for Environment, University of Toronto, a panel of environmental and conservation experts answered questions from UTS Biology students, and university students studying at the Centre. These Grade 10 students asked insightful questions, which impressed the panelists who commented on the “excellent and reflective broad thinking.” … and “[the] special thrill to see how engaged the students were and how insightful their questions were – both those prepared in advance as well as those asked from the floor.” Dr. Goodall discussed the critical need to protect Africa’s Great Apes and other wildlife species and North America’s excessive consumption, saying “if we all continue living the way we currently are, we will need three earths, and the last time I counted, we only had one.” To the audience’s delight, Dr. Goodall also gave a light-hearted lesson in chimpanzee calling. With the help of OISE, UTS Biology students developed a science Wiki site on Dr. Goodall’s life and work. The end goal is to create a prototype educational Wiki that can be shared with the wider educational community. UTS student participated in world-renowned research camp Gordon Bae, UTS Grade 11

UTS students with Dr. Jane Goodall and Principal Michaele Robertson. student and International Chemistry Olympiad Gold Medalist, participated in SciTech 2007, an exclusive research program for outstanding science students from across the globe. Last August, Gordon conducted research on an enzyme that degrades into ethanol. He cloned its DNA, as well as manufactured and tested its protein. This pioneering research could become a less costly method of producing ethanol, an alternative biofuel. Gordon praised the program, saying it gave him valuable research experience that “helped me decide that I want to do research during my undergraduate and graduate work.” He also received the Wegner-Minc Scholarship, a full scholarship to the SciTech program. Only 75 students from the across the world are selected to participate annually. Gordon was chosen based on his academic performance and a demonstrated passion for science and technology. SciTech gives students the opportunity to work with mentors on the latest scientific research, and is hosted by Technion, one of the world’s top

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technological universities. The program is intended to challenge the world’s best science students and build scientific and cultural bridges between nations. UTS students win Gold and Bronze medals at International Chemistry and Math Olympiads. Two UTS students medaled last July at the International Chemistry Olympiad in Moscow, Russia, and the Mathematics Olympiad in Hanoi, Vietnam. They pitted their skills against talented young chemists from over 60 countries and 500 of the world’s top young mathematicians from over 90 countries. Gordon Bae [grade 11] won a Gold Medal at the International Chemistry Olympiad and Kent Huynh ’07 a Bronze Medal at the International Mathematics Olympiad. Kent attributes their formidable performances to their balanced training. This is the fourth consecutive year UTS has had a student on the International Chemistry team. Last year, an unprecedented three UTS students represented Canada at the International Chemistry Olympiad, each coming home a medalist.

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on a Theme from the Magic Flute” for Chamber Orchestra, performed by the Joensuu City Orchestra (an excellent full-time professional orchestra). The orchestra was led by Patrick Gallois, a prominent flutist and conductor, who has performed and recorded with many of the world’s finest musicians. Working and socializing with such a brilliant musician for a week was an incredible learning experience. Upon my return to UTS, I was excited to try out some of the new conducting techniques learned from Mr. Gallois. Recently, two of my compositions were internationally released on The Nightingale’s Rhapsody CD with Clarinetist Jerome Summers and The Thirteen Strings

of Ottawa by Cambria Master Recordings, California. On the CBC Radio 2 show Sound Advice, host Rick Phillips commented, “The five newly-commissioned Canadian works, all in their world premiere recordings here, are beautiful. If any one ever tells you that Canadian composers can’t measure up internationally, or that new classical compositions are irrelevant in today’s society, they are wrong.” I was particularly pleased with this critique, as I believe that interacting with students makes my compositions more relevant. Altogether, I am a much better composer because of my stimulating experiences at UTS. Ronald Royer, Instructor of Music, UTS

Interested in Helping Create a Centennial Documentary? A chronicle of UTS, past, present and future, in documentary format, is in the works for our centennial celebrations in 2010. I am looking for people with interests or experience in the following areas: & Script writing & On-Screen talent & Camera operator

& Video editing & Go-fer, grip, or PA & Documentary or film making This will be an exciting and busy production, so if you can help with any of the above, it will be most welcomed. Let me hear from you asap. Contact: Rob Duncan ’95, utsfilm@roki.ca or 416-809-2488

An Interview with Lydia Millet ’86

Photo: bluestocking; istockphoto.com

The Novelist Extraordinaire on her life at UTS and beyond



Lydia Millet ’86 is a novelist now living in Arizona, who has just published her sixth novel, How the Dead Dream. “[It] dramatizes the power of attentiveness to an expanded… and potentially dying world, attentiveness being a kind of tenderness, which is a kind of love,” according to the review by in the Globe and Mail. Her fifth novel, Oh Pure and Radiant Heart, was named one of the Best of 2005 by the Globe and Mail. Recently, her old friend David Weiss ’86 had the opportunity to interview Lydia.

room and being branded for it with a scarlet A. Q: Would you say you became a writer because of experiences you had at UTS or despite them? A: UTS was more exciting for learning than either college or graduate school, in my case. The teachers I loved most were Madame Collier, Nora Maier, Scott Baker and Demo Aliferis. Madame Collier was just elegant and rigorous and perfect; Mrs. Maier had a kind of riveting intensity; Mr. Baker was wildly encouraging, warm, and kind; and Demo let me do a philosophy presentation on the Marquis de Sade [he covered the handouts in censor’s marks]. I think it was Scott Baker who encouraged me to write.

Q: What are your earliest memories of UTS? A: I do remember the entrance exam, in the gym, but after that the next thing I recall is kissing Mike Grasley ’86 in the locker t h e root : t h e u t s a lu m n i m a g a z i n e

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Q: If you could keep just one memory that epitomizes your time at UTS, what would it be, and why? A: I think it was when we watched the space shuttle explode in the senior lounge on a TV screen over which Nick Holmes ’86, like the true performance artist he was, had scrawled AMERICAN EMPIRE. Nick Holmes’s art defined my future! Q: The path you’ve taken since UTS has had many twists and turns. Did you ever feel discouraged or disheartened about following your calling to write? A: I was never discouraged, for some reason, and I had the good luck or bad luck – depending on how you feel about the book, I guess – of

selling my first novel when I was 23, so it turned out the waiting wasn’t the hardest part. The truth is, writing’s what I most love doing, so it was never a question of stopping. Q: Are you at liberty to discuss any future projects? A: The second book in this series – How the Dead Dream was the first of a trilogy – is called Ghost Lights and will come out a year from now. It’s about the same characters, from a different point of view, and picks up where the first left off. This time the protagonist is an IRS agent who finds out his wife is having an affair. And I just started writing the third book, Magnificence, which follows chronologically from the second and is about the IRS man’s wife.


Branching Out: A Progress Report

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t’s no secret that UTS students can be precocious, but having one be mistaken for a professional journalist is something new. That’s what happened to Jake Brockman S5, a participant in UTS’s new Branching Out Alumni Mentoring Program. “My mentor [National Post reporter Jamie Cowan ’94] and I recently visited City Hall where he had worked as a journalist,” recalled Jake. “In the news room, we met several veteran municipal reporters. One even suspected that I was my mentor’s new colleague.” Mistaken identity notwithstanding, Jake had no complaints: “It was a fun experience,” he enthused, “and showed me first-hand the dynamic of municipal politics as well as the work of a journalist behind the scenes.” Jake’s experience isn’t an isolated one: several months after its official kick-off, Branching Out is in full bloom. Last fall, sixteen UTS Senior students were paired with alumni in fields ranging from academia, journalism and the arts to business, medicine, computer science and law. Feedback from mentors and mentees has been remarkably positive overall. “The mentor-mentee partnership has become a valuable asset in my life,” noted Alysha Murji S5, who is paired with Kate Bingham ’96, a resident in family medicine. “My mentor is someone who has helped me become more self-confident, mature and helped me realize the various opportunities available to me. I’m able to better understand my potential as an individual and I personally value this partnership above and

beyond a regular friendship.” Mentors and mentees are meeting, corresponding over email, visiting workplaces, and attending UTS events. The program encourages alumni to share their knowledge and experience with students, and strengthen their connection to the school, as was witnessed by those mentors who attended the recent Culture Show. “It’s inspiring to see the complex mosaic of a UTS student’s life and activities from the outside,” said Ilan Muskat ’96, a business and information technology analyst, whose mentoring partner Alex Radu S5, was heavily involved in the show. “Despite formidable academic commitments,” added Ilan, “Alex has somehow managed to retain his house leadership role and carry off a jaw-dropping performance.” This is music to the ears of Carole Bernicchia-Freeman,

Deputy Captain Salvator Cuisimano, UTS Board member, Sujit Choudhry ’88 and School Captain Sima Atri, following Sujit’s talk to the student assembly. Student Services Department staff, who conceived of Branching Out and is overseeing the program. “I’m delighted that our students are benefiting from the wisdom and insights of our alumni,” said Carole. “And it’s just as exciting when our alumni feel inspired by our students and also learn from the mentoring experience. Branching Out is part of a broader effort to encourage fruitful interaction between students and alumni, and I’m grateful to our mentors and to those alumni who volunteered to speak to our M4 and S5 students in Guidance and Careers Studies this past October.” In addition to class visits by alumni, Uof T Law Professor and UTS Board member Sujit Choudhry ’88 spoke to an assembly of students on how UTS graduates can serve the global community.

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Luke Stark ’02, who has worked with Carole on developing Branching Out, couldn’t be happier. “One of our goals is to bring different parts of the UTS community closer together,” said Luke. “I hope that the success of Branching Out will help foster opportunities for alumni and students to share ideas, experiences, and the creative spark that makes life at UTS so special.” Though Branching Out is in its pilot phase, Luke and Carole are confident that it will continue to take root in 2008-2009. Grads from 1987 to 1998 are particularly encouraged to get involved, first by updating their information in the UTS Alumni Email Directory, www.utschools. ca/ alumni/emaildirectory. html and then emailing Carole Bernicchia-Freeman at cbernicchia@utschools.ca.

