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the uts alumni magazine | spring 2007

Class of ’46

Always Setting the Pace: in School, Business, & Bursaries!

in the sudan

Chris Federico’s First-Hand Narrative

Alumni Dinner

We Have the Photos!

’46ers

Robert Dowsett & Joseph McArthur

Sporting life

3-on-3 Basketball and Hockey, Too!

PLUS: remembering mavor moore | meet the uts board | Alumni News


Upcoming UTS Events

Mark Your Calendars monday, April 23 to saturday, april 28

Arts & Music Week

Art: UTS Gym – Daily 9 to 4 p.m. Music: Auditorium – 7:30 p.m. – Friday & Saturday Contacts: jkay@uts.utoronto.ca and jwilliamson@uts.utoronto.ca

UTS Alumni Association Board of directors President

Tom Sanderson (416) 604-4890 vice president

George Crawford ’72 (416) 499-9000 past president

Nick Smith ’63 (416) 920-0159

Friday, May 4

Rejuvenation II – UTSPA Evening

The Great Hall, Hart House, 6:30 P.M. For more information, go to: www.uts.utoronto.ca/parents/rejuvenation/Rejuvenation_pkg.pdf

Treasurer

Bob Cumming ’65 (416) 727-6640 Secretary

Phil Weiner ’01 (416) 868-2239

Thursday, May 3 to Sunday, May 6

Classics Conference – Brock University Contact: edisante@uts.utoronto.ca

Honourary President

Michaele Robertson (416) 946-5334 Honourary Vice President

Wednesday, May 30

Rick Parsons

UTS Library, 6.00 p.m. Contact: alumni@uts.utoronto.ca

Don Borthwick ’54

UTSAA Annual General Meeting

(416) 946-7088 Executive director (416) 946-7012 directors

Late May / Early June [Date and Location to be confirmed]

Alumni Ottawa Reception

5.00 to 7.00 p.m. Liaison: Tim Wardrop ’74, tim_wardrop@scotiacapital.com, 613-782-6700

Gerald Crawford ’52 (905) 271-0445

Rob Duncan ’95 (416) 809-2488

Lisa Freeman ’95 (416) 923-5000

Tuesday, June 19

Alumni Golf Tournament

St. Andrews Valley Golf Club, 11.30–1.30 Tee-offs. Contact: peter_frost@Canaccord.com, 416-571-0038

Peter Frost ’63 (416) 571-0038

Dana Gladstone ’80 (416) 643-4766

Sharon Lavine ’84 (416) 868-1755 x235

FRIDAY, October 26

Alumni Dinner

UTS, 5.30 p.m. Reception, 7.00 p.m. Dinner. All years are welcome. Special Anniversary Year Celebrations: 1947, 1957, 1967, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1997 Contact: alumni@uts.utoronto.ca

Bernie McGarva ’72 (416) 868-7765

Peter Nielson ’71 (416) 214-5431

Ana Shapiro ’93 (416) 498-1922 x215

Jennifer Seuss ’94 (416) 597-6293

David Weiss ’86 (416) 469-5777


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Contents

IN SHORT

 rom the solid foundations provided by their education at UTS, F this group of alumni have gone on to outstanding achievements.

 hristopher Federico’s account of his participation in the United C Nations Mission to this war-ravaged country.

President’s Report

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Principal’s Message

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UTS Board Report

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Sanderson provides answers to some alumni questions. The scope of the opportunity for UTS in the future is great.

Always a terrific event, this year’s dinner was truly outstanding with many reunions and a special bursary endowment.

Making the UTS Foundation a reality.

ODAA Report

We’re in the middle of our most successful fund-raising drive ever!

Catch up with happenings in the lives of your classmates. In Memoriam and tributes to the lives of three outstanding alumni.

30 Sports Report

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Reports

22 Alumni News

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Meet the people who are shaping the future of UTS.

18 Annual Alumni Dinner

Bits & Pieces

Board of Directors

14 In the Sudan

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A NEW section. Check it out for some very interesting items.

10 Class of ’46

Calendar of Events

Upcoming alumni and school events you will want to attend.

the root | spring 2007

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Our thanks to this issue’s contributors:

 lumni versus School hockey game results, and photos of this A year’s annual 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament.

Copy: Tom Sanderson ’55, Michaele Robertson, Robert Lord ’58, Lily McGregor, Kirstin Brothers ’91, Christopher Federico ’91, Donna Vassel, Don Borthwick ‘54 Photography: Victor Yeung, Don Borthwick ’54, Caroline Kolch, Christopher Federico ’91. On the cover: McArthur and Dowsett, UTS ’46

University of Toronto Schools Alumni Association 371 Bloor Street West, Room 121, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2R8 Phone: (416) 978-3919 Fax: (416) 971-2354 E-mail: alumni@uts.utoronto.ca, Web: www.uts.utoronto.ca/alumni The Root is published Spring and Fall and is available to all alumni, parents and friends of UTS. Contact us at the above addresses to receive a copy or to change your address. This issue is also available on the website: www.uts.utoronto.ca/alumni/magazine

spring 2007

Editor: Don Borthwick ’54 Design: Eye-to-Eye Design Ad Design: Caroline Kolch, Eye-to-Eye Design Printed by: Thistle Printing Ltd.

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Bits&Pieces A Compendium of Noteworthy UTS Tidbits

UTS Mentoring Project

creativity and curiosity of today’s UTSers. One initiative is a revamped and expanded Alumni Mentoring Program, designed to foster connections between students and alumni around shared enthusiasms; career, professional and university interests; activities or hobbies; and experiences at the school. More details about this program will become available in the weeks to come. In the meantime, how can you become more

UTS is developing new opportunities for our alumni to become more involved with students and the current UTS community. Spearheaded by faculty member, Carole BernicchiaFreeman of the Student Services Department and alumnus Luke Stark ’02, the new programs are aimed at bringing together the wisdom, experience and passion of our alumni with the

informed or involved in this new mentoring? Make sure you’re listed in the Alumni Email Directory (accessible on the UTS website: www. uts.utoronto.ca/alumni/ emaildirectory.html – and if you are already signed up, check to make sure the bio and Mentor sections of your profile are as complete as possible. Having your current information in the E-Directory is the easiest way for the school to contact you. If you’d like more detailed information imme-

diately, feel free to email luke.stark@utoronto.ca.

Calling all members of UTS Swim Teams At this year’s Alumni Dinner, UTSAA would like to organize a ‘Welcome Back’ to all former swim team members. We recognize this is quite a large group which spans easily 50 or more years. UTSAA would especially like to invite all those who helped

2006 Athletes of the Year Louise Harris ’06 received the Ornella Barrett Award for the female athlete of the year. She was 2006 captain and a three year starter on the Girls’ Varsity Basketball team, a member of the 200203 Senior Girls’ City Basketball Championship team, coached by Karen Sullivan ’95, and a member and captain of the Girls’ Senior Soccer team. In her final year, Louise joined the UTS Girls’ Wrestling team, won a gold medal at the City Championship and qualified for the provincial wrestling championships in Sarnia. Louise played on three UTS Soccer teams that qualified for OFSAA (Provincial Championship) and was also



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an accomplished swimmer and baseball player. Jonathan Gregory ’06 won the Ron Wakelin Award for the male athlete of the year. He was captain and a standout on the Boys’ Soccer team, a Cross-Country runner, a Junior and Senior Basketball player, a Track and Field midto-long distance runner and a standout on the Boys’ Rugby team. These awards are based on the following: the student athlete must be a graduating student who has displayed exceptional skill, leadership, sportsmanship and achievement in competition during their UTS athletic career.

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coach the teams. We know about Balfour LeGresley, Ron Wakelin, P.A. Grudzien, McKinstrie, but there are certainly others. We are looking for one or two alumni from each half decade to ‘cobble together’ a list of names and phone/ email contacts for us to follow up. We would then try to organize the names into “teams” and to plan meeting rooms and table arrangements at the reception. If you would like to volunteer to help out, please email Don Borthwick at dborthwick@uts.utoronto.ca to start the ball rolling. A number of swimmers will probably attend the various special anniversary activities, but we know there are many others out there. The dinner is Friday, October 26th and it would be great if you could join us!

2nd Annual Rejuvenation! Come and Enjoy an evening of great entertainment, a raffle and a silent auction at the 2nd annual Rejuvenation! It is being held in the Great Hall, Hart House on Friday, May 4th starting at 6:30 pm. The Lorne Nehring Trio, a Juno-award winning jazz musician and past parent, is the entertainment. This year’s UTSPA fundraiser will equip a ‘smart classroom’ – a system of interactive whiteboards and connecting laptops. All adult UTS stakeholders – current and past parents, alumni and friends of UTS – are welcome. Tickets are $55 and includes hors

Mavor Moore Drama Award

d’oeuvres. Cash bar. For more information and ticket order form, go to the Rejuvenation link under “Parents” on the UTS website: www.uts.utoronto.ca or email: rejuvenation@uts. utoronto.ca

Special scholarship created to honour notable UTS graduate

Alumni Annual Dinner on a Friday! This year’s dinner will be Friday October 26, 2007. It is being moved from the traditional Thursday night to encourage more out-of-town alumni to attend and to allow more time for socializing after the dinner. The price of the dinner has been increased to $100, except for alumni graduating in 1997 to 2007 which is $50. Having the dinner at UTS has proven to be a more interesting venue and the environment seems to be more conducive to easily reminiscing about one’s student days. Unfortunately, catering of the event significantly increases the costs because of the rentals of tables, chairs, linens, outside kitchen, etc. in addition to the food cost. UTSAA has been subsidizing this event in the past years and believes this price adjustment is appropriate for our fiscal well-being. To help defray some of the costs, we are seeking sponsors for various elements of the evening activities. If you or your employer is interested in supporting this dinner, please contact Tom Sanderson at tomsand3@rogers.com. We look forward to seeing you there!

