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SPRING 2019

HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Embracing Change, Fueling Growth.


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UTHSC Chancellor Steve J. Schwab, MD Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operations Officer Kennard Brown, JD, MPA, PhD, FACHE Dean, College of Health Professions Stephen E. Alway, PhD, FACSM Senior Associate Dean Research and Graduate Studies James A. Carson, PhD, FACSM Associate Dean for Academic, Faculty, and Student Affairs Hassan A. Aziz, PhD, FACSs, MLS(ASCP)cm Assistant Dean, Student Affairs Richard Kasser, PhD, PT Chair, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology Ashley Harkrider, PhD Chair, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences Kathleen Kenwright, EdD, MLS(ASCP)SI, MB Chair, Department of Health Informatics and Information Management Rebecca Reynolds, EdD, RHIA, FAHIMA

Table of Contents Letter from Dean Alway..............................................................................................2 Letter from Chancellor Schwab...............................................................................3 COHP by the Numbers................................................................................................ 4 Building the College’s Research Profile................................................................6 New Division of Rehabilitation Sciences Launched ......................................8 OT Chair Writes Second Book on Back-to-Basics Parenting..................10 Helping Children with Special Needs Get Moving........................................ 12 Catchings’ Philanthropy Assists UTHSC Students........................................ 14 OT Assistant Professor Focuses on Visually Impaired................................ 16 HIIM Scholarship Honors Outstanding Alumna............................................. 18 PT Student Drawn to Helping Others................................................................20 Speech-Language Student Inspired by Sister............................................... 22

Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy Anne H. Zachry, PhD, OTR/L

MLS Student Dedicated to Quality Life for All.............................................. 24

Chair, Department of Physical Therapy Carol Likens, PT, PhD

HIIM Student Breaking Down Barriers............................................................... 26

Vice Chancellor for Development and Alumni Affairs Love Collins, III, MBA

Congratulations to Our 2018 Graduates!.......................................................... 28

Associate Vice Chancellor for Development Bethany Goolsby, JD Assistant Vice Chancellor for Development Services Jada Williams Associate Director of Development – College of Health Professions Michelle Nixon Assistant Vice Chancellor, Alumni Affairs Chandra Tuggle

COHP and Campus Briefs........................................................................................ 32 Alumni Spotlight: Sally J. Baerman, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA..........................36 1911 Society...................................................................................................................... 38 2018 Golden Graduate Homecoming.................................................................. 41 Faculty Publications and Presentations............................................................42 In Memoriam...................................................................................................................48 Legacy Society..............................................................................................................48

Director of Alumni Affairs Natassha Works Assistant Director of Alumni Programs Terri Catafygiotu Assistant Vice Chancellor for Communications and Marketing Sally Badoud, MBA

On the cover: Doctor of Physical Therapy students, from left, Kajal Patel, Trevor Wallace, and Alesha Nolen learn to operate the Likorall 242 overhead lift system for transferring patients. The students are training in the new Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Simulation on the Memphis campus.

Editor Peggy Reisser Contributing Writers Peggy Reisser, Amber Carter, Jackie Denton Designer Adam Gaines Photographers Allen Gillespie, Jay Adkins, Natalie Brewer, Sam Thomas, Jackie Denton, Julie Beeler

All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment and admissions without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, or covered veteran status. Eligibility and other terms and conditions of employment benefits at The University of Tennessee are governed by laws and regulations of the State of Tennessee, and this non-discrimination statement is intended to be consistent with those laws and regulations. In accordance with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, The University of Tennessee affirmatively states that it does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, or disability in its education programs and activities, and this policy extends to employment by the University. Inquiries and charges of violation of Title VI (race, color, national origin), Title IX (sex), Section 504 (disability), ADA (disability), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (age), sexual orientation, or veteran status should be directed to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), 910 Madison Avenue, Suite 826, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, telephone 901-448-7382 (V/TTY available). Requests for accommodation of a disability should be directed to the ADA Coordinator at the Office of Equity and Diversity. E073701(003-191111)


From the Dean The College of Health Professions took some important steps in 2018. Our faculty members have approved a new Strategic Plan, which we will use to guide us toward the goal of gaining Top 20 national ranking in each of our programs in five years. We have, for the first time in our college’s history, established two full-time leadership positions that were filled by nationally recognized and outstanding leaders. James Carson, PhD, FACSM, became our senior associate dean for Research and Graduate Studies. He is building an Office of Research to support faculty and student research in Knoxville and Memphis. He has also overseen the approval process to begin a new PhD program in Rehabilitation Sciences. Hassan Aziz, PhD, FACSs, MLS (ASCP), became our associate dean for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs. He will guide our college’s revision of its bylaws and oversee all proposed academic changes, developing new academic programs, as well as student recruitments. We have welcomed new faculty and staff to our college family, and this has made us stronger. The momentum for change in our college, which began in 2018, is now a theme of change for 2019. Some of changes on the horizon for 2019 include finalizing the location of the new home for the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology. We will be hiring new faculty in all of our disciplines for our newly established Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, as a means to increase research collaborations and support the college and departmental missions for research and scholarship. The first students in the newly approved PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences will arrive in our college this year. We will begin plans for adding new programs. Initially, we will be creating a new department tentatively called the Department of Cardiopulmonary and Exercise Science. We will begin with a BS program in biomedical health sciences, BS and MS programs in respiratory therapy, and then add a BS in cardiac rehabilitation and clinical exercise physiology. The Departments of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy will expand enrollment with four additional slots each for students in 2019, and are working on expansion plans to double the current student enrollment within the next four years. A new one-stop interdisciplinary clinic will be built as part of the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences. We will hire full-time clinicians to treat patients and train students there. These changes come with challenges. We will need a wider base of funding and a new building on the Memphis campus to support the educational, clinical, and research needs of our students and faculty. We will begin planning for a $20 million capital initiative for constructing a state-of-the-art building and purchasing new or updating training equipment for the expanded educational, research, and clinical missions of the college. The projected launch is 2020. We hope to engage corporate, state, community, and alumni support for this, and we are hoping you will join with us. I stand resolved in knowing that an education that encompasses a research perspective to impact the clinical outcomes is of lasting value. Growing our college’s opportunities to train a wider workforce of health care leaders and providers will better position us to impact our communities, our state, and our world. Let’s build our future together by embracing change now for growth tomorrow.

Stephen E. Alway, PhD, FACSM Dean, College of Health Professions


From the Chancellor This is an exciting time for the College of Health Professions. In the year since he became dean, Dr. Stephen Alway has set many exciting initiatives in motion that are designed to move the college into the future. It is also an exciting time for the university as a whole. In May, we opened the doors of our new Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Simulation in Memphis. With the latest in technology and a collaborative, team-based training model, every day we are making sure our graduates will be ready to deliver the best care possible in the future. I am happy to share a few other recent achievements. A new Economic Impact Report shows UTHSC contributed a record $4 billion to the state’s economy in Fiscal Year 2017. In addition, enrollment, graduation rates, and first-time board pass rates continue to climb. We have successfully recruited many top-tier faculty and researchers to the university, and our outstanding faculty and students have supported the community with hundreds of volunteer hours and free health services for the underserved. We are proud of all the accomplishments. We are look ahead. And we are grateful for the continued engagement and support from you, our wonderful alumni, in all we do. Sincerely,

Steve J. Schwab, MD Chancellor The University of Tennessee Health Science Center


268

116

178

93 BS ASP 99 MS SLP 65 AUD 11 PHD

PASS RATES:

96.2%

PASS RATES:

NATIONAL BOARD PASS RATE WITHIN FIRST YEAR OF GRADUATION

FIRST-TIME PASS RATE ON NATIONAL PHYSICAL THERAPY EXAMINATION (100% ULTIMATE PASS RATE)

100%

96.3%

AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY ENROLLMENT

100%

PRAXIS FOR MS SLP

100%

PRAXIS FOR AUD

100%

JOB PLACEMENT WITHIN 3 MONTHS OF GRADUATION

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ENROLLMENT

100%

JOB PLACEMENT WITHIN FIRST YEAR OF GRADUATION

PHYSICAL THERAPY ENROLLMENT

GRADUATION RATE

100%

EMPLOYMENT RATE WITHIN FIRST 6 MONTHS OF PASSING NPTE EXAMINATION


85

HEALTH INFORMATICS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT ENROLLMENT

100%

PASS RATE ON THE RHIA EXAM

0%

ATTRITION

100%

EMPLOYER SATISFACTION

35

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES ENROLLMENT 20 BS MLS 8 MS CLS 7 MCP

PASS RATES:

94%

MLS - NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION WITHIN FIRST YEAR OF GRADUATION

100%

MCP - NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION FOR HISTOTECHNOLOGY AND CYTOTECHNOLOGY WITHIN FIRST YEAR OF GRADUATION


“Collaborating with other colleges is critical.� James Carson, PhD, FACSM, senior associate dean for Research and Graduate Studies


The COHP Office of Research Aims to Build College’s Research Profile By Jackie Denton

The College of Health Professions is moving to position itself as a national leader in research. James Carson, PhD, FACSM, senior associate dean for Research and Graduate Studies and professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, joined the college last fall to usher its Office of Research toward this lofty goal. “Our college has a very strong teaching mission,” Dr. Carson said. “We offer degrees that students want. However, there is a growing national trend for programs associated with allied health professions to expand their mission beyond teaching, and develop a robust research component that can positively impact their discipline. This type of transition has been done successfully by many health related disciplines. Our goal is to allow research to thrive in the College of Health Professions. This will involve incorporating our already strong teaching mission with impactful research and realigning our college to achieve this next phase of growth.” The COHP Office of Research is focusing on several key areas: Providing the infrastructure for research and scholarship; enhancing relationships among researchers; creating collaborative partnerships through a research network across colleges, campuses, disciplines, industry, and partner hospitals; developing and implementing research mentorship programs; recruiting and retaining faculty and staff; and fostering and sustaining a diverse and inclusive culture. A major part of Dr. Carson’s role will be focused on getting the infrastructure in order to facilitate growth in research by the faculty, as well as laying the groundwork to recruit new faculty interested in doing research that fits well with initiatives at UTHSC.

The COHP Office of Research plans to collaborate with the main UTHSC Office of Research. At the same time, it will be a full-service resource for college faculty to facilitate submission of grants and publication of papers, as well as offering pre-award and post-award assistance. Dr. Carson will also seek avenues for faculty to collaborate with investigators across campus and at partner institutions. “Collaborating with other colleges is critical, and one of the nice things about having a comprehensive health science center is that you have all these different units together.” His own Integrative Muscle Biology Laboratory focuses on the biological mechanisms regulating muscle mass and metabolism and their influence on frailty related to aging, quality of life, and survival from cancer. It is housed in the Cancer Research Building on the Memphis campus. “My research laboratory is actually housed in a building with other faculty studying cancer whose home departments are located throughout the health science center. This structure serves to promote interdisciplinary work and collaboration between investigators,” Dr. Carson said. “Our programs in the College of Health Professions have natural skill sets that would fit in nicely with interdisciplinary research teams throughout the health science center, and that kind of interdisciplinary approach is how novel, impactful research is being conducted today. “In the past, our college may have been a little more isolated as far as interacting with initiatives taking place at the health science center,” Dr. Carson said. “An important priority for our Office of Research will be to make sure the College of Health Professions has a seat at the table.”

“Our office wants to be the hands-on, first line of contact for the college and work with the faculty members here and guide them with their interactions with the other resources already here on campus,” Dr. Carson said.

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New Division of Rehabilitation Sciences Marries Teaching, Clinical, Research Expertise By Peggy Reisser

The new Division of Rehabilitation Sciences in the College of Health Professions is a significant step toward increasing research across departments in the college, as well as across the campus and beyond. As part of the division, the college has launched a new PhD program in Rehabilitation Sciences. The PhD program will operate as a track in the Integrated Biomedical Sciences program in the College of Graduate Health Sciences, and will have a heavy emphasis on basic and clinical sciences with a neuroscience focus. “In order to have research faculty, we must have PhD students,” said James Carson, PhD, FACSM, senior associate dean for Research and Graduate Studies, who is overseeing development of the division and the new doctoral program. “Now, we have that structure in place.” The first PhD candidates are expected in the fall. “Rehabilitation Sciences can be quite broad,” Dr. Carson said. “It has to do with understanding movement science, both neural- and muscle-based.” It is expected that

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research centers will develop in the division with specific focus on areas, such as frailty associated with aging and disease or sports-related movement. Dr. Carson said the vision is that faculty located in various departments throughout the college will be associated with the division, which will be focused on research and managing and mentoring PhD students. Another component of the division will be a clinic that will merge the strong teaching and clinical expertise in the college with the growing research emphasis. “It all kind of fits,” he said. “It’s a twofold goal, as we move forward. The dean is talking a lot about expansion. As we expand to bring new faculty, finding that mix with teaching and doing research, we needed a place for these different components. The division will allow us to be effective in recruitment and effective in helping our existing faculty to allow some more time for research.”


Brittany Counts, doctoral student in the Integrative Biomedical Sciences program at UTHSC, is working in the lab of Dr. James Carson. She will be in the new Rehabilitation Sciences PhD track in the COHP.