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President’s Report

Your Alumni Association Its role in the ‘New’ UTS

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n the last issue of The Root, and at the UTS Alumni Dinner, I discussed three challenges facing UTS, and I spoke of the generosity of our many alumni who volunteer their time and resources to help the school in many ways. Today, I will discuss the status of one of the three challenges and its effect on alumni activities and volunteerism. One challenge facing UTS is to transition itself from a UTS that relies upon the University of Toronto for some forms of financial George support, to a UTS Crawford ’72 that is a finanpresident, UTSAA cially-independent school still affiliated with the University. That transition is successfully occurring under the leadership of the UTS Board and its Chair, Bob Lord ’58. One of the implications of this transition is that we now have the opportunity to re-consider and perhaps re-define some of the traditional functions and roles of the UTS Alumni Association. The “new” UTS is an evolving organization made up of various entities: the UTS Board, the School operation led by the Principal, the UTSAA, the UTS Parents’ Association, the recently established UTS Foundation, and, still a key partner, the University of Toronto. In most respects, the Alumni Association, the Parents’ Association and the school will continue their traditional roles and



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relationships. Perhaps more importantly, each entity is working to better define and to coordinate their roles and functions, and through that process each is establishing new relationships with the others. So what does all this mean to you and to your Alumni Association? Your Association has worked diligently to identify, and to communicate to the UTS Board, what we believe to be the core functions of the UTSAA and how we can best continue to support UTS. We have identified our events that bring Alumni together, such as the Golf Tournament, Alumni Hockey Challenge and the Annual Dinner; our stewardship role for specific endowments or funds from alumni donations; our direct support to the school for student-led initiatives and for gifts to the school; and our role in fundraising, whether for the Annual Fund, the Bursary Fund (to ensure accessibility to all who qualify), or for a Building Campaign that will likely be needed soon. These roles and functions have been discussed with members of the UTS Board, and a proposal was presented to the UTS Board on March 18, after this issue of Root went to press. I would like to present some of the highlights of our proposal, and to invite your feed-

back. In the broadest of definition: The UTS Alumni Association is a not-for-profit corporation without share capital with charitable status, the membership of which consists of all UTS alumni (former students and staff). The Association’s prime objectives are to support UTS, maintain contact with the alumni community, and represent the interests of the alumni of the School. The UTSAA wishes to continue its alumni activities, in particular the publication of The Root, other alumni publications and communications, the annual alumni dinner, other alumni social and fundraising activities, sponsorship of the student graduation banquet, maintenance of the alumni directory and address list, and any other alumni activities which it thinks are appropriate to support its objectives. The UTSAA has historically been responsible for the majority of fundraising effort, the majority of funds raised, and all alumni activities with and on behalf of the School. The UTSAA and UTS want to cooperate in fundraising and advancement activities, and UTS has established the Advancement Office to manage its own advancement activities. The above definition reflects several realities regarding the UTSAA, two of which are of particular interest

As the new UTS evolves, there will be increasing opportunities for alumni to serve UTS as volunteers on a variety of committees and task forces.


to alumni. The first is that the Alumni Association is the Alumni’s “window” into the school and its current affairs; our continuing leadership role with key communications (such as The Root) and with alumni events and activities will maintain that “window”. Second, the UTSAA Board membership is unique, with some Board members serving for 15 years or more; our support and advice to the school truly reflects the history and long-term interests of the school. To support the definition of our role in the new UTS, we proposed a variety of specific recommendations. I will not list them all here, and at the time of this writing they have not been considered or approved by the UTS Board; however, our recommendations include the following:

tion of all alumni-donated funds. & Administrative support will

be provided by UTS through the Advancement Office, and will include the following functions: l

Development and publication of The Root

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Communication services

l

Accounting of alumni donations

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l

Co-ordination of all alumni events, working with the UTSAA Board  arious day-to-day liaison with V alumni in response to their Association requests

& UTSAA Board members, or alumni

designated by the UTSAA Board, shall be considered as candidates when any opportunity for alumni involvement in the UTS Board or board committees arises.

& The UTS Alumni Association will

continue to maintain its charitable status and corporate status.

Your Alumni Association Board is looking for feedback, support and involvement as the various entities that make up the new UTS establish our new relationships. And as the new UTS evolves, there will be increasing opportunities for alumni to serve UTS as volunteers on a variety of committees and task forces. If you are interested in helping, or if you want your opinion to be heard, contact any Board Member at alumni@utschool.ca or me personally at gvc1@rogers.com. In closing, I look forward to seeing many of you at our upcoming events.

& The UTSAA will jointly participate

with UTS in developing the goals of the Association’s Annual Fund campaigns, and will cooperate with UTS in any capital campaign fundraising activities. & Funds donated by alumni to

UTS will be tracked and directed to the appropriate Endowment and Expendable Funds as established from time to time by the Advancement Office, and the amount of alumni donations will be reported to the UTSAA on a regular basis. & The UTSAA will be consulted by

UTS as to the expenditure and distribu

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Principal’s Message

Vision Accomplished Next up: the Strategic Plan

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t seemed so simple: the job was to capture the essence of the school in a Vision and Mission statement that was clear, comprehensive and worthy of the school. Given that the associations that come to mind when one thinks of the school are, for the most part, those that make us proud – great students, great teachers, merit-based admission, partnered with the university – the crafting of a new Vision and Mission for the school seemed a straightforward task. But, as it turned out, it was not that way at all. Michaele The Strategic Robertson Planning team Principal, UTS began their work in February of 2007. By April we had a draft document that we could begin to discuss with the Board, our teachers and students, and the wider community of alumni and parents. Our first efforts drew more criticism and suggestions than support (does this surprise anyone in the UTS sphere?). To move from the first draft to the final version, which the Board unanimously approved in January 2008, took 19 revisions, many of which were extensive. The final product reflects a student-focused, outward-looking and future-oriented perspective that I believe to be worthy of our UTS school and community. But more than that, the process of arriving at the final product has confirmed how deeply people care about their associa-

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tion with the school. And what dreams they dream for its future. I am proud of what our team has brought forward and I have been really delighted by the positive response the document has elicited from alumni and parents. We are now working on the Strategic Plan itself, and we hope to have a draft version ready for the Board’s consideration in May. The plan, Building the Future 2008-2020, will provide the framework for a series of action plans over the next 12 years that will encompass the Centennial, the renovation of the building, and the creation of programs, opportunities and partnerships that will help us achieve our Vision. The plan will have five distinct components: Academic Program, Community and Outreach, Student Recruitment, Finance and Advancement and Facilities. The first three teams have all but completed their work and are writing their draft reports. The final two teams will begin their real work once the action plans are clear and the University has moved further along in its own deliberations about the renovation of the building. In general terms, what you can expect to see in the immediate future is a renewed focus on strengthening the UTS community and on building

the kinds of partnerships that will continue to differentiate UTS from other schools. UTS needs strong partners to continue the work of leveraging and accessing funding, attracting excellent students and teachers, providing extraordinary learning opportunities, deepening our ties with Uof T and expanding the size and scope of our community. The Board has recently approved a set of guiding principles which will give shape to the partnerships we will seek. With strong partners and a strong plan, we are so optimistic about the second century of UTS. We have wonderful support from our community, a solid financial base upon which to build and the prospect of some exciting changes to our academic program immediately before us. In the nottoo-distant future, we will celebrate 100 years of our past and, looking ahead to our Second Century, and we will be renovating our building. This bright picture is the result of the endless dedication of our Board to preserving UTS for the future. Our community will never be able to repay Bob Lord ’58, David Rounthwaite ’65, Jim McCartney ’56 and John Jakolev for their tenacious negotiating during the Affiliation talks. They worked as hard as anyone ever has in the school’s proud history and they are entirely responsible for the fact we can think about and plan our future with confidence and excitement.

...what you can expect to see in the immediate future is a renewed focus on strengthening the UTS community... building the kinds of partnerships that will continue to differentiate UTS from other schools.


’47ers Celebrate their 60th in style! T

hirty of the class had a great reunion luncheon, held October 17th at the RCYC. Congratulations to the organizing committee – Dick Grout, Lang Farrand and Dick Sadleir, who did a yeoman’s job of locating a number of ‘lost’ classmates and setting up the event.

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1 Bill Bartlett and Don Currie 2 Bob Bertram, Tom Symons and Gord Mollenhauer 3 Geoff Noble and Bill Rankin 4 Don Scroggie and Hugh Locke 5 Larry Enkin, Dick Sadleir and Dick Grout [Class Rep] 6 Lang Farrand, Bob Elgie and Mike Fair 7 Quintin Maltby, Kent McKelvey, John Finlay and Dick Hassard

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Advancement Report

Giving Makes the Grade at UTS! Everyone in our community plays a part

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t is better to give than to receive. This well known adage was presented to prospective students as part of the UTS admission interviews. As the 11 year old candidates spoke to us about the importance of philanthropy, addressing the themes of love and charity, of the impact that giving can have for others as well as the feeling of altruistic joy one can receive by giving, I couldn’t help but be reminded of the many examples of giving that I have encountered this year at UTS. One such Martha Drake example is the Executive Director, Class of 2007 UTS office of advancement Bursary. In its inaugural year, the UTS Class bursary program raised a total of $32,481.70. I would like to extend a sincere note of thanks to Kathleen Crook and James Penturn ’72, parents of Sarah Penturn ’07, for their generous display of philanthropy. Not only did Kathleen and Jim encourage us to initiate a class bursary program at UTS, but they also matched all donations made by fellow parents to the Class of 2007 Bursary. Together, parents established an endowed bursary which will provide an annual award in perpetuity for future UTS students. This alone is cause for celebration but I would be remiss if I did not share that two of the students who received awards at the November 2007 Graduation Awards and Prize Ceremony,

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chose to donate their awards back to UTS for the Class of 2007 Bursary. Also, we have received inquiries from other ’07 graduates who, in typical UTS fashion, are preparing their post-university donation plan and would like to contribute to the fund. (The answer is yes, by the way!) Not to be outdone by alumni and parents, current UTS students got in on the act and, in December, presented Principal Michaele Robertson with the proceeds from the Holiday Concert for the Class of 2007 Bursary. Following this autumn’s Undergraduate Awards Night, Dr. Dale Gray, mother of UTS alumna Jessica Hamilton ’04 and daughter of the late W. Barry Gray, contacted the school to let us know that she and her sister, Dr. Laurel Gray, were interested in further endowing the W. B. Gray Prize. This memorial prize was established in 1956 by donations from UTS staff, students, alumni, friends and family in response to the accidental drowning of the UTS teacher who was revered by students and staff alike. Barry Gray firmly established Chemistry as a leading science to study at the school and when not teaching Chemistry in the classroom, could be found tutoring students in his favourite subject. He also coached rugby and parlayed his love of football as a player at Uof T into coaching the UTS Seconds for many years. The W. B. Gray Prize was initially awarded in 1958 and is awarded

each year to the student who achieves outstanding results in OAC Chemistry and demonstrates the attributes and interest in the welfare of others. Dr. Dale Gray and Dr. Laurel Gray have chosen to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the awarding of the W. B. Gray Prize through their gifts. In addition to the many expressions of immediate philanthropy we see during the year, from alumni and parents who volunteer their time as well as contribute financially, the staff who are here both early and late supporting students in their extracurricular activities, to the students who volunteer and hold school fundraisers, there are also those who are thinking about tomorrow. This year alone, we have learned of 20 alumni and friends who have made charitable bequest intentions to benefit UTS. Some have designated the UTS general endowment while others have created a legacy to support students in specific ways. To those of you who have given of yourselves, by making financial contributions now, by making future legacy plans, for volunteering your time and expertise to mentor students, or serve on boards and committees, thank you. On behalf of the UTS students who will directly benefit because you chose to give, thank you, again!

