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Eyelights Hamilton

SPECIAL EDITION 2016

HONORING THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF A REMARKABLE LEADER, HEALER & VISIONARY PAG E 4

HAMILTONS LAUNCH HAIK ENDOWED CHAIR PAG E 1 5

1951-2016

BARRETT G.

HAIK MD, FACS


FROM THE CHAIR

Looking Back and Moving Forward

James C. Fleming, MD, FACS Chair and Philip M. Lewis Professor of Ophthalmology

This special edition is dedicated to the life and legacy of our beloved founder, Barrett G. Haik, MD, FACS, and the remarkable future of the Hamilton Eye Institute for which he paved the way. While this issue looks back at the life and legacy of our founder, we mindfully embrace Barrett’s spirit of always moving forward. At all levels, we are achieving more than ever before. We have hired two highly accomplished R01-funded research faculty this year, and secured funds to recruit two more. Our clinical program remains at the cutting edge, with the newest treatments and technologies including corneal cross-linking for keratoconus, which was just approved by the FDA a few months ago (page 10). Our surgery center, which was just renamed the Dr. Barrett G. Haik Eye Surgery Institute, has performed upwards of 40,000 procedures over the eight years of its existence, and it continues to grow. Our outreach program continues to flourish (page 18), as we provide support and skills exchange to improve vision care in Panama, Guatemala, and Haiti. With 15 residents and 6 fellows, our physician education program is bigger than ever. We have a strong academic presence at hospitals throughout the Memphis region, including St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, the Veteran’s Affairs Hospital, Baptist Hospital, Methodist Hospital, and Regional One, at which we provide the highest level of patient care available. As you will see in this issue, the department continues to expand and thrive through the extraordinary philanthropic support of its donors. Dr. Ralph Hamilton has committed support for our sixth endowed professorship, not only to propel the institute to new heights, but also to honor the memory of Dr. Haik (page 15). Please read about our founder’s remarkable life and legacy, and join us as we carry on his spirit of not just looking to the future, but leading the way to it.

HAMILTON EYELIGHTS a seasonal newsletter produced by The Hamilton Eye Institute at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center 930 Madison Avenue, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38163 (901) 448-5883 heiacademic@uthsc.edu

Editors: James C. Fleming, MD, FACS Lee A. Thompson, MA Blanca X. Phillips Photography & Design: Lee A. Thompson, MA Kaycie Coppock Thurman Hobson

Chancellor, UT Health Science Center: Steve J. Schwab, MD Robert Kaplan Executive Dean, College of Medicine: David M. Stern, MD Assistant Vice Chancellor, Communications & Marketing: Sally Badoud, BA, MBA

Front cover photo of Barrett G. Haik, MD, FACS, courtesy of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Publication Number: R073285036-001-2017 All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment and admissions without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, or covered veteran status. Eligibility and other terms and conditions of employment benefits at The University of Tennessee are governed by laws and regulations of the State of Tennessee, and this non-discrimination statement is intended to be consistent

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with those laws and regulations. In accordance with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, The University of Tennessee affirmatively states that it does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, or disability in its education programs and activities, and this policy extends to employment by the University.

Inquiries and charges of violation of Title VI (race, color, national origin), Title IX (sex), Section 504 (disability), ADA (disability), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (age), sexual orientation, or veteran status should be directed to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), 910 Madison Avenue, Suite 826, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, telephone 901-448-7382 (V/TTY available). Requests for accommodation of a disability should be directed to the ADA Coordinator at the Office of Equity and Diversity.


REMEMBERING BA R R E T T G . H A I K , M D, FAC S Early Years Barrett George Haik grew up in a medical family in New Orleans, where his ophthalmologist father taught him about medicine from the earliest years. He was also taught by the world’s finest eye surgeons, including famed eye cancer pioneer, Robert M. Ellsworth, MD. “My dad was a wonderful role model,” Dr. Haik said. “He and my mentors believed strongly in the importance of ongoing education to maintain the highest level of surgical expertise and ethical standards, feeling that one of the greatest privileges in life was to be a surgeon, serving those entrusted to our care and preparing the next generation of surgeons to serve humanity.”

Vision Recruited in 1995 to chair the Ophthalmology Department at UTHSC, Dr. Haik was inspired by Ralph S. Hamilton, MD, who had sought since the 1960s to build a world-class eye center in Memphis. Through Dr. Haik’s visionary leadership and the support of university and community leaders, friends, and colleagues, Dr. Haik transformed a small office with four academic faculty members into the acclaimed Hamilton Eye Institute, a world-class eye center with more than 40 academic faculty members lauded among the top ten eye programs in the United States.

