Cornucopia catalogue

Page 1

Cornucopia Helen E a g er , A ng us N i v i son, K ylie Sti l l ma n, Li z Coa ts, Tony Col ei n g , Marea Ga zza r d , E l oi se R a nk i ne, Brett Sto ne, P eter M a l oney , Chr i stop h e r Hodges , Ka ti W a tson, John R . W a l k e r , K irsteen P i eter se, P a p uny a Tul a A r ti s t s



C o r n u c o pia 3 September - 1 October, 2016

© Utopia Art Sydney



“Not as flat or solid as they initially appear, on closer examination the works range in transparency and depth. By layering surface washes, Hodges builds the form of each shape leaving evidence of brush strokes and the artist’s hand, creating shapes that shimmer and flux with the movement of the brush strokes.”

Christopher Hodges, 2015, synthetic polymer on paper, 19.5 x 19.5 cm Things, Red Thing #2, Dark Flower, Red Flower, Grey Flower, Red/Black Flower, Red Cloud Thing # 2, Red Cloud Thing #3 Black Thing #1

Chloe Watson, 2015


Liz Coats, 2005, Night Light Series #4, heat fused glass pigments, lead frame, 37 x 38 cm

Liz Coats, 2002, Sky Glass #10, kiln fire


ed pigments on float glass, 37 x 38 cm

“We often tell ourselves what we are seeing, rather than just experiencing the play of light and acting on that. “

L.C, 2016

Liz Coats, 2003, Sky Glass #20, kiln fired pigments on float glass, 37 x 38 cm


John R Walker, 2001, Chicken Drumstick, bronze & oil paint, 15 x 5 x 5 cm



“Created as a response to the aftermath of the Vietnam War, Coleing’s bronze sculptures are imbedded with the trauma felt on both a psychological and physical account by the individual. Heightened by the small scale of Coleings sculptures, and the solo figure dipicted in each is the idea of constant inherent isolation.” Felicity Brading, 2016


Toney Coleing, 1975 - 92, Alternative War Memorial #2, bronze, 11 x 3 x 2.5 cm 1975 - 92, #1, bronze, 7.5 x 4 x 3.5 cm 1975 - 97, #7, bronze, 8 x 5.5 x 4 cm 1975 - 97, #4, bronze, 6.5 x 5.5 x 9 cm 1975 - 97, #6, bronze, 7 x 5.5 x 3 cm 1975 - 97, #5, bronze, 9.5 x 3.5 x 3 cm 1975 - 97, #9, bronze, 8 x 23 x 2.5 cm


Peter Maloney, 2009, Tar People, acrylic on canvas, 125 x 94 cm


Peter Maloney, 2008-14, Hijack #2, oil on canvas, 46 x 35 cm


“During the last two decades my paintings have flaunted their ambivalent relationship with histories of abstract painting. While my works maintain some of the outward appearances of post-war abstraction I have always operated as an interloper, attempting in my way to subvert issues of robust masculinity with cut & paste photocopy collage origins and dead-pan paint delivery.�

P.M 2014

Peter Maloney, 2008-14, Hijack #3, oil on canvas, 36 x 28 cm


Peter Maloney, 2008-14, Hijack #4, oil on canvas, 36 x 28 cm




“I think sense of place is very important, not just for the landscape painter but for everybody. We all need to know our place in the world. But I think I could find something no matter where I was. I do like people to feel that my paintings have a feeling of the spirit of where they were painted.�

Angus Nivison, 2013, Study for Instinct (RHS), acrylic, pigment & charcoal on yalgoo letterhead, 21.5 x 20 cm

A.N, 2015

Angus Nivison, 2014, Study for Instinct (LHS), acrylic, pigment & charcoal on yalgoo letterhead, 21.5 x 20 cm

Angus Nivison, 2014, S acrylic, pigment & ch terhead, 21


Study for Presence 2, harcoal on yalgoo let1.5 x 20 cm

Angus Nivison, 2014, Study for Changing Landscape 1, acrylic, pigment & charcoal on yalgoo letterhead, 21.5 x 20 cm

Angus Nivison, 2015, Study for Changing Landscape 2, acrylic, pigment & charcoal on yalgoo letterhead, 21.5 x 20 cm


“The concertina book is a kind of prototype for an expanded view – two, four or six or more pages can be visible at any particular time, rather than the limited spread available in the traditional sketch-book. Drawings can be treated as discrete statements or they can spread horizontally; episodic drawings and notations can be read singly or as a series of connected visual observations. The landscape is regarded as a whole, yet, at the same time, it is a journey through motifs – an unfolding.”