This year alone we have learned of 20 alumni and friends who have made charitable bequest intentions.


UTS Board Report

Shaping and Building Our Future The path to a unique learning community

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n January 8, 2008, the UTS Board of Directors approved a new Vision and Mission Statement for UTS, developed by the UTS Strategic Planning Committee over the past 10 months in consultation with UTS constituencies. The Vision and Mission Statement, which received enthusiastic feedback from a number of UTS alumni, as well as parents, students and staff, provides the framework for a comprehensive strategic plan that will shape and build our future beyond this period Bob Lord ’58 of transition. chair, UTS The Strategic Planning Committee led by Michaele Robertson, is now hard at work developing a plan that encompasses key components of UTS as an organization and a centre for learning excellence. The Vision guiding the Building the Future Strategic Plan will also form the basis for the redevelopment plans of 371 Bloor Street, as well as our future beyond our Centennial year in 2010 and into our second century. Much like the Vision and Mission statement, the Building the Future Strategic Plan will integrate input from our community and will reflect a collective ambition to see UTS strengthen its programs and partnerships, and be at the forefront of today’s and tomorrow’s educational frontier. I invite you to examine the Vision and Mission document (right); also

posted on the school’s website (www. utschools.ca). You will find that our Vision and Mission remain true to our core identity – as a school and as a community. We continue to be very much committed to remaining a merit-based school, attracting the best students and teachers and providing the best program and learning environment. To remain merit-based we will need to find a way to minimize increases in tuition in the face of increasing costs. We will also need to increase our capacity to provide bursaries for students requiring financial aid. I am delighted to report that a number of school-led committees are embarking on a program review, and board sub-committees are now hard at work fleshing out community partnerships. Most of these initiatives are being led by Michaele Robertson, whose tireless efforts have guided UTS during this turning point. Her passion to see UTS realize its full potential has been, in a word, transformational. Her clear vision and heartfelt commitment has strengthened our partnership with OISE, and have galvanized every constituent group in support of the work that we must take on if we are to reach our vision and fulfill our mission. The Board of Directors is also working closely with our Principal, Michaele Robertson to explore potential new avenues of funding for UTS. However, these cannot replace your support. For at the end of the day, our Vision and our Mission are contingent on the generosity of the school’s alumni, parents and friends who know UTS to be the very unique learning community

that it is – shaped by nearly 100 years of creativity, social leadership, ingenuity and lifelong friendships. Thanks to your support we can step into our Centennial with confidence, knowing that our students will continue to be the beneficiaries of a unique legacy that has been handed from class to class, since 1910.

UTS Vision and Mission january 8, 2008

Vision Statement

UTS is a transformative learning community focused on intellectual growth and individual development. We build on a tradition of academic distinction and leadership to develop socially responsible, global citizens. Mission Statement We admit students on the basis of merit

and we are committed to making financial accessibility a reality for all UTS students. We provide our students with an excellent academic experience that is rich, challenging and full of opportunities to reach beyond the requirements of the provincial diploma. We inspire our students to challenge themselves as learners, communicators, creative artists and athletes, and to pursue their goals with confidence and integrity. We provide a dynamic and respectful culture in which students take on significant responsibility for the decision-making, planning and leading of both student affairs and initiatives in the wider community. We demonstrate leadership as a school through exemplary teaching practices, innovative curriculum and good governance. We develop and nurture strong relationships with our community and strategic partners to fulfill our objectives.

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un climate change conference | bali, indonesia

Answering the Call of Global Responsibility UTS Grade 12 student Azra Shivji writes of her experience as one of Canada’s three Youth Delegates.

In recent years, global warming has become an internationally pertinent issue. We are beginning to better understand the wide ranging effects of climate change beyond local temperature changes: coastal cities facing floods with rising sea levels, an increase in the prevalence and magnitude of diseases, devastation to crops, poor air quality, famine and drought, just to name a few. With such devastating consequences already hitting parts of the world, something more must be done on a global scale, and done now. Message echoed at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Bali, December 2007.

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he room erupted into applause. A scattered few stood up, nodding slightly while applauding passionately. The rest followed suit as Ban ki-Moon, UN Secretary General, promptly walked off the stage, escorted by his security personnel. It was hard to imagine that just two weeks before, I had entered that very same plenary for the first time, mouth gaping and wide-eyed as I scanned the room trying to take it all in. I was one of three high school students from across Canada selected to be part of the Canadian Youth Delegation at the December 2007, United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bali, Indonesia. My involvement with climate change and environmental issues was sparked when I was in Grade 10 by UTS Science teacher Ms O’Mahony. When the after-school Envirothon program was in need of a teacher, I took on the position, working to educate students on the increasingly urgent issues of sustainability and the connections between humanity, wildlife and nature. I worked with the Jane Goodall Institute, and co-founded a UTS Roots and Shoots

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chapter, to take action to improve our community through various initiatives and projects to promote understanding and action on behalf of wildlife, the environment and our society. It was extremely empowering to educate and lead my peers into thinking critically about such a universally pertinent and urgent issue, and to encourage them to take constructive action. However, I often asked myself, “How can I, a single student, have an impact on such multifaceted and global issues?” Little did I know I would find the answer at the UN Climate Change Conference just a few months later. The conference gathered over 190 nations from around the world at the Bali International Conference Center (BICC) to engage in dialogue and debate in order to formulate a feasible Bali Roadmap - a workable post-Kyoto plan to lower emissions and create a sustainable future. As soon as I entered the BICC, I knew I was in the right place: people were rushing in all directions to various organization’s and national booths, news reporters and TV crews were stationed on the sides of the lobby, etc. The Youth Delegates attended the conference as the leaders of tomorrow, those who will have to live with the decisions being made today. Our mandate was to galvanize the public and the national delegates to participate in these issues and facilitate a successful agreement on a viable and equitable plan. In order to do so, we met on a daily basis, brainstorming and organizing plans and action. The daily Youth Action events were either a short presentation, skit, play, song, or dance, etc. that helped to express our message to the public and governments. These events received great media coverage, as they were held outside and attracted all sorts of press. Often these actions were simple


“How can I, a single student, have an impact on such multifaceted and global issues?�

and metaphorical, but all had the same essential message. One day we taught swimming lessons, deeming them essential for when the sea levels rise; another day we presented a Climate Change Emergency Kit. These events proved to be a great way to relay our message and get the media attention that we needed. In fact, most of our events

made it into newspapers and also reached the government delegations both at the conference and back home. Working with such a diverse and intelligent group of individuals was a truly inspiring experience. Every day was filled with creativity and critical thinking on ways to use different media to share the

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youth’s perspective with the public and to work with the Canadian government towards a post-Kyoto plan. Having the opportunity to meeting and engaging with youth from China, Germany, Belgium, Japan, the United States, Indonesia and Australia, gave me the opportunity to truly understand where I fit in the world and how my actions and decisions could contribute to an overall global movement. he conference gave me a rare glimpse into the world of international affairs and how the decision-making process works. Sitting in the plenary and watching national delegates engage in debate made me realize the complexities inherent in any potential resolutions. I realized there is no cookie-cutter solution; every nation has its own social, economic and political situations that must be taken into account when pushing for a universal plan. It became apparent during negotiations that politics is heavily intertwined with the issues of basic human welfare and protection. As a result, unfortunately, the voices of smaller nations, often those that are already feeling the detrimental effects of climate change, are under-represented and not heard. However, that is not to say that individuals can’t make a difference. This message was brought home to me through the story of a fellow delegate, Sister Claire. I was deeply moved when Sister Claire told us the story of her island, Kiribati, in the Gilbert Islands in the South Pacific which lies only two meters above sea level. With the rapid occurrence of climate change, her people are facing a crisis of rising sea levels. She went on to explain the helplessness she feels watching her culture, home and people being washed away by the rising seas. I immediately made a connection to the helplessness I felt back home in Canada as just an individual trying to help to tackle an overwhelming problem. She told us that she knew that the future lay in the youth, and she was proud to have us as her future. She told us that saving her island depended on the work we were doing to push for immediate action, and thanked us for our efforts at the conference and back home. I soon realized that the responsibility I had now was very different from before; I now had a global responsibility to do everything I could

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We talked about policies, future plans and actions we, as youth, wanted to see to safeguard our future.

Azra met Liberal leader Stephane Dion in Ottawa.