Health Care Helping people was Dr. Haik’s true passion. He often met people at the lowest time of their lives. He loathed grief and aspired to heal suffering. Those in his care were blessed to have a physician whose top concern was their well-being. Many patients drove great distances to see him, following wherever his career took him. He inspired hope, and they trusted his guidance. In addition to founding the Hamilton Eye Institute, Dr. Haik built the ophthalmic oncology service at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, making huge strides in the fight against retinoblastoma. Due in part to his research and outreach efforts, the death rate for childhood eye cancer has dropped from 90% to less than 10% in many developing countries.

Mentorship Dr. Haik was a consummate mentor. He conveyed not only medical knowledge and surgical technique, but exhibited the best qualities of humanity: empathy, kindness, modesty, respect and sincerity. Many under his instruction saw him as an archetype for the kind of doctor they wished to be.

Legacy Dr. Haik was many things: doctor, mentor, researcher, leader, steward of philanthropy, visionary, father, brother, son, friend, and so much more – and in all of these, he gave the best of himself. He always reminded those who praised his accomplishments that his successes were not his alone, but the product of a network of dear supporters and friends. The memory of his limitless spirit of warmth and kindness remain in our hearts forever. We honor Dr. Haik’s memory by carrying on his vision for the future: reaching out to underserved nations to share knowledge and resources for saving sight, discovering new treatments for disorders of the eye and visual system, educating the next generation of ophthalmologists, and providing every patient entrusted to us with the finest care possible.

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Dr. Barrett G. Haik Legacy of a Healer, Teacher & Visionary

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arrett George Haik, MD, FACS, Hamilton Professor of Ophthalmology, founder and director of the Hamilton Eye Institute, died Friday, July 22, 2016, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Haik was born into a family of ophthalmologists in New Orleans in 1951. The son of George M. Haik, MD, and Isabelle Saloom Haik, he graduated from Centenary College with a bachelor of science in biology and earned his medical degree and doctorate in anatomy from the Louisiana State University Medical School. After residency at New York’s Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Dr. Haik joined the faculty at Cornell University and the Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center. In 1986, he moved to Tulane University in New Orleans as a professor of Ophthalmology, and was made program director and medical director of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital. In 1991, Dr. Haik was named the George M. Haik, Sr., MD - St. Giles Foundation Professor of Pediatric and Adult Ophthalmic Oncology.

Top: Dr. Haik (far right) with some of his mentors at Cornell University

In 1995, Dr. Haik was recruited to be Chair of the University of Ten-

Middle: In 2005, the Hamiltons, Dr. Haik, and Dr. Pat Wall pull a rope to unveil the Hamilton Eye Institute’s signage, signifying completion of the institute’s construction

Barrett Haik in 1959, age 8

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Bottom: Dr. Haik with children in the Republic of Panama who were excited to have their strabismus (crossed or “lazy” eyes) repaired


nessee Health Science Center Department of Ophthalmology, where he transformed a small office with four academic faculty members into the world-class Hamilton Eye Institute, home to more than 40 academic faculty members and ranked among the top ten eye clinics in the nation. After 17 years as chairman, Dr. Haik took on the role of director of the Hamilton Eye Institute. A prolific fundraiser, Dr. Haik raised more than $100 million dollars for the Hamilton Eye Institute and its programs. Dr. Haik’s love of ophthalmology and dedication to healing was evident in his loyal, selfless service to organized medicine. He was past president of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, the American Eye Study Club, and the American Society of Ophthalmic Ultrasound; a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American College of Surgeons (for which he also served nearly a decade on the Board of Regents), and the New York Academy of Medicine; and a member of the American Ophthalmological Society. Dr. Haik specialized in ocular oncology, oculoplastics, and orbital disease, and he was internationally renowned as an expert in the diagnosis and management of ophthalmic tumors, receiving numerous grants for his research. He served on the National Advisory Eye Council and the National Eye Institute Advisory Council for the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Haik gave hundreds of presentations in both national and international forums. He received a Healthcare Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award from the Memphis Business Journal and a Life Achievement Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Dr. Haik also touched countless lives through his efforts to improve health care in underserved nations throughout the world. He traveled to Panama frequently for medical missions and gave lectures across the globe teaching physicians how to identify and treat pediatric ocular cancers. He made tremendous strides in the fight against retinoblastoma, an eye cancer that in developing nations once took the lives of 90% of children afflicted with it. Through Dr. Haik’s initiatives to establish centers of excellence throughout the developing world, that mortality rate is now under 10% in many countries. When not caring for patients or teaching others, Dr. Haik enjoyed the company of his friends and family, fishing at the family’s camp in Venice, Louisiana, and spending time with his bloodhound, Maddie. Services were held in New Orleans on July 24. An event celebrating his life and accomplishments was held at the Hamilton Eye Institute on August 12, where many of his dearest friends, colleagues and family shared their thoughts and memories on his life and legacy. (See next page.)