T

he UTS Drama Department wishes to establish a new award, the Mavor Moore Drama Memorial Scholarship, to commemorate the outstanding career of this UTS ’36 grad, who died in December 2006. This would be the first-ever scholarship strictly for drama. UTS and UTSAA are seeking funds to establish this award from alumni, particularly those who have performed in the annual drama productions over the many years. The present UTS curriculum teaches four drama courses, beginning in Grade 8 [F2] and continuing in Grade 9 [M3] or 10 [M4] and again in Grade 11 [S5] or 12 [S6]. Three productions are staged each year: the Junior play (directed by senior students), the Senior play and the Sears Drama Festival play. From an endowment fund of $10,000, a minimum annual income of $500 could be generated for the award, which is about the average value of comparable subject specific scholarships. The proposed criteria for the award to a senior (S5 or S6) student would include a person:

• who has made a signifi

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cant contribution, both at a curricular and a co-curricular level, to the UTS drama program

• who is an ‘ensemble’

worker, i.e. works in a collaborative way in production and/or performance roles, and demonstrates qualities of leadership, dedication, responsibility, mentorship, and generosity of time and resources

• who has demonstrated

an ability, interest and talent for drama in a performance and/or production capacity

• who has maintained a

good academic standing Here is a terrific opportunity to honour an outstanding Canadian and UTS grad. You can make a donation through the UTSAA 2006 Annual Fund: just designate ‘Mavor Moore Memorial’ with your pledge. For more information, or if you are interested in making it happen, please contact H.D. Borthwick at 416-946-7012 or email dborthwick@uts.utoronto.ca. It is hoped that this endowment can be achieved before the end of September to enable the award to be offered in the 2007–08 school year. Help ensure this scholarship becomes a reality!

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President’s Report

Now is the time to create the future Our challenge is to foster more alumni participation.

P

AST. With the school year end only a few months away and my term as your president coming to an end, I cannot help but reflect on the last few years. It was my purpose from the outset to prepare UTSAA for the changes necessary. The UTSAA board has participated with the UTS Board of Directors on some governance and affiliation issues, and on Advancement office planning. PRESENT. We have overdelivered on our $200,000 pledge to ‘top up’ the UTS Tom Student Bursary Sanderson, ’55 Fund over the last president, UTSAA 2 years, continue to hold the annual alumni dinner at the school, sponsor the student graduation dinner, provide the Remembrance Day guest speaker (John Clarry ’38) and schedule a number of other events including golf, 3-on-3 Bball and alumni/UTS hockey game. FUTURE. We will continue to support the principal in the development of a vision and strategic plan for the school, in the preparation of a redevelopment proposal and the organization of the Advancement Office to expand fund raising efforts. UTS financial reports will provide a baseline for accountability and measurement in the future. Our challenge as an association will



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be to foster more alumni participation in our activities and develop a wider chapter network while continuing to support the financial needs of UTS. CENTENNIAL 1910 – 2010. [UTS Year Reps please note]. A milestone for the school is rapidly approaching – our centenary celebration. Various celebrations, events and activities will require many alumni volunteers to help all our stakeholders to reconnect with the school. In this regard, the UTSAA has made recommendations to the UTS Board of Directors to form a Centennial Steering Committee as early as possible. If you are interested in getting involved, please call the Alumni Office. You can make a difference! Our vision for UTS Centennial 2010 is to create a celebration for all alumni to step up and reconnect with UTS. Our focus is to honour the past, work the present and help create the future.

Alumni Want to Know

Q A

Has the cultural image of UTS changed?

The culture of UTS has been enhanced with the change to a coed school in 1973 and with the growing multiculturalism and diversity of the students living in the GTA. Admission to UTS continues to be solely merit-based with equality for all. The UTS students awareness of cultural diversity is exemplified by the annual Culture Show production which has been an outstanding success. Yes,

the culture of UTS has been enhanced, and the students and the school are stronger because of it.

Q A

What is the UTS Bursary Application Process?

Dorothy Davis, Vice Principal in charge of Admissions, reports that each year approximately 20% of the students apply for a bursary. ENTRANCE PROCESS. In the future, new students will qualify through an outside SSAT (Secondary School Admission Test) and an internally-prepared UTS exam, as well as an interview in which many UTS Alumni have assisted. A UTS Admission Committee selects the students after analyzing the above results and reviewing past report cards and other references. (See UTS website for additional information). BURSARY PROCESS. Parents submit financial application information directly to an outside independent agency called Apple Financial. Apple prepares a detailed financial analysis and makes recommendations to a UTS Bursary Committee who make the final recommendation based on the funds available. Prospective parents are then notified of the decision and will either accept or refuse the school’s offer. There is an appeal process whereby the family may supply Apple with additional information. It should be noted that no guarantee of continued support is given to parents; however generally, if the


President’s Report

criteria below are followed: • Consistency in parents financial status. • No drastic change in number of bursary applicants. • Consistency in student academic performance • Maintenanceof student’s good standing then, every attempt will be made to continue support. In any case, parents must reapply each year. BURSARY SUPPORT. It should be noted that for the 2006–2007 year, $785,000.00 support was given 112 families, of which 20 received full tuition. The entrance process and the bursary support program are very professionally-managed and we can be very proud of the efforts which UTS is making to secure the best students – our future alumni. FUTURE CHALLENGE. The challenge will be to have additional endowment funds available to provide the income for the increasing need for full and partial bursaries. It requires an endowment of more than $300,000 invested today to secure full tuition of 1 student through the 6 years of UTS. We must continue to support the high standards that have already been set.

Q A

What is the status of our Teachers?

61 full and part time teachers with high energy and outstanding teaching credentials – 3 doctorates and 36 master degrees (including 3 doctoral students) – are dedicated to our 640 students. In addition, 13 projects are under way with OISE/UT teachers to support the rigorous UTS liberal arts and science curriculum. At UTS, learning is valued, individuals are respected, early specializa-

tion is discouraged, intellectual activity is encouraged and physical needs well served. The teaching faculty is the solid catalyst of this learning process.

Q A

What is the present state of athletics at UTS?

Jeff Kennedy, Director of Athletics for the last 4 years, reported that our Phys Ed programs use 3 gymnasiums, 1 swimming pool, 4 ice rinks, and Uof T facilities at Varsity, Trinity and Robert Street field for tennis, hockey and outdoor sports. PRESENT STATE. 72 voluntary coaching positions are filled by UTS staff, Uof T personnel and alumni to support the program and 1,000 participants through our 30 teams (male/ female/co-ed). In the last few years, UTS teams are recognized as highlyskilled, well-trained and very well-respected. Teams include soccer, ice and field hockey, wrestling, curling, rugby, tennis, golf, basketball, volleyball and badminton among others, even ultimate Frisbee. UTS plays in the South Region of a citywide athletic association called TDSSAA, which sends teams to provincial championships. Individual and team accomplishments are well documented. The UTS athletic goal of ‘Bigger, Faster, Stronger’ supports the belief that students participating in athletics will be less fatigued, less agitated and less stressed which leads to building stronger self – confidence and certainly becoming better candidates for learning.

• Moreuse of the Robert Street Field • Bleachersin redeveloped gymnasiums • A5-year development plan for a return to football • Aplan to develop sports medicine programs as part of the Ridley Fitness Centre UTSAA has been a major supporter of athletics through the Ridley Fund, and we will continue our support. FINAL REMARKS. Congratulations to Bernie McGarva ’72 on being appointed to the UTS Board of Directors. I would especially like to thank Don Borthwick ’54, who has served as Executive Director of UTSAA for the last 6 years and is a former UTSAA President. Don is also currently the editor of the UTSAA Magazine (now The Root) and has been the catalyst for most UTSAA activities including the Annual Fund. It has been a great pleasure working with him over the last few years. His untiring efforts are much appreciated by UTS and all alumni. Two highlights stand out above the rest during the last two years of my presidency. The first was participating in the interview process for Grade 6 students applying to join UTS and the second was addressing the graduation classes. There is nothing that can match the sparkle in the eyes of the young students on these occasions. Thank you to all for your support and guidance during the past two years.

Our focus is to honour the past, work the present and help create the future.

FUTURE PROJECTS. The future for athletics looks very bright and future goals include:

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Principal’s Message

The Road Ahead We must take advantage of the opportunities the future will bring.

I

think it’s fair to observe from the vantage point of 8 months into the job that, while the challenges facing UTS may be daunting in scale, the scope of the opportunity for UTS in the future is equally great, and the combination of the two is so interesting that I’ve decided to write about it. UTS today is blessed with a thoughtful and dedicated Board of Directors who understand very well their responsibility to protect the long term viability and reputation of the school. An equally talented Michaele group of commitRobertson ted supporters are Principal, UTS working to establish the Board of the UTS Foundation, and their job will be the stewardship and growth of the UTS funds. As is the case with UTSPA and UTSAA, all these people are volunteers working to advance an institution whose existence they believe to be of profound importance. UTS may have had its identity crises, its troubled times and its struggles to overcome the limitations of an old (but elegant) building, but everyone I have spoken with to date, whether volunteer, alum, employee, student, parent or friend, exudes a kind of goodwill about the school that we should all find remarkable and precious. And they share a certainty that the school will and must continue to thrive. In 2010, UTS will be 100 years



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old. It will also be financially self-sufficient for the first time in its history. It will meet this challenge with the same success as it has met past challenges. The financial demands are clear: the operating budget must be entirely funded from tuition by 2010 and, in the future, the endowment must grow to preserve the commitment to be as accessible to the students we want to attract as possible, and we must continue to raise dollars for a new building. So 2010 is a kind of milestone. We know what we have to do by then to meet the challenge of self-sufficiency on the operating side. We know what we have to do to meet the challenge of fund-raising for endowment and building funds. We’ve made real progress in getting ready for those challenges. But the interesting thing, and the real opportunity, is that we have the opportunity and incentive at the same time to consider 21st Century principles and realities in our decisions about what a UTS education should offer. The prospect of a new space will force us to ask ourselves what kinds of learning and what kinds of relationships that space should support. The prospect of strong partnerships with Uof T and other institutions will force us to ask how we will support both students in developing a vision of the world and their places in it

and our city schools and UTS’s contribution to them. The challenges we are facing globally become opportunities for education – and they must be so, or we risk handing over the world’s challenges to our children who will have no skills to meet them and therefore no opportunity to resolve them. If we seize this opportunity, then the sometimes-heard comment that UTS has nothing to contribute to the public education debate because its students are atypical and elite will disappear. UTS students will be known as students who have learned about the challenges to their city and the planet, who have learned what it means to strive to overcome those challenges, and who carry with them into university a commitment to service and the life of the mind and an understanding of the power of the individual to do good. Those are the factors that will make them leaders. R That is the opportunity before us. l

...we have the opportunity and incentive ...to consider 21st Century principles and realities in our decisions about what a UTS education should offer.


UTS Board Report

Better Control of our Destiny The Board moves forward with UTS Foundation.