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to effect change. Hearing Sister Claire speak, I forgot my limitations and gained the confidence and drive to have a positive impact for people like her. Consequently, my role as a participant developed further; I took on new challenges and responsibilities by being interviewed by Toronto newspaper, radio and television journalists, as well as engaging in dialogue with various government delegates. Speaking with people like Liberal Party leader Stephane Dion and Ontario’s Environment Minister John Gerretsen was a whole new experience in itself. We talked about policies, future plans and actions we, as youth, wanted to see to safeguard our future. During our meeting with Minister Gerretsen about an environmental caucus, we brought up a new idea. He responded with, “Hmmm, that’s an interesting idea. I’ll make a note of that”, after which he motioned to his secretary who scribbled something quickly in her book. It was at that moment that I realized that people—even those in high places - are willing to listen; it’s just a matter of finding your own voice and sharing it. ooking back on the conference, I realize that I gained a sense of personal clarity and perspective. My perspective on the workings of the world and international issues has most certainly changed. I feel that it is my duty to pass on the story of Sister Claire, to create a sense of understanding and global movement. I realize that, while I do not have the power to combat such an issue by myself, I do have the power to make my actions and voice heard to the people who can, as Sister Claire did. In a way, such an experience fired up a passion in me, as Gandhi says, ‘to be the change I want to see in the world.’ In many ways, this attitude already exists in the UTS community through our student-run organizations, global initiatives and community outreach. The teachers, administration, students and network of alumni make UTS the motivating, thought-provoking and globally-conscious institution that I have come to love, which enabled me to truly learn and R grow with the experience of this conference. l

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I would like to extend a special thanks to the British Council of Canada for sponsoring and mentoring me (Martin Rose, Margret Brady and Rebecca Zalatan), and to the University of Toronto Schools’ staff (Ms Robertson, Ms O’Mahony, Mr. Marsh, Mr. Parsons, Ms Davis, Ms McPhedran, Ms Kolch and Ms Drake) for their constant support and guidance, without which this would not have been possible.


U T S A l u m n i A ss o c i at i o n

Annual General Meeting

Wednesday, May 28, 2008. 6pm at UTS. All alumni welcome. The Alumni Association is in a transition phase – a result of UTS’ new governance and becoming financially-independent. Your Association has the opportunity to re-consider and perhaps re-define some of the traditional functions and roles of its operations We have openings for board members who are interested in actively participating in redefining our mission, implementing our alumni activities throughout the year and par-

ticipating in making the Schools’ 2010 Centennial Celebrations a resounding success for all alumni. If you are interested in serving, or wish more information on this opportunity to actively participate in an exciting and important phase of our history, please contact our president, George Crawford ’72 at george.crawford@ch2m.com, or Don Borthwick ‘54 at dborthwick@utschools.ca

Help make a difference for tomorrow’s uts students!

If you would like to designate a specific bequest to UTS or receive information on planned giving, please contact Martha Drake, Executive Director, Advancement at (416) 946-0097, or mdrake@utschools.ca

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30 years ago...

UTS Marched Up with 1978: The first by chuck tysoe ’75

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n their last day of school, the Class of 1978 “borrowed” the janitor’s key and joyfully tumbled a balcony full of balloons onto the assembled student body in the auditorium. At the graduation of this first-ever co-ed class, the young men presented their female peers with conciliatory roses. School captain, now well-known political pundit David Frum ’78, said this gesture acknowledged the resolution of various tensions that had accompanied the class with the first group of girls “marching up” to take hold of their place in the order of things. The roses also reprised the welcoming from the male student body to the first incoming grade 7 and 8 girls in September 1973; after which by all accounts the expectations of not a few boys had been set back on their heels as to how things would be once the girls arrived. Mature reflection on five years’ growth together in the UTS hothouse led to mutual understanding in that allimportant and successful Grade 12 year. Writing in Through Our Eyes, the compelling Alumni History of UTS: 1960-2000, Francesca Reinhardt ’00 said the 1978 graduating class “was greeted by the public at large with pride, relief and sometimes a little astonishment. Chatelaine knew they could do it; the Globe and Mail blinked a bit.” To what extent did this class, in particular the girls, sense or know of the turmoil surrounding the school during the years immediately preceding their entrance, or of how much was at stake in the minds of old boys, faculty and second-year principal, Don

Photo: lisa thornberg; istockphoto.com

6 8 6

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Pride and Never Looked Back Co-ed Grad Class Gutteridge (who had staked his 1972 selection on a the schools’ willingness to make the change)? “Probably not much”, Reinhardt concluded. “They spent five formative years following the prosaic regime of math projects, soccer, selling Twig ads and bouncing Frisbees off the lockers.”; both boy and girl graduates for the most part thought “a lot less than everyone else did” about the drama of their achievement. It remained for Gutteridge and his peers to ponder whether the academic soul of UTS had been saved. For some an inevitable political necessity, Gutteridge had considered a “female presence” an absolute necessity based on the poverty of literary imagination in his English classes, observed from the 1962 start of his UTS teaching career. Debbie Berlyne ’86, now a medical writer, says (apparently without surprise or blinking) the girls had an enormous impact on the school which “felt like a very different place by the time we graduated. Girls were becoming leaders...the school culture had changed from a rather stuffy...Britishstyle boys’ school to a much more modern school with a broader perspective.” Without the change to co-ed, Berlyne believes the school “would not have provided such a good education”. This class seems both uniformly and abundantly grateful for having experienced UTS in this era and the way that it did. Of that graduating year, Audrey Marton ’86, now a sports and recreation executive, recalls “an almost ‘seize the moment’ epiphany of sorts that saw the graduating class become a fairly closeknit group during our final ten months

together.” Teachers it seemed “relaxed the teacher-student boundaries in a positive way allowing us to grow into our leadership roles in the school”. The ‘Grade 12-Grade 7’ student weekend proved to be a highlight of that last year for many, fondly recalled by software entrepreneur, Vic Nishi ’86, who appreciated the lower/upper school connection on arriving at UTS and “it was nice to ‘return the favour’ as senior students ourselves.” Penny Harbin ’86, long-serving class rep and a national sales manager, remembers the group “really gelling as a class as friends and supporters of each other despite our differences”. The passage of time continues to vindicate both how the Class of ’78 views itself, and the vision of Don Gutteridge. Art historian, Allison MacDuffie ’78, who has taught at both York and Uof T, remembers

Room and the elite “west side” auditorium seating. According to Audrey Marton ’78, “Boy, was it worth the wait!” But it was the substance these represented that mattered more: student government, other leadership responsibilities and especially the student-run assemblies so vital to community life and communication at UTS. Investment banker, David Allan ’78, says these “made the grads feel both a greater sense of freedom and responsibility that was a glimpse of what was coming for us.” Allan highly values the influence on him of UTS, commitment to merit as the most relevant criterion for success, adding: “UTS was a small school, and an inclusive one. It was not impossible but difficult to hide from your classmates or from the opportunities that UTS offered.” To be part of the first co-ed class “where that oppor-

“Being part of the first co-ed class has always made me feel like I had a small part in making history”

“Our 25th (2003) reunion was the largest of any class in the school’s history, so I would say we have a lot of cohesion and that we love the school.” Film distributor, Tim Sellers ’78, recalls “more than forty of us attended and the camaraderie exhibited...was memorable indeed.” The ’78 class naturally relished such perks as the Senior Common

tunity was extended to capable young women was only fitting”. Clearly by any standards this was and is an outstanding group, whose abundant mutual respect seems wholly unfeigned. Sunnybrook physician and Uof T professor of medicine, Don Redermeier ’78, said “Despite spending time at Stanford, Harvard,

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“I’m glad we were able to pave the way...”

Princeton and other academic institutions, I believe that my classmates at UTS were the most impressive peer group I’ve ever had.” And he was not alone in his sentiments. Writer and broadcaster, John Robson ’78, is grateful for having spent six years in the company of such a bright group of peers, with the freedom to speak up and not be “beaten up for expressing ideas and pursuing new ideas”. The early 1970s were termed the most momentous and best in UTS history by Rick Spence ’73, whose compelling account appears in Through Our Eyes. Gutteridge had shepherded the co-ed initiative through in barely a year, at a time of ongoing curriculum reform and the change to the four-year program; the latter strongly influenced by Derek Bate ’44, the outstanding physics teacher, who was interim principal between ‘Brock’ MacMurray ’24 and Gutteridge. Was this the result of synergistic singularity, or merely the luck of “preparation meets opportunity”? At this point, it seems deceptively obvious that UTS had everything to gain and nothing to lose by the move in going co-ed; opposition had been based mostly on remarkable trivialities and almost a superstitious regard for the manly traditions. It was after all, mirabile dictu, Bill Naylor ’54, who first mandated post-Phys. Ed class showers about the time Gutteridge was longing for the academic redemption of UTS, beginning with English literature! Of that first year, Vic Nishi suggests it must have been very different for the

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girls; to the boys it was “like Christmas without the packaging”, but the girls were part of “what many saw as a grand experiment”, the focus of attention at a “totally different school”. Through Our Eyes relates that many of the girls, who had applied “just to see if they could pass”, were delighted to be there. Said Allison MacDuffie: “I am very grateful that my parents encouraged me to try out for UTS”. Audrey Marton “quite enjoyed the notoriety and special attention that whole first year”, but “admittedly the significance of the breaking of the longstanding all-male tradition was lost on me as a 13-year-old Grade 8 student”. Now looking back, MacDuffie says, “Being part of the first co-ed class has always made me feel I had a small part in making history” and Berlyne adds “I’m glad we were able to pave the way for the girls who followed us and who have had a lot of success at the school”. While Harbin remembers the media presence (Toronto Star) on opening day: it was, in the end for her, “just school… we knew we were breaking new ground, but as 12- and 13year-olds it did not seem as important to us as it did to others”. Pleased by attention and dance invitations from the older boys (their male classmates were not), the girls were also justifiably preoccupied by the most unsuitable bathroom and change facilities that greeted them, persisting for several months. Academic struggles or the grumbling of Old Boys seem not to have detracted from the initial UTS experience of most of them. From week one, the intellectual competitiveness of the school was manifest; there was “a lot of homework,” MacDuffie recalls the challenge: “Shakespeare in Grade 8, that was very different. Math was more challenging... the chemistry experiments... more complex.” The late Stewart Bull, who welcomed co-education, said later: “The girls soon proved their worth and easily coped with the challenges of an

enriched and accelerated program”. So well in fact that Harbin said the transition to university was easy because of the work habits inculcated by UTS; Sellers said UTS prepared him ‘incredibly well”. Berlyne, possessor of both Masters’ and Doctoral degrees, said UTS was her best educational experience, citing the research and writing skills developed here. Nishi said UTS gave him the ability to assess and analyze the “big picture of any problem”. David Frum, another professional writer and analyst, said UTS is “where I began to learn to express myself easily. The only way to do that is through relentless repetition and through making (sometimes very painful) mistakes”. Don Redelmeier now regrets his distaste for the “hassle” of written expression, characterizing the lost opportunity as a “major limiting factor” in his career. Of their teachers, grads recall their helpfulness and caring, (Marton said “they exuded enthusiasm for the subject matter and an even greater enthusiasm for my attempt to grasp it”), professional passion and many qualities likely unique to the UTS environs. A favourite was ‘Doc’ Montgomery’s “punchables”, “parseables” and “take your zero like a man”; there were Al Fleming’s ’54 questions to “separate the men from the boys”; Harbin said “I was never insulted by (such remarks); I found them funny and kind of appropriate”. UTS has never looked back; the intervening thirty years have been dynamic and fruitful for the school, with alumni involvement at the forefront in the school’s continual efforts to survive financially, justify its existence, remain relatively accessible, and form new traditions of excellence in academics, sports and community involvement. No area of school life has remained untouched by the women’s presence envisioned by Donald Gutteridge over R thirty-five years ago. l

Research from Through Our Eyes – An Alumni History of UTS: 1960-2000, edited by Adam Chapnick ’94, from material written by alumni who were students during the five-year periods defined by the chapters in the book. [Available through the Alumni Association]


Centennial Notebook Centennial Happenings: We hope you will help us out!

created to centralize all aspects of this important function and support each committee’s requirements. At present, these committees are in the process of finalizing the overall plans and developing budgets.