Dr. Haik’s true passion was helping people. He personally saved the sight or lives of thousands of people, and exponentially more through research, international outreach, and his mentorship of young eye surgeons. He cultivated meaningful, lasting friendships and promoted the careers of countless ophthalmologists and medical leaders during his lifetime. Dr. Haik inspired the careers of innumerable medical students, residents, fellows and junior faculty, and gave many leaders in medicine and ophthalmology his loyal mentorship and support. Associate Professor of Ophthalmology Jorge I. Calzada, MD, is one of the multitude mentored by Dr. Haik. “Through people like me,” he said, “Think about this — thousands and thousands of patients that I’ve seen — he’s impacted an exponential number of people out there ... He will be irreplaceable.”

Dr. Haik at Tulane University in the early 1990s visits with some of his young patients on the playground

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Haik Memorial at HEI On August 12, more than 150 of Dr. Barrett Haik’s dear friends, colleagues, grateful patients and family gathered in the lobby of the Hamilton Eye Institute for a memorial service (see photo above). Many shared their most cherished memories of Dr. Haik and honored him by raising a ceremonial goblet, toasting his life and legacy. Speakers included: 1. Philip M. Lewis Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology James C. Fleming, MD, FACS, 2. 930 Friends board member R. Brad Martin, 3. Dr. Haik’s cousin, George Ellis, MD, Director of Ophthalmology at the Children’s Hospital of New Orleans, 4. Ayers Foundation President Janet Ayers, 5. HEI Plough Foundation Professor Ed Chaum, MD, PhD, 6. HEI Hiatt Professor of Ophthalmology Natalie C. Kerr, MD, FACS, 7. grateful patient, Sarah Leger, 8. UTHSC Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operations Officer, Kennard Brown, JD, MPA, PhD, FACHE, 9. grateful patient Sheila Farmer and husband, 10. 930 Friends board chairman George Cates, 11. HEI supporter and FedEx CIO Rob Carter, 12. Associate Professor of Ophthalmology Jorge I. Calzada, MD, and 13. Associate Vice Chancellor for Development and Alumni Affairs Bethany Goolsby, JD.

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J. Thomas Ford, executive director of Panama’s Niños Sanos, Niños Felices program, presented ceremonial resolutions from the Republic of Panama in Dr. Haik’s honor to his longtime companion, Blanca Phillips (14) and Dr. Haik’s children, Claire and Barrett (15).

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Dr. Steve Charles, Department Chair Dr. James C. Fleming, and Dr. Aaron N. Waite at the newly renamed Dr. Barrett G. Haik Eye Surgery Center with the extraordinary support of the HEI Surgery Center Board Members

Dedications in His Honor Dr. Haik’s impact was felt in so many ways and in so many places. It therefore comes as no surprise that many organizations and individuals wish to honor his memory in very lasting ways. The following are just a few of the many ways in which his lasting legacy has been commemorated. The Hamilton Eye Institute’s Surgery Center received a new name and signage on December 12. Now doing business as the Dr. Barrett G. Haik Eye Surgery Center, it stands as a testament to the remarkable impact that Dr. Haik made on patients’ lives every day. The Kiwanis of Panama renamed their annual cataract surgery mission the Dr. Barrett G. Haik, MD, Cataracthon, in honor of his steadfast support and participation in the program, and the lasting impact his work has had in Panama and throughout Latin America. Additionally, friends of Dr. Haik had a ring of trees planted in Israel in his name.

Top: The plaque commemorating the Panama Cataracthon being renamed in honor of Dr. Haik Bottom: A plaque signifying that a ring of trees was planted in Israel in memory of Dr. Haik

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Dr. Haik in Publications and News Since joining the Department of Ophthalmology in 1995, Dr. Haik’s successes as a leader and physician frequently attracted the attention of the media. He was also a highly prolific clinician-scientist, having authored more than 160 peer-reviewed journal articles, 55 book chapters, and four books. The clippings shown here are the tip of an enormous iceberg. Dr. Haik and the Hamilton Eye Institute have appeared in People magazine, the Today show, CNN, USA Today, and many more major news outlets throughout the nation and world.