S

ince our last report in the UTSAA Magazine’s fall issue, the Board has been working closely with UTS Principal, Michaele Robertson, to ensure that sufficient resources are set aside to support improvements in the School’s facilities and boost security standards. In addition, we have made significant strides in securing a senior professional to take on the role of Executive Director, Advancement and spearhead the School’s fund-raising activities. Two key comBob Lord ’58 mittees estabchair, UTS lished under the provisions of the UTS-UT Affiliation Agreement – the Academic Activities Affiliation Committee and the Joint Development Planning Committee – are moving forward as planned under Ms Robertson’s direction. The goals of the Academic Activities Affiliation Committee are to establish and make known existing partnerships between OISE/UT and UTS and to expand the partnerships where there is common interest between UTS and other faculties. The mandate of the Joint Development Planning Committee is to map out a vision and a plan for a common site and some common programming between UTS and OISE/UT, resulting in both institutions, once again, sharing the 371 Bloor Street site. The School’s strategic planning pro-

cess is now underway and is being led by Michaele Robertson and UTS parent David Saffran, who is Senior Vice President of Ipsos Reid Corporation, a leading market research firm. The mandate of the Strategic Planning Team is to work in consultation with UTS stakeholders to develop a long-term strategic plan for UTS and bring forth its recommendations to the UTS Board. The Board’s priority for the remainder of 2006-07 academic year will be to establish the UTS Foundation and finalize the transfer of assets from the University of Toronto to UTS and its Foundation. The UTS Foundation is currently operating on a steering committee basis. However, once established, it will operate at arm’s length from the UTS Board and its mandate will be to ensure that the School’s endowments are wisely invested. We are fortunate to have gained the support of Bill Saunderson ’52, who is chairing the Steering Committee as it establishes the framework for the UTS Foundation. Mr. Saunderson’s commitment to UTS is well-known amongst the School’s alumni. He served on the UTS Interim Board in 2002-03 and chaired the Preserving the Opportunity campaign from 1993 to 1994, as well as being a major contributor to both the Preserving the Opportunity campaign

and the Building Campaign. Former OISE/UT Dean, Michael Fullan, once said, “Successful schools are not only collaborative internally, but they also have the confidence, capacity and political wisdom to reach out, constantly forming alliances.” UTS has always enjoyed its own, very unique brand of success, even at times of uncertainty and turbulence. As of July 1, 2006, under Michaele Robertson’s leadership, UTS has begun to experience a new form of success that comes from quiet confidence and political wisdom. UTS is no longer in waiting mode; it is moving ahead, firmly focused on strengthening current alliances and forging new ones – and enlivening a sense of social responsibility in our students. In the coming months and years, the Board’s objective will be to ensure that we continue to build on our legacy by supporting the School’s leadership and ensuring that the School’s administration not only has the confidence and political wisdom at the helm, but the capacity by way of tools and resources to reach out to the greater community and attract the best students, best teachers, and form partnerships that serve our students, as well as society at R large. l

The Board’s priority ... will be to establish the UTS Foundation and finalize the transfer of assets from the University of Toronto to UTS and its Foundation.

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Fond Memories Do Not Fade Class of ’46 recalls what UTS meant to them – excellence, discipline, social responsibility and friendships.

If

great schools have souls then unstinting support for the school, including a record it seems that the soul of UTS has changed pledge to the Andy Lockhart bursary fund, named very little over the past 60 years. What after one of their favourite teachers, active parstruck me most about my conversations with ticipation in both the Preserving the Opportunity members of the Class of 1946 was how simibursary endowment campaign, the UTSAA annual lar the nature of their fondest memories was funds, and other fund-raising activity both for UTS to that of my own class, despite the differand elsewhere, and you have a truly stellar group of ence of decades. people. They have distinguished themselves hugely It’s funny how our experiences tend to get in all their fields of endeavour, from university presaltered through the prism of memory. What seemed ident to Olympic athlete, including successful busiincredibly important at one point in time can in ness leaders, lawyers, ministers, leading physicians retrospect seem much less significant. One goes and professors. There are five Order of Canada to Paris expecting the highlights of the trip to be recipients among them but what is most remarkthe Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame Cathedral and the able about the group is the fact that they’ve shown Louvre only to find oneself waxing more later about themselves to be so supportive, not just of society as a meal at a quaint little café, an acquaintance met a whole, but of each other. As a class many of them or the fresh smell of a street after a rain. continue to be very close and to meet on a regular I believe that’s equally the case with our basis, having a reunion every five years and in many memories of UTS. We agonize over exams, projcases meeting much more frequently. ects and presentations and fret about I had the opportunity popularity, and then realize later that to speak with a number of class of what we most value about our time at 1946 alumni and to ask them what school are lessons learned, friendships they believed made their class stand made and small day-to-day occurout most from the classes that came rences that we didn’t really even think before and after, and while all of about back then. their answers were different, it was their strong civic-mindedness that The Class of 1946 celebrated their 60th anniversary of graduation struck me as the most salient feature this past year, but what stands out is of this group of graduates. Although not their longevity but their success in many of the men that I spoke with all fields of life and for the excellence indicated that they harboured strong of their careers, in the same way most feelings of obligation towards society – Rob Dowsett of us consider what UTS stands for: as a whole, I got the impression that excellence. Combine that with their they were primarily motivated less

“UTS is elitist for the right reason: academic excellence.”

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Robert Dowsett (seated) and Joseph McArthur

by duty than by the desire to be supportive not only of the country and institutions to which they have belonged, but also each other and those less fortunate than themselves. Some members of the class attribute this ethos of community mindedness to the spirit of the time in which they were growing up. During their student years at school, World War II began and ended. Classmates were lost, like George Bean ’41, the School Captain during the first year many in the Class of 1946 were at UTS, family members were away serving in the military, and some staff members apparently carried combat injuries. Whether primarily as a result of bearing witness to the consequences of the war or from exposure to the heated rhetoric of the time, many were instilled with a sense of duty and obligation both to their country and to society at large that never fully left them. Similarly, the perceived threat of World War II was interpreted by some as a throwing down of a gauntlet that prompted them to excel in ways they might not have otherwise felt motivated. Rob Dowsett, whose father was an air raid warden in Lawrence Park in 1944, comments, “We did well because we learned that there was something worth fighting

for and carried that lesson with us all through our lives. Schoolmates left school and never came back. We were challenged to do as well as they could.” Defending “the Canadian way of life” and all that it stands for continues to be a lifelong goal for many. More importantly, it is worth noting that all of the alumni that I spoke with credited their time at UTS for their successes as adults. While they were a “clean”, “high energy” bunch, UTS gave them the ability to work and taught them how to balance the demands placed on them both inside and outside the classroom. It was a busy, friendly place where the students were bright, challenging and fair. Many report that they spent several hours on homework each night and believe that the rigorous discipline that it imparted taught them how to work, study, and be geared for success later in life. Working to meet the standards expected of them by UTS gave them the mental preparation necessary to achieve aims that they set for themselves later in their careers. They appreciate the fact that they were “not allowed to goof off” and as Joe McArthur says, “We played hard and studied hard.” “We didn’t realize it at the time but it was a challenging environment to be in,” says Ralph Barford. According to Donald Thain, it was thanks to UTS that “I never felt out of my depth later on,” at Harvard or elsewhere. One gets the impression that there was an atmosphere of supportiveness and friendly camaraderie at the school. The students were generally helpful with each other and enjoyed participating in a wide variety of curricular – Charles catto and extracurricular activities, especially team sports. Football was a particularly popular pastime and appears to have added greatly to the class’ cohesiveness. Many would spend time after school practicing, playing other schools and going over the book of plays given to them by the football coach. It created a real “esprit de corps”. According to Fraser Fell, “if people couldn’t play, they would coach or watch – the whole school was involved.” Hockey and football games would never be missed, but basketball and swimming are also among the most mentioned of a huge list of sports that the class remembers fondly, including boxing, water polo, gymnastics, handball in the court that was behind the school and skiing on weekends. Both Varsity Stadium and the Aura Lee are remembered with particular nostalgia.

“The school is held together and lead by its strong tradition of pride.”

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Order of

Canada:

FIVE from ’46!

Ralph Barford: Member

Charles Catto: Member

John Evans: Companion

Fraser Fell: Member

Fraser Mustard: Officer

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Music, drama and debating round out the most remembered activities and are credited, along with sports and academics, for having provided such a balanced education. Public speaking contests and debates, the choir and the school band were all popular, but drama was enjoyed above all and included productions such as operettas, Shakespearian plays like Henry IV Part I and more modern ones like Trial by Jury. The crosscountry run and The Twig were both around back then. So were school assemblies, at the beginning of which teachers and school captains would announce highly anticipated news about classmates overseas. There was also a cadet corps that was mandatory at that time, in which students would march around the school with wooden guns and might over time eventually have the opportunity to practice at the rifle range. It seems that cadets was either strongly loved or strongly hated. As one can imagine, students either loved the discipline or it was “too much discipline for too little purpose”. The staff was superb by all accounts, both for the quality of their teaching and for the interest that they took in the students’ progress inside and outside the classroom. History teacher and advisor to the debating society, Andy Lockhart, was evidently a favourite of the class, especially because he taught them “how to study”. Others of note include “Sad Sam” Carlisle, chemistry teacher Barry Gray, Petrie, Joe Gill, Hal Newall, Bernie. Taylor, Lou Hayman who was later coach for the Argonauts, Gib Cochrane, English teacher Norm McLeod and Bruce MacLean. There were also Johnny Workman who could stand at the blackboard and draw a perfect circle for a geometry lesson and Phys Ed teacher Roy Dilworth who told the class that if they did nothing for an assignment they would get only 10% docked from the mark. This was apparently because he didn’t want students to push themselves beyond what they were physically capable of. All are recognized in hindsight for their high standard of excellence and for having taught in a way that was unusual for a high school at that time. Headmaster “Baldy” Lewis merits particular mention, as everybody remembers being terrified of getting on his bad side, but counts him a positive influence in their lives; he is considered to have been a strong disciplinarian in a character building sort of way. The background of the class itself was much more homogenous than it is now. Toronto was a small place at the time and while nobody was

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terribly rich back then, they were all of a JudeoChristian background or, as Kingsley Smith is credited with having said, “middle class anglicized kids”. Many of them lived in the northern part of Toronto around the Lawrence Park, Moore Park and Rosedale areas and rode their bikes to school. One of them, Don Wright, is even said to have hitched a bus with his bike on occasion. They played bridge and had parties and dances to which girls from schools like Havergal and Bishop Strachan would be invited. Joe McArthur recalls that John Evans would take eight people in his Buick to dances at Casa Loma where there would be a big band playing every Saturday night. It could be argued that the class’ first real tragedy occurred when Doug Murray, the first of the class to have a motorcycle, got killed on Yonge St. two days after he bought it. He had been bright, a good athlete, and much loved and respected and was the first of the class to die. On a happier note is Donald Thain’s recollection of when his class’ homeroom master announced the war ended and went to find out if school would be cancelled. After a certain amount of time, the class got antsy and just climbed out the window. The Class of 1946 has kept in exceptionally close contact, partly through the efforts of several members, who have worked hard to keep everybody in communication. But it is clear that the strong loyalty that so many of its members continue to feel for the school is based not only upon that effort or upon family ties – the fathers and sons of many also attended UTS – but upon their perception of a clear continuity of the belief in excellence that was there when they were students. “The school is held together and led by its strong tradition of pride,” states Charles Catto. The tuition fees of the 1940s were fairly modest by today’s standards – $75 per year plus a $31.50 athletic fee – but today have risen to a price that might have prevented many of its former pupils from attending without financial aid. However, if it can be considered an elite school “it’s elitist for the right reason: academic excellence” as Rob Dowsett puts it. While there is a difference in student composition between then and now, they all feel very proud of their affiliation with the school because of what it is today. For Dowsett, “the UTS of today is to Toronto what it should be for academic achievers.” When the issue of UTS’ public funding arose in 1993 and there was strong debate about whether the school should continue, the three-per-