“I feel like this is such an important message for parents to hear.� Anne Zachry, PhD, OTR/L, chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy


Professor Anne Zachry Writes Second Book on Back-to-Basics Parenting By Peggy Reisser

In 2013, when Anne Zachry, PhD, OTR/L, wrote her first book about back-to-basics parenting of babies, she queried many publishers before the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) accepted it for publication. That book, “Retro Baby,” was so popular that the AAP asked Dr. Zachry, a professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy at UTHSC, to write a second book for parents of slightly older children. Dr. Zachry’s “Retro Toddler” was released by the AAP in 2018. Subtitled, “More than 100 Old-School Activities to Boost Development,” the book encourages parents of toddlers, ages 1-3 years old, to favor personal interaction with their babies over technology in order to help them best develop. “The basic message of the book, similar to “Retro Baby,” is back to the basics with parenting, no tech, more DIY toys and activities, and the importance of interacting with your toddlers one on one, rather than putting them in front of a screen and hoping they’ll learn that way,” Dr. Zachry said.

With more than 25 years in clinical and academic pediatric occupational therapy, Dr. Zachry is well-versed in early childhood development. Her research has been published in national peer-reviewed journals, trade magazines, and parenting publications and websites, including Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine, Parents.com, SheKnows, and Education.com. She is a member of the American Occupational Therapy Association. Her blog, Pediatric Occupational Therapy Tips, was recognized by Feedspot as one of the top 12 pediatric OT blogs. “Retro Baby” won the Independent Bookseller’s Benjamin Franklin Gold Medal. “I feel like this is such an important message for parents to hear,” Dr. Zachry said. “It’s put out in a way that’s not meant to make you feel guilty, but just to know that this is best practice, and if you know better, you can do better.” “Retro Toddler: More Than 100 Old-School Activities to Boost Development,” $16.95, is available in some bookstores, on Amazon, and on the AAP website at https://shop.aap.org/publications/books.

“Based on established research that I found, the child rarely retains anything from the screen,” she said. “They retain through direct interaction with others.” The AAP recommends limiting screen time for ages 2 to 5 to one hour per day. In pulling the book together, Dr. Zachry studied best practices, the most up-to-date research, and incorporated the latest recommendations from the AAP. “Retro Toddler” includes fun activities to boost development of language, movement, and social skills, as well as practical advice, from Dr. Zachry, including: • Dealing with “No”: “Unless it’s a safety issue, avoid having toddlers dig their heels in, and work around it, so they don’t realize they’re giving up control and power.” •P  raise: “Don’t say, ‘you’re so smart.’ Instead say, ‘you worked hard on that,’ so it tells them the value of work.” • Promote creativity. “It’s OK to have them be bored, because they’ll come up with ideas to entertain themselves, and that’s where creativity comes from.”

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UTHSC’s GoBabyGo! Memphis Continuing to Help Children with Special Needs By Amber Carter

UTHSC’s GoBabyGo! Memphis initiative was launched by the Department of Physical Therapy in 2016 to give children with little mobility the independence to explore through toy ride- in cars adapted to their special needs. Since the UTHSC program began, 19 children with special needs have received cars. The 2019 event it is slated to take place this summer. UTHSC faculty, students, and staff in partnership with engineering students from Christian Brothers University will work with eight children and their families to customize and retrofit off-the-shelf cars to match each child’s needs. The children were referred to the program by community therapists. The UTHSC Department of Occupational Therapy will also join the effort this year for the first time. Modifications to the cars may include anything from changing a foot pedal to a steering wheel switch or button, raising the seat height, or adding stability through harnesses or other structures. Jennifer Pietrowski’s daughter, Ava, who was born with spastic cerebral palsy, was given a custom white BMW during UTHSC’s Go Baby Go! event last year. “This event has given Ava the ability to experience mobility in a completely different way and we are grateful,” she said. “She absolutely loves her car.” Stephanie Lancaster, MS, OTR/L, ATP, CAPS, program director in the OT Department, said that by working side-by-side with professionals, students have the opportunity to develop their skills in working as part of an interprofessional team.

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“One way to support engagement in occupations is through the use of technology, which is something that is in the forefront of theory and practice in the OT profession,” she said. “By participating in GoBabyGo!, our students learn more about how technology and adaptation can be used to facilitate participation for children with challenges in accessing standard play equipment.” Second-year UTHSC physical therapy student Cara Levi participated in GoBabyGo! Memphis last year and is the PT student lead this year. “It was such an uplifting experience to be able to help children and their families in our community,” she said. “This year, I have been working with the faculty to get students involved. I will also be working with the referred families to set up evaluation times and assessments, so we can ensure that every child’s car has the accommodations that they need.” GoBabyGo! was founded in 2006 at the University of Delaware by Cole Galloway, PhD, FAPTA, to give mobility to children with special needs. Funding for the UTHSC program relies heavily on donations in order to provide the service to families free of charge. Individuals interested in sponsoring GoBabyGo! Memphis should contact Michelle Nixon at mnixon@utfi.org or 901.448.8387.


“My passion for pediatric audiology stems from the fact that it has played such a key role in my life.� Audiology student Morgan Stansberry, right, with fellow student Tessie Blanchard


ASP Students Helped by Basketball Star Tamika Catchings’ Philanthropy By Amber Carter

The recipient of the UTHSC Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology’s Tamika Catchings Endowment Scholarship believes she owed a great deal of gratitude to the department, even before receiving the scholarship. Morgan Stansberry, a Morristown, Tennessee, native and third-year audiology student, was diagnosed by the faculty in the department with hearing loss at age 3 and given treatment. Thus, she credits the department with giving her the gift of sound, and also with inspiring her to become a pediatric audiologist. “My passion for pediatric audiology stems from the fact that it has played such a key role in my life and personal success,” said Stansberry, who recently received bilateral cochlear implants. “Audiology to me is more than identifying hearing loss alone. The counseling of the child and their parents is most critical. You empower children and their families by providing them with the gift of sound and language. I want to inspire children to chase their dreams, as I have chased mine. I strive to empathize with parents of children with hearing loss, and reassure them that their children are capable of anything.” Stansberry is one of two students receiving help from the outstanding philanthropic efforts of former Lady Vol and WNBA standout Tamika Catchings. Catchings was born with hearing loss in both ears. As a college student, she was helped by the UTHSC Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, and has used her success and fame to give back to the department. She hosted a fundraiser for the department, Dinner with Tamika Catchings, which was a huge success. Catchings was the keynote speaker and donated $50,000, while the event brought in $33,000. Her donation was put toward the Tamika Catchings Endowed Scholarship for UTHSC students pursing graduate degrees in audiology and/or speech pathology, who plan to work with individuals with hearing loss. Proceeds from the dinner went to the Tamika Catchings Amplification Assistance Fund, which helps qualified individuals with such things as new hearing aids, repairs to broken equipment, and replacement parts.

Jerry Faerber, a member of ASP’s Community Development Board and his wife Peggy, are the original donors of the Tamika Catchings Endowed Scholarship, giving $75,000. First-year audiology student Tessie Blanchard is benefiting from the Amplification Assistance Fund. Blanchard received a new set of hearing aids shortly after arriving at UTHSC. “I arrived knowing I needed new hearing aids. My previous pair were approaching eight years old,” she said. “My hearing loss had progressively worsened. My previous hearing aids could not give me the amplification I needed. I was working with Dr. Beth Humphrey, an ASP clinical associate professor and audiologist, as a patient, when she informed me of the Amplification Assistance Fund and how I would be a candidate.” Blanchard, a Houma, Louisiana native, was diagnosed with hearing loss at the age of 5. She did not receive her first pair of hearing aids until she was almost 10. “We were told to take the “wait-and-see approach” with my hearing loss, which is not ideal,” she said. “At first, I would never wear my hearing aids outside of school, but as time progressed, I realized that I needed hearing aids more and more.” Like Stansberry, Blanchard plans to become a pediatric audiologist. “I want to work with families who are receiving this diagnosis for the first time,” she said. “Most children with hearing loss and deafness are born into families who have little to no experience with hearing loss. I have firsthand experience as to what it is like to have a childhood hearing loss. I want to share that with the families I am working with. It is something I really wish my parents had.” Life experience is also fueling Stansberry’s future. “When I decided that I wanted to become an audiologist, I knew I wanted to be able to give back to the community that helped me become successful,” she said. “As I walk through the hallways and the clinics at ASP, it is so heartwarming to see that other children are still being provided the same exceptional care. I have had such a rare experience. I have been the recipient of services from ASP clinics, and now I am an audiology student offering the same care that was once provided to me. If this program and the services had not been available when I was a child, my life would have been very different. I have been fortunate enough to have seen the program full circle.”

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OT Faculty Member Helps Visually Impaired Function More Fully By Amber Carter

Orli Weisser-Pike, OTD, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV, CAPS, an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Health Professions at UTHSC, was initially interested in the profession of art therapy. She could find no courses of study in that field at the time, so she looked into occupational therapy as an alternative. “I had a few friends who were occupational therapists, and what they did sounded like a good fit for me,” she said. “I realized that I wanted to work with people, rather than make art.” Dr. Weisser-Pike was born to Israeli parents in Cape Town, South Africa, and lived there until the age of 12, when her parents decided to return to Israel. She spent her middle- and high-school years there. She later served in the Israeli Defense Force in military intelligence. After her military service, Dr. Weisser-Pike studied jewelry-making and came to the United States to work in a small jewelry manufacturing facility in Connecticut for a year. She returned to South Africa, where she earned her National Diploma in Fine Art in 1993 and a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy from the University of Cape Town in 1996. As an occupational therapist, Dr. Weisser-Pike began her career working in local schools in Virginia. That time ignited her interest in the low vision specialty. “I developed an interest in the impact of visual impairments on one’s ability to carry out activities of daily living,” Dr. Weisser-Pike said. ”The field of low vision was in its infancy in America and I became more and more interested in it, taking courses and networking with other professionals. I was largely self-taught and pursued certification in low vision therapy from the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals.” In 2003, Dr. Weisser-Pike became the first occupational therapist in Tennessee to be certified in low vision therapy. She is the only occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation specialist in the Mid-South.

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While working at Baptist Rehabilitation Hospital in Germantown, Dr. Weisser-Pike opened the first occupational therapy outpatient clinic for adults with low vision. The same year, she was selected by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) to be a member of a special task force to develop standards for specialty certification in low vision for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants. The specialty certification was launched in 2006. Dr. Weisser-Pike was recruited by the UTHSC Hamilton Eye Institute to head the Low Vision Service with Thomas O’Donnell, MD. She earned a clinical doctorate in occupational therapy in 2013 and became a full-time faculty member of the College of Health Professions in the Department of Occupational Therapy in 2017. “I love the UTHSC campus and particularly the Department of Occupational Therapy,” she said. “All my colleagues make it so that I am glad to be at work each day.” Dr. Weisser-Pike has transitioned her clinical practice into a new emerging field within low vision, involving work with children with cortical visual impairments, or brain blindness. “It is thought to be the leading cause of visual impairments in children, but relatively little is known about the best ways to work with children with this condition,” she said. “I am taking courses and hoping to do some research into this important field, which includes collaborating with the Department of Ophthalmology at UTHSC and with Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.” Dr. Weisser-Pike also lends her time to AOTA as an applicant reviewer and serves on the board, and the low vision committee for the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals. At this year’s annual AOTA conference, Dr. Weisser-Pike will receive the Roster of Fellows Award for her contribution to the profession in the area of low vision.


“I love the UTHSC campus and particularly the Department of Occupational Therapy. All my colleagues make it so that I am glad to be at work each day.” Assistant Professor Orli Weisser-Pike, OTD, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV, CAPS, shown wearing lightweight binoculars made specifically for watching TV


HIIM Establishes Scholarship Endowment in Memory of Alumna By Jackie Denton

The week before she started school at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Natalie Stovall Frady’s husband was killed in the line of duty in Iraq. Despite the tragedy, she excelled in the Department of Health Informatics and Information Management at UTHSC. A young mother, she quickly became involved with the program’s advisory and admissions committees, regularly taking students on rotations.

“Natalie was one of those people who made everyone feel special,” said Rebecca Reynolds, EdD, RHIA, FAHIMA, chair and professor in the Department of Health Informatics and Information Management. “The way her husband was killed made her live her life to the fullest each and every day.” After graduating from UTHSC in 2005, Stovall Frady established the Stovall Foundation in memory of her husband, 1st Lt. Matt Stovall. The foundation raises money


to offer financial assistance to military men and women and their families. One of the ways the foundation helps is by granting a wish to a soldier returning from deployment. Since 2011, the foundation has assisted numerous military families monetarily and through several events, including the Snowball Express and meet-and-greets with the Mississippi RiverKings. Working with various agencies, it identifies the families that will most benefit.

To honor her legacy, the College of Health Professions is raising funds to establish the Natalie Stovall Frady Scholarship Endowment. Dr. Reynolds generated the idea and approached the Memphis Health Information Management Association (MHIMA) about establishing the scholarship endowment. Stovall Frady was a member of both the local MHIMA and the state organization, the Tennessee Health Information Management Association (THIMA).