The Story of One, The Gratitude of All At the age of 6 months, Sarah Leger developed bilateral retinoblastoma — cancer in both eyes. This terrifying life- and sight-threatening diagnosis led her parents to Dr. Barrett G. Haik, who showed the Legers remarkable compassion and kindness. Over the next several months, Sarah received 23 radiation treatments that eradicated her cancer. While legally blind, she has 20/400 field of vision in her left eye, and 20/200 vision in her right eye with corrective lenses. Now age 29, she plays the piano, sews, knits, writes poetry, sings and draws. (She created the background of this page.) Sarah said, “Dr. Haik is not just my doctor, he’s my pen pal. I have always looked up to him. He is my inspiration. He has always told me that I will make a difference in the world, and I will do my best to live up to his expectations.” Sarah is a donor to the Hamilton Eye Institute, and has encouraged members of her family to give as well, “because of what I went through when I was little, and to help other kids out.” In a 2007 interview*, Sarah’s mother, Velma, said,

“We are thankful to the Hamilton Eye Institute for all the wonderful things they do. We hold Dr. Haik dearly in our hearts, for with the help of God, he saved our daughter’s life.” In the same interview, Dr. Haik said, “Sarah is extremely intelligent and incredibly gifted in the visual arts, music, and as a poet. I keep her photograph on my desk and a book of her drawings and poetry on my bookshelf to provide personal inspiration in our team’s efforts to fight eye cancer. Sarah and her parents give tremendous hope to all facing great challenges in life. For every obstacle encountered, she found a special strength to improve the lives of all around her.” Sarah aspires to teach children at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, paying Dr. Haik’s kindness forward by dedicating herself to heping children with cancer, as he helped her. And Sarah is just one of thousands whose life or sight Dr. Haik saved. These people represent a wonderful legacy, each of them forever grateful for Dr. Haik’s kindness, compassion and expert care.

Left: The white reflection in baby Sarah’s pupils was the camera flash bouncing off her tumors Middle: Young Sarah visiting Dr. Haik at Tulane in the 1990s for follow-up care Right: Sarah visiting Dr. Haik at the Hamilton Eye Institute more than 20 years later Above: Dr. Haik kept this note written by Sarah more than two decades ago

* “Pay It Forward,” Medicine, Summer 2007, page 39. Accessed November 3, 2016, https://goo.gl/v79Lok.

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HEI Offers Newest Technology in Cornea Treatment The Hamilton Eye Institute has acquired a cuttingedge new medical technology for treatment of progressive corneal ectatic disorders such as keratoconus. Just a few months ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first corneal cross-linking system in the country, the Avedro KXL, which strengthens the chemical bonds between collagen fibrils in the cornea. This treatment halts corneal thinning and abnormal curvature of the cornea including keratoconus, a disorder that occurs when the normally round cornea (the clear front of the eye) becomes thin and abnormally cone-shaped. This irregular shape prevents light entering the eye from being focused correctly on the retina, causing vision distortion. Prior to this technology, the only solution for many patients has been corneal grafts or transplants, but because collagen cross-linking halts progression of keratoconus, the need for corneal transplantation is eliminated. “In the United States, we have been anxiously awaiting the FDA approval of collagen cross-linking that occurred earlier this year,” said HEI Director of Cornea, Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Aaron N. Waite, MD. “This technology will revolutionize how we treat keratoconus.” The science behind this treatment has been developing for nearly twenty years. Corneal ectasia has long been known to progress more rapidly in younger patients, and is more likely to slow or stabilize in middle-aged and older patients. It was also noticed that in older patients, collagen fibrils in the cornea form stronger chemical bonds with adjacent fibrils than in younger patients. This led to the theory that corneal ectasia could be stabilized by finding

Before treatment, fewer collagen cross-links

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Dr. Waite performs corneal cross-linking on a patient with keratoconus

a way to strengthen these collagen cross-linking bonds. German scientists discovered just such a process using a riboflavin ophthalmic solution and ultraviolet radiation to activate the enzymatic reaction necessary for cross-linking of collagen fibrils. In 2003, the first human trial of this technology, 22 patients with rapidly advancing keratoconus were treated with corneal cross-linking. Results showed that progression of the disorder was halted in all patients, and 15 eyes had a slight improvement in visual acuity. After years of testing, the method has improved, and is finally available as a remarkable new treatment to save the vision of patients with keratoconus.