Here is an outline about what is presently planned to happen during the UTS Centennial Year coming up in 18 months!

Volunteers Needed! Volunteers from all stakeholder groups are, and will be, needed to assist in making these celebrations exciting and memorable. UTS alumni have many talents to offer, so here is your chance to volunteer your services. Let us know where and when you can help out, and depending on your time availability, we will get you involved! Contact: alumni@utschools.ca

The Centennial Advisory Board has been formed and has held monthly meetings since September to begin the exciting and daunting task of planning these special celebrations. This committee is composed of representatives from all UTS constituencies – alumni, parents [past and present], current and former staff, students and UofT.

The big alumni event will be the HomeComing at the end of May 2010. Many alumni groups – individual grad years, special anniversary years, clubs, sports teams, and art, music and debating groups – all will have the opportunity to join in the festivities at the school, Varsity and Robert Street field that weekend.

A number of major events are planned, beginning in September 2009, the start of UTS’ 100th year. These activities are over and above the usual student and school events normally held during the school year. The major centennial events are:

This is where alumni can be of most help. Let us know your ideas and suggestions about what you would like to see happen.

& Annual Alumni Dinner: October 23 or 24, 2009 – Special Dinner to honour alumni and important achievements over the past 100 years.

Start the ideas flowing NOW! Email us with your thoughts. alumni@utschools.ca

& HomeComing / Open House: May 28 to 30, 2010 – an extravaganza to welcome all alumni back to the school for an events–filled weekend – Friday to Sunday.

Design a Logo

& Gala Dinner: Saturday, November 20, 2010 – final celebration of the centennial year and the launch our 2nd Century of achievements.

for the UTS Centennial!

& Arts / Music / Public Affairs Speaking Evenings: February, March, April, and October 2010 events, with music performances and art exhibits by alumni and students, and speaker evenings with appearances by experts, alumni and others discussing topics of major interest.

We are seeking submissions from alumni, parents, staff and students for a design to commemorate our 100th birthday year, beginning in September 2009 through 2010.

Other planned events include a ’Kick-Off celebration’ during the first week back at school in September 2009 and an Opening Reception at the end of September to officially begin the centennial year of celebrations.

Full details can be found on the UTS website: www.utschools.ca/centenniallogocontest.html The winning design will appear in all communications, from the website and displays to stationery and merchandise. The logo must be submitted in both colour and b&w.

Photo: jan rihak; istockphoto.com

More in-depth details will follow as plans are developed. During the 2009-10 school year, the various student activities and events will continue. Many will have a centennial overlay, and in some cases, may be integrated with some of the major events above.

Deadline for entries is May 31, 2008 Here is a chance to put on your design hat and help us make our Centennial the best ever!

All the planning for the Centennial Class [2010] Graduation, which will occur on November 6, 2010, will be the class’ responsibility. Centennial Committees are being formed to manage each of these major events, and a Communications Committee is being

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The class of

1962

2007

Alumni Dinner Another wonderful evening of reunions, catching up and much merriment

The class of

22

1967

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The class of

1972

1 S ara Son Hing ’97 with french teacher Marie-Claire Recurt 2 Former phys-ed teacher Ron Wakelin, Linda Oh ’97, and Michael Shenkman ’97

2

3 George Boddington ’67, Peter Ortved ’67 and Michael Gilles ’67 4 Roger McCullough ’52 and Ted Hadwen ’52

3

The class of

4

1977

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The class of

1982

1 B ill Kennedy, Thomas Bauer, David McCarthy, David LeGresley, Ian Stock and Tim Birnie – all ’77 2 Mardi Witzel ’82 and Lisa Jeffrey ’82

2

3 Kati Basi (née Quirt) ’87 and Tom Wilk ’87

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The class of

24

1987

3


The class of

1997

4 C aroline HooperCathcart ’87, Sarah McDonald ’87 and Lisa Freeman ’87

4

5

5 Dave Galloway ’62, Donald Laing ’62 and Chris Grandison ’62 6 John Fauquier ’62, Gerald McMaster ’62 and Peter Markle ’62

6

Andre Hidi ’77 and Geoff Boothe ’77

Dick Grout ’47, David Wishart ’46, Bill Copeland ’47, and Lang Ferrand ’47

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uts Alumni News Notes on the interesting lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni. Ralph Hennessy ’36 reports that he and his wife, Diana, are serving on a Working Group that is planning country-wide celebrations of the centennial anniversary of the Canadian Navy in 2009-10 – the same time as UTS. For any UTS grads who served in the Canadian Navy, there will be a number of affairs in Toronto with HMCS York. George Bain ’41 retired from the World Bank in 1983 and is now living in a retirement community in Silver Spring, Maryland. He and his wife, Mildred, celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary at the end of 2007. George has

just published Religion, Myth and Brain and organizes monthly lecture series – science, technology and political science. Geoffrey Adams ’43 published Political Ecumenism: Catholics, Jews and Protestants in de Gaulle’s Free France 1940-45 in November 2006, McGill – Queens Press. He says, “Am still waiting for critics to comment, [which] takes patience when you’re 81!” Derek Tough ’45, one of the ‘Overseas Boys’, writes from Edinburgh, Scotland that “It is always of interest to me to hear about UTS

and its alumni even though it’s 64 years since my brother, [Ian ’43] and I were part of the school.” Derek has been retired for 18 years from the government’s Department of Agriculture where he was involved in estate management and land use planning, as well as grant and subsidy work with farmers. In retirement, he took up golf, is enjoying singing in a community choir and is a member a Probus club. He has had a few wonderful trips to Canada over the years and some great holidays to Europe, but mainly spends holiday time at his cottage in Galloway.

Douglas Dean Maxwell UTS ’45 alumnus was an international giant in developing the sport of curling.

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oug was revered throughout the Canadian and international curling worlds for his leadership and innovations over 58 years in the sport, starting in Montreal in 1950 when CBC asked him to announce the first Canadian Curling Championship in Quebec City. His leadership elevated the popularity and prestige of the game to a major international sport. Curling was his passion, having been introduced to the game by his father, and over the years, he was steadily involved in many aspects of the sport. From 1968 to 1995, he changed the world’s men’s championship from ‘Canada versus Scotland’ to a ten country challenge, which took curling from a small sport to a mega sport. During this period, Doug served as Executive Director of Air Canada’s

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Silver Broom [the world curling championship]. Doug wrote in his book, Canada Curls: The Illustrated History of Curling in Canada, “At one time or other, I have been a broadcaster, reporter, official, umpire, statistician, organizer, promoter, innovator, sponsor, and most recently, a historian of the game.” That pretty much says what he meant to the sport! He also introduced the time clock to speed up the game for fans and television, the free-guard zone rules and the ‘skins’ format and was the second media person elected to the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame as a builder. He served as owner, editor and publisher of the Canadian Curling News, and wrote his fourth book last year, Tales of a Curling Hack. At UTS, Doug played football

1928 2008

and basketball, did track & field, was a captain in the Cadet Corps and a Form captain [VB], won several scholarships and worked on the Twig. He was a powerful punter for two years on the Senior Football team and was a scoring ace as a centre on the Senior Basketball team. He graduated from UofT and later returned there to earn a Master degree in Commerce. Doug will be remembered for his work ethic, his standards of professionalism and his sheer love and passion for curling. His modesty as a man was summed up in a letter to his family shortly before his death, “[I] have accomplished more than I thought possible [in life].” He leaves his wife, Anne and four children: Ward, Gordon, James and Janet. Don Borthwick, with excerpts from www.inthehack.com and Toronto Star


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“2007 was a milestone year for Jacqueline responsibility. His firm recently designed 2) Religion and Science: from Swedenborg Notes theourinteresting and outstanding achievements ofSolomon, our alumni. and I, as we on celebrated Golden Wedding lives the award winning, new Continuing Studies to chaotic dynamics, 1992 Press, and I reached my 80th birthday!”

Building at Ryerson U.

Kingsley Smith ’46 recalls opening his sermon at a church in Ruxton, Maryland last July with “Happy Birthday!” As a son of a British mother and an American father, who lived in Toronto until age 15, few knew it meant a celebration to both ‘Canada Day’ and ‘Independence Day’. This has been important to me in keeping patriotism in perspective, and I think about ‘Canada. Toute la route!’ whenever I hear ‘USA. All the way!’

Don Wood ’54 now spends half of his time living in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and the other half at a country cottage in Barbados. His wife, Professor Betty Jane Punnett, is a professor in the Department of Management Studies at the University of the West Indies, Barbados. He retired after 40 years as a management consultant, but is currently working on a project to establish the Caribbean Institute of Certified Management Consultants. He returns home to Canada regularly to visit his son and daughter and their families. He reports, “Life is good in the tropics!”