Stovall Frady, who lived her life serving others and her community, died in 2016 in a car accident during Memorial Day weekend. After her death, she was awarded the Mississippi Distinguished Service Award, the highest civilian recognition awarded by the state.

The UTHSC scholarship fund was started with a $5,000 donation from MHIMA, with a goal of raising $25,000 to establish the scholarship endowment. The majority of the funds from the $5,000 donation came from members, most of whom knew Stovall Frady.

She was often quoted as saying, “If we can all be more giving, the world will be a better place.”

“We wanted to establish something so people could know and remember Natalie as one of our professional colleagues who made a difference, even if they weren’t able to work alongside her or be in the classroom or in the profession with her,” said MHIMA president Jamie Glenn, RHIA, CPEHR. “Through the scholarship, we could potentially help a military family,” Dr. Reynolds said. “They don’t necessarily have to use it just for tuition or books. Maybe they just need to make a car payment or to pay for child care.” Glenn, who is HIM corporate director at Methodist Healthcare and a 2007 graduate of the UTHSC HIIM program, said veterans and those with a military background would enjoy a career in health information management. “Since the military have a service background, I would like to think that they would like to continue to serve, and health care is a big part of helping people,” Glenn said. Jana Crawford, RHIA, director of HIM Operations at Methodist Healthcare and a UTHSC HIIM class of 2003 alumna, met Stovall Frady as a work colleague and eventually became her sister-in-law. “She always gave expecting nothing in return,” Crawford said. “Natalie was from a military family and a widow of a soldier, she had that connection and understood that you need to keep on and try and do better for yourself and your family, and that there are people willing to support you along the way.” To donate toward the Natalie Stovall Frady Scholarship visit: uthsc.edu/stovall-frady-give.

A scholarship was created to honor the legacy of HIIM student Natalie Stovall Frady. Laritha Boone, center, presented a check from the Memphis Tennessee Health Information Management Association. Pictured, from left, Michelle Nixon, associate director of development for the college, Dean Stephen Alway, Boone, and HIIM Chair Rebecca Reynolds.


PT Student Finds Helping Others a Good Fit By Amber Carter When a 12-year-old boy with cerebral palsy in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, lost his father to cancer, Isaac Durrington reached out to help him. Durrington was in college then, and he didn’t know it at the time, but that kind gesture would help him find his calling. “I was kind of always interested in physical therapy, but I wasn’t sure until the second semester of my sophomore year in college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,” said Durrington, now a third-year physical therapy student at UTHSC. “A woman in the community needed someone to help her son. I reached out to her and eventually became a rehabilitation technician for him.” Durrington worked with the boy after school every day for three to four hours that semester, taking him to his PT and OT appointments and helping him with his exercises, homework, feeding, cleaning, and more. “I really got to see the difference PT could make in someone’s life, and that’s when I was sure physical therapy was what I wanted to do,” he said. Durrington, whose parents are both professors, earned his undergraduate degree in Exercise and Sport Science from UNC Chapel Hill. He was born in Lubbock, Texas, then moved to Starkville, Mississippi, then to Wilmington, North Carolina, where he lived for most of my life. He chose UTHSC’s College of Health Professions because of the experienced faculty. “It just seemed like a place I would fit in and be able to find a great mentor,” he said.

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“Memphis is also an awesome city with a lot of history, and coming here would give me a chance to branch out a little bit, since I didn’t know anyone here.” One of Durrington’s favorite things about UTHSC is the clinical experience offered to students. Physical therapy students are able to do up to five clinical experiences. Durrington has traveled to Nashville, New Orleans, and Park City, Utah. He is currently completing clinicals in Jackson, Tennessee. Durrington is involved outside of UTHSC as well. In Memphis, he is involved with Southern Reins Equine Therapy, which serves individuals with physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities through activities with horses and horseback riding therapy. He also works with Church Health, through its Stroke Support Group. He has traveled abroad doing physical therapy work through an internship program called Work the World. “I was able to go to Nepal for three weeks and Sri Lanka for four weeks, working in hospital and rural community settings,” he said. After graduation, Durrington plans to pursue physical therapy work domestically and internationally. “In the next four years, I plan on getting a certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy and becoming an Orthopedic Certified Specialist,” he said. “I also plan to become certified in dry needling. Long term, I would like to become a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists.


“I really got to see the difference PT could make in someone’s life, and that’s when I was sure physical therapy was what I wanted to do.” Third-year PT student Isaac Durrington


“I hope I make each child I work with feel valued and loved on a weekly basis, all while having fun.� Speech-language pathology student Marilyn Mays, right, pictured with younger sister, Megan Mays.


Little Sister Inspires Pursuit of Speech-Language Pathology Career By Amber Carter

Speech-language pathology student Marilyn Mays’ love for the profession was sparked by her desire to help her little sister, Megan, who is deaf, to communicate. “As a child, I sat in countless observation rooms with my mom and dad, watching my sister participate in preschool classes for deaf children, speech-language therapy sessions, and audiology appointments,” she said. “Full of curiosity and interest, I watched and listened to everything Megan’s therapists were teaching her and wanted to help her practice these skills at home.” Mays, who is from Franklin, Tennessee, is in the final year of her program at UTHSC. She married Tanner Owens, a business planning specialist, in January. Mays said she knew from a young age that she wanted to pursue a career that would allow her to work with deaf/ hard of hearing children, but wasn’t sure which route to take. “Because I had seen so many professionals, deaf educators, speech therapists, and audiologists, give my sister tools to succeed in a variety of ways, I valued all of these fields and areas of expertise and struggled to choose which one was right for me,” she said. “After giving it lots of thought, I realized that speech therapy was the career I wanted to pursue. Over the years, Megan’s speech-language pathologists (SLPs) helped her succeed with her cochlear implant, while also giving her a background in ASL (American Sign Language) to support spoken communication. As a child, Megan’s speech therapy sessions looked like fun and games to me; however, now that I’ve held several speech therapy sessions of my own in graduate school, I realize that it’s so much more than what meets the eye.”

Mays chose to attend UTHSC because of the wonderful things she’d heard about the Audiology and Speech Pathology Program, while attending the University of Tennessee, Knoxville as an undergraduate. She also knew that UTHSC offered an Aural Habilitation Concentration (deaf/hard of hearing specialty), for graduate students. This cemented her choice. “Considering my background and my passion for working with this population, I knew that UTHSC was the perfect school for me.“ During her time at UTHSC, Mays has gained an abundance of knowledge in and outside of the classroom. She was the speech-language recipient of the SilversteinLuper Scholarship earlier this year, which is given to a student voted by the clinical faculty as the strongest performer in clinical placements. “UTHSC has solidified this for me while giving me the resources and tools I need to be the best speechlanguage pathologist I can be for this population. My experiences here have allowed me to blend my passion for working with deaf and hard of hearing children with what I’m learning in my academic classes.” After graduation in May, Mays plans to work with deaf/ hard-of-hearing children. “I hope I make each child I work with feel valued and loved on a weekly basis, all while having fun,” she said. “I have so many wonderful SLPs to look up to, and I hope that I will impact my future clients and their families in the same way Megan’s former SLPs have impacted our lives.”

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MLS Student Dedicated to Improving Quality of Life for All Citizens By Jackie Denton

The Cooper-Young neighborhood in Memphis has historic landmark status, thanks to the work of its Landmarks Committee, which is chaired by Robert Hatfield, a Medical Laboratory Science student at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Hatfield settled into the neighborhood while working in the information technology field. He said he feels “really plugged in” to Memphis and proud to have been a part of the project as a volunteer board member of the CooperYoung Community Association. With the adoption of the historic overlay, the neighborhood can ensure the character of Cooper-Young is being maintained by developers and builders. “The built environment affects behavior,” Hatfield said. “We have a community built with lots of front porches, a pedestrian focus, and that creates a nice sense of community.” That sense of community is also what he enjoys the most as a student in the College of Health Professions. “I love our Clinical Laboratory Sciences program. It’s small, and we have 12 people in our class,” Hatfield said. “I know everybody in my class. We have gone through it all together. We text each other, and that’s a really great thing. You also get such great one-on-one time with faculty.” Hatfield says he was introduced to the medical laboratory when he did IT work for the Raleigh Group Pediatric Clinic. He took the position in an effort to get into medical school, while earning prerequisites at the University of Memphis. “The laboratory is so important to the whole system of health care, but it kind of flies under the radar,” Hatfield said. “The more I looked into the program, the more interested I became in working in a laboratory. The modern laboratory really has a lot of the information technology component to it.” With encouragement from several colleagues, Hatfield decided to combine his love of technology with the sciences and enrolled in the MLS program at UTHSC. As a UTHSC student, he served on the Development Committee for the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP). The QEP is a multiyear commitment that focuses on 24

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improving student learning and behavior. He lobbied for the focus of UTHSC’s plan to be the social determinants of health, issues he said he is exposed to daily, while riding the bus. “I challenged myself last year to take the bus for one week,” Hatfield said. “For me, the social determinants of health is an academic abstract idea that you may be removed from. One thing I’ve found is you get to see it firsthand on the bus. You overhear people riding the bus and struggling with mobility, such as wheelchair access, and overhear people talk about finances.” Hatfield is also the president of the MLS Class of 2019. He is working on an initiative with the Student Government Association Executive Council and campus administrators concerning mobility implementation for the campus. He said his passion for quality public transportation, as well as his daily bus commute, exposed him to the many social and economic conditions affecting the health of Memphians. “If you can throw money at a problem, one that touches everything, mobility and transportation is an issue,” Hatfield said. “It directly impacts your access to education, opportunities for work, and reliable health care. My personal experience working in the pediatric clinic and seeing people struggle to get out there, get to their appointments on reliable transportation, and just my experience riding the bus in the last year, it’s such a tangible way to really become more empathetic as a health care provider.” His goal through the initiative is to provide bus passes for students, so they can ride the bus more often, and thus become more aware of the hardships faced by their neighbors and more empathetic health care providers and advocates for improving transportation and health care access. “Part of my every day, when I think about things either as a community association member, a student at UTHSC, or a citizen of Memphis, I think about what do I want Memphis to look like as a city,” Hatfield said. “I’ve really appreciated my time at UTHSC, because you can get here and if you want things to happen, you can get involved, learn to navigate it, and hopefully influence it a little bit and nudge this huge institution into a new direction.”


“The laboratory is so important to the whole system of health care.� MLS student Robert Hatfield


“I see myself breaking down barriers and encouraging everyone to collaborate to use health technology better to promote health care.� Tamika Douglas, HIIM student


HIIM Student Hopes to Break Down Barriers to Quality Health Care By Jackie Denton

Tamika Douglas, a student in Health Informatics and Information Management (HIIM) at UTHSC, considers herself a community activist. She is breaking down barriers as a volunteer for the Music City Riders United, a union group that advocates for bus riders, bus drivers, and mechanics in Nashville, where she lives. She has spent more than 150 volunteer hours doing community service with the group at over 20 events and speaking engagements on pedestrian and commuter safety in the last two years. Through the group’s efforts on scorecards for various public transit areas throughout the city, Music City Riders United is getting the attention of the Tennessee Department of Transportation, Metro Nashville Public Works, city council members and even the mayor. Douglas has also been featured on several news segments for her advocacy work, including at the recent Transit Equity Day in February. “I am a community activist in Nashville because of the love that I have for people. I believe that it shouldn’t be life threatening to cross the street to catch the bus, ride a bike, and walk around in Nashville,” Douglas said. “As tax paying citizens, we have a right to walk around Nashville and have adequate lighted and raised crosswalks, sidewalks, and bus shelters. As a bus rider and bike rider, I have experienced firsthand waiting at bus stops without adequate shelter and riding in streets without bus lanes. It is hard work advocating for pedestrian safety and affordable housing, yet I’m motivated to continue because I know the power of people to change the course of history.” A natural leader, Douglas was one of 25 students in the country selected as a student ambassador for the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) convention and exhibit held in Miami. She was selected from more than 150 applicants to serve on a team of sponsored student ambassadors and volunteers, a first for the convention. The event brought together more than 4,000 health care professionals to learn about the latest issues affecting the industry and insights into strategies for advancing the profession.

professor in the Department of Health Informatics and Information Management. “Having her selected is a testament to her leadership abilities, as she is able to juggle responsibilities of a full-time job, school, and her family. She is typical of the students in our program, who have many responsibilities outside of the classroom, but who are able to make the commitment to the profession. Student involvement in the professional association is something we encourage all of our students to do, but it takes drive and ambition, like Tamika’s, to make it happen.” Douglas maintains a 3.6 GPA, while being a wife, mother to three daughters, and working full-time as a medical laboratory scientist at Vanderbilt, where she was introduced to the health informatics field. “I’ve never done anything like this in the sciences, clinical laboratory is my background, but with this pathway into a different field, I can see many opportunities,” she said. While at the AHIMA convention, she had the opportunity to network with current HIIM professionals and future employers, as well as to meet with recent graduates from HIIM programs throughout the country. Douglas said attending the conference encouraged her that HIIM would be a very rewarding career path. “As I was walking around meeting people at this convention, I realized that this was a career that I’m going to stay in,” she said. “I really felt good about my decision to pursue this career — from cyber security, privacy, compliance, information governance — there’s just so many different tracks. There are endless possibilities.” After working in the field of clinical laboratory sciences for 13 years, Douglas said she is eager to graduate this spring. She hopes to use her new career in HIIM to promote better communication among information technologists, physicians, clinicians, and the health informatics field. “I see myself as breaking down barriers and encouraging everyone to collaborate to use health technology better to promote health care,” Douglas said.