The Class of ’46 A Sampling of Accomplishments Ralph Barford BComm, Uof T; MBA Harvard [Baker Scholar]; Member of the Order of Canada; Former Chair General Steel Wares, Camco, Advisory Board of Ivey School of Business [UWO]; former member of UWO Board of Regents; Former President of Valleydene Corp.; President of Valford Holdings; Boards: Toronto Hospital, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Victoria College, BCE, Bank of Montreal, Hollinger, Nortel, Northern Telecom, Molson, CIAR. Charles C. Bigelow BaSc, MSc, PhD, ECIC; Dean of Science, University of Manitoba [1979–89]. Bruce C. Bone Chair and CEO of Labrador Iron Ore; Former Vice-President and Treasurer, Noranda, Former Treasurer, Brunswick Mining and Smelting William Buik Former President, Burns Fry Investment Management; Deceased. Denis W. Case Former Chair and President of Case Advertising; Former Creative Director, McKim Advertising, one of Canada’s major advertising agencies; Deceased. Charles Catto Victoria College, Emmanuel College; LLD; Member of the Order of Canada; United Church Minister; Founding Director of Frontiers Foundation, a nonprofit voluntary service organization which promotes advancement of economically and socially disadvantaged communities. George Cuthbertson Mechanical Engineer, Uof T; Designer and Founder of C&C

Yachts; Award: Elected Academician in Royal Canadian Academy of Arts [1974]. Robert Dowsett BA, Honour Math and Physics, Uof T; Actuary; Independent management, actuarial, pension and insurance consultant; Senior Consultant, Wm. Mercer; Former President and CEO, Crown Life; Former President , Canadian Institute of Actuaries and Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association; Boards: Centre for Mental Health Foundation, CT Financial Services, Dofasco, Mercer, Crown Life, Canada Permanent, Donwood Institute. Denis Evans Owner of Steed and Evans, a major Ontario road construction company John R. Evans MD, DPhil; Chair, Canada Foundation for Innovation, MARS Discovery; Director: MDS, McClelland & Stewart; Former President, University of Toronto; Former Vice-President, Health Science and Dean of Medicine, McMaster U.; Former Honourary CoChair, UTS Preserving the Opportunity Endowment Campaign; Former Chair: Torstar, Alcan, Allelix; Former Director: World Bank, C.D.Howe Institute,Dofasco, Royal Bank Companion, Order of Canada. Fraser Fell BA; LLB; Lawyer; Doctor of Laws, McMaster University; Member, Order of Canada; Chair, Gentra Inc.; Former Chair of Board of Governors, McMaster University; Former Chair of Aetna Life Insurance and Placer

son committee who made the final decision consisted exclusively of UTS grads: John Evans, Ralph Barford and Harold Smith. Their classmates have been equally optimistic about the school’s independent future and instrumental in keeping the school going. The Preserving the Opportunity campaign benefited hugely from their generosity and the Andy Lockhart bursary is the most ambitious and successful class fund-raising effort in the school’s history. The latter began with a $50,000 donation from Ralph Barford’s Andy Lockhart history scholarship fund to which about $200,000 was eventually added by other class members in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of their graduation last year. They are still working towards the $300,000 target they had initially set. The bursary program is important to them because they want the school to stay elitist for the right reasons, by allowing a smart kid to get a good education who otherwise could not afford it. Most would agree with Ralph Barford’s assertion that UTS was a great place to be where

Dome Mines; Boards: Aetna, Royal Trust, Toronto Symphony, World Gold Council, Toronto General and Western Hospital Foundation. H.Donald Guthrie Lawyer, Senior Consulting Partner, Cassels Brock; University of Toronto Counsel since 1972; Former Vice Chair of the Royal Ontario Museum; Boards: CNR, Ontario Place. Lawrence B. Heath Lawyer; Entrepreneur. William L.B. Heath Lawyer; Former Vice-President, Breakwater Resources. Warren Hughes Owner, Theatrix Costume House, a professional costumes service to film, tv and theatre industry. James D. Lang Former Executive and Owner [with brother Gordon S. Lang ’44], CCl Industries, a family business and world class leader in specialty packaging. Joseph McArthur Former Vice-Chair and CFO, Moore Corp. and Moore Business Forms; Former Director Allendale Mutual Insurance, Toppan Moore Co. Fraser Mustard MD, Uof T; PhD, University of Cambridge; Founding President and Fellow, The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research [CIAR]; Helped establish along with John Evans the new school of Medicine and Health, McMaster U.; Uof T medical faculty; currently leads the Founders’ Network; Chairman Emeritus, Council for Early Child Development; numerous awards in the medical field; Canadian Medical Hall of Fame inductee; Officer, Order of Canada. Peter Pollen Politician and Owner of Automobile Dealership; Former Mayor of Victoria [1971-5 and 1981-5]; Former Leader, BC Conservative Party.

Donald H. Thain Professor, Richard Ivey School of Business[UWO] for 38 years;one of Canada’s pre-eminent management teachers, thinkers and writers; served on 16 Boards. James M. Tory LLB [Gold Medalist], Uof T; Lawyer; Chair Emeritus and Counsel, Torys; Former Chair: Cognos, Inmet Mining, Hospital for Sick Children and its Foundation; Boards: Canadian General Tower, Canadian Real Estate Investment Trust, Teck Corp. John A. Tory Q.C. LLB, Uof T; Lawyer; President of Thomson Investors; Former President of Toronto Board of Trade and Woodbridge; Former Deputy Chair, Thomson Corp. Boards: Rogers Communications, AbitibiConsolidated, Thomson Corp., Woodbridge. Warren Wilkes Chair and Founder of Webcom Ltd., Canada’s leading book printer; Awards: Printer of the Year in Canada [2003], First Canadian to receive North American Award for Graphics Arts Leaders of Americas [2005]. David H. Wishart BCom, Uof T; CA; Partner, Clarkson Gordon; Director, Arthur Young International. Donald J. Wright Patent lawyer, Senior Counsel, Managing Partner, Lang Michener; former lecturer, Uof T Law School; Fellow of the Patent and Trademark Institute of Canada. Lawyers Peter Mills, Peter Webb, Doctors Jim Brisbee, John Dawson, Don Montgomery, David Watson, Clayton Ross Tom Gayford 1968 Olympic Team, Gold Medal in Equestrian Team Jumping;

[Apologies to those in the class who are omitted]

one would “learn as much from your classmates as from your teachers”. The students were outstanding individuals who had high expectations of leadership; what Donald Thain likes to call the “quarterback complex”, the feeling of responsibility for what’s going to happen next. “A work ethic was ingrained in us that people in our class could literally do anything that they set their minds to” and they were committed to success. “Leadership is thrust upon you and you respond”, and they did, with the help of excellent teachers and a program that was committed to high academic standards and curricular and extracurricular balance. Their loyalty to the school comes from their loyalty to values they gained while being there and which continue to set the tone of the school and of their lives. They would like the newer generation to have the opportunity to obtain an education also anchored by those core values of academic excellence, discipline, social responsibility and friendships. Kirstin Brothers ’91

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My 6 months in the

The Sudan is the largest

country in Africa – an area of over 2,500,000 sq. km or slightly more than ¼ size of the US – sharing a border with nine neighbours – Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, The Democratic Republic of Congo, The Central African Republic, Chad, Libya and Egypt, and also possessing a stretch of coastline along the Red Sea. [see map on page 16]. The human population [40 million estimated] of Sudan is quite diverse: the north predominantly Arab, including several nomadic groups; the south comprising more than fifty African tribes. In the frenzy of decolonization that took place following the Second World War, Sudan gained its independence on 1 January 1956. Like many African countries which had been penetrated and developed by many of the great imperial powers over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Sudan’s fluid colonial situation eventually resolved itself into a ‘condominium’ between Egypt and Great Britain. However, the freedom and prosperity that this decolonization promised was not forthcoming, and for the next 40 years, the country

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constantly found itself entangled in a complex web of internecine fighting and almost continual civil war: north vs. south, Muslim vs. Christian, nomad vs. farmer, Dinka vs. Nuer, liberal vs. socialist. All the while, a raft of UN agencies and NGOs struggled to keep food and medical supplies flowing to the already desperate citizens of southern Sudan. Finally, in the late spring of 2005, an internationally-sponsored Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), under the United Nations Mission In Sudan [UNMIS] umbrella, was achieved and an invitation to the UN to deploy a multicapability force with the mandate to observe the conditions of the CPA by the former combatants was implemented. Canada’s contribution to UNMIS consisted of 32 members of the Armed Forces, drawn from all three services. Seven were staff officers, working in the force headquarters in Khartoum or Juba, and the remaining 25 of us were employed as UNMOs, distributed across the conflict area in southern Sudan. Prior to deployment, we had all undergone a battery of medical and dental examinations and inoculations for every disease imaginable. We also all


Sudan

undertook an intensive five-week training course at the Canadian Forces Peace Support Training Centre in Kingston. Unfortunately, many of our colleagues from around the world were not similarly prepared, so the first order of business on arrival in Khartoum was an additional two weeks of training provided by UNMIS itself. In the end, we spent almost a month in Khartoum before being shipped off. it would be to the small but strategically critical Sector Six, centred on the town of Abyei, approximately 100 kilometres to the east of Southern Darfur, a nexus of conflict since the early twentieth century. It sits astride the only year-round land route between north and south (the massive Al Sudd swamp lying not far to the east) and marks a zone of transition between the Arab north and the African south. Perhaps more to the point, it is also one of the most oil-rich regions of the country. As military observers, we were expected to live “on the economy” and were provided a daily subsistence allowance by the UN. We cooked in a tent at the camp and did our daily shopping in the local market, purchasing fresh meat from a butcher who trimmed his meat

In my case

The trials and tribulations of a UN Mission in africa.

by christopher federico ’91, uts staff

with a hatchet on an old tree stump. The contingent of military observers in Abyei changed constantly, as officers from different countries started and finished their tours of duty, but at any given time there were representatives of at least 20 different countries: Australia, Canada, Russia, a number of African countries, India, Germany, Norway, and several South American countries. The 28 of us shared a prefabricated office with a water cooler and dozen or so clunky computers. All of our communications had to go by satellite via Khartoum, Brindisi, and New York before getting to the outside world. It was quite common to receive e-mail two or three days after it had been sent, and on more than one occasion, we were literally incommunicado for days when the satellite system crashed. Our task was to monitor and verify the activities, dispositions, troop strengths and weapons states of the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army (SPLA), as required under the CPA. Additionally, we were often called upon to investigate alleged treaty violations, shootings and other acts of violence, as well as

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LEFT: Debating how best to get moving! Center: Befriending a young Sudanese. Right: The ‘bakery’ in the village of Arik which was the destination of my first patrol soon after I arrived in Abyei in July.