After treatment, more collagen cross-links


(From left) Dr. William N. Williford, Gloria Williford, Drs. Matthew W. Wilson, Mary Ellen Hoehn, Allen D. Beck, Elliott M. Kanner, Shiva N. Bohn, and James C. Fleming

Williford Distinguished Visiting Professor October 6, we proudly welcomed Allen D. Beck, MD, as the 19th Annual William N. Williford, MD, Distinguished Visiting Professor. A very highly regarded glaucoma surgeon, Dr. Beck is Interim Chair, Director, and William and Clara Redmond Professor of Ophthalmology at the Emory Eye Center, Emory University School of Medicine, in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Beck lectured on glaucoma following congenital cataract surgery for our faculty and residents. He also presented several lectures for our residents the following morning. Many of our faculty attended and found the lectures tremendously insightful and informative. The Williford Lecture is named for anterior segment and cataract surgeon William N. Williford, MD, a 1975 graduate of our residency program who established this endowed lectureship in 1997. Department Chair James C. Fleming, MD, FACS, and all of our faculty and residents are grateful to both Drs. Williford and Beck for making the 19th Williford Lecture such a wonderful success.

Dr. Beck presents the Williford Lecture

Dr. Nawajes Mandal Joins Research Faculty

Nawajes Mandal, PhD

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology Nawajes Mandal, PhD, is a seasoned researcher who joined our faculty this fall. He is currently studying an important group of molecules called sphingolipids. The metabolism and signaling pathways of these molecules are common factors for many diseases involving neurodegeneration in the retina, corneal wound healing and fibrosis, inflammatory processes, and many systemic diseases. Dr. Mandal earned his doctorate in biochemistry at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute in New Delhi, where he developed expertise in lipid gene cloning. He then worked in the corporate sector for two years as a bioinformatics quality control scientist performing pathway analysis on mammalian molecular biology. In 2002, Dr. Mandal traveled to the United States to begin his postdoctoral training in the molecular genetics of inherited retinal and macular degeneration at the Kellogg Eye Center at the University of Michigan. He then joined the research faculty at Dean McGee Eye Institute of University of Oklahoma, where he rose through the ranks from instructor to associate professor while working on retinal degeneration research, sphingolipid metabolism, and the development of augmentative therapy for age-related macular degeneration using various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compounds. We warmly welcome Dr. Mandal to the Hamilton Eye Institute.

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42nd Annual Alumni/Residents’ Day Celebrating the graduation of our senior residents and instructors, and featuring the

26th Annual Kambara Distinguished Visiting Professor, K. Bailey Freund, MD May 20, 2016, marked the Hamilton Eye Institute’s 45th Annual Alumni/Residents’ Day. This program provides a forum for our residents to present clinical cases and research projects, and our faculty to present clinical and basic science research, as well as updates on current practice. We were privileged to welcome the 26th Kambara Professor, K. Bailey Freund, MD, retina specialist at Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, and clinical professor of Ophthalmology at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Freund delivered an outstanding lecture on the topic of “The Pachychoroid Spectrum.” Lecturing UTHSC faculty members included Vanessa M. MoralesTirado, MS, PhD, assistant professor of Ophthalmology, and Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry; Jorge I. Calzada, MD, associate

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professor of Ophthalmology; and Rajashekhar Gangaraju, PhD, assistant professor of Ophthalmology, and Anatomy and Neurobiology. Dr. Calzada also assigned the cases to be presented by our residents. The event was directed by Hiatt Profes-

sor of Ophthalmology and HEI Residency Program Director Natalie C. Kerr, MD, FACS, and organized by associate professor and HEI Special Events Director Mary Ellen Hoehn, MD.

Top: (from left) Drs. Steve Charles, Natalie C. Kerr, K. Bailey Freund, Jorge Calzada, and James C. Fleming at Dr. Freund’s award presentation, which followed his outstanding lecture Bottom: Ophthalmologists, vision scientists and other medical professionals packed the Freeman Auditorium to participate in the 45th Annual Kambara Lecture


Alumni/Residents’ Day culminates with a celebration of our graduates. Mentors presented certificates to those completing their subspecialty fellowships, while Dr. Kerr conferred diplomas to residents matriculating to the next phase of their medical careers. Outstanding teachers were awarded by the residents, as well: Dr. Aaron Waite received the Philip M.

Lewis teaching award and Dr. Andreea Partal received the Roger L. Hiatt teaching award. The Department of Ophthalmology also awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award to Dr. James C. Hart, Jr., and the Distinguished Service Award to Tracy Speake, Alison Long, and the students of Germantown High School TV.