“We were so excited to have Tamika selected as one of the student ambassadors for the AHIMA convention,” said Rebecca Reynolds, EdD, RHIA, FAHIMA, chair and UTHSC COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS | SPRING 2019

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Congratulations to Our 2018 Graduates! BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE Emily Brooke Hammock Korron Terrell Hightower Matthew Ryan Honey Elisha Laqua Miles Loressa Moneé Richards Hannah Jane Windham Angela Seaming Yu

MASTER OF CYTOPATHOLOGY PRACTICE Irise Joanne James Rashid Olaseni Lawal Alexander McClung Meagan Dianne Paladino CraDale O’Brien Waller

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE Leshon Marie Anderson Keaton Maquade Burney Laura Jessica Casey Lakeva Nicole Leigh Elvis Otieno Marienga Kara B. Matteson Alexandria Jordan Mullikin Geofrey Ochenge Deonna Jordan Owens Barbara Shipp

MASTER OF HEALTH INFORMATICS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Amanda Shanty Baksh Chelsea Ann Christopher Alaina Brooks Darby Susan Marie Heyde Rameria LaSha Stewart

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MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Chelsea Lee Best Aaron Pierce Broyles Payton Shea Caldwell Caitlin Leigh Cole Jaclyn Yvonne Craddock Tara Beth Cunningham Allison Grace Deal Martha Mayo Dennis Shani Henley Doyle Megan Michelle Driscoll Lorin Kelsey Felts Margaret Pohlman Green Carly Rae Harrison Mary Kate Henderson Morgan Kay Henry Lauryn Elizabeth Hill Alyson Leigh Howard Katelyn Marie Kellams Miriam Penaflor Kennetz Allison Marie Martinez Jessica Marie McNatt Marleigh Diane Mills Katherine Michelle Penn Ashley Nicole Phifer Jacob Dustin Rickard Rachel Elizabeth Rochester Saniya Sajwani Hannah Beth Sanchez Anna Mackenzie Shirk Daniel Aaron Stockton Brittany Nicole Story Jacob Stowe Marcaria Reneé Surratt Katelyn Gayle Tansey Kyle Taylor Tamra René Weakley

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DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

James Austin Boyd Hannah Trimble Burton Darianne Yvette Elizabeth Butler Tyler Reid Caples Sara Margaret Cathey Kayla Marie Dockendorf Chelsea Alyse Dunnam Derek Ernst Eckert Leah Kathryn Evanson David Harold Funk Katie Lynne Garland Taylor Mclane Gaulden Sarah Anderson Gill Alexandria Sheva Hajjafar Chelsea Brooke Hall Sarah Sutton Harris Ethan Patrick Healy Brittany Loan Henry Chelsey Elizabeth Hensley Kenneth Charles Hill Whitney D’ Ann Horner Stephen J. Ingersoll II Joshua Scott Ingram Lucas Isley Lauren Elizabeth Johnson Taylor Suzanne Johnson Jessica Renee Jones Michael Ian Jones Anna Laura Irvine Kaspar Megan Nicole Knight Candice May Lancaster Amber Nichole Lankford Zachary Neal Lankford Stephen John Magee Miranda Claire Martin Meredith Leigh Mayfield McCarley Adams McGlaughlin Rachel Elyse Minton Lindsey Abington Neri Gabe Gordon Punke


William Michael Record Ashleigh Lauren Schaefer Sarah Elizabeth Shepard Julia Wray Stonebrook Lacee Rhea Tinker Elizabeth Anne Vaughn Benjamin John Wahlman Emma Katheryn Wechsler Matthew Richard Welter Daniel Glenn Wickliff Olivia Caroline Williams Patrick Ross Wills Emily Nicole Wu

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY Shahd Alattar Taylor Allen Shelby Bearden Lauren Beeler Kelsey Blinn Abigail Bushur Emily Byrd Kimberly Chambers Emily Clelland Mackenzie Cooler Rachel Corrin Abagail Cunningham Lydia Elise Ferguson Mary Flowers Mary Geiser Caroline Graham Yuliya Gusar Elizabeth Harris Emma Heim Olivia Herd Cayla Hickey Kaylee Himes Cameron Hinch Hannah Holman Elizabeth Klein Dora Klink Laura Lamsey Ramsay Laughlin Hannah Leeds Kathryn Macon Elizabeth Manning Leigha McGee Haley Miller Elizabeth Minor Shelby Monroe

Alana Moore Courtney Morelock Andrea Nickels Christina Oakley Whitney Pickwell Meredith Powell Melissa Ringenberg Ashley Robertson Kelby Seivers Kanden Sharp Melissa Shih Leslie Sizemore Christine Sledge Charity Smith Laura Smith Madison Stewart Emily Stiner Jessica Stone Chrisann Tipton Madison Webb LeAnn Wills Jana Zdancewicz

Olivia Gianeselli Christopher Goodman Caroline Gowin Allison Hartsfield Jordan Hill Pamela Johnson Claire Keating Amanda Kidd Kaitlin King Sarah Kulik Meghan Lamsey Kelly Manning Sarai Messer Karissa Nesbitt Caitlin Page Sarah Posen Sarah Ralls Elizabeth Robinson Kathleen Snyder Morgan Suffridge Hannah Thomason

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AUDIOLOGY Claire Alexander Allison Anderson Jessica Bulley Micaela Capps Kayla Cintron Mary Cox Shannon Faulkner Stella Herard Allyson Lambert Mary Martin Amy Mashburn Kylie Pearson Corrin Phillips Tyler Phillips Conner Rouch Morgan Stansberry

DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY Alexandra Grace Berlin Alexandra Cavitt Allen Derina Jaclyn Drolet Alexa Grisby Katherine Hogue Nicole Humphries Hannah Kerley Rowan Lang Britney Ometz Kathryn Rybolt Kimberly Sawyer Alexandra Smith Natalie Steinberg Kristen Waggoner Rebecca Walston

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY

Dave Jenson

Bobbie Albertson Margaret Bell Adriana Binasco Caroline Boccarossa Nan Bumpus Emily Burns Cassandra Carpenter Meghan Gallagher

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Student Leaders Honored The College of Health Professions is proud to recognize these students honored during 2018 commencement ceremonies.

ALPHA ETA SOCIETY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY Student Nominees Taylor Allen Abigail Bushur Laura Jessica Casey Kimberly Chambers Chelsea Ann Christopher Tara Beth Cunningham Allen Derina Megan Michelle Driscoll Megan Gallagher Katie Lynne Garland Olivia Gianeselli Alexa Grisby Alexandria Sheva Hajjafar Carly Rae Harrison Morgan Kay Henry Olivia Herd Hannah Holman Matthew Ryan Honey Lauren Elizabeth Johnson Michael Ian Jones Anna Laura Irvine Kaspar Megan Nicole Knight Amber Nichole Lankford Stephen John Magee Elizabeth Manning Alexander McClung Leigha McGee Alexandria Jordan Mullikin Andrea Nickels Christine Oakley Sarah Posen William Michael Record Saniya Sajwani Charity Smith Jessica Stone Brittany Nicole Story Jacob Stowe Morgan Suffridge

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Lacee Rhea Tinker Kristin Waggoner Patrick Ross Wills Hannah Jane Windham Emily Nicole Wu

Faculty Nominees Vickie Barnes Jacque Bradford Mary Velvet Buehler Emily Shannon Hughes Myra Meekins Courtney Sasse Anne Zachry

SIGMA XI (INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH) Occupational Therapy Shani Henley Doyle Allison Marie Martinez Marleigh Diane Mills Jacob Dustin Rickard Brittany Nicole Story Katelyn Gayle Tansey

Health Informatics and Information Management Alaina Brooks Darby

IMHOTEP SOCIETY

Chelsea Lee Best Aaron Pierce Broyles Peyton Shea Caldwell Jaclyn Yvonne Craddock Allison Grace Deal Kayla Marie Dockendorf Megan Michelle Driscoll Lorin Kelsey Felts

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Sarah Anderson Gill Mary Kate Henderson Irise Joanne James Katelyn Marie Kellams Rashid Olaseni Lawal Stephen John Magee Alexander McClung Jessica Marie McNatt Meagan Dianne Paladino Jacob Dustin Rickard Saniya Sajwani Hannah Beth Sanchez Brittany Nicole Story Katelyn Gayle Tansey CraDale O’Brien Waller

MASTER OF CYTOPATHOLOGY PRACTICE AWARDS The Cyrus C. Erickson Award in Cytotechnology Meagan Paladino

Gerre Wells Gourley Award in Histotechnology Irise James

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE AWARD Frances Guthrie Outstanding Student Award Matthew Honey Hannah Windham

Alice Scott Hitt Faculty Award Lakeva Leigh


CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE AWARD Brenta G. Davis Outstanding Clinical Laboratory Science Graduate Student Award Laura Casey

MASTER OF HEALTH INFORMATICS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AWARD Mary “Mamel” McCain Leadership Award Jennifer Wetteland

MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AWARDS Achievement Award in Occupational Therapy Jacob Stowe

Leadership Award in Occupational Therapy Hannah Sanchez

President’s Award for Service in Occupational Therapy Jacob Rickard

The Rosemary Batorski Community Service Award in Occupational Therapy Nikki Story

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY The Outstanding Physical Therapy Student Award Katie Garland

Margaret and Perry “Stack” Ayers Scholarship Award Anna Laura Kaspar

Distinguished Alumni Award Roy Aldridge

GRADUATION WITH HONORS Medical Laboratory Science Highest Honors Matthew Ryan Honey

Honors Hannah Jane Windham

Clinical Laboratory Science Highest Honors Laura Jessica Casey

Occupational Therapy Highest Honors Tara Beth Cunningham Carly Rae Harrison Saniya Sajwani

High Honors Jacob Stowe Brittany Nicole Story Megan Michelle Driscoll Morgan Kay Henry

Physical Therapy Highest Honors Katie Lynne Garland Lauren Elizabeth Johnson Anna Laura Irvine Kaspar Amber Nichole Lankford Stephen John Magee William Michael Record Lacee Rhea Tinker Emily Nicole Wu

High Honors Patrick Ross Wills Alexandria Sheva Hajjafar Michael Ian Jones Megan Nicole

High Honors Alexandria Jordan Mullikin

Cytopathology Practice Highest Honors Meagan Dianne Paladino

High Honors Alexander McClung Irise Joanne James

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Promoting Kindergarten Readiness The UTHSC Rachel Kay Stevens Therapy Center, launched in 2016 by the students and faculty of the Occupational Therapy Department, received a $25,000 grant from the Urban Child Institute in May. The funds were used to hire a part-time occupational therapist to work at the clinic, as well as to conduct a kindergarten readiness workshop series for under-resourced families with children ages 3 to 5. Participants receive kindergarten readiness kits with age-appropriate books, activities, and developmental toys. The center is the only pro bono, student run, pediatric clinic in the area providing OT services to children of families who are uninsured or underinsured. It was founded in memory of Master of Occupational Therapy student Rachel Kay Stevens, who died suddenly shortly after starting her training at UTHSC. The clinic is open two afternoons each month and has served 280 children, trained 54 teachers, and worked with 52 parents since it opened.

Distinguished PT Alum The Physical Therapy Department has established a Distinguished Alumni Award. The first recipient was Roy Aldridge, professor of Physical Therapy at Arkansas State University. He received his BS in physical therapy in 1990 and his post-professional MS degree in 2001, both from UTHSC. He completed his requirements for the EdD at Arkansas State University in 2008. He joined the faculty at ASU in 2000. His research interests include hippotherapy, lymphedema management, and educational predictors.

Wearing White Coats White Coat Ceremonies honored COHP students from several departments, as they move into clinical practice. During the White Coat Ceremony for the PT Department in April at the Children’s Museum of Memphis, 60 firstyear Doctor of Physical Therapy students received their white coats and jointly took a pledge of professionalism. In September, 37 Master of Occupational Therapy students received their white coats during a ceremony in the Student-Alumni Center. It was only the second time the department has held a white coat ceremony. The Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences held its White Coat Ceremony in October, when 14 students received their white coats.

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Outstanding Teacher Penny Head, an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, received a 2018 University of Tennessee Alumni Association (UTAA) Outstanding Teacher Award. The awardees were recognized during the UTAA Board of Governors Dinner in Knoxville. Head has been an assistant professor at UTHSC since December 2013. She graduated from the UTHSC Physical Therapy program in 1982 and was board certified as a clinical specialist in Sports Physical Therapy. Head practiced in the areas of orthopedics and sports medicine for 20 years before pursuing a career in academia.

Champion of Rural Health Dr. Sajeesh Kumar, PhD, center, associate professor of HIIM, has been awarded this year’s Al Grant Award from the Rural Health Association of Tennessee for exemplary initiative in the cause of rural health in Tennessee. Dr. Kumar believes the use of informatics will be a key element in the future of rural and remote health care. Through his research he has established evidence-based treatments for remote diagnosis and management of ocular conditions using cost-effective technologies.