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“When the UN leaves a place, everyone spits on us. But if they’re too busy spitting on the UN to be shooting at each other, then we’ve done our job.” – Lubomir Radovnikovic, UNMIS staff

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monitor the overall security situation of our area of operations. The Sudanese conflict involved not only the regular SAF forces and their SPLA opponents, but also numerous proxy militias and groups of bandits (euphemistically referred to as Other Armed Groups) operating in dispersed pockets and across porous national boundaries. This meant we had to come face-to-face with the combatants, rather than simply observe them from afar; and often were also involved in communicating between local civic leadership and the many UN agencies and NGOs operating in the sector. Accordingly, as part of a crew, we mounted daily patrols with an interpreter, along with a national monitor from each of the SAF and SPLA – to inspect military installations and nearby settlements. During the dry season, travel was a fairly simple task, but once the rains came in late April it was virtually impossible to travel cross-country, and there was only one route that could reasonably be called a road. Even that quickly became rutted and washed out, making long-distance movement an excruciatingly slow process. Just prior to the end of my deployment, I accompanied a convoy on a 650-kilometre drive from Abyei north to the UN supply depot at El Obeid, and it took us nearly 24 hours of straight driving, in addition to the cow-jams, flat tires and would-be ambushes. Despite the robust, standard UN Nissan truck, I once spent the night in a swamp because we had become stuck without the mud tires that were held up by Sudanese customs, and even though we were only eight kilometres from the UN camp, it took more than 24 hours for a recovery team to haul us out, which they only managed after getting themselves stuck multiple times. In addition to the movement restrictions imposed by the terrain and climate, the two hostile parties also prevented us – often at gunpoint – from visiting locations they considered sensitive. To overcome this problem, I instituted aerial surveillance by Indian Air Force helicopter patrols, but, unfortunately the threat of landmines and unexploded

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ordinance was so extreme that copters were greatly restricted in choice of landing zones; the UN Mine Action Service was unable to conduct any mineclearing activities until the end of the rainy season, so in most cases we were limited to only overflights of the SAF and SPLA positions. noteworthy incidents that took place over the course of my tour. I once had to intervene to prevent a shootout when a platoon of armed SPLA soldiers on flower-covered bicycles arrived to attend a wedding ceremony next to the SAF compound. There was a tense situation when the convoy we were accompanying struck and killed a cow and we had to transport both the rancher and the dead cow back to the camp to negotiate compensation. An Australian UNMO and I were in the market one day when a force of about a dozen armed and determined SPLA soldiers came patrolling through the town; when we notified the command post, the only response we received from our UNMO superior was “since you’re in the market, pick me up three packs of Benson & Hedges”! We were frequently held up at improvised checkpoints set up by locals hoping to obtain anything from clean water to a cut of the national oil revenue. We conducted an investigation into a series of aircraft landings at supposedly abandoned airstrip, locally. One of the interpreters had been arrested for taking photographs of the plane and dragged before the local SPLA commander. When we checked it out, we came upon a pair of SPLA soldiers in civilian clothes playing cards outside a building which was piled floor to ceiling with weapons crates. The next day the SPLA commanders imposed a restriction enjoining us from traveling any further than 150 metres south of the UN camp. It was very easy for us who were from an ABCA (Australia, Britain, Canada, America) military environment to become very frustrated with the inefficiencies of the UN and what seemed to us to be a very weak mandate: neither the UN’s Status of Mission Agreement (the UN is in Sudan at the invitation of the parties) nor the CPA itself permitted us to do anything other than observe and report on the activities of the former combatants. It was especially depressing to hear officers of the SPLA and SAF discuss what they perceived to be the merits of the peace: that it afforded them time to recruit, rearm, and retrain so that next time they R might win. l

There were some


UTS Board of Directors: 2007

A Little Personal Background Gen Ling Chang was appointed to the UTS Board as an independent director November of 2005. Ms Chang is a superintendent of education in the Toronto District School Board. A seasoned educator, Ms Chang holds a Masters in Linguistics from Lancaster University in England. She has served with the TDSB since 1996, as principal, viceprincipal and K–OAC instructional leader, and with the Department of Curriculum & Modern Languages, OISE/UT. sujit choudhry ’88 was originally recommended for nomination by the UTS Alumni Association. He is associate professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto and a senior fellow of Massey College. He holds law degrees from the University of Oxford, the University of Toronto, and the Harvard Law School and was a Rhodes Scholar. He has also been actively involved in public policy development, serving as a consultant to the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada, the Advisory Committee on SARS and Public Health, the World Bank Institute, and is a member of the Academic Advisory Committee to the Province of Ontario’s Democratic Renewal Secretariat and of the Governing Toronto Advisory Panel. David gurin is the parent of two current UTS students and was recommended for nomination by the UTS Parents’ Association. He is a former commissioner of planning for Metropolitan Toronto and a former deputy commissioner of transportation for the City of New York. He has a Master of City Planning from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Arts from Cornell University, and also taught at the University of Toronto and the City University of New York. He is currently a city planning consultant, research associate of the Centre for Urban and Community Studies of the University of Toronto, and adjunct professor of planning at Ryerson. He has published popular and professional articles on urban planning issues.

John jakolev is a parent of a current student and was recommended for nomination by the UTS Parents’ Association. He is a chartered accountant and presently serves as treasurer of the UTS Board. A seasoned professional with significant expertise in finance; he is co-founder of Jet Capital. Mr. Jakolev became a partner at Goodman and Carr LLP in 2002, effectively becoming the first non-lawyer allowed by the Law Society to be a partner in a law firm practicing in Ontario. Formerly, he was executive vice president at Newcourt Capital and a senior partner at Ernst & Young.

the UTS Alumni Association (UTSAA) 1982, 2002-03, and currently serves as director on the UTSAA Board. Mr. McGarva holds an A.B. mcl (Phi Beta Kappa) from Harvard University where he also received a fellowship from the John Fitzgerald Kennedy School of Government. He holds an LL.B. (Hons.) from University of Toronto. He is a partner at the law firm of Aird & Berlis where he heads the Infrastructure Group as well as the ADR Group. He has taught Civil Procedure at the Bar Admission Course, and authored a number of articles on risk management.

Robert Lord ’58 is the current chair of the UTS Board of Directors and was recommended for nomination by the UTS Alumni Association. He is a chartered accountant who has previously served as the vice chair of Ernst & Young, chair of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants and the Royal Life Saving Society of Canada, and as a director of the YMCA of Greater Toronto. Mr. Lord is a director or former director of four public and three private corporations.

Nasir Noormohamed is the parent of two current UTS students, and presently copresident of the UTS Parents’ Association, a position he has held since 2005. Mr. Noormohamed is the co-founder of Drug Intelligence Inc., which provides consulting services to some of the larger, research-based pharmaceutical companies in Canada in the areas of specialty and emerging therapies. He holds a Master of Health Science in Health Administration from the University of Toronto, a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Western Ontario, and the Certified Management Accountant designation. Nasir has served on the boards and executive committees of numerous national, provincial and local organizations.

Cathy Mallove is the parent of a UTS student and currently Vice-President, Communications of the UTS Parents’ Association. She holds a Master of Business Administration from the University of Toronto and a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations from Georgetown University. A communications consultant specializing in public consultation and facilitation, strategic planning and organizational development, Ms Mallove was the Director of Marketing for Steelcase Canada Ltd. and helped a large public school board to develop a strategic and financial direction. She has served on a number of advisory committees at the Toronto District School Board as well as on the boards and executive committees of a number of non-profit and community organizations. Bernie McGarva ’72 was recommended for nomination by the UTS Alumni Association. He is a former president of

F. David Rounthwaite ’65 was recommended for nomination by the UTSAA. Mr. Rounthwaite currently serves as Secretary of the UTS Board of Directors. He was instrumental in the negotiation and drafting of the UTS constituting documents and the interim affiliation, services and premises agreement with the University. Mr. Rounthwaite holds a B.A. (Hons.) from the University of Toronto, a M.Sc. (econ.) from the London School of Economics and Political Science and an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School of York University. He is a founding principal of Neurus Financial Inc. and serves as a director of several private companies and Northland Power Income Fund.

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2006

held once again at uts, the evening was a great success with many in attendance. And we have the photographic evidence to prove it!

1 Keith McLean ’66 speaks with Dave Sanderson ’66 2 Sarah E.V. Cooper ’96, Sarah Y. Cooper ’96 Amanda Martyn ’96 3 Karl Schabas ’96, Naomi Hamer ’96, Sally Byun ’96, Amanda Ross-Whyte ’96, Carole BernicchiaFreeman, UTS Staff

2 1

4 Ron Baker ’56, Lesley Sanderson, UTSAA President Tom Sanderson ’55, John Snell ’56 5 Stephanie Fung, ’96, Naomi Hamer ’96, Sally Byun ’96 6 Chad Bark ’43 and Don Hubbs ’43

4 3

5

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class of

1946 Front Row [L-R]: R. Dowsett, L. Heath, B. MacLean [former staff], J. McArthur, W. Heath. Back: D. Wishart, P. Webb, D. Montgomery, C. Catto

class of

1951 Front Row [L-R]: G. Rayfield, J. White, J. Kerr, R. Davies Back: L. Scott, W. Wilson, J. Wilkinson, G. Fierheller, G. James

class of

1956

Front Row [L-R]: R.Raisman, R. Baker, D. Cole, C. Snelling, D. Dingle, G. Lovatt Back: H. White, A. Lansbury, J. McCartney, D. Flint, D. A. Scace, P. Scott, S. Lowden

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2006

Alumni Dinner

1 Don Gordon ’76, Chris Medwell ’76 2 Alex Bain ’66, William MacKay ’66 3 Eugene Siklos ’81 and Jeremy Celliers ’81

2

4 J. Graham ’76, Gerhardt Hauer ’76 5 Larry Heath ’46 and Donald Montgomery ’46

1

6 Tim Halderson ’66, Dave Sanderson ’66, Bill Watts ’66

3

7 Brian MacMillan ’81 and Andre Schmidt ’81 share a laugh. 8 Principal Michaele Robertson accepts a cheque from the Class of 1946 for their initial pledges to the Lockhart Bursary endowment fund.