(From left) Drs. Adam AufderHeide, Kourtney Houser, Shilpa Reddy, Stephen Huddleston, Rebecca S. Epstein, Jordan S. Masters, James Chelnis, Juliet Kim, Andrew Meador, Natalie C. Kerr, Hank Wynn, Cody Richardson, Rocio I. Diaz Sanjur, Brian T. Fowler, Benjamin King, Sarah Duhon, Devin West, and Elizabeth Rosenberger gather for a class photo following the graduation dinner

Left: (from left) Alison Long, Dr. James C. Fleming, and Tracy Speake; Middle: Dr. James Chelnis; Right: Dr. Fleming, Dr. James Hart, and Anne Fleming

Left: (from left) Drs. Stephen Huddleston, Steve Charles and Adam AufderHeide; Right: Drs. Kourtney Houser, Shilpa Reddy, Aaron Waite, Rebecca Epstein, and Jordan Masters

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Incoming Fellows

Ocular Oncology

Anita Barikian, MD

Vitreoretinal Surgery Nicholas Marchase, MD

Pediatric Ophthalmology Ayman O. Suleiman, MD

Oculoplastic Surgery Tara Goecks, MD

American University of Beirut, Lebanon

Nassau University Medical Center, New York

Medical University of Varna, Bulgaria

Storm Eye Institute, Medical University of South Carolina

Incoming Residents Clockwise from top left: Claire Kiernan, MD Rush University Medical Center College of Medicine

Cale Hildebrand, MD East Tennessee State University College of Medicine

Josh Little, MD The University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine

Whitney Potter, MD University of Oklahoma College of Medicine

Matthew Hartman, MD Loma Linda University College of Medicine

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Building the Future, Honoring the Past Ralph & Barbara Hamilton Establish the Barrett G. Haik Endowed Chair Endowed chairs are vital to attracting faculty The lifelong dream of Ralph S. Hamilton, MD, who are at the top of their profession. The Hamwas to build an eye institute in Memphis. Never iltons’ generous endowment will contribute sigwavering, his faith in that dream ultimately innificantly to HEI’s ongoing spired Barrett G. Haik, MD, reputation for excellence FACS, whose unparalleled This endowment will carry and will promote its conleadership made it a reality. on Dr. Haik’s vision, his tinued growth, innovation Dr. Hamilton and his commitment to outstanding and success. wife, Barbara, both devoted progress and productivity in Dr. Hamilton’s 70-year philanthropists and humaniresearch and teaching, and to career in ophthalmology tarians who have generously providing the highest echelon began at age 15, when he contributed millions toward of service to the university, would assist his father the Hamilton Eye Institute’s community and world. by shining a light into the construction and ongoing eyes of his cataract surgery development, are funding patients. After earning his medical degree from the Barrett G. Haik Endowed Chair for OphthalUTHSC at the remarkable age of 23, he had his mology in loving memory of Dr. Haik.

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fellowship and residency at Wills Eye Hospital, the nation’s first dedicated eye institute. There, Dr. Hamilton realized what a huge advantage it was to have a center dedicated to the preservation and restoration of sight at all levels: vision research, medical education and patient care. When he returned to UTHSC in 1959, he saw the potential for creating such a center in Memphis and undertook a quest to fulfill that vision. In 1995, Dr. Hamilton was instrumental in the recruitment of Dr. Haik to chair the UTHSC Department of Ophthalmology. He saw in Dr. Haik not only an extraordinary leader, but also a kindred spirit who shared his unswerving dedication and sincere care for his patients. Through Dr. Haik’s tireless efforts and steadfast direction, within a decade he founded both the UT Hamilton Eye Institute and the Ocular Oncology Service at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He made tremendous strides in the worldwide fight against pediatric

Top: Dr. Haik (middle row, first from right, under white arrow) at St. Jude with its boards of directors, governors and national committee members in 2002 Middle: Dr. Haik presents awards to the Hamiltons in 2003 Bottom left: Dr. Hamilton Bottom right: Drs. Haik and Hamilton in 2002

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eye cancer, nurtured young ophthalmologists into becoming compassionate caregivers, and evoked tremendous gratitude and loyalty from countless patients whose sight and lives he saved. In Dr. Hamilton’s words, Dr. Haik’s impact was “beyond anything we could have imagined.” A warm-hearted, soft-spoken man, caring for others was Dr. Haik’s mission in life. He found dignity and worth in every person, and he left a legacy for his students, colleagues, and patients

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to live by his example: to treat all with kindness, warmth, and respect, and to believe that any vision can be achieved. The Hamiltons establish this endowed chair to support an exemplary faculty member who will carry on the spirit of Dr. Haik’s vision and commitment to outstanding progress and productivity in research and teaching, and to providing the highest echelon of service to the university, community and world.