ASP Open House The Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology’s student organization, the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association, hosted a successful Audiology Open House in Knoxville in October. Students screened the hearing and balance of 316 children and adults. Individuals could also have an earbud sound-level measurement and received information about the level at which they are listening to music and the potential for noise-induced hearing loss. This provided valuable education for the community and helped students develop clinical skills in sound-level assessment.

Supporting Speech-Language-Hearing Research Assistant Professor Eun Jin Paek, PhD, received the Advancing AcademicResearch Careers Award from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The highly competitive award is given to 10 individuals across the country each year to support the academic research careers of juniorlevel faculty in the field of communication sciences and disorders. The award supports mentored activities in teaching and research. Dr. Paek will be honored at the ASHA conference in Boston in November.

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HIIM Grads Honored

Warm Welcome

Cathy Clawson, MHIIM, RHIA, CCS, (left) a 2008 graduate of the HIIM program at UTHSC, received the 2018 Foster Award from the North Carolina Health Information Management Association for knowledgeable, effective, and proactive interaction with other North Carolina state associations to build and grow advocacy operations and effectiveness in the state. She is the corporate director for Health Information Management for Appalachian Regional Healthcare System in Boone, North Carolina. JoEtta Powell, MHIIM, BSN, RN, (right) a 2014 graduate of the HIIM program, was awarded the Veteran’s Affairs Secretary’s Award for Informatics. She was honored for contributions to implementation and modification of a new electronic health record that captures physician productivity and workload like no other system in the nation and for solving a longstanding billing workaround for the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System.

ASP hosted a successful Parent Weekend in November. Activities included a departmental open house, a dessert reception, and a tailgate before the UT vs. KY football game. Though the weekend was cold, the turnout was great!

Being of Service OT student Sarah Caldwell has been awarded a $3,000 scholarship from the Professional Network on Aging, a community organization dedicated to assisting the geriatric population in Memphis. This is the second year in a row the organization has given the award to a UTHSC student. Caldwell sets a high priority on service to others. “I believe that we can learn so much about our world and others who are different from us by serving them,” she said. “I hope to be a servant leader as an occupational therapist in the future.” As a recipient of the scholarship, she will work with the geriatric population to further the organization’s mission.

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Lifetime Achievement Vickie Barnes, MA, CCC-SLP, received the 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Tennessee Association of Audiologists and SpeechLanguage Pathologists for her significant contributions to the profession. Barnes, a clinical associate professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology since 1988, has served in the Pediatric Language Clinic, a grant-funded Early Intervention Resource Agency for the Tennessee Early Intervention System in Knoxville. She is the agency’s director overseeing center- and home-based developmental therapy services for children, birth to age 3, at risk for or with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.


PT Day Physical Therapy (PT) Day is a semi-annual event on campus where PT students provide free screenings to all other students on campus under the supervision of PT faculty. The event, during October, which is National Physical Therapy Month, is entirely organized and executed by PT students. Originally meant to promote awareness of what physical therapists do, it also educates other health care professionals at the student level, and gives PT students an opportunity to hone clinical skills.

UTHSC Takes Stand Against Hate When students at UTHSC were asked if they would sign a banner with a message of unity against hate, more than 400 stepped up to sign in roughly two hours. That banner and two others with hundreds more signatures from students, faculty, and staff were hung in buildings on campus to proclaim that the state’s only public academic health science university stands in solidarity against hate in all forms, in light of the many recent instances of hatred and violence locally, nationally, and internationally. Signage was placed in public spaces around campus with the messages that “Hate Has No Place at UTHSC,” “UTHSC is United Against Hate,” and “UTHSC is a Hate-Free Campus.” An observance against hate was held on campus November 8. Anna Evans, 24, president of the UTHSC Student Government Association Executive Council, said she hoped the anti-hate movement would spread across the campus and to the wider community.

Research Photography Award Sheila Criswell, MS, an instructor and histotechnology coordinator in the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, received the Diamond Cover Award in September from the National Society for Histotechnology for a photograph she took when she was working on a research project. The image was chosen for the cover of the Journal of Histotechnology, the organization’s magazine, and the cover was selected as the most impactful for the year.

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT Sally J. Baerman, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA HOMETOWN: Lockport, Illinois WHERE DO YOU LIVE NOW? Knoxville, Tennessee. My husband and I moved from Winnetka, Illinois, to Knoxville in 1993. We purchased a home in Old Westmoreland, as we fell in love with the charm and history of the neighborhood. General Robert Neyland resided in our home during his tenure at UT. When we moved to Knoxville, I served as a clinical supervisor in the audiology clinic at UTHSC, which is housed in Neyland Stadium. Many folks asked if I was a die-hard UT fan! HOBBIES: I love yoga, reading, and travel. CURRENT POSITION: Owner/audiologist at Bridgewater Balance & Hearing. After completing my doctoral studies at UTHSC, I opened the private practice, Bridgewater Balance & Hearing. My staff and I provide audiological services at offices in Knoxville and Sevierville, Tennessee, as well as outreach services in Harrogate, Tennessee. I received my Bachelor of Science degree from Bradley University in Illinois, and my master’s in audiology at Rush University, where I received the honor of Outstanding Graduate Student in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences. I received my clinical doctorate from the University of Tennessee, and completed a clinical fellowship at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles. FAMILY MEMBERS: My daughter, Jensine, 25, graduated from Parsons The New School in New York, where she now lives and works in the fashion industry. My son, Elliot, 23, is a first-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. My husband, Jeff, is a cardiologist at Knoxville Heart Group. WHY DID YOU PURSUE AUDIOLOGY AT UTHSC? My career goal was always to open an office to offer extraordinary hearing health care services. While my children were young, I was blessed in being able to work part time in order to stay home with them. Once Jensine and Elliot were in middle school, it was time for me to see my goal come to fruition. During that time, the entry level degree progressed to a doctoral degree. I knew to get the most out of pursuing a doctoral degree in audiology, I wanted the classroom experience, and thus enrolled at UTHSC. My previous experience as a supervisor at UTHSC solidified my decision, as the Department of Audiology

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provided a quality education with extremely talented professors and supervisors. HOW ARE YOU CURRENTLY ENGAGED WITH UTHSC? I serve on the Community Development Board for the Department of Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology. We serve as the community voice for the department to the university. In addition, I supervise graduate students enrolled in the audiology doctoral program at UTHSC. My current audiology staff are all graduates from the Department of Audiology program. In addition, I mentor undergraduate students interested in a career in speech and hearing sciences. Lastly, I have endowed a scholarship for future audiology students at UTHSC. WHY DID YOU GET INVOLVED WITH THE UTHSC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION? I value education and giving back to a community that has served me well. I believe we have a professional responsibility to support higher education and mentor our future colleagues. I enjoy seeing a group of like-minded individuals come together to educate our community about speech, language, and hearing disorders. Audiologists are a close-knit group of professionals in Knoxville. Most are graduates of UTHSC. The friendships and professional relationships are an integral part of why I do what I do every day. I absolutely love audiology and am blessed to have a career and colleagues who inspire me every day. I always look forward to going to my office, working with my staff and UTHSC graduate students, and helping our beloved patients. WHAT ARE SOME NOTABLE MEMORIES FROM YOUR TIME AT UTHSC? Leaving South Stadium Hall (where the audiology clinic is located) early on Fridays before a home game.


Thank You for Your Membership in the 1911 Society The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s 1911 Society recognizes annual supporters, who are critical to our mission of educating, conducting innovative research, and improving health. Named for the year the Health Science Center was founded, the 1911 Society celebrates the total giving by donors, who each year make their gift of $100 or more between July 1 and the following June 30. Recognition levels reflect total contributions during the

Annual Giving Partners (Gifts during FY ’18)

HYMAN ASSSOCIATE PARTNERS ($5,000 +) Drs. Jeffrey and Sally Jo Baerman Henry Curtis and Leigh Chesney Barnes Ms. Tamika D. Catchings Mr. and Mrs. Jerry J. Faerber Dr. and Mrs. William Alan Helms Drs. E. Dwayne and Donna W. Lett Dr. James Douglas Lewis Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Sloan Dr. Anne H. and Mr. Michael S. Zachry

PATRON PARTNERS ($2,500 - $4,999) Mr. and Mrs. W. Dale Amburn Dr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Johnson Ms. Susan Stearns

CHANCELLOR’S CIRCLE PARTNERS ($1,000 - $2,499) Mr. and Mrs. Fred H. Brackney Mr. and Mrs. Thad S. Cox Sr. Dr. Barbara Lynn DuBray-Benstein Mr. and Mrs. Tony Ferrara Dr. Lori S. Gonzalez Mrs. Gerre W. Gourley Ms. Ruby Nell Jeter Dr. Carol Likens Dr. and Mrs. William R. Thompson

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year to any college program or fund at UTHSC. Gifts are renewable annually to retain membership in the 1911 Society. The Office of Development and Alumni Affairs wishes to thank all donors for their commitment to the College of Health Professions and to the university. For details go to giving.uthsc.edu/1911. To make a gift, please visit giving.uthsc.edu/give or call 901.448.5516.

DEAN’S ALLIANCE PARTNERS ($500 - $999) Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Bogard Dr. Barbara H. and Mr. Michael J. Connolly Ms. Sheila L. Criswell Mrs. Vicki Lynn Davidson Donald E. and Nancy G. Dunning Dr. Ashley Harkrider Dr. Cheryl D. Gunter and Mr. Paul A. Rabe Mrs. Elaine Perry Robinson

VISIONARY PARTNERS ($250 - $499)

Ms. Sherry Denise Ashe Mrs. Julie A. and Mr. George Beeler Dr. and Mrs. Charles Franklin Benton Mr. Antolin Victor Blanco Dr. Robert W. Bruno Ms. Loretta L. Bunn Dr. and Mrs. Paul F. Consroe Mr. and Mrs. Johnny R. Crisler Dr. Mustafa Dabbous Ms. Elaine K. Ettman Mrs. Gail P. and Mr. C. Thomas Fennimore Dr. and Mrs. James T. Goodwin Dr. Sue Bessel Hume and Mr. Leland C. Hume Mrs. Kathleen Mcloughlin Kenwright Ms. Patricia Marie King Ms. Stephanie B. Lancaster Ms. Jillian Heather McCarthy Mr. and Mrs. Rickey N. McCurry Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Pickens Dr. Kathleen Faulkner Scalzo


Mr. and Mrs. Dion Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Randy Stevens Drs. Vanessa S. and M. James Torrence Mrs. Melba White Dr. Kelly Rene Yeager

MILESTONE PARTNERS ($100 - $249)

Dr. Noma Anderson Mr. Gregory S. Bainer Mrs. Laurie McCallen Bainer Ms. Rene Bard Mrs. Christine and Mr. James Barkley Drs. Jacque Lynn Barnes and Jeremy Lynn Bradford Mr. and Mrs. Jerome J. Barthelemy II Miss Janice E. Beard Ms. Mary Sue Bennett Ms. Tamelia S. Boehm Mrs. Mary Ellen Boehms Mrs. Kendal L. and Mr. Richard W. Booker Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Boyd Dr. Ashley Nations Bradford Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Buckner Ms. Janet S. Bush Mr. Patrick L. and Mrs. Tammy L. Cardosi Mrs. Mary-Virginia Christakos Dr. George Anthony Cibulas, II Dr. and Mrs. John D. Cima Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Clark Dr. Judy Clifft Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Cohan Mr. F. Donald Coleman Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Dale Collins Mr. and Mrs. Lanis L. Cope Mr. Stephen E. Costner Ms. Judith Gayle Davis Dr. Peter Benjamin Everett Dr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Falwell Mr. and Mrs. Rusty Farrell Drs. James R. and Glenda McCartney Feild Mrs. Jami E. Flick Mrs. Denise M. and Mr. Mark A. Fredette Dr. Kartheek Ganta Ms. Beverly S. Graves Mr. Lenard A. and Dr. Nina Q. Grice Dr. Thomas M. Hamm Mr. Nasim Daniel Haq Mr. and Mrs. John A. Harris III Mr. and Mrs. Scott Henley Dr. Daphne Delane Herron Mr. and Mrs. John Hildick Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hoelscher Mrs. Angela U. and Mr. Bobby Holcomb