4

5

9 Beverly Wells ’86 and Jacquelyn Sloane-Siklos ’86

6

7

8

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class of

1976 Front Row [L-R]: G. Pitchford, V. Holysh, M. Fleming, G. Campbell, D. Gordon, J. Graham, M. Cybulsky Second: D. White, R. Jenkins, G. Hauer, J. Higginson Rollins, G. Yost, A. Clute, P. Celliers Third: P. Davis, C. Farlinger, D. Sarjeant, P. Froebel, M. Duik, D. Wright Back: R. Harwood, C. Leyerle, A. Sura, C. Medwell.

class of

1986 Front Row [L-R]: K. Alberti, K. Douglas, N. Jones, D. Weiss, J. Williams, L. Valencia-Svensson Middle: T. Betel, A. Baird, L. Fann, J. Kramer, B. Wells, N. Patsiopoulos Back: J. Sloane-Siklos, P. Martin, M. Phillips, A. Lee, D. Auster

class of

1996 Front Row [L-R] : I. Muskat, W-Y Shum, K. Schabas, D. Chiang, P. Duez. Middle: Mme. BernicchiaFreeman, S. Fung, N. Hamer, S. Byun, J. Mason, S.Y. Cooper back: E. Rix, K. Wong, J. Young, A. Martyn, F. Chiu, K. Bingham, M. Lam, S.E.V. Cooper

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uts Alumni News Notes on the interesting lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni. & In a new position and doing well... David Holdsworth ’61 has founded a management consulting firm, after retiring 5 years ago from 31 years in the federal public works service in Ottawa; often partnering on some projects with John Coleman ’61. Currently, he is writing two books: a critical study on Lawrence Durrell [a British author, novelist, poet, screenwriter and jazz pianist who worked in the foreign service after WWII] and a book of short stories about the humourous side of diplomatic life in the Canadian Foreign Service. John McKinnon ’67 has been recently promoted to General Manager, Pension Investments Finance Administration, Canada Post, Ottawa. It follows positions in this field at Imperial Oil, Bank of Montreal, Canada Post and Canada Post Pension Fund. Donald Clarke ’73-4Y moved in January 2005 to Washington, DC to join the faculty of the George Washington University Law School, where his specialty is Chinese law, after many years at the University of Washington in Seattle. (Check out his blog at http://chineselawblog.com). During the 2007-08 academic year, he’ll be a visiting professor at New York University Law School, and is looking forward to spending a year with a nice apartment in the Village. Chris Medwell ’76 has relocated with his family to Pensacola, Florida, to join Bloomberg Consulting, specialists in Engineering Biomechanics and Accident Reconstruction, as an Investigative Engineer. Andre Hidi ’77 is now Head of Mergers and Acquisitions at BMO Capital Markets, responsible for Canada, US and Abroad. David Allan ’78 has joined Coventree Capital Group as Principal, Head of Capital Markets; previously at CIBC. Chris Alexander ’85, previously Canada’s

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ambassador to Afghanistan, is now the Deputy Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General in Afghanistan. Dory Boyer ’91 will be the Manager of Athlete Medical, Vancouver 2010 Olympics, for all competition venues. Paul Wright ’70 will be the Medical Manager [orthopaedic coverage] for the Nordic site. Paul Sedra ’93, now living in Vancouver, was appointed assistant professor of history at Simon Fraser U. and is teaching and doing research on the modern Middle East. Steve Engels ’94 has been promoted to Senior Lecturer in the computer science dept. at Uof T, a tenured position. He was a contestant in TVO’s Best Lecturer competition last year. Gary Lau ’96 has been appointed Specialist Registar in Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Management, University of Leicester [UK]. This July, he is planning to wed Jenny Mao, whom he met at medical school.

& congratulations to... Michael McMordie ’53 was admitted to The Order of the University of Calgary [November 2006] for “a record of exemplary and distinguished service to the university”. He is serving on the Board of the Nickle Arts Museum and on the Editorial Board of the Canadian Architectural Photography Web Portal. John Rodway ’54 celebrated his first holein-one this past January in Florida, where he has retired after practicing medicine for 35 years. For you golfers, the full details are: it was The Villages’ Hill Top Course, on the first hole, 146 yard par 3. Congratulations from UTS’ many golfers! Charles Baillie ’58, former Chair and CEO of TD Bank Financial Group, has been named to the Canadian Business Hall of Fame.

John Lynch ’59 was elected a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario last September. He noted that he was “one of 87 and has probably joined a number of fellow UTS alumni at the Institute”; nevertheless, he took great pride in his achievement. Paul Fisher ’64 is the new president of the Uof T T-Holders Association and a member on the new Varsity Centre Campaign Advisory Board. Noah Cowan ’85, co-director of Toronto Film Festival, will be the Jury President of the Adelaide [Australia] Film Festival. John Caldwell ‘87 and his wife Susan are now proud parents of a beautiful baby girl named Amelia, who was born October 14th, 2006. Susan, Amelia and John are all very healthy and happy and doing well in Port Moody, British Columbia. Jennifer Andrews ’89 had a second child, Gillian Ella, last July, a little sister for Alex. Elizabeth Phillips ’91 and her husband, Keith McTaggart, welcomed their son, Kieran Graham last August and have enthusiastically tracked his development on their blog at http://mctaglips.blogware.com.

& here and there... John Wilkinson ‘45 has recently moved to Windermere on the Mount, an elegant senior’s residence in London, ON. He notes that he was appointed a lay member of the Council of the Ontario Association of Land Surveyors and has just completed a term of 25 years on the Manual Committee of The United Church of Canada. Fergus Kyle ’48 is building a two-seat cruising aircraft with a retractable single wheel, landing “radar”, angle of attack sensor and digital “glass” cockpit. Ten years in the making, he says, “It may fly in 2007!”


uts Alumni News Donald A. MacRae Astronomy Professor at University of Toronto

1916 Notes on the interesting lives andof outstanding achievements and one Canada’s Great Science Visionaries of our alumni. 2006

Jack McOuat ’52, a member of the ROM’s Heritage Board of Governors and a veteran mining consultant, played a key role in attracting the largest corporate gift in the ROM’s history – a $10 million gift from Teck Cominco – to provide for a new home for the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame and to establish a suite of earth sciences galleries at the ROM. Charles Magwood ’61 has built upon his Skydome experience and helped foster the Varsity Centre development project as a member of the Varsity Centre Steering Committee. The first phase – stadium, track and infield with a winter dome cover for year-round usage – opened in early February. Tim Halderson ’66 is looking forward to retirement from the Ottawa Police this July, after 34 years of service with the OPP, Nepean and Ottawa forces. He plans to enjoy regular hours, golfing, biking, traveling and keeping active in the community. Peter Weedon ’67, after a 30-year career in management consulting, finds himself residing in paradise – Hamilton, Bermuda – managing a law firm. As a dedicated, long distance, open water swimmer, he trained for the 2005 10k US Masters Swim Championship, held in Florida, by swimming around the island of Bermuda. He finished second in his age group in the event. Bruce McKelvey and Richard Boxer, Class of ’67, recently finished a housing project in Sri Lanka. Following the Tsunami, the McKelveys (Janet and Bruce) and the Boxers (Richard and Joan) purchased land in the Tangelle area of Sri Lanka and started a housing project. Money was raised in Canada, which was sufficient to hire 15 local workers and buy building materials, and assisted by supplementary manpower involving 3 volunteer trips from Canada. The project of 24 homes and a community centre had its grand opening in February. For further information see http://www.tripca.org.

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he Canadian astronomy community lost one of its visionaries with the passing of Don MacRae, UTS 1933, on December 6, 2006 at age 90. He was the leader of the internationally-recognized Uof T Department of Astronomy in the 1960s and 1970s. Born in Halifax February 19, 1916, Don moved to Toronto with the family in 1924 when his father, a classics scholar, joined the faculty at Osgoode Hall Law School. After UTS [1928-1933], Don received a degree from Uof T in math and physics in 1937, winning the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Gold Medal, before doing his PhD at Harvard in 1943. He taught at the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell before a brief stint at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, working on the Manhattan Project, the nuclear weapons program. However, he struggled with the moral dilemma of using the A-bomb against Japan and joined other scientists to lobby against it. He taught at the Case Institute in Cleveland before returning to Uof T to help establish the new astronomy department in 1953, where he began his specialization in radio astronomy, a field which many others viewed with skepticism at that time. During his career, Don was very instrumental in the establishment and success of the David Dunlap Observatory, north of Toronto in Richmond Hill, where he was a director from 1965 to 1978; the Carnegie Observatory in Chile which became Uof T’s Southern Observatory in 1971; the Canada-

France-Hawaii telescope in Hawaii in 1970s; and helped attract funding for the McLaughlin Planetarium [1968] beside the Royal Ontario Museum. His devotion and dedication to his students and chosen field of science was a hallmark of his outstanding career. In the post-Sputnik era, he had standing-room at his lectures and his important research findings on the origin and nature of the moon were confirmed in later lunar landings. He was very innovative in his teachings and promoting new research directions, as evidenced by the fact that he was the first professor to teach computer programming to his students at the university, having recognized the future importance of computer skills in their careers. His many achievements and the use of leading-edge telescopes eventually led to one of his students finding the first evidence of black holes in the universe, ten years before the second one was found. After retiring in 1982, he became professor emeritus and continued his interest in the department for many years. Professor Emeritus E.R. Seaquist, a former student and later a colleague, recalled “the enduring respect that many had for Don’s wisdom, generosity, sense of humour, powers of observation and rigorous attention to accuracy and detail.” He left a tremendous legacy. He is survived by three sons. This article includes excerpts from the Globe & Mail and a tribute by E.R. Seaquist, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto.