Eye on Panama H

EI faculty recently visited the Republic of Panama for Niños Sanos, Niños Felices (Healthy Children, Happy Children), a program of the Fundación Pro-Integración led by Virginia Alvarado, executive directors Soraya Bhiku and J. Thomas Ford, and board trustees. Children and their families from underserved areas of Panama are prescreened, then brought to El Vigia Hospital in the village of Chitré for free corrective surgeries for crossed eyes (strabismus) and drooping eyelids (ptosis). Participating in this event were HEI Director, Chair and Philip M. Lewis Professor of Ophthalmology James C. Fleming, MD, FACS, oculoplastic surgery instructor Tara Goecks, MD, and third-year resident Andrew Meador, MD. Esteemed Panama ophthalmologists Jorge Arrue, MD, Felix Ruiz, MD, and Ernesto A. Calvo, MD, were among many who provided excellent leadership and interchange of knowledge and skill. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, scrub technicians, nurses and many others also participated. We are pleased to report that 100 cases of strabismus and 62 cases of ptosis were treated, and several young surgeons were afforded the opportunity to learn important surgical skills for treating these conditions. Our thanks to all who helped make this event such a success.

Vision f r Ethiopia

Soraya Bhiku, Drs. Fleming, and Meador with grateful children recovering from eye surgery

(From left) Dr. Calvo, Dr. Goecks, Tom Ford, and Dr. Meador at a pre-meeting before surgery day

The new center will be academically oriented, providing ophthalmology training for Ethiopian physicians, as well as clinical and surgical services. With a population of nearly 100 million, Ethiopia has only about 100 ophthalmologists — that’s one eye doctor for every one million citizens. About 1.6 million Ethiopians are blind, and 2.5 million have debilitating low vision from preventable or treatable causes. Thus, the “One of my first impressions,” Dr. Lawrence said, “was arriving at the clinic and seeing need for eye care and physician training is thousands of patients who had camped out the night before, lined up as far as the eye can critical. While working to establish the new see. Many... had traveled for days - sometimes by stretcher - to reach our camp.” center, Dr. Lawrence is currently helping cott Lawrence, MD, who completed his ophthalmology as many Ethiopians as he can with clinical and surgical services residency at HEI in 2009, has joined our faculty as an aswhile training Ethiopian doctors. sociate professor of Ophthalmology. Dr. Lawrence is laying the These efforts are supported by the World Cataract Foundagroundwork for establishing the Discover Eye Institute, a new tion and the Hamilton Eye Institute, whose greatest strides are international Center of Excellence in Addis Ababa, the capital of made through the generosity of individual donors and foundaEthiopia, where he moved with his family in August 2015. tions for whose support we are deeply grateful.

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Eye Care Soars in China

Dr. Charles performs retinal surgery with an operating microscope

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ver the past 15 years, the Hamilton Eye Institute has partnered with Orbis International on innumerable outreach missions. Founded in 1982, Orbis runs the world’s only mobile ophthalmic teaching hospital, which flies to locations

around the world, provides its services while parked at its destination, and leaves a sustainable eye-care legacy in its wake. In the 1980s, Orbis used a converted Douglas DC-8. In 1992, they purchased a DC-10, which was retired this year after more than two decades of use. The Flying Eye Hospital now enters its third generation with a Boeing MD-10. September 17-23, HEI Clinical professor of Ophthalmology Steve Charles, MD, FACS, FICS, attended the inaugural mission of the new Orbis MD-10 Flying Eye Hospital in Shenyang, China. There, he held a symposium on “Surgical Retina,” performed screenings and surgeries for patients in need, and taught retinal surgery techniques to local eye doctors and medical personnel. Dr. Charles also donated one of the seats in the plane’s cockpit. A plaque on the back of the seat reads, “Steve Charles, vitreoretinal surgeon, engineer and jet pilot donated this seat to honor Al Ueltschi, Oliver Foot, Jack McHale, FedEx and Alcon.”