Ms. Kayla R. House Mr. and Ms. Andrew Lee Hubbard Dr. Patti Michele Johnstone Mrs. Margaret Seymour Jones Mrs. Ann Julius Dr. Sajeesh Kumar Kamala Raghavan Dr. and Mrs. Richard John Kasser Mr. and Mrs. John Alan Kerr Ms. Nikki Jean Koehler Drs. Kazunari and Mary Archer Koike Dr. and Mrs. Gordon J. Kraus Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Lawrence Dr. Gary D. and Mrs. Rebecca Epps Lawson Mrs. Jewell B. and Mr. George M. Lee Mrs. Sherri Parker Lee Ms. Sara Ogilvie Leonard Timothy D. Lockey, PhD Dr. Danielle Strickland Magness and Mr. Garth Magness Mrs. Amy C. and Dr. A. Daniel Martin, III Mr. William A. Hotz and Mrs. Drucilla McCutchen-Hotz Mr. and Mrs. John Marshall McMillin Dr. Myra M. Meekins Dr. Kathryn R. and Mr. Thomas K. Meeks Dr. Mary C. and Mr. Curtis P. Meier Ms. Janeta L. Mick Mrs. Kathleen C. and Mr. Michael B. Miller Ms. Brooke Mills Mrs. Geneva C. Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Moore Dr. Bill H. and Mrs. Janice Cox Murphy Ms. Heather E Nichols Dr. and Mrs. William T. Nichols Ms. Michelle E. Nixon and Mr. Ragan Watson Mrs. Felisa J. and Mr. Wade Odle Mrs. Terri Flake O’Neill Mr. and Mrs. Courtney N. Pearre Dr. and Mrs. James M. Peery, Jr. Mr. Stephen J. Pike and Dr. Orli Weisser-Pike Dr. Patrick N. and Mrs. Erin Lee Plyler Robert L. Pollack, Ph.D. Mr. Scott Porter Mrs. JoEtta Powell Mr. Randy R. Raley Christopher Randolph Mr. and Ms. Kevin Joseph Reilly Mr. and Mrs. Charles Remaklus, III Mr. and Mrs. Kevin T. Reneau Dr. Diane Michelle Reynolds Dr. Rebecca D. and Mr. Jeremy Reynolds Dr. Cynthia McCormick Richburg Mr. Charles Atlee Robbins, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Irving L. Rosenbloom Dr. Karen M. Ross-Gilson UTHSC COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS | SPRING 2019

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Mrs. Ann Margaret Salina Mr. and Mrs. Daniel R. Sechrist Mr. and Mrs. James C. Sensenig Mrs. Marcia Y. Sharp Mr. John J. and Mrs. Carol C. Sheridan Dr. Ken and Mrs. Barbara Showalter Ms. Leigh Anne Smith Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Smith Dr. Elizabeth Ann Stillman Ms. Julie Sutherland Mr. and Mrs. Thad J. Thomas Mrs. Jane Diddle Thompson Ms. Ann Marie Tugwell Mr. and Mrs. Terry G. Tyler Mr. Joe Wayne Walker, Jr. Mr. Raymond E. Wells Mrs. Billie Whitney Ms. Pamela Whittenburg

SUSTAINING PARTNERS (CONSECUTIVE YEARS OF GIVING) FOUNDATION PARTNERS (20 YEARS +) Dr. Mustafa Dabbous Donald E. and Nancy G. Dunning Dr. and Mrs. Richard John Kasser Mr. and Mrs. Kevin T. Reneau

CORNERSTONE PARTNERS (10 - 19 YEARS)

Ms. Loretta L. Bunn Dr. Barbara Lynn DuBray-Benstein Mrs. Gail P. and Mr. C. Thomas Fennimore Mr. and Mrs. Tony Ferrara Mr. Lenard A. and Dr. Nina Q. Grice Mrs. Jewell B. and Mr. George M. Lee Timothy D. Lockey, PhD Mr. and Mrs. Mark W. McMaster Mrs. Shirly Newberry Ritter and Mr. Harold T. Ritter Mr. and Mrs. Larry C. Roofner

ARCHWAY PARTNERS (5 - 9 YEARS)

Miss Janice E. Beard Ms. Mary Sue Bennett Ms. Carol Sue Bloomquist Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Clark Dr. Judy Clifft Dr. Barbara H. and Mr. Michael J. Connolly Dr. and Mrs. Paul F. Consroe Mrs. Vicki Lynn Davidson

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Ms. Judith Gayle Davis Mrs. Denise M. and Mr. Mark A. Fredette Mr. and Mrs. Ted M. Gleason Ms. Beverly S. Graves Mr. Harry Guinocor Dr. and Mrs. William Alan Helms Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hoelscher Drs. Kazunari and Mary Archer Koike Dr. and Mrs. Gordon J. Kraus Mr. Steve Lewis Dr. Carol Likens Mrs. LaNelle Wells Lindsey Mrs. Sheila R. Littleton Dr. Terri Levi Lynch Mr. Edward Stephen McDaniel Dr. Kathryn R. and Mr. Thomas K. Meeks Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Moore Ms. Michelle E. Nixon and Mr. Ragan Watson Dr. Cheryl D. Gunter and Mr. Paul A. Rabe Mr. and Mrs. Charles Remaklus, III Mr. and Mrs. James C. Sensenig Mr. John J. and Mrs. Carol C. Sheridan Mr. Joe Wayne Walker, Jr. Mr. Jeromey S. White Dr. Anne H. and Mr. Michael S. Zachry

LIFETIME PARTNERS (CUMULATIVE LIFETIME GIVING) LEADER PARTNERS ($25,000 - $99,999) Drs. Jeffrey and Sally Jo Baerman Henry Curtis and Leigh Chesney Barnes Ms. Tamika D. Catchings Dr. Barbara H. and Mr. Michael J. Connolly Mr. and Mrs. Jerry J. Faerber Dr. and Mrs. William Alan Helms Dr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Johnson Drs. E. Dwayne and Donna W. Lett Dr. James Douglas Lewis Dr. Rebecca D. and Mr. Jeremy Reynolds Dr. Anne H. and Mr. Michael S. Zachry

FOUNDING PARTNERS ($500,000 - $999,999) Ms. Linda A. Caldwell


Golden Graduate Homecoming 2018 The 2018 Golden Graduate Homecoming was held October 10-12 in Memphis. This milestone celebration included dinner at Charlie Vergos Rendezvous, open houses at the various colleges, a tour of the new Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Simulation (CHIPS) on campus, as well as the Golden Graduate Ceremony and Dinner at the historic Peabody Hotel. The 2019 celebration, which honors the class of 1969, is set for October 16-18. See you there!


Faculty Publications and Presentations Audiology and Speech Pathology PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS Bowers, A., Saltuklaroglu, T., Harkrider, A., Jenson, D., Thornton, D. Power and phase coherence in sensorimotor mu and temporal lobe alpha components during covert and overt syllable production, Experimental Brain Research. Easterday, M., Plyler, P., Lewis, J. Doettl, S.M. (2018) Auditory Suppression of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology 30;9.

Johnstone, P.M., Yeager, K.R., Pomeroy, M.L., Hawk, N. (2018). “Open-Fit Domes and Children with Bilateral High-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Benefits and Outcomes.” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 29, 4, 348-356. Kittilstved, T., Reilly, K., Harkrider, A., Casenhiser, D., Thornton, D., Jenson, D., Hedinger, T., Bowers, A., Saltuklaroglu, T. (2018) The effects of fluency enhancing conditions on sensorimotor control of speech in typically fluent speakers: An EEG mu rhythm study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience .doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00126 Lewis, J.D. (2018). The area discontinuity between probe and ear canal as a source of power-reflectance measurement-location variability. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 143(2): 1106-1116.

Erickson, M. L. (in press). Inexperienced Listeners’ Perception of Timbre Dissimilarity Within and Between Voice Categories. Journal of Voice.

Lewis, J.D. (2018). Synchronized spontaneous otoacoustic emissions provide a signal-to-noise ratio advantage in medialolivocochlear reflex assays. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, 19(1): 53-65.

Erickson, M. L., & Burnette, P. (in press). Can Listeners Hear Who Is Singing? The Role of Listeners Experience in Singer Discrimination Across Pitch. Journal of Voice.

Paek, E. J., & Murray, L. L. (2018). A Novel Cognitive-Linguistic Approach to Addressing Developmental Reading Disorders: A Pilot Study. Communication Sciences & Disorders, 23(3), 609-628

Erickson, M. L. (2018). Can Listeners Hear Who Is Singing? The Role of Onset Cues. Journal of Voice, 32(4), 466-473.

Plyler, P.N., Easterday, M., & Behrens, T. (2018). The effects of extended input dynamic range on laboratory and field-trial evaluations in adult hearing aid users. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology.

Erickson, M. L. Burchard, J., & Phillips, P. (2018). Can Listeners Hear Who Is Singing? The development of voice category perception. Journal of Voice, 32(4), 459-465. Finke, E.H., Hickerson, B. & Kremkow, J.M.D. (2018). “To be quite honest, if it wasn’t for video games I wouldn’t have a social life at all”: Impact of videogames as leisure on young adults with autism spectrum disorder. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 27, 672-689. Finke, E.H., Drager, K.D.R., Kremkow, J.M.D., Murillo, A., Richardson, L. & Serpentine, E. (in press). “I would like for my child to be happy with his life”: Parental hopes for their children with ASD across the lifespan. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Hume, S., Schwarz, I., & Hedrick, M. (2018). Preliminary investigation of the use of phonological awareness paired with production training in childhood apraxia of speech. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, vol. 3(SIG 16), pp 38-52. doi:10.1044/ persp3.SIG16.38 Jenson, D., Reilly, K., Harkrider, A., Thornton, D., Saltuklaroglu, T. (2018). Trait Related Sensorimotor Deficits in People Who Stutter: An EEG investigation of µ rhythm dynamics during spontaneous fluency. NeuroImage: Clinical. May 21;19:690-702. doi: 10.1016/j. nicl.2018.05.026. eCollection 2018. Johnstone, P.M., Mills, K.E.T, Humphrey, E, Yeager, K.R., Jones, E., McElligott, K., Pierce, A., Agrawal, S., Froeling, C., Little, J.P. (2018). “Using Microphone Technology to Improve Speech Perception in Noise in Children with Cochlear Implants.” Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 29, 9, 814-825.

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Saltuklaroglu, T., Harkrider, A., Bowers, A., Casenhiser, D., Reilly, K., Jenson, D, Thornton, D. EEG mu rhythms: Rich sources of sensorimotor information in speech processing. Brain and Language. Thornton, D., Harkrider, A., Jenson, D., & Saltuklaroglu, T. Sex differences in early sensorimotor processing for speech discrimination, Nature, Scientific Reports.

NON-PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS Brennan, M., & Hedinger, T. (June 2018) “I Got My Life Back - Thanks to my SLPs.” ASHA Leader Live Doettl, S.M., McCaslin, D. (2018). Oculomotor Assessment in Children. Seminars in Hearing. 39(03):275-287. Invited Article Doettl, S.M., McCaslin, D. Adult Audiology Casebook 2nd Edition. Valente and Valente eds. – A Case of Peripheral and Central Vestibular Pathology. Chapter. Invited Book Chapter. Currently in Press. Hedinger, T. & Wegman, A. (July 2018) “Siblings in the Spotlight.” Breaking Ground Wilson, J. (2018). “Tips for Teaching Graduate Students About Dysphagia.” [Blog post]. Wilson, J. (2018). “Emojis, iPads and G-tubes, Oh my!” [Blog post].


INVITED PRESENTATIONS Capps, M., Cox, M.A., Plyler, P.N., Hausladen. J. The effect of hearing aid tier level on objective and subjective outcome measures. Tennessee Academy of Audiology Annual Conference. Podium Presentation. Hedinger, T. Invited Lecturer, Knox County Schools In-service Day, “Treatment for Stuttering: What a Therapy Session Should Look Like” (June 2018) Johnstone, P.M., Robertson, V.S., Mills, K.E.T., Agrawal, S., Yeager, K., Humphrey, E. (2018). Use of remote microphones for toddlers, school-age children, and adolescents with cochlear implants. Annual Conference of the Kentucky Speech Language Hearing Association, Lexington, KY, February, 22. Plyler, P.N. (2018). Hearing aid features and tier levels examined within and beyond the clinical setting. Kentucky Academy of Audiology Annual Conference. Keynote Speaker.

PRESENTATIONS Barnes, V. & Barry, L.L. (2018) Talking Should Be Easy, Right? TEIS Statewide Early Intervention Conference: Building Best Practice, Murfreesboro, TN. Barnes, V. (2018) What I always wanted to know about Autism, but was afraid to ask! Central Heights Elementary School In-service, Kingsport, TN. Barnes, V. (2018) Q & A Session: Communication Delays, Autism, Apraxia, Behavior and other Related Topics. Emory Valley Center, Oak Ridge, TN. Beeler, J., Bulley, J., Moore, A., Pearson, K. (2018) A unique AuD practicum experience that supports EHDI program follow-up efforts. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Annual Meeting. Atlanta, GA. Poster. Beeler, J. (2018) Tele-practice services for families of young children with hearing loss. Breaking the Sound Barrier Conference. Kingsport, TN. Buchanan, J., Lau, B.Y.B., Kumar, A., Reilly, K.J., & Krishnan, K. (2018). A Cry For Help? Decoding Mouse Language During Maternal Behavior. 2018 Neuroscience Network of East Tennessee (NeuroNET) Retreat. Denver, Colorado. (poster). Bushur, T., Garrison, N., Hausladen, J., & Plyler, P.N. (2018). Comparison of noise management strategies in hearing aids. Poster presentation at the American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, Tennessee. Defenderfer, J., Hedrick, M., Plyler, P., & Buss, A. (2018). Functional networks between temporal and frontal cortices during effortful listening. The Society for functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy. Tokyo, Japan. Erickson, M. L., (2018). Experienced Listeners Perception of Dissimilarity Within and Between Voice Categories. Paper presented at the Voice Foundation’s 46th Annual Symposium, Philadelphia, May.