© Andrew Sayers


John R Walker, 2016, Monaro, Concertina Artist Book (gouache on paper), 35 x 650 cm (unfolded)


“Precipice is a series of black and white lithographs originally printed in 2001, at a time when Helen was painting a series of paintings in the same format. Rediscovered recently while compiling a catalogue raisonne of her prints, each has been hand-coloured, the colour combinations luminous and often unconventional. The pastel softness giving depth to the printed surface.� Brett Stone, 2016

Helen Eager, 2001 - 16, hand coloured lithograph, 13 x 20.5 cm Precipice 1/9, Precipice 2/9, Precipice 3/9, Precipice 4/9, Precipice 5/9, Precipice 6/9, Precipice 7/9, Precipice 8/9, Precipice 9/9,




Helen Eager, 2001 - 16, hand coloured lithograph, 13 x 20.5 cm each Precipice Ed.1 - 12/12,






“Marea Gazzard had a love of the Australian landscape and forms from antiquity, objects that captured her imagination during her stay in London and visits to the British Museum. Maltese idols, pre-Columbian pottery and the museum’s Cycladic collection, their totemic and emblematic forms translated to Gazzard’s own language.” Gina Fairley, 2013

“To me the central holes or penetrations have become wells of contemplation which attract shadow play, rather than openings which are passed through and although they are a geometric form, their varied fullness and surface marks render them more ancient, more organic; as if caught between breaths.”

M.G, 2002


Marea Gazzard, 2006, Janus R.4 (IV), bronze, 17 x 9 x 4.5 cm


Marea Gazzard, 2006, Janus T2, bronze, 18 x 6.5 x 6.5 cm


Marea Gazzard, 2006, Janus T.1, bronze, 25 x 9 x 8 cm


Marea Gazzard, 2004, Kythera 1/5, bronze on slate, 23.5 x 16.5 x 6.1 cm

Marea Gazzard, 200


04, Grotta III, bronze, 23.5 x 15 x 6.5 cm

Marea Gazzard, 2005, Portara I, bronze on slate, 20.5 x 14.5 x 6 cm


“One of the challenges of making a sculpture is ensuring that it stands up... Many of Christopher Hodges’ latest works threaten to fall. They tilt precariously into space. And yet, their steel forms are perfectly poised over bases that are not simply a support, but crucial to the work as a whole. As the artist, explains, “to create balance within a sculpture you need to have every element sitting in harmony... I’m seeking a refinement of form so that it can speak freely and truly.” C.H, 2014


Christopher Hodges, 2014, IngĂŠnue, stainless steel, 245 x 15 x 10 cm




Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Soft Cloud Stone, stainless steel, 16.5 x 13 x 9 cm

Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Summit, stainless steel, 20 x 9 x 8 cm


Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Jagged Peaks in Spring Mist, stainless steel, 19 x 17 x 7 cm

Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Peaks in Foggy Cloud, stainless steel, 20 x 12 x 10 cm


“My studio (in Hong Kong) is located is in an area surrounded by mountains, often shrouded in low cloud giving them a direct visual link to traditional Chinese landscape painting withmountains and mists. Currently there is much upheaval due to the construction of an extension to the mass transit railway network. The juxtaposition of these two elements is dominating my studio practice at the moment.�

Kirsteen Pieterse, 2016


Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Solemn Pillar, stainless steel, 26.5 x 7 x 8 cm

Kirsteen Pieterse, 2015, Celebrating Clouds Peak, stainless steel, 24 x 8 x 7 cm




Kylie Stillman, 2015, Leaf Remains, cotton thread on paper, 42 x 30 cm


Kylie Stillman, 2015, Lead Type, cotton thread on paper, 42 x 30 cm


Kylie Stillman, 2015, Plume White, cotton thread on paper, 42 x 30 cm


Kylie Stillman, 2014, Stitch Stitch, cotton thread on paper, 42 x 30 cm




“I like finding rocks, mud and timber where water collects and dries out. Tidal pools become crusty with salt, and riverbanks are layered with silt. My new bowls are trying to look like they are found - glazes that rust and drip as if weathered and worn.�

B.S, 2016

Brett Stone, 2016, Salt Lick, stoneware, sizes vary


Brett Stone, 2016, Salt Lick, stoneware, sizes vary


Nanyma Napangati, 2014, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, 2014, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm


Nanyma Napangati Nanyuma was born in approximately 1944 and is the sister of Charlie Tjapangati. In Nanymas’ painting’s controlled dotting utilises techniques to create pulsating lines of ‘tali’ which depict important ceremonial stories central to the Pintupi culture.

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa Ronnie was born in the early 1940’s. He spent most of his formative years as a nomad in the remote desert surrounding his birthplace. He commenced painting for Papunya Tula in 1971. This painting depicts designs associated with the site of Walungurru or Kintore. The site is associated with the Tingari song cycle, ancestral stories about figures in the dreaming who travelled over the country creating and shaping particular sites.