Saving Sight in Guatemala

F

or one week each year, specialists from the Hamilton Eye Institute and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital travel to Guatemala City to provide care to underserved children. This year, more than 80 cases of pediatric strabismus and ptosis were surgically corrected. In addition to providing a tremendous educational opportunity for residents from Guatemala and HEI, it also dramatically improves the quality of children’s lives. The HEI team included Drs. Natalie C. Kerr, Brian T. Fowler and Ralph F. Hamilton, orthoptist Ebony Murchison, and technician Lori Rikard. HEI Surgery Center participants included nursing director Eric Pilkington and technician Sharon Tatum. Representing Le Bonheur were anesthesiologist Dr. Liliana Perieras, HEI alumnus Dr. Emily Taylor Graves, and OR technician Stephanie Lenn. “There are so many wonderful people that make this mission work,” said Dr. Fowler. “We are there for one week a year, but the local doctors, nurses and staff of the mission hospital work there all year long, making much less than they would in other careers,

because they believe in service to others who are hurting and in need in their community.” We wish to thank the Shalom Foundation and its founder, Steve Moore; Dr. Ligia Figueroa and the Moore Pediatric Surgery Center team in Guatemala City; the Hamilton family and Dr. Fowler with one of his patients the Mid-South Lions, who provided invaluable support; Alcon, Ethicon, Biogel, Beaver-Visitec International, MAP International, Johnson & Johnson, and Poriferous, who donated medical supplies; and all other sponsors, donors and volunteers.

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Bradshaw Family Supports Uveal Melanoma Research In 2002, at the age of 38, business and civic leader Charles A. Bradshaw of Montgomery, Alabama, was diagnosed with uveal melanoma, a cancer affecting pigment cells in the eye. Seeking the best care possible, he came to Memphis, where he received expert care from Professor of Ophthalmology and St. Jude Chair of Pediatric Ophthalmology Matthew W. Wilson, MD, FACS, who used radioactive plaque brachytherapy to destroy the cancerous tissue in his eye. “My husband developed great respect and friendship with Dr. Wilson over the years,” said Charles’s wife, Katie. “He is an outstanding doctor and caregiver!” For the next ten years, Mr. Bradshaw was monitored closely both by his local oncologist and Dr. Wilson. In 2012, it was found that the melanoma had metastasized to his liver. Following a 10-month battle, he passed away at age 49. When his battle with cancer ended, however, the Bradshaws weren’t ready to stop fighting. Over the years, they had learned about the important research being done with these eye cancers and their treatments here at the Hamilton Eye Institute, which under the chairmanship of Hamilton Professor of Ophthalmology Barrett G. Haik, MD, FACS, had attained rapid growth and global notoriety. Under the direction of Dr. Wilson, HEI’s Ophthalmic Oncology Service developed the Translational Ocular Oncology Program, through which he and Assistant Professor of

Austin Bradshaw (center) with a few of the golfers who participated in the memorial golf afternoon

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H A M I LT O N E Y E I N S T I T U T E

The brown spot on the iris above is one example of uveal melanoma, though its appearance can vary widely

Ophthalmology Vanessa Morales-Tirado, MS, PhD, lead clinical and research efforts to generate new technology and novel therapeutics against uveal melanoma. Work from Drs. Wilson and Morales-Tirado has gained international notice, building strong collaborations with multiple centers across the United States and Europe. There are no treatments for metastasis. Dr. MoralesTirado is dedicated to training medical students, residents and graduate students in research focused on how we can modify our immune systems to fight uveal melanoma. “Her research sounds VERY promising and we want to be a part of these forward steps!” said Mrs. Bradshaw.


Austin Bradshaw, who was a toddler when his father’s eye cancer was initially discovered, is now a junior at Montgomery Academy. After his father’s death, Austin had an idea. “Throughout my life,” said Austin, “I have constantly played and watched the game my Dad loved most: golf.” So, to honor his father and help raise money for eye cancer research, Austin held a memorial golf afternoon in his memory on October 26 at Montgomery Country Club. More than 80 golfers joined Austin for this wonderful event, and even more donated money to this worthwhile cause, raising more than $10,000 for ocular oncology research at the Hamilton Eye Institute. On December 9, Austin was presented an award for this accomplishment at a dinner honoring the memory of his father. “We will keep fighting,” said Mrs. Bradshaw. “We are committed to making a difference in the lives of others who are hurting and suffering from this deadly disease.” At HEI we are committed to move our findings into clinical applications. There are several ways for patients, fam-

ilies and others to support our ocular oncology research, including tissue donations to our HEI Tissue Repository, a priceless resource for us to learn about the disease, or by donating to the UT Ocular Oncology Research Fund. For more information, please contact (901) 448-4974 or giving@uthsc.edu.

Drs. Vanessa M. Morales-Tirado and Matthew W. Wilson; Austin, Katie and Beverly Bradshaw; Dr. James C. Fleming and Mrs. Anne Fleming at the