Fergus Kyle ’48, retired from flying for 20 years, but he is still working on constructing a 2-seat cruising mono-wheel aircraft, which he began 10 years ago. Both sons are pilots [Air Canada and West Jet]. Rod Davies ’51 retired to Guelph in 1999 after forty years in veterinary practice. He keeps busy nowadays with a fascinating hobby of stained glass works: windows, Tiffany lamps and other artifacts. Merv Dickinson ’52 returned to Toronto again from New Zealand in February, 31 years after leaving. ”The circumstances of my return are precipitated by my wife’s illness and our decision to be closer to family. But such is life. The upside is that I will henceforth be available to re-connect with old friends, including classmates from UTS.” During the past year, he has been doing volunteer service in Kenya, where he helped bring to birth the Kenya Centre for Leadership Development. He looks forward to returning there whenever the current post-election chaos in that country subsides. Hugh Westren ’52 spent grades 9 and 10 at UTS; is an architect [B. Arch. FRAIC] and spent 8 years as a member of National Council of Architectural Registration Boards – responsible for preparing exams and documents across North America. Redesigned and constructed Katmandu Airport. Currently resides in Bancroft, Laguna Hills [California] and Toronto. Bill Lett ’53 is still enjoying practicing architecture and is trying to take a lot more holidays, leaving his son, Bill Jr. with more

and 3) The Pendulum: a case study in Physics, Oxford U. Press, 2005, a Glencairn Award for scholarship, and publication of about 60 papers. At this point, he is working on a popular version of pendulum book, and is about to start the tax season as a volunteer tax preparer through a program run by the AARP. He is still getting used to retirement, but all signs point to it being a good life. Best wishes to my classmates from UTS!

Newman Wallis ’55 is president of the Seneca College Retirees Association. Roger Ball ’57 has retired from general practice, but is practicing now as a surgical assistant on the B.C. Interior thoracic team (Kelowna). This year he was honoured by the College of Physicians and Surgeons, receiving the Award of Excellence for outstanding contribution to the practice of medicine in British Columbia. Married to Dr. Barbara Massey, they have two sons, who after having been born in the beautiful Okanagan Valley, now reside in Toronto. Hobbies include woodcarving, boat building, skiing, kayaking, bagpipes, and along with Jim Grand ‘57, membership in the Antique and Classic Boat Society (1959 Shepherd). Peter George ’58, president and vice-chancellor of McMaster U, was one of twentyseven to receive the Order of Ontario in January 2008 for his distinguished career, including his work as an economist, author and chairman of the Council of Ontario Universities. This award is the province’s highest honour given for excellence and achievement in any field.

Anthony Burger ’63 has retired and has accompanied his wife on a posting to New Zealand where she is Counselor at the Canadian High Commission. They are planning to return to Ottawa in 2011. Jack Petch ’65 has been appointed Chair of the Governing Council, University of Toronto for 2008. He has served on the Council since 2002 and as Vice-Chair for the past two years. Currently, Jack acts as Consulting Counsel to Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt.

Greg Baker ’60 retired ten months ago after 37 years as a professor of physics and mathematics at Bryn Athyn College in Pennsylvania. Some academic highlights include books, 1) Chaotic Dynamics: an introduction, Cambridge U. Press. 1990, 1996,

Duncan Baillie ’60 has left the investment counseling business to pursue metaphysical studies. Trouble is, there seems to be a dearth of metaphysicists out there.” I have half a dozen contacts but the internet can be a wasteland if you’re looking for an open mind.” His question: “Is anyone else trying to apply the laws of physics (and science) to the reality of (human?) consciousness? With new data and discoveries confounding twentieth century physics, is anyone connecting the dots in the newly-discovered landscape of subjective reality and mapping the territory of this extra-dimensional frontier? No, I’m not kidding.”

Rick Haldenby ’69 marks his 20th year as Director of the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, which makes him the longest serving head of an architecture school in North America. He has agreed to serve four more years as the school expands its graduate programs and launches a doctor-

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Alumni remembered... Ross Campbell ’36: 1918-2007 was invested as an Officer of the Order of Canada just four months before his death. He joined the Dept. of External Affairs after the war and had a very distinguished career, serving as a diplomat in Norway, Denmark and Turkey and Head of the Middle East division before becoming responsible for international security affairs of the department, working with NATO, NORAD and the UN. He was cited for his contributions as the ambassador to Yugoslavia, Korea, Algeria, Japan and NATO, to the many historic events in the 1960s and 1970s which influenced Canadian foreign policy, and for raising the profile of Canadian nuclear technology abroad as chair of the Atomic Energy Board [1975-80]. In WWII, he received the Distinguished Service Cross [DSC] as a Lieutenant-Commander in the Royal Canadian Navy. Graduate of Uof T [BA and law degree]. Charles Theodore M. Hadwen ’52: 1933-2007 was a professor of sociology at the University of Guelph who inspired many students over three decades. After UTS, he attended UBC, Cambridge and Yale before joining the Sociology faculty at USC in Los Angeles during the tumultuous ’60s. As a founding member of the newly-created Guelph University in 1966, he served also as chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Dept. He leaves his wife Alison, two daughters and two sons, and was predeceased this past summer by both his brother and sister. LCOL Edward Slade Gibson ’45: 1928-2009 received his MD from Uof T. In addition to a family practice in Welland, he was Medical Director of Dofasco until retirement and

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Clinical Professor in the Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology at McMaster, where he did extensive research into the health of steel workers – lung cancer and foundry work, hearing loss from noise level, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. He was a strong supporter of physiotherapy and occupational therapy within the industry and served as a director of the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Hamilton Burlington Big Brother Association. He leaves his wife Audrey, three sons, a stepson and stepdaughter. Donald Stewart Mills ’51: 19342008, a lawyer and senior partner at Mills & Mills, died unexpectedly near Naples, FL, while taking helicopter pilot training. He was one of five brothers who were UTS grads – Alex ’48, the late Howie ’54, Jim ’58 and Paul ’62 – and son of the late Ralph ’21. He achieved prominence in a number of diverse fields of law and was a special advisor to governments, involved in the creation of TVO and with many charitable and volunteer organizations. He lived his life to the fullest, with compassion and determination. Husband of Ann and father of Nancy, Ted, Wendy and Cathy. Ernest Everet Minett ’34: 1918–2007 excelled in classics, languages, science and Music at UTS where he graduated with 13 first class subject marks, before studying math, physics and chemistry at Uof T [Trinity College] and doing graduate work in physics and chemistry at MIT. In his career, he played significant roles in the Manhattan Project [atomic bomb] in the 1940s, in the development of RCA’s and Remington Rand’s computer systems in the 1950s, in senior positions at Xerox [1960s] and Uof T’s UTLAS in the ’70s.

Paul Clark MacNeill ’72: 1954-2007 died after long battle with cancer. He received degrees from York and Uof T Law School and was called to the Ontario bar ’81 and BC bar ’82. He practiced securities law in Vancouver and was very prominent lawyer and director of several public mining companies. A friend said, “He died as he lived his life – a fighting spirit to the end. ... He brought tremendous intellect, command of the language, wit, humour, generosity and charm to all who knew him.” Charles [Chuck] William Weir – UTS Staff 1967-71: 1934-2008 died Jan. 12th after battling brain cancer. As a youth, he starred as a quarterback at Humberside Collegiate, and then obtained his Master’s degree in English Literature at Uof T. Fondly remembered as the football coach at UTS, he left teaching to pursue a very successful career in writing, and to contribute to popular theatre and television productions, like Spring Thaw, Front Page Challenge, Dreamweaver and The Music of Man for which he received an Emmy nomination. A number of alumni ‘blogged’ about ‘Chuck’ –“He taught us about the love of language and the love of humour... he set me on my lifelong path as a radio broadcaster, actor and teacher”; “I will always remember the importance of inclusiveness that [he] taught me [on the football field] that dusty Friday afternoon”; “We were asked to do a creative writing assignment about a kid reaching into a cereal box marked with ‘Prize Inside’. When I got my paper back, it had a comment which I still recall precisely – You have the capacity for tremendous good – or evil! Time will tell!”; his description of the junior team: “we’re small but we’re slow”; and “By not cutting me from the junior team, he set me on the road toward changing my perception of who I was and what was possible.”


uts Alumni News Alumni News

ate and a new round of remarkable cultural Income Tax Act (33rd edition just published) “It is a hot assignment – the temperature Notes onwiththe and outstanding achievements of our collaborations Italy. interesting lives and many professional publications on the rarely falls below 22C., even at alumni. night!” John Hunter ’67. After 30 years of law practice in Vancouver, he has been elected president of the Law Society of British Columbia for 2008. This is the equivalent to the Treasurer of the Law Society in Ontario. “I am continuing with my litigation practice this year as well.” Rick Spence ’73 recently scored the high individual total as an in-studio participant on the Bloggers team on CBC TV’s Test the Nation show. The “test” was 60 questions on 21st Century Trivia and he scored 57 out of 60 to win a $5,000 travel voucher. More info at www.cbca.ca Greg Turnbull ’73 is now the Regional Managing partner of McCarthy Tétrault LLP in Calgary. He is actively involved in international and regional oil and gas companies and trusts, and currently sits on the board of 9 publicly-traded companies. He works a lot with Mike Hibberd ’73 in Calgary. Also, he is a Trustee of the Calgary Zoo Foundation and on the board of the Canadian Youth Business Foundation. He has three adult children, a spouse, an exspouse and two dogs. Donald Clarke ’73 is a professor at George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC, specializing in Chinese law. Currently, he is visiting professor at New York University School of Law. He says, “I’m having a ball. I love New York, and they’ve given me a great apartment right in the heart of Greenwich Village.” Howard Trickey ’74 moved in 2006 to Google’s New York office, where he is an engineering manager responsible for maps search quality; after earning a PhD in computer science at Stanford, and 20 years in Bell Labs Research in Murray Hill, NJ. David Sherman ’75 continues to write tax law publications including The Practitioner’s

GST. He and his wife, Simone, celebrated their 30th anniversary in February with a cruise to Antarctica. Gary Solway ’76 recently joined Bennett Jones LLP in Toronto to continue his corporate law practice, focusing on technology and media companies, from start -ups to public companies. Gary spends his spare time playing late-night pickup hockey, and participating in various sporting activities and traveling with his family, wife Carole, and Alex (14) and Rachel (12). Bill Kennedy ’77 writes that he is working on his first full-length play, Cyberland, following studying at Uof T’s SCS Creative Writing program. The United Church published his children’s short play, “Signs of Christmas”, last fall. Richard Small ’77 is living with his family in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and owns a marketing and media consultancy. He reports that,