Erickson, M. L. & Faulkner, K. (2018). Multidimensional Timbre Spaces of Cochlear Implant Vocoded and Non-vocoded Synthetic Female Voices Poster presented at the 2nd Music and Cochlear Implants Symposium, Montreal, August. Faulkner, K., Easterday, M., Slade, T., & Plyler, P.N. (2018). Relationship between auditory and visual noise acceptance. Poster presentation at the American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, Tennessee. Finke, E.H., Eck, A., & McCarthy, J. (2018, November). Supporting friendships in schools: Lessons from a success story. Poster presented at the Annual Conference of the American SpeechLanguage Hearing Association, Boston, MA. Finke, E.H., Kremkow, J.M.D., & Drager, K. (2018, November). Parental hopes for their children with ASD across the lifespan. Seminar presented at the Annual Conference of the American SpeechLanguage Hearing Association, Boston, MA. Ghawaly, R.K., McCarthy, J.H., Schwarz, I., Noss, E., & Finke, E. (2018, November). Incorporating phonological awareness into the RAAP program with parents & children who use AAC. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA. (*Student mentored project) Goshaw, A.*, McCarthy, J.H., Wegman, A., Schwarz, I., & Noss, E. (2018, November). School-based SLP knowledge of AAC & literacy: Results of a nationwide survey. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA. (*Student mentored project) Hedinger, T. 1.5 oral presentation, Tennessee Association for Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists (TAASLP) Annual Conference, “Supplementing Stretchy Speech,” (October 2018) Hecker. O.*, McCarthy, J.H., Berry, M., Schwarz, I. (2018, November). Effectiveness of a speech-to-text vocabulary application for children who are hearing impaired. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA. (*Student mentored project) Hickox, A.M., Brown, L.M., Faulkner, K.F., Plyler, E.L., Hausladen, J., Humphrey, E.L. (2018). Survey of Self-Advocacy Proficiency in School-Aged Hearing Aid Users. American Academy of Audiology (AAA) Conference, Nashville, TN, April. Ingram, V.* & Finke, E.H. (2018, November). Examining how working memory capabilities change across the lifespan of people with language impairment. Poster presented at the Annual Conference of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, Boston, MA. Johnstone, P.M., Mills, Kristen E.T., Yeager, K.R., Humphrey, E., Jones, E., McElligott, K., Pierce, A., Agrawal, A., Duncan, C., Little, J.P. Using Microphone Technology to Improve Speech Perception in Noise and at a Distance in Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants. 6th Annual Tom Davidson Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee, September 28, 2018.

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Keith, R., McCarthy, J. & Finke, E.H. (2018, November). Incorporating phonological awareness into the RAAP program with parents and children who use AAC. Poster presented at the Annual Conference of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, Boston, MA.

Paek, E. J., Murray, L. L., Newman, S. D. (May, 2018). Neural and behavioral correlates of anomia treatment in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease. Poster session presented at the 2018 Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Lakeway, TX.

Kremkow, J.M.D. & Finke, E.H. (2018, November). Military families and special needs: Perceptions of best and worst characteristics of military locations. Poster presented at the Annual Conference of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, Boston, MA.

Radford, N. T. (2018). When language is not the issue: Effectively dealing with Tizzies and Tantrums. A 2-hour seminar presentation for the 2018 Annual Convention of the Georgia Speech Language and Hearing Association (GSHA), Atlanta Marriott Northwest at Galleria, Atlanta, Georgia, February 9, 2018

Marshal J, Hedrick M, Plyler P, Wijeakumar S, & Buss A. (2018). fNIRS in 3D! Exploring relationships between speech perception and functional connectivity in a frontotemporal network. NeuroNet Retreat, Knoxville, Tennessee.

Radford, N. T. (2018). Tantrums & Tizzies: SLPs & Effectively Managing Young Children’s Behavior. A poster presentation for the 2018 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, Boston, MA, November 16, 2018.

Martin, K., Johnstone, P., Hedrick, M., Faulkner, K. (2018). Prevalence of Use of a Cognitive Screening Tool in Hearing Aid Evaluations for Older Adults. Annual Conference for the American Academy of Audiology, Nashville, TN, April.

Saltuklaroglu, T., Harkrider, A. , Thornton, D., Jenson. Changes in sensorimotor control of speech observed in oscillations of the EEG mu rhythm (August, 2018). Poster presented at Society for the Neurobiology of Language. Quebec City, Canada

McCarthy, J. H., (2018, November). S-P-E-L-L-I-N-G it out! How to address writing and spelling needs of children who use AAC. Tennessee Association for Assistive Technology (TAAT) Annual Conference, Franklin, TN.

Saltuklaroglu, T., Harkrider, A. , Thornton, D., Jenson. Stutteringrelated differences in auditory-motor coherence in speech and tone discrimination (August, 2018). Poster presented at Society for the Neurobiology of Language. Quebec City, Canada

McCarthy, J. H., (2018, November). Words, words, glorious words! The importance and “how to” of teaching vocabulary. Tennessee Association for Assistive Technology (TAAT) Annual Conference, Franklin, TN.

Scheperle, R.A., Lewis, J.D., Hajicek, J.J. (2018). Wideband Reflectance and Electrically Evoked Stapedial Reflexes Following Cochlear Implantation. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Auditory Society, Scottsdale, AZ, March 2018.

Mills, K.E.T., Martin, M.K., McCarthy, J.H., Faulkner, K.F. Can normal hearing school-aged children use phonological and lexical characteristics to learn novel words when presented with spectrally degraded speech? Poster presented at the American Cochlear Implant Alliance Annual Conference (March, 2018).

Vaughn T. (Nov. 2018). Using Low Tech Visual Supports to Scaffold to a New High Tech AAC System, presentation for Tennessee Association for Assistive Technology Conference, Franklin, Tn.

Morris, L., Hall, C., Johnstone, P., Plyler, E. (2018). Effect of a Formulated Work-up Protocol for Pediatric Unilateral Hearing Loss Patients. Annual Conference for the American Academy of Audiology, Nashville, TN, April. Noss, E., Irick, A., Sanderson, A., Bunch, J., Buehler, V. (June 2018) “Preparing Graduate and Undergraduate Students Across Disciplines: AuD, SLP, Deaf Ed”. AG Bell Convention 2018. Scottsdale, AZ. Poster. Noss, E., McCarthy, J., Bunch, J., Buehler, V., Irick, A. (June 2018) “One Book-Many Goals: School Age Catch Up”. AG Bell Convention 2018. Scottsdale, AZ. Poster. Noss, E., Sanderson, A., Irick, A., Bunch, J. (June 2018) “Hands In and Ears On”. AG Bell Convention 2018. Poster. Paek, E. J., Murray, L. L., Newman, S. D. (May, 2018). Test-retest reliability of fMRI confrontation naming measures in dementia. Poster session presented at the 2018 Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Lakeway, TX.

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Watson, B., Tobener, E., Doettl, S.M., Plyler, P.N. (2018). Occurrence and Types of Artifact During Oculomotor Testing in Normal Pediatric and Adult Populations. Poster Presentation accepted at the American Balance Society Annual Meeting. (Scottsdale, AZ). Wilson, J. & Radford, N. A Survey of Speech Language Pathologists’ Perceptions Regarding Pediatric Dysphagia, American Speech-Language Hearing Association, November, 2018. Yeager, K. R., Noss, E., Johnstone, P., Erickson, M.L., & Love, A. (2018). Development of the Pediatric Auditory Recognition Test (PART). Poster presented at the AG Bell Convention, Scottsdale, AZ, June.

Occupational Therapy Lancaster, S. B. (2018, April). Dogfooding: What it is and how it impacted my teaching. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Salt Lake City, UT. Lancaster, S. B. (2018, April). More than words: The use of glyphs as a tool for teaching and learning. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.


Lancaster, S. B. (2018, April). A dissection of a reflection: Guiding students in the reflective writing process. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT.

Weisser-Pike, O. (2018). A survey of caregivers of people with low vision: A pilot study. Annals of International Occupational Therapy, 1(2), 74-83.

Lancaster, S. B., & Hoyt, C. (2018, April). Methods, Strategies, and Benefits of Building and Creating an Inclusive Practice. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT.

Williams, L. (2018) Functional Adult Home Programs. Speaker Presentation, TNOTA State Conference, Nashville, TN.

Lancaster, S. B., & Hoyt, C. (2018, April). Methods, strategies, and benefits of building and creating an inclusive practice. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT. Mitchell, A.W., Hale, J., Lawrence, M., Murillo, E., Newman, K., & Smith, H., (2018). Entry-level occupational therapy programs’ emphasis on play: A survey. Journal of Occupational Therapy Education, 2(1).

Mitchell, A.W., & Booker, K. (2018, October). The Snakes and Ladders of a Review Session. Poster presentation, American Occupational Therapy Association Education Summit, Louisville, KY. Lancaster, S.B. (2018, November). Supporting Students in Notetaking Efforts Using Assistive Technology. Presentation, Tennessee Association for Assistive Technology Conference, Franklin, TN. Lancaster, S.B. (2018, December). Podcasting in Occupational Therapy. Presentation, World Federation of Occupational Therapy Virtual Exchange (WFOT Vx2018).

Mitchell, A.W., Hale, J., Lawrence, M., Murillo, E., Newman, K., & Smith, H., (2018, April). Entry-level occupational therapy programs’ emphasis on play: A survey. Poster session,American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT.

Zachry, A.H., Lancaster, S.B., & Robertson, E. (2018). Effect of a Sound-Based Intervention on a 7 Year-Old Child Diagnosed with Autism. Annals of International Occupational Therapy.

Weisser-Pike, O. & Booker, K. (2018, April). Free Smartphone Apps for People With Visual Impairments. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT.

Williamson, T. W., Hughes, S., Flick, J. E., Burnett, K., Bradford, J. L., & Ross, L. L. (2018). Clinical experiences: Navigating the intricacies of student placement requirements. Journal of Allied Health, 47(4), 237-242.

Booker, K., Sasse, C., & Weisser-Pike, O. (2018, April). Getting Simulation Savvy. Poster session, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference: Salt Lake City, UT. Zachry, A. & Flick, J. (2018, April). OT in Pediatric Primary Care. Short course, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Salt Lake City, UT. Cruz, E., Olmstead, J., Flick, J., Gannon, S., Husters, S., Cobble, B., & Johns, H. (2018, April). Mental health promotion through community development: How to employ community-campus partnerships to Integrate practice, education, and research. Workshop, American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Salt Lake City, UT. Flick, J. E. (2018, May). Human trafficking and the emerging role of occupational therapy. Poster session, World Federation of Occupational Therapy Congress: Cape Town, South Africa. Moliner, C., Flick, J., O’Flynn, J., & Demers Duboc, S. (2018, May). Challenges of international fieldwork partnerships and utilization of collaborative leadership. Poster session, World Federation of Occupational Therapy Congress, Cape Town, South Africa. Weisser-Pike, O., Kaldenberg, J., & Jacobs, K. (2018). Building capacity for occupational therapy practice in low vision on the other side of the world. Poster presentation, World Federation of Occupational Therapy Congress, Cape Town, South Africa. Weisser-Pike, O. (2018, June). Cortical visual impairment. Presentation at TNOTA West District meeting: Memphis, TN. Weisser-Pike, O. (2018). Technologies for people with low visionPart 2. The Israeli Journal of Occupational Therapy, 27(2).

Physical Therapy Alway, S. E. Mitochondrial Biogenesis: Processes, Regulation, Functions and Disease ISSN: 2056-452X ed. Hood DA, editor. London: Henry Stewart Talks Ltd; 2018. Pathways of Apoptosis Brooks, M. J., A. Hajira, J. S. Mohamed, and S. E. Alway. 2018. “Voluntary wheel running increases satellite cell abundance and improves recovery from disuse in gastrocnemius muscles from mice.” J Appl Physiol (1985) 124 (6):1616-1628. doi: 10.1152/ japplphysiol.00451.2017. PMCID: PMC6032091 Bowyer, K. P., Carson, J. A., Davis, J. M., and Wang, X. 2018. “The influence of exercise training dose on fasting acylated ghrelin concentration in older women.” J Behav Med. Fix, D. K., J. P. Hardee, S. Gao, B. N. VanderVeen, K. T. Velazquez, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Role of gp130 in basal and exercise-trained skeletal muscle mitochondrial quality control.” J Appl Physiol (1985) 124 (6):1456-1470. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01063.2017. Hardee, J. P., B. R. Counts, S. Gao, B. N. VanderVeen, D. K. Fix, H. J. Koh, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Inflammatory signalling regulates eccentric contraction-induced protein synthesis in cachectic skeletal muscle.” J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle 9 (2):369-383. doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12271. Hardee, J. P., D. K. Fix, X. Wang, E. C. Goldsmith, H. J. Koh, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Systemic IL-6 regulation of eccentric contractioninduced muscle protein synthesis.” Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 315 (1):C91-C103. doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00063.2018.