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Alumni News

Charles Tysoe ’75 is at home a lot, hampered by chronic ill health, after briefly teaching high school math and science. He writes a little, recently doing short interview/photography features on Hall of Fame hockey player Bryan Trottier and Global Television’s Roz Weston. His first love is to research, write and teach his Christian faith. Lawrence Hill ’75 received critical acclaim for The Book of Negroes – a historical novel about the 18th and 19th century slave trade – his third novel and seventh book by HarperCollins Canada. He is also coauthor of The Deserter’s Tale, which was released early in ’07 in Canada by House of Anansi Press and in ten countries. It tells the story of an ordinary soldier who walked away from the war in Iraq. Hill received a National Magazine “Best Essay” Award for his 2005 Walrus feature Black America’s Burden.

ABOVE: “To the victor go the spoils.” A friendly contest between two sailors: Alberti and Pitchford . Gavin Pitchford ’76, the C&C 34 Fleet Captain at the RCYC, presents an award to Andrew Alberti ’80 to mark his long service to the club, with particular note of the role Andrew has played in establishing Protest Committees and educating others on the rules of sailing. Both have matching boats, down to the colour, and race each other all summer. Iver Corneil ’77 has just completed two architectural design projects – a new visitors centre at the Cathedral of Trondheim, Norway, and a new exhibition of the Norwegian crown regalia in the Archbishop’s Palace. Trondheim is 550 km. northwest of Oslo on the Norwegian Sea coast and is the site of the University of

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Norway’s science and technology centre. Jennifer Storer ’78 has been working at the University of Toronto for 15 years and is currently the Internship Support Officer, Uof T Mississauga. She assists with placing 4th year students in the outside community for unpaid hours towards course credits. She is a new dog breeder, with her first litter of Shiloh Shepherds last summer. Both dogs have proven talents in obedience, tracking, herding, and cuddling[!]. “Well, that’s it, except I’m single, in case anyone is seeking a dog crazy, eccentric, and not very tidy, but very good at relaxing, middleaged lady.” Jamie Somerville ’80 is the new Artistic Director and Principal Conductor of the Hamilton Philharmonic. He has an extensive schedule of performances this year: as the Solo Horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he will perform at Carnegie Hall and the Proms in London, followed by a tour of Europe and Brazil. As a featured soloist and chamber musician, he’ll be in Boston and Costa Rica, and he will also premiere a new horn concerto by the doyen of American composers, Elliot Carter, which was commissioned by the BSO. Ted Griffith ’84 wed Charis Keiso in Toronto last October and had two classmates, Kosta Michalopoulos as his Best Man and David Kreindler as his Groomsman. Their honeymoon in St. Lucia was postponed to Christmas to allow his bride to launch her teaching career. Ted works for the Ontario government as a senior policy advisor. Lisa Valencia-Svensson ’86 is assisting the producer at Storyline Entertainment, a Toronto-based documentary film company. Larry (Kuntz) Kline ’89 changed his surname to Kline after marrying Karen Elkin in 2003 (the anagram was intentional, but partly coincidental). Larry works in web communications for the City of Toronto, and also plays drums in the Russell Leon Band, which performs regularly in Toronto and recently completed its debut disc, If Red Was Green. The CD release party is on April 26 at Lula Lounge. For more info, visit: http://www.rleonband.com.

ABOVE: Meeting up at the Canadian Consulate in New York City [L-R]- Hilary Davidson, Jennifer Szalai, Elizabeth Mendez Berry. Hilary Davidson ’90 reported meeting Jennifer Szalai ’95 and Elizabeth Mendez Berry ’95 at a media party at the Canadian Consulate General’s residence in New York in February. Jennifer is senior editor of Harper’s Magazine and Elizabeth is a freelance writer. Hilary just published her 14th book, Frommer’s Toronto 2007. Solomon Douglas ’92 spent last fall touring with the world-famous Glenn Miller Orchestra as their pianist, playing all over the United States and Japan. “Now I’m

In Memoriam Condolences are extended to the families of these alumni who passed away recently. Ross G. Dance ’30 Kenneth Crosby Legge ’30

September 6, 2006 February 7, 2007

Henry Stanley Hunnisett ’32

December 24, 2006

Donald Alexander MacRae ’33

December 6, 2006

James B. Keachie ’34

February 27, 2007

J. Murray Macleod ’34 J. Mavor Moore ’36 Leonard Ernest Andrews ’38 Peter Gault Kingsmill ’43

August 14, 2005 December 18, 2006 August 3, 2006 December 10, 2006

John R. Ardagh ’44

February 25, 2007

W. Donald Bark ’44

November 3, 2006

Robert C. Stone ’44

February 18, 2007

Donald Hume Crawford ’45

November 12, 2006

Donald H.H. Mackenzie ’47

December 2, 2006

Norman J. Filmer ’51

October 3, 2006

Peter F. McGaw ’55

January 4, 2007

Joseph Bruce Stovel ’60

January 12, 2007

Pamela Selby Eden ’79

February 5, 2007


uts Alumni News Alumni News

Notes on the interesting lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni.

James Mavor Moore

1919 2006

Playwright, actor, director, produce, composer, critic, poet, administrator, teacher and public servant

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avor Moore passed away in Victoria on December 18, 2006 in his 88th year. He was born in Toronto, the middle of three sons and a daughter of an Anglican theologian, John, and the famous Dora Mavor Moore, actress, theatre producer and teacher. During the last century, Mavor devoted a long and prolific career to nurturing the national culture, both as a theatre artist and founding father of a number of Canadian arts organizations He began his career as a 12-yearold, writing his first play which his mother staged at a local drama club, and followed as an actor on radio as one of the Crusoe Boys, a daily serial, and on CBC Radio. Mavor attended UTS 1930-1936, and then enrolled at Trinity College, Uof T, earning his BA [Honours] in English and philosophy in 1941. At the Schools, he served as president of the Literary Society and portrayed Falstaff and Macbeth in the school’s annual Shakespearian productions, under Joe Gill. It came as no surprise that Mavor would play Macbeth, but what was long remembered was Macduff’s over-zealous rage which caused a

back being a freelance musician and dance teacher. My brand-new CD Swingmatism was released in November and is doing great.” Kai M.A. Chan ’93, an assistant professor at UBC, has been awarded a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair for Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services. He and his wife Ljuba

slash across Macbeth’s forehead requiring some stitches after the performance. He had a profound interest in Macbeth, as witnessed by his Literary section article in the 1935 Twig, in which he discussed the exhaustive research done on the character by the many famous actors over the centuries since the play was first staged circa 1610. After a brief stint as a psychological warfare officer in the Canadian Army Intelligence in London, he returned to CBC’s international service, but soon branched into producing Spring Thaw, a popular annual satirical revue from 1948 to 1965. In the early 1950s, he moved over to CBC television in its infancy as its chief producer. In the 1950s and 1960s, he was busy as the executive television producer for the UN in New York, and produced many stage performances for the Crest Theatre [Toronto], the Stratford Festival and the Canadian Opera Company. Later, he participated in the creation of the Charlottetown Festival as the founding artistic director [1964-68], contributed lyrics to the Anne of Green Gables musical, was the founding director of the St. Lawrence have bought a new home in Vancouver... with room for visitors! Jason Shron ’93 left an unfinished PhD in art history in 2004 to pursue a dream of making model trains and started Rapido Trains Inc. – now the second largest train manufacturer in Canada. With a factory in

Centre [1965-70] and became the first artist to chair the Canada Council [1979-83]. He was author of over 100 works for stage, radio and tv, and his publishings were numerous – an autobiography, Rejuvenating Myself, dramatic and musical works, poetry, essays, articles – and stints as a journalist with the Toronto Telegram [1958-60], the Globe & Mail [198489] and Maclean’s magazine. He appeared in over 60 films, was a professor at York University [1970-84], before moving west to Vancouver in 1986 and later to the University of Victoria in 1990 as research professor, fine arts and humanities. Mavor held seven honorary degrees, was an Officer [1973] and Companion [1988] Order of Canada and received the Governor-General’s Award for lifetime achievement in 1999, and the same year, he was elected to the Order of British Columbia. He leaves his third wife, opera singer Alexandra Browning, and four daughters. Includes excerpts from the Toronto Star, Globe & Mail, Canadian Encyclopedia and Canadian Communication Foundation China and a warehouse in Concord, ON, his company actually turned a profit in its first full year as a manufacturer. The products have been described by the American hobby press as the best out there. The company is built on the idea of making models of Canadian trains, and then selling them around the world. “Our models are spring 2007

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Alumni News

accurate renditions of real trains operated by Canadian National, VIA Rail Canada and Canadian Pacific. My UTS friends all knew of my obsession with the Turbo, which ran between Toronto and Montreal, and Rapido. We will be releasing the first-ever, sound-equipped, scale model of the Turbo this summer.”

tematics and behaviour, with an emphasis on dragonflies; she lives with husband, Jeremy, and their two-year-old daughter, Aeshna, and dog, Spider, in New Brunswick, NJ.

Jessica Ware ’95 is an evolutionary biologist currently finishing up a PhD at Rutgers University. Her work focuses on insect sys-

Alex Eddington ’98 will be taking his second one-man play, The Fugue Code, on tour to six Canadian Fringe Festivals this sum-

Michelle Wong ’97 is finishing up a pharmacy residency at Hamilton Health Sciences Center.

mer. In this fast-paced, comedy thriller set in the world of J.S. Bach, Alex is playing 14 characters! It will appear in Ottawa, Toronto [first half of July], Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Vancouver. Emily Antze ’02 received her BA at McGill in Anthropology and International Development Studies last June and is currently in Varanasi, India on a Canadian International Development Agency-sponsored internship with a small NGO, World

W. donald bark

1926 2006

School Captain, Gold Medalist and Athlete... One of the Best

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ne of three brothers who attended UTS, Don was one of the best at everything he did. A student during the wartime years from 1938 through 1944, he was part of an illustrious era at the Schools. Under the steady hand of Headmaster Lewis, UTS not only continued to graduate outstanding scholars, many of whom carved very successful careers in a number of professions, but a number of sports teams also enjoyed outstanding success. After graduating, Don joined the Fleet Air Arms, a new wing of the Canadian Navy and did his basic training with the British counterparts in England; however, before he was able to go on active service, he was grounded by inner ear problems. Don enrolled in Commerce and Finance at Uof T and then went on to Osgoode Law School, before setting up a one-man practice in Peterborough. Later, he became a partner in the oldest law firm there. For many years, Don continued playing intermediate football with Peterborough Orphans in the ORFU, and enjoyed adult hockey into his early

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60s, often with his youngest brother John. Curling was another sport he loved. For the last 20 years, Don was the chief layman at their church. At UTS, Don was elected school captain [1944], won the Nesbitt Gold Medal and was vice-president of the UTS Athletic Association. At the last assembly, unknown to almost everyone, he showed his skill as a pianist by playing the Warsaw Concerto. He played quarterback on the football teams, backing up Chad in the early years before taking over, and he was the punter. Chad said, “He could really boom the ball.” He played centre on the hockey Firsts for 4 years, was the team’s high scorer for 3 years, and early on, centred a line with his older brother, Chad. Chad recalled a special moment with Don, shortly before his passing, about the thrilling second game of the OHA two-game semifinal series with Stratford, whose star forward was Howie Meeker, the renowned Maple Leaf forward. The game was played at Maple Leaf Gardens and broadcasted by Foster Hewitt, who said it was one of the

most thrilling games ever. Don talked about the time when he and Chad broke in on the Stratford goalie in the last 10 seconds and failed to complete the pass to win the game and the series. He confided to Chad that he was thinking that if he could only get the puck over they would score, and although they had never ever talked about it before, Chad said, “In his mind he was hoping Don would take the shot and score.” At Varsity, Don continued to star in both football and hockey, was the leading scorer on both teams in the same year – a record still held – and was coached by Ace Bailey, the famous Toronto Maple Leaf defenseman, when Uof T won two intercollegiate titles in 1947 and 1948. Don was elected into the Uof T Sports Hall of Fame in 1995. Don loved his cottage and for many summers he and his wife would canoe many of the rivers in Ontario. He also ‘tripped’ the Nahani River on two occasions. Don leaves his wife, Joan, and four children. Don Borthwick ’54


The uts Alumni News Keys Alumni News

Literacy of Canada. She is returning to Notes interesting Canada thison springthe and will assume a posi- lives and outstanding achievements of our alumni. tion as their Overseas Program Manager in WLC’s Toronto Office.