Debby Berlyne ’78 earned her Ph.D. in philosophy from Brown University, and has followed a rather winding career toward becoming a freelance medical writer. Since 1999, she has been writing and editing for U.S. government agencies, professional societies, and pharmaceutical companies. “After spending several years in Philadelphia, my husband, Danny Bachman, and I now live in Rockville, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC. He is an economist with the U.S. Department of Commerce.” They have two daughters – Hannah, age 18, a freshman at Barnard College in New York, and Miriam, age 15. “I’d love to hear from UTS friends. You can look me up on Facebook or e-mail me at dberlyne@comcast.net” John Moffet ’78 recently joined Environment Canada as Director General of Legislation and Regulatory Affairs, after consulting for about 15 years for governments, NGOs and industries in Canada and in devel-

hugh otter barber Class of ’40 grad was a world-renowned ear, nose and throat specialist for NASA

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eaching and guiding young doctors at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and Uof T and his family were the true loves in his life. Hugh entered UTS in Grade 11, graduated in 1940, went on to study biological and medical sciences at Uof T and received his MD degree in 1945. While at the school, he played snap [centre] on the senior football team, where they say, “he was a real battler” and blew a mean trumpet in the band. He was a top expert in his field and was recognized and respected throughout the world. One highlight was his association with NASA in

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researching dizziness. Over the years, he headed up the Otolaryngology [Ear, Nose and Throat] Dept. at Sunnybrook, was attending Otolaryngologist at TGH and Uof T professor in the Otolaryngology Dept. He received many international honours for his work, resided as president of the Canadian Otolaryngological Society and the American Neurotology Society and was guest lecturer and visiting professor at a host of Canadian and US universities. He leaves his wife of 60 years, Joyce, and three children, and was predeceased by four other children. Don Borthwick spring 2008

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Alumni News

Michael Foster Smith UTS ’65 grad was someone who realized the truth of how children live and see the world.

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assing away unexpectedly in his sleep, Michael was a wellloved man who lived a life of passionate engagement. A UTS graduate, Class of 1965, he received his MD at Uof T in 1971, followed by an anesthesiology residency at UBC and further study at the Hospital for Sick Kids in Toronto. Upon rejoining the BC Children’s Hospital, he was one of a few who specialized in pediatric cardiac anesthesiology. Michael was a Nesbitt Gold Medalist, Senior Prefect [Cody House], Precision Squad participant and Swim team member, played Senior football on the York League Champions, and ran track & field and cross-country. He taught at UBC’s Anesthesio-

oping countries. He is enjoying the unprecedented surge in public demand for federal action on climate change, air pollution, toxics and other environmental and health issues. John lives in Ottawa with his wife, Liz Stirling, and children, Sarah (16) and Graham (13). Kirsten Abbott-West ’78 is now Director

logy Dept., mentoring and inspiring many students, for which he received the UBC Master Teacher Award in 1991. His research contributions were man and his kind spirit and unassuming demeanor reflected a confident and humble man. As his daughter Meghan noted in Lives Lived, Globe and Mail column, “Dad was not scared of being silly, but embraced it as an important behaviour.” She went on to say that, “He would come home as Clark Kent...as if he had done nothing extraordinary, [but] just trying to help some little kids with big problems.” Michael had many interests and reflected his passion for family and friends through his generous givof Learning & Development at Universal Studios in Orlando, having previously worked at Disney. John Robson ’78 premiered a new TV show, It’s Your Government, in February on the digital specialty cable iChannel [www.ichannel. ca]. He is one of the hosts and is also a col-

Start your morning with spirit!

t h e root : t h e u t s a lu m n i m a g a z i n e

Phone: 416.978.3919 Email: alumni@utschools.ca

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ing of time for enjoyment. Whether it was using his carpentry skills at the cottage, piloting a plane, riding his motorcycle, sailing, kayaking, ski patrolling, playing his guitar, working on model planes, playing hockey with the hospital team, or being the prankster – disguises, magic tricks, and the world – was fascinating, beautiful and remarkable. Meghan summed up her dad the best when she said, “He treated me like a princess and made me believe it.” Michael leaves his wife of 26 years, Connie, and daughter Meghan and son Colin. Don Borthwick, with excerpts from Globe and Mail and anesthesia.ubc.ca umnist for the Ottawa Citizen and a broadcaster with News Talk Radio on Ottawa CFRA. Ted Barnett ’80 has started a new company: building an online virtual world for kids age 8-12. It is based in San Francisco and has 10 employees. Find more info on him (and his life) at www.tedbarnett.com.

Show your school spirit in style!

To order, simply contact the UTS Alumni Office: UTS Coffee Mug $12 30

1946 2007

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UTS Sweat Shirts Available in sizes S-XL Zip-front $40 Hood $50


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Kelly Fergusson ’80 is currently serving Notes interesting as mayor of on Menlothe Park, California, a city of lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni. 30,000 between San Francisco and San Jose. She reports that daily she wrestles with such issues as water supply, transportation, housing, economic development and reversing global warming. Jamie Sommerville ’80 was recently appointed Conductor and Artistic Director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra. He also remains in his endowed chair as Principal Horn for the Boston Symphony Orchestra where he recently performed the world premiere of an Elliott Carter Horn Concerto, which was commissioned specifically for him by the BSO. In a recent Toronto Star article, Canadian musician Stephen Pierre was quoted as stating that “Jamie may be the best horn player who has ever lived.” Rick Marin ’80 recalls Norah Maier’s Additional English class and former students will remember her livening up Heart of Darkness by cross-referencing it with a hot new movie called Apocalypse Now.[ If only we’d had Beowulf in 3-D back then!]. “When Norah flew from Vienna to Los Angeles for Nomi Morris’ son’s Bar Mitzvah, she took Nomi, Martha Demson and I (Class of ’80) to the big-screen version of the Old English epic. Because for Norah, there’s no such thing as a former student.” Kim Kho ’81 just finished exhibiting her mixed media, photo-based, self-portrait as part of a group show, On the Edge of Recognition. Coming up [April 24-May 25], she and her husband, Kal Honey, will hold a joint show of experimental drawings and mixed media work at the Whitney Community Gallery in the Peel Heritage Complex, 9 Wellington St. E., Brampton. “We’d be delighted to see you at the opening reception on Wednesday, April 30, from 7 to 9 pm.” Martin Van Kranendonk ’80 published his first book last October, entitled Earth’s Oldest Rocks, by M. J. Van Kranendonk, R.H. Smithies, and V. Bennett. He was the senior editor of the book. Over 1300 pages long, this volume contains 41 papers by over 80 world authorities on the geology of ancient rocks on Earth, from the time of planetary

Robert Laidlaw MacMillan 1917 2007

Class of 1934 member pioneered the world’s first coronary care unit.

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noted cardiologist, a surgeon and Lieutenant-Commander on HMCS Prince Robert in WWII, Robert led an active and successful life for 90 years. After the war, he did postgraduate studies in London and Oxford and qualified as a Member of the Royal College of Physicians. Returning to Toronto in 1948, he joined the Toronto General Hospital as a senior intern in hematology. Shortly thereafter, he became a fellow of The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and began his long and distinguished career as a cardiologist. In 1962, troubled by the high mortality rate of supposedly-recovering cardiac patients, Dr. Macmillan, along with Dr. Kenneth Brown, established the world’s first coronary care unit at Toronto General Hospital. He later established a very successful private practice, and with his dry wit, he proved to be a superb teacher to generations of medical students at Uof T and TGH. He was professor of medicine and head of general internal medicine at TGH when he retired from teaching in 1982. Bob was part of a medical family – his father was anesthetist at Wellesley Hospital, his mother a nurse and his

brother, Hugh, a doctor. Both burly and athletic, the brothers were known as ‘Big Beef’ and ‘Little Beef’ at UTS. While at school, he won two scholarships, played football [interscholastic champions – 1933], hockey and tennis [senior doubles champion – 1933] and graduated with eight Firsts. Robert attended Trinity College ’34, played college football and hockey, earned degrees in biological and medical science, and received his medical degree in 1941. A fearless athlete, Bob loved the outdoors – canoeing, scuba diving, hiking, camping and playing tennis and helicopter skiing, and was an accomplished traveler. In 2001, he recognized the symptoms of a heart attack, and after asking his wife to drive him to a country hospital, he read his own cardiogram and diagnosed a clot in his heart. Next morning, he had a massive coronary, but with intense therapy over the following months, he learned to walk and talk again. Robert leaves his wife of 65 years, Lyn and 5 children, 2 girls and 3 boys. All the boys, Tom ’67, Robert ’69 and David ’72, attended UTS, as well as Robert’s brother Hugh A. ’37 and nephew, Hugh R. ’66.

formation at 4.567 billion years ago to 3.2 billion years ago. After UTS, he received a BSc (1984) and MSc (1987) from Uof T and a PhD from Queens University (1992). He did his postdoctoral fellowship at the Geological Survey

of Canada, before moving to Australia in 1994 to take up a post-doctoral position at the University of Newcastle (Australia). He gained employment with the Geological Survey of Western Australia in 1997, where he maps rocks, makes geological maps,

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The Keys

Alumni News

Gallery Jacquelyn Sloan Siklos ’86 Paintings and Photographs

Future Exhibitions Kasper Podgorski ’04 Kim Lee Kho ’81 Baillie Card ’05

It is not too early to begin thinking about exhibiting at our Special 100th Anniversary Showing in 2010!

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Pericles Lewis ’86 is a, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Yale University, and is the author of The

In Memoriam Condolences are extended to the families of these alumni who passed away recently.

Mardi Witzel ’82, a mother of four, is in her second year of a PHD in Management from Laurier U., following which she hopes to teach and do research. Laura Murray ’83 is associate professor and Undergraduate Chair, English Dept., Queens U. She does work in American literature & literary theory. Recently, she co-authored A Citizens Guide [Between the Lines] which attempts through colourful examples and case studies to demystify Canadian copyright law – a subject which is becoming part of everybody’s life in today’s world of internet to ordinary people (www.faircopyright.ca). Anthony Lee ’86 Last November, he helped Toronto-based Ritchie’s Auctioneers set auction records for the largest Canadian sale of Chinese art. He is working with the UTS music dept. in developing a Japanese Taiko drumming group.