Kenny Williams Tjampitjinpa Kenny was born near where the Kiwirrkura Community now stands c. 1950. In 1999 Kenny contributed to the Kintore men’s painting as part of the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal. Kenny’s paintings depict dreamings which include a python story and Ngamanpura, a swamp west of Kintore where a small berry is found.

Lorna Brown Napanangka Lorna was born in the bush near Haasts Bluff in 1962. This painting depicts the site of Waren Creek, just to the west of Mt Liebig community. This is the artist grandfathers country and there are both rockholes and soakage waters at the site.


Kenny Williams Tjampitjinpa, 2015, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm

Lorna Brown Napanangka, 2015, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm


Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra, 2015, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm

George Tjungurrayi, 2016, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm


Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra Elizabeth was born at Papunya in August 1959. In this painting the artist has painted designs associated with the rockhole of Kalipinpa, a major water dreaming site north of Sandy Blight Junction. In ancestral times a huge storm erupted in this area causing the lightning to flash and the water to rush across the land.

George Tjungurrayi George was born in the desert in the vicinity of Kiwirrkura in approximately 1943. George walked into Papunya with another young man along a freshly graded road, after living at Mukula, west of Kiwirrkura. He commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the early 1980s This painting depicts designs associated with the soakage water site of Tjulurulunga. Associaated with th Tingari Cycle which form part of the teachings of the post initiatory youths


Charlie Tjapangati Charlie was born at the site of Tjulurrunya, west of Kiwirrkura in approximately 1949. Charlie commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1978. This painting depicts designs associated with Karilwarra a rockhole site west of Kiwirrkura in Western Australia. Two ancestral snakes travelled to this site from the south.

Josephine Nangala Josephine was born circa 1950 and grew up in country north of Jupiter Well in Western Australia. In 1999 Josephine contributed to the Kiwirrkura womens’ painting as part of the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal. This painting relates to a venomous snake that lives at the soakage site of Nyinmi. The snake had travelled to Nyinmi from the lake site of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay, north of Kiwirrkura community.


Charlie Tjapanagati, 2015, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm

Josephine Nangala, 2015, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 61 x 31 cm




Kati Watson, 2016, Marble Bowl (brown), clay, 10 x 17 cm


Kati Watson, 2016, Marble Bowl (cream), clay, 10 x 17 cm


“No matter how much I plan what I want to do with my pots, there are always surprises. My aim is always to create forms and surfaces that hint at landscapes, rain showers, skies, mountains. I do some of the work to obtain these results but the glaze always finishes it off and I can never totally predict how this will be. With these marbled pots I decided to let the clay give me some surprises too. I think I have always loved the element of chance. And of course I keep coming back to the landscape hidden in every piece!� K.W, 2016

Kati Watson, 2016, Marble Bowl (white), clay, 9.5 x 19 cm


Kati Watson, 2016, White dishes (set of four), clay, 4 x 17 cm each


Eloise Rankine, Good Together, 2015, red stoneware, 2 pieces: 13.5 x 8 cm; 5.5 x 6 cm

Eloise Rankine, Bloom II, 2015, porcelain, 1 x 14.5 cm

Eloise Rankine, Falling Leaves, 2015, porcelain, 12 x 12 cm



“My work explores my place in the world - as a woman; as an individual relating to others; as an artist working in the medium of ceramics. The focus of my work is to explore how the physical qualities of porcelain can evoke emotion and empathy in the viewer.”

E.R, 2016

Eloise Rankine, Grandma’s Curtains, 2015, porcelain, 9 x 6 cm


Eloise Rankine, Nuclear Family, 2015, porcelain, 4 pieces: 13.5 x 9 cm




Kylie Stillman, 1999, Bottle drawing #6, plastic bottle and embroidery thread, 30 x 9 cm


Kylie Stillman, 1999, Bottle drawing #4, plastic bottle and embroidery thread, 30 x 9 cm


Kylie Stillman’s introduction to art came from learning how to sew and her mother’s way of sewing – her resourcefulness and her frugality; making the most of every piece of cloth, every sheet of newspaper. She has often used thread in her work in the way a painter would use paint, and in her bottle drawings the three dimensional thread drawings float in the space defined by the shape of the bottle, like abstracted rigging from a model ship. Stillman loves reusing ordinary objects in extraordinary ways – “the purpose of purposeful repurposing”.



Co r n u c o p ia 3 - 24 September, 2016

Utopia Art Sydney 2 Danks Street Waterloo NSW 2017 Telephone: + 61 2 9699 2900 email: utopiaartsydney@ozemail.com.au www.utopiaartsydney.com.au


Utopia Art Sydney 2 Danks Street Waterloo NSW 2017 Telephone: + 61 2 9699 2900 email: utopiaartsydney@ozemail.com.au www.utopiaartsydney.com.au