Gallery

Evelyn Choi ’02, is in her final year at Cornell as an interior design major and says she misses being back home in Toronto, but enjoys catching up through the magazine. Last fall, she initiated and organized a team of 6 students to participate in a national competition called CANstruction (www.canstruction.org). It is a community service competition for design professionals to design and construct large, three-dimensional structures consisting of common food cans. At the close of the competition, cans are donated to local food banks. With the $4600 received in grants, she organized a team which designed the logistics of building the whale with 5064 cans [equivalent to 1.4 tons of food] – 3,996 cans of tuna for the blue skin, corn for the teeth and inside, sardines for the water and guava paste for the eyes. As the only student entry, we won ‘Honorable Mention’ in Rochester against 9 corporate teams. It was a really fun, meaningful and highly educational experience for all of us.]

ABOVE: Evelyn Choi’s whale constructed with 5064 cans. Taylor Zho ’02 received his Honours BSc from Uof T last June and is now enrolled in first year of medical school there, along with Ray Guo ’03, Michael Quejada ’02 and Eric Tseng ’02 who completed a Hon. BSc at Uof T.

Upcoming show Jim MacDougall ’54 plans to exhibit this autumn

Jacqueline Woo ’05, a Life Sciences student at Queens U., reports that several UTS grads traveled to Nicaragua for 10 days during Reading Week, as part of a Volunteer Abroad contingent. Ellen Miles ’05 and Sarah Tumaliuan ’05 helped finish construction on a school which is an academy for the best students in the country; Jackie Ang ’05 and Jacqueline worked at a state-run children’s cancer hospital, at a health clinic in Diriamba and at the National Centre for Disease Control.

More details will follow in the next issue

Future Exhibitions Kasper Podgorski ’04 Jacquelyn Siklos ’86 Kim Lee Kho ’81 Baillie Card ’05 It’s not too early to begin thinking about exhibiting at our Special 100th Anniversary Showing in Fall 2010!

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The Keys Gallery is located in Room 107A at UTS. If you would like to exhibit, contact Ann Unger, retired staff, (416) 932-1963 or e-mail aeunger@sympatico.ca for further information.

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Office of Development and Alumni Affairs

Much Happened & More to Come Make sure you try and connect with your class this year.

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he ODAA has continued to experience its normal busy time during the last six months, with the Annual Dinner, the Remembrance Day service, the commencement of the 2006 Annual Fund campaign, the Alumni vs. School hockey game and the BBall tournament. Annual Dinner. The Annual Dinner attracted 212 alumni, guests and current and former staff. The special anniversary years had good attendance, especially the classes of 1976, 1981, and 1996. This year, our Dinner is being moved Don to Friday night, Borthwick ’54 October 26th, to UTSAA Executive allow for more Director time to socialize later in the evening and to better enable out-of-town alumni to attend. We look forward to the special anniversary years coming back to celebrate their reunions: 1947, 1957, 1967, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1997. We also encourage some of the classes, like ’62, ’72, ’92 to consider organizing an interim 5-year get-together, with activities centred on attending the dinner; rather than wait ten years for your next ‘special’ anniversary to come. Finally, the committee is attempting to organize a special celebration for members of the many successful Swim Teams over the years.

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Annual Fund. Our first four months of the 2006 Annual Fund campaign have been an outstanding success. Donations through the end of December exceeded $280,000, well above the record final total for the 2005 campaign. For those of you who regularly support this fund, it is not too late to make a donation to ‘top-up’ the student bursary program. There are still three months to the end of the campaign. Athletics. The alumni regained their winning ways with a vengeance in the annual hockey game with the School team in early December. The final score was 10-2. After the first period, the alumni jumped out to a 6-1 lead, taking advantage of the School team which seemed to be still basking in the limelight of last year’s victory. In the last two periods of the game, they recovered with a really good effort. UTSAA would like to develop additional events to cover off the interests of other groups of alumni; particularly, for those interested in literary, art and music events and a specific event for women grads only. Ideas are welcome.

school. The Root has a number of symbolisms to UTS, following on traditions of the Twig and our motto – ‘velut arbor ita ramus’ – “as the tree grows so grows the branches (twig)”. Many alumni attribute an important part of their personal and career successes to their UTS education. Hence, one might say their success had strong roots! Alumni E-Directory. If you have not yet applied for a listing in our email directory, I would encourage you to do so. Weekly, I find that communication opportunities arise to contact various alumni groups to seek their assistance, or advise them of a school event of interest, or bulletin important news. You can register by accessing through the alumni section of the UTS website: www.uts. utoronto.ca/alumni/ emaildirectory.html. In particular in the Bio section, it would be appreciated if you would include your university data: school, degree(s) and year and complete in detail the Mentoring information section. The school is in the process of setting up a formal mentoring program, in terms of providing on-going counsel about university choices – both the school and area of academic study, together with additional perspectives on how personal character development R can better impact one’s future career. l

The school is in the process of setting up a formal mentoring program

New Name. I hope you enjoy the new look of the magazine – the name and the new page designs. More changes will be phased-in in upcoming issues. We felt that ‘the UTSAA Magazine’ could be improved to be more reflective of what the alumni means to the


2006 Annual Fund Success breeds greater success.

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he response to the 2006 UTSAA Annual Fund through the end of December has surpassed all previous years. Over $280,000 has been received, primarily in support of ‘topping up’ the Student Bursary program. Thanks to the outstanding efforts of the Class of 1946, which, in celebration of their 60th anniversary , established a named bursary fund in honour of the much-loved, history teacher, Andy Lockhart, who was on staff from 1940 to 1959. Led by Rob Dowsett and Joe McArthur, the class raised over $145,000 in 2006 and with additional pledges the fund now is approaching $250,000. This is a terrific effort by the class, who have been exceptionally strong supporters of UTS in many ways over the years. Congratulations go to a number of other classes, too. Significant donations were received from the Class of 1945, who are now in their third pledge year of giving to their Class of 1945 Bursary fund, also established on their 60th. They are half way to their ultimate goal of $300,000, which will be able to provide a full bursary annually to a student throughout the entire 6 years at the school. The Class of 1976 in celebration of their 30th anniversary raised nearly $12,000 to be awarded for a bursary in 2007-08. Three other 50th anniversary celebrants continue to make annual contributions to their endowment funds through the yearly Annual Fund campaigns: Class of 1952 to the Donald G. Cossar Scholarship, Class of 1953 to their Mathematics Scholarship and

spring 2007

the Class of 1954 to the Al Fleming Bursary. All of these contributions not only provide recognition to the academic performance and the quality of other student characteristics, but leave a lasting legacy of their class at UTS. The UTS Board, staff, students and the UTSAA Board are extremely appreciative of your continuing support. The 2006 campaign will continue R until the end of June. l |

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The Alumni Annual 3-on-3 Basketball

Perseverance Pays as Crampton team wins! Joe Crampton’s group was finally victorious after being division runner-ups twice in the last three years. Congratulations. It was a hard-fought final with Shawn Beard’s team.

1 Competitive Champions [L-R] Linus Yung, Eric Barnhorst, Norman Farb, Joe Crampton, all ’98. 2 Competitive Runner-up [L-R] Shawn Beard ’01, Sherwyn Benn and Jay Bahadur ’02. 3 Recreation Group Champions [L-R] Ana Shapiro ’93, Jaylene Morrison and Karyn Sullivan ’95. 4 Crampton plots mid-game strategy with his team. 5 Competitive Consolation Champions [L-R] Noam Bierstone, Jonathan Farine and Andrew Chan, all S5.

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sports report Alumni vs. School Hockey

Alumni Pay Back Time! Still smarting from last year’s game when the UTS school team prevailed with a stunning come-frombehind victory, the alumni squad of wily veterans had a point to make, and make it they did with an overpowering 6-1 performance in the first period. The school team came back in the game’s second half with a strong performance but the alumni coasted on to a 10-2 victory. The big question for the next game is: can the alums make it two in a row?

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1 The UTS alumni team led by the stellar goaltending of Livingston. 2 Both squads in the traditional post-game photo.

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Start your morning with spirit!

Show your school spirit in style!

To order, simply contact the UTS Alumni Office: UTS Coffee Mug $12

Phone: 416.978.3919 Email: alumni@uts.utoronto.ca

For more UTS mechandise, visit

www.uts.utoronto.ca/alumni

UTS Sweat Shirts Available in sizes S-XL Zip-front $40 Hood $50


Remembrance Day 2006

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Lest we forget...

1 Murray Bosley ’32 2 George Edmonds ’44, R. Boxer ’36, Ted Cross ’43, Rycken Suydam ’43, Don Manchester ’44, J. Sebert ’40 3 Guest speaker, John Clarry ’38 4 Jack Murton ’38, David Fraser ’38, Clare Morrison ’44 5 Don Teskey ’43, James O’Brian ’38, Murray Bosley ’32 6 Don Manchester ’44 with Principal Michaele Robertson 7 The memorial plaques that hang proudly in the entrance stairwell at UTS. 8 Robert Dale ’39, Bob Cameron ’38, John Clarry ’38, all guest speakers.

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The Root - Spring 2007  
The Root - Spring 2007