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Robert Laidlaw MacMillan ’34

September 5, 2007

Ernest Everet Minett ’34

September 5, 2007

Grant [Tim] Ashton Cooper ’35

October 23, 2007

Alan Fraser Raney ’35

October 16, 2007

Ross Campbell ’36

August 15, 2007

Eric C. Lehman ’39

February 17, 2008

Hugh Otter Barber ’40 William R. Livingston ’40 Douglas Duncan Currie ’41 Bruce Harold Gosnell ’42 Robert James Hallawell ’42 Robert C. Short ’43 Edward Slade Gibson ’45

December 14, 2006 August 5, 2007 January 22, 2008 April 24, 2007 March 19, 2007 February 29, 2008 November 10, 2007

Douglas Dean Maxwell ’46

August 31, 2007

Donald Ramsay Gordon ’47

March 17, 2006

Edmund Thomas Draper ’48

January 4, 2008

Donald Stewart Mills ’51

Lydia Millet ’86 has just published her sixth book, a novel, How the Dead Dream. Interestingly, it was reviewed in the Globe and Mail last January by Catherine Bush ’79, herself a novelist and writer-in-residence at the University of Guelph. Bush’s review says, “The author creates a complex self capable of complex encounters. It’s hard, in fact, to convey how invigorating Millet’s fiction is, how intelligent and thematically rich.” She goes on to say, ” Millet is a writer capable of great tenderness and empathy toward her characters, a tenderness that moves outward

Margaret Krawecka ’96

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from human beings to encompass the natural world.” [See David Weiss’ ‘86 interview on page 6 of this issue.]

Eric Fritz ’81 continues to circle the globe as Sound Recordist for a new travel series called Which Way To..., shooting recently in the Peruvian Andes, on the Nile River, riding reindeer in Lapland, and soon in Japan and the Philippines. He is also pleased to have been on the crew for the now-airing historical detective drama series, The Murdoch Mysteries.

Exhibiting this fall

The Keys Gallery is located in Room 107A at UTS. If you would like to exhibit, contact Ann Unger, retired staff, (416) 932-1963 or e-mail aeunger@sympatico.ca for further information.

interprets the geological history of the regions and writes reports for Survey publications and publications in international research journals. In his capacity , he has been involved with the discovery of earliest life on Earth and with the search for life on Mars. Divorced father of one son, Damian, who is 10 years old.

January 22, 2008

Charles Theodore M. Hadwen ’52 December 27, 2007 Charles Hammond Rust ’54 George Barry Brace ’59 Michael Foster Smith ’65 Leonard Alknsis ’67 Paul Clark MacNeill ’72

December 6, 2007 February 6, 2008 September 19, 2007 December 19, 2007 December 9, 2007

James Wild Eayrs ’74 Charles W. Weir [Staff: 1967-71]

January 12, 2008

Yvonne E. Lacey [Staff: 1975-87]

January 4, 2008

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Cambridge Introduction to Modernism, a new Notes on the interesting book on modernism in English literature. He lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni. has been teaching at Yale for ten years and lives in New Haven with his wife, Sheila, and children Siddhartha, 7, and Maya, 5. Tracy Betel ’86 is a Business Analyst in Vancouver, currently working on contract for Lululemon’s head office and taking advantage of free yoga lessons. Last October she married Imtiaz Jadavji, who she met while working on a project at Best Buy Canada. Julie Williams ’86, a pediatric anesthetist in Halifax, is going to Rwanda to teach her specialty under the Canadian Anesthetists Society International Education Program and to Tanzania with the Dalhousie University International Health Program in 2008. Catherine [Torrie] Ellis ’89, Assistant Professor of History at Ryerson University, and husband, Matthew, welcomed their daughter, Sophie, in January 2007. Catherine Landolt ’90 has joined the Canadian Marketing Association as Director of Events, after being with the Royal Conservatory of Music for nearly 9 years. She is looking forward with her team to handling about 80 events a year. She has also become a homeowner again and celebrated a first Xmas there with her son, Hayden [6]. Kate Jackson ’90 has a new adventure book [to be published by the Harvard University Press in April 2008] about her expeditions to the swamp forest of northern Congo to col-

lect snakes. Her new job at Whitman College is keeping her very busy, but as soon as the semester ends she is heading straight back to the Congo. Liz Tolhurst ’92 has recently returned to work at the North York General Hospital as an EMR physician, after she and husband, Gavin, welcomed a son Robert, last August. Bo Durickovic ’92 has had a lot of changes in his life over the last few years, including marrying Jennifer, having an 20-month-old son, Alek, with another child due in May, living in Leesburg, Virginia, [DC area], and now working as the Chief Strategy Officer for Serco, a global government services firm. Jennifer Couzin ’94 married Richard Frankel, a public interest lawyer, in May 2007 in Maryland. This summer, they will be moving from Washington, DC, to Philadelphia, where Rich will join the faculty of a law school there. For the last 6 years, Jenny has been a reporter with Science magazine, covering medicine, and looks forward to keeping up with all things medical once settled in Philly.

General David Petraeus and Ilya Shapiro ’95.

Ilya Shapiro ’95 spent the past summer in Iraq as Special Assistant/Advisor to General

David Petraeus on rule of law issues; having practiced international and political law for several years at two Washington firms. He is now a senior fellow in constitutional studies at Cato Institute, the nation’s foremost libertarian think tank, and was also recently sworn in as a member of the U.S. Supreme Court Bar, where he filed his first amicus [“friend of the court”] brief the following day. Noel Semple ’98 married Angélique Moss last summer. They are eagerly expecting their first child, Madeleine, in May. He is currently articling at Borden Ladner Gervais LLP in Toronto, and expects to begin graduate legal studies in September. Alex Berezowsky ’99 will wed Bryna Tallman in August 2008. He recently won the Mellon Graduate Achievement award at U Chicago and composed “Constellation”, a piece which was read in January by the St. Paul’s Chamber Orchestra. John Bitidis ’99 and Daron Earthy ’99 were married last October and 23 alumni attended, Sarah Yaffe, Raheem Peerani and Derek Cheung [all ’99] and Eric Barnhorst, Michelle Cohen and Sebastian Kun [all ‘98]

spring 2008

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Alumni News

William Ross livingston

1923 2007

A man whose heart was always close to UTS.

B

ill Livingston, a graduate of the UTS Class of 1940, passed away last year on August 5th. He had a wonderful business career, volunteer life and loving family, but always kept a soft spot for the University of Toronto Schools. During his student days, Bill played tackle on the Senior football team and defence on the Midget and Juvenile hockey teams and was business manager of the Twig. It was noted in the Twig that, “He never failed to turn in a good game a middle and was the life of the bus trips.” He kept in touch with UTS throughout his life. He was president of the UTS Alumni Association in 1970, and was instrumental in helping to raise the funds for the Robert Street Athletic complex. When UTS lost the funding support from Uof T in the 1990s, his campaign gift is recorded on the Preserving the Opportunity plaque on the second floor outside the Library. He was a faithful attendee at the UTS Alumni Hockey Night at Varsity arena back in the 19601970 period, and was even more delighted to be a spectator to see his son tend goal for the grads in recent games between the reinvigorated UTS Varsity hockey teams and the alumni. As a veteran of World War II, he

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s p r i n g 2008

attended many Remembrance Day ceremonies at the school. In 2002, he was given the privilege of giving the Remembrance Day address to the students. He tried to bring the war memories to life by using real stories, such as the time an air raid warden in London told him to get into the shelter using words, as he put it, that he had never heard in a UTS locker room. He described how Headmaster ‘Baldy’ Lewis told them of the start of the war at a September 1939 assembly. One could imagine Headmaster Lewis looking down from heaven on Bill’s head and saying, “So Livingston (headmasters always called students by their last names back then), look who’s calling who baldy now”. Bill’s family has donated a scholarship prize to the school in his memory. This prize is being awarded to two students, who upon completing studies in first year Physics will benefit from participating in additional study, working under the guidance of a university professor on an approved research project, during their second year [grade 12] of Physics study. A memorial service was held for Bill on September 14 last year. His son Brian ’72 spoke at the service, and wore the UTS tie. I think Bill would have smiled when he saw it. Brian Livingston ’72

were in the wedding party. To the delight of the fans, two former staff, Demo Aliferis and William Tipova, made a surprise appearance! Wendy Leung ’00 is releasing her third album, Stop/Start, this April. The CD features ten pop/rock songs written and performed by Wendy and her band. The album is available through her website, wendyleung.com, and on iTunes and CDBaby. The band will be playing live shows in the GTA throughout the summer and fall. Andrea Ho ’01 received her Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern University ’07 for her work in micro- and nanotechnology. She is now working in accident reconstruction with MEA Forensic Engineers and Scientists in Vancouver. Vanessa Meadu ’01 is currently working in Kenya with CIDA and attended the International Environment Conference in Bali last December. Doug Poon ’04 opened a nutrition and health food store (Doug’s Low Carb Store) last summer in Richmond Hill that has been quite successful, and recently has been expanded to another location in Downsview, with a couple of other stores in the works for downtown Toronto and also Brampton/ Mississauga. He works with his father Dr. Poon to help treat Metabolic Syndrome (diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure) and is currently in negotiations with the author of Keep Canada Slim for a partnership.

CLASS OF ’48 Reunion Dinner and Party Thursday, October 23 (Night before the Alumni Dinner)

Come and join us! Contacts:

Butch Bowden: 416-496-2500, jbowden@bowdengroup.com Bill Francis: 905-727-0440, drawesome@zing-net.ca John Thomson: 403-209-5940, thomac@shaw.ca


Remembrance Day 2007 2006

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Lest we forget...

1 Perennial alumni veterans, Richard Boxer ’36 and Ed Jull ’31 2 Observing a minute of silence: Jim Sebert ’40, Don Teskey ’43, John Fox ’43 and Don Manchester ’44 3 Guest speaker, John Rhind ’38 speaking about his memories of the war. 4 Math teacher, Diane Lang and Clare Morrison ’44 5 Choir members performing a choral interlude, “In Flanders Fields”, during the service. 6 UTS alumni veterans attending this service. 7 Violinists in the Senior Chamber Strings conducted by Ron Royer. 8 Jack Rhind ’38 conversing with Bob Dale ’39.

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Looking Back

Celebrate

From the

Archives: A Look Back to 1914: From Grads to Graduated Cylinders TOP The Fifth form of 1914 pose for their graduation photograph, looking suitably serious for the gravitas of the occasion. right The famous third-floor chemistry lab as looked circa 1914, complete with surface-mounted porcelain sinks and the very same gas jets that are still in use today.

100 Years of U TS in 2010!

The Root - Spring 2008  
The Root - Spring 2008