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Kaur, K., A. Saxena, I. Debnath, J. L. O’Brien, N. J. Ajami, T. A. Auchtung, J. F. Petrosino, A. J. Sougiannis, S. Depaep, A. Chumanevich, P. M. Gummadidala, M. H. Omebeyinje, S. Banerjee, I. Chatzistamou, P. Chakraborty, R. Fayad, F. G. Berger, J. A. Carson, and A. Chanda. 2018. “Antibiotic-mediated bacteriome depletion in Apc(Min/+) mice is associated with reduction in mucus-producing goblet cells and increased colorectal cancer progression.” Cancer Med 7 (5):2003-2012. doi: 10.1002/cam4.1460. Montalvo, R. N., B. R. Counts, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Understanding sex differences in the regulation of cancer-induced muscle wasting.” Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. doi: 10.1097/ SPC.0000000000000380. Montalvo, R. N., J. P. Hardee, B. N. VanderVeen, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Resistance Exercise’s Ability to Reverse Cancer-Induced Anabolic Resistance.” Exerc Sport Sci Rev 46 (4):247-253. doi: 10.1249/JES.0000000000000159. Oliveira, J.R.S., J.S. Mohamed, M. J. Myers, M.J. Brooks, S. E. Alway. Effects of hindlimb suspension and reloading on gastrocnemius and soleus muscle mass and function in geriatric mice. Exp. Gerontol 115:19-31, 2019 doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2018.11.011 VanderVeen, B. N., J. P. Hardee, D. K. Fix, and J. A. Carson. 2018. “Skeletal muscle function during the progression of cancer cachexia in the male Apc(Min/+) mouse.” J Appl Physiol (1985) 124 (3):684695. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00897.2017. Williamson, T.W., Hughes, E.S., Flick, J.E., Burnett, K., Bradford, J.L., & Ross, L.L. (2018). Clinical experiences: Navigating the intricacies of student placement requirements. Journal of Allied Health, 47(4), 237-242. Williamson TW, Hughes, ES, Head PL. (2018). An exploration of administrative bloat in American higher education. Planning for Higher Education Journal, 46(2), 1-8. Hughes, E.S., Bradford, J.B., & Likens, C.C. (2018). Facilitating collaboration, communication, and critical thinking skills in physical therapy education through technology-enhanced instruction: A case study. TechTrends.

PRESENTATIONS Bradford, J. & McGriff, A. (2018, September). Creating and User Friendly Course: Learning Objectives and Course Alignment. Oral presentation at: University of Tennessee Symposium. Memphis, TN. Bradford, J., Beckel, C., & Henderson, H. (2018, July). Oral Presentation at: Academy of Physical Therapy Education Faculty Development Workshop Director of Clinical Education Workshop: Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. Bradford, J., Beckel, C., & Teglia, V. (2018, October). Help for the new DCE: Where do I start? Oral presentation at: American Physical Therapy Association Education Leadership Conference. Jacksonville, FL.

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Bradford, J., MacCabe, A. (2018, October). Innovating acute care curriculum and simulation to prepare physical therapist students for clinical education. Oral presentation at: American Physical Therapy Association Education Leadership Conference. Jacksonville, FL. Bradford, J., Murphy, E., Braese, A., & Jones, K. (2018, October). Simulated patients as an instructional tool for the novice physical therapist student clinical reasoning and confidence. Oral presentation at: American Physical Therapy Association Education Leadership Conference. Jacksonville, FL. Bradford, J.L. (2018, January). Think Aloud Standardized Patient Examination to measure clinical performance. Platform Presentation at: International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare: Los Angeles, CA. Bradford, J. (2018, October). American Physical Therapy Association Education Leadership Conference Oral presentation: IGNITE speaker: Jacksonville, FL. Carter, K. (2018, July) The use of motivational interviewing to increase weekly aerobic physical activity in African American women with type 2 diabetes. Poster presented at: 2018 Delta Clinical and Translational Health Disparities Conference: Jackson, MS. Carter, K. (2018, September). Preservation, Prevention, and Participation in Progressive Neuromuscular Disease. Oral presentation at: Tennessee Physical Therapy Association State Meeting; September 2018; Memphis, TN. Tennessee Occupational Therapy Association; October 2018 Carter, K. (2018, August). Benefits of Exercise for People with Parkinson Disease and LSVT BIG program. Oral Presentation at: Mid-South Parkinson’s Disease Support Group: Memphis, TN. Hughes, E.S. (2018, November). Myofascia and Functional Dry Needling. Oral presentation at: American Academy of Physical Therapists Annual Conference: Memphis, TN. Meekins, M. (2018, November). Changing the pain game by adding health coaching to your toolkit in the practice of orthopaedic manual therapy. Oral presentation at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapist Annual Conference: Reno, NV. Meekins, M. (2018, November). It’s not what you do, but how you do it: analyzing movement impairments to guide treatment. Oral presentation at: American Academy of Physical Therapists Annual Conference: Memphis, TN. Mihalko, W.M., Richey, P.A., Johnson, K.C., Singhal, K., Coday, M., Fridjtoff, T. (2018, September). Incidence of total knee replacement does not change with behavioral lifestyle intervention in type II diabetics. Oral presentation at: The Knee Society: Saint Louis, MO. Richey, P.A., Mihalko, W.M., Johnson, K.C., Singhal, K., Coday, M., Fridjtoff, T. (2018, November). A behavioral life style intervention and incidence of total knee replacement in the look ahead study. Poster presented at: The Obesity Society: Nashville, TN.


Health Informatics and Information Management PUBLICATIONS Kumar. S, Bell, A. Clinical Practice Guidelines: A strategy for evaluating perception and quality. International Journal of Medical and Biomedical Studies (IJMBS), Volume 2, Issue 6 Dec. 2018 Kumar, S., Stewart, R.L. Barriers that Affect the Use of Patient Portals. J Hosp Health Care Admin: JHHA-117, 2018. DOI: 10.29011/ JHHA-117. 000017.

Kenwright, K.M. (2018). Career Satisfaction in the Profession of Medical Laboratory Science. J Allied Health, Fall;47(3): 222-227. Oliveira, J.R.S., Mohamed, J.S., Myers, M.J., Brooks, M.J., Always, S.E. (2018). Effects of hindlimb suspension and reloading on gastrocnemius and soleus muscle mass and function in geriatric mice. Exp Gerontol. Nov 16;115:19-31. PMID: 30448397.

Kinsler, S., Mathews, F., Kumar, S. Gamification of Online Education: Graduate Level Course in Health Informatics. Research Journal of Library and Information Science. Volume 2, Issue 4, 2018, PP 26-31

Pifer, L.L.W., and Hicks, W. ”A Laboratory Perspective on Emerging and Re- Emerging Infectious Diseases in North America”, Medical Laboratory Observer March 22, 2018. (Retrieved from https://www. mlo-online.com/a-laboratory-perspective-on-emerging-and-reemerging-infectious-diseases-in-north-america) Published hard copy: MLO 50:4, 36-38, 2018.

Harrison, I., Kumar, S. Behavioral Health Providers and Effectiveness of Electronic Health Record. Op Acc J Bio Eng & Bio Sci 2(2)-2018. OAJBEB.MS.ID.000133.

Pifer, L. W.: Leveraging your case: Aid of an expert in world medical, technical and scientific literature, Am. Bar Assoc. Weekly, Sept. 10, 2018,

Payne, B., Kumar, S. Effects of Personal Health Record on Patient Healthcare Outcomes. Op Acc J Bio Eng & Bio Sci 2(2)- 2018. OAJBEB.MS.ID.000134.

Pifer, L. W.: Diagnostic clinical laboratory error and medical malpractice. The TASA Group Laboratory Observer, Nov. 50:1132-33,

PRESENTATIONS Kumar, S., Daniel S. Addressing Health Disparities Using Telehealth: The Interface of Research, Policy and Collaboration. Delta Consortium Health Disparities Conference July 19, 2018 Jackson, MS Sharp, M. and R. Reynolds Blending Two Worlds: The Connection Between Andragogy and Online Education. American Health Information Management Association Assembly on Education, Indianapolis, IN July 29, 2018 Stewart, R., Kumar, S. Identifying Barriers that Affect Patients Access to their Patient Portals & m- Health Applications 2018 Public Health Informatics Conference, August 20-23, 2018. Atlanta, GA.

Clinical Laboratory Sciences PUBLICATIONS Brooks, M.J., Hajira, A., Mohamed, J.S., Always, S.E. (2018). Voluntary wheel running increases satellite cell abundance and improves recovery from disuse in gastrocnemius muscles from mice. J Appl Physiol. Jun 1;124(6):1616-1628. PMID: 29470148. Criswell, S., O’Brien, T., and Skalli (2018): Presence of intermediate filament protein synemin in select sarcomas, Journal of Histotechnology, DOI: 10.1080/01478885.2018.1438757 Criswell, S., Lazar, C., and Lewis, P. (2018): Troubleshooting on the Roche Ventana BenchMark ULTRA IHC/ISH automated staining system, Journal of Histotechnology, DOI: 10.1080/01478885.2018.1518805 Hicks, W., and Pifer, Linda, L. W. “Highlighting the Hematology in Immunohematology”, Medical Laboratory Observer, November, 2018.

Williamson, T., Hughes, S., Flick, J., Burnett, K., Bradford, J., & Ross, L. (2018). Clinical Experiences: Navigating the Intricacies of Student Placement Requirements. Journal of Allied Health, 47(4), 237-242. Williamson, T., Hughes, E., & Head, P. (2018). An Exploration of Administrative Bloat American Higher Education. Planning for Higher Education, 46(2), 15-22.

PRESENTATIONS Criswell, S. Mitotic Index and Ki-67 Proliferation Marker Coupled with Bleaching in Evaluation of Pigmented Melanomas at the NSH conference in September. St. Louis, Missouri. Poster. Pifer, L.L.W.: Keynote Address, “Mosquito-Borne Viruses of Tennessee”, Annual Meeting, Mosquito and Vector Control Div. of TN State Health Dept., Nashville, TN, Jan., 2018 Pifer, L. L. W.: Rift Valley Fever Virus, Presented for Memphis/Shelby County Environmentalists, Mosquito Control Division, Feb. 28, 2018, Pifer, L. L. W.: Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Special Course on Cancer, “Papilloma Virus as an Etiologic Agent of Cancer”, Dept. of Biology, Memphis, TN. Mar. 27, 2018. Pifer, L. L. W.: Arboviruses of Tennessee, Memphis Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Le Bonheur Children’s’ Medical Center, Memphis, TN, May 3, 2018. Pifer, L. L. W.: “The Dark Side: Emerging Pathogens”, Memphis Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Oct. 4, 2018, American Esoteric Labs, Memphis, TN. Ross, L. Medical Laboratory Mysteries, Memphis Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, November 2018. Ross, L. Medical Laboratory Mysteries Part 2, Memphis Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, December 2018.

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In Memoriam 1948 Frances Buchalter Memphis, Tennessee Medical Technology

1950 Jo Turner Wright Tupelo, Mississippi Medical Technology

1949 Gene Hawkins Bauer Court Gray, Georgia Medical Technology

1959 James W. Cary Martin, Tennessee Radiologic Technology

1974 Carolyn H. Bowman Knoxville, Tennessee Medical Technology

This listing, done by year of graduation, is inclusive of December 2018 to January 2019. To inform the UTHSC Office of Development and Alumni Affairs of any errors or omissions, or to make a donation in memory of a classmate or friend, please contact the office at 901.448.5516 or alumni.uthsc.edu.

Leave Your Legacy Have you thought about the legacy you will leave behind? With a Planned Gift, you can: • Simplify your estate for your family • Reduce the tax burden applied to your assets • Benefit causes you hold dear

Legacy donors become members of the Hershel “Pat” Wall Legacy Society Dr. Wall’s 50 years of dedication as a student, faculty member, and administrator at UTHSC are unsurpassed. His legacy will live forever, as will the impact made by our donors. For more information about planned gifts to UTHSC and Legacy Society membership, contact Bethany Goolsby at 901.448.5516 or estateplans@uthsc.edu.

THANK YOU TO OUR LEGACY SOCIETY MEMBERS! Mr. H. Curtis and Mrs. Leigh

Dr. Brenta G. Davis

Estate of Mary L. Luper

Miss Judy W. Griffin

Estate of Charles S. and Lucille H. Moon

Ms. Linda A. Caldwell

Mrs. Denise F. Harvey

Estate of Raymond Skinner

Estate of Sharon Diane Carney

Estate of Judy Duane Haston

Estate of Dr. Tyler Young

Chesney Barnes

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Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Memphis, TN Permit No. 4026 Office of Development and Alumni Affairs 62 S. Dunlap, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38163 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

SAVE THE DATE! 2019 GOLDEN GRADUATE HOMECOMING OCTOBER 16–18 | MEMPHIS, TN Honoring graduates of 1969 from all six UTHSC colleges. Join your classmates in Memphis for your 50th reunion celebration! Please watch your mailbox for a detailed event brochure.

THIS YEAR’S EVENTS INCLUDE: Dinner at Charlie Vergos Rendezvous College Open Houses and a tour of the new Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Simulation (CHIPS) Golden Graduate Homecoming Ceremony and Dinner at the Peabody Hotel

For more information, contact Terri Catafygiotu, Assistant Director for Alumni Programs, at tcatafyg@uthsc.edu or 901.448.8580.

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UTHSC College of Health Professions Magazine - Spring 2019  

UTHSC College of Health Professions Magazine - Spring 2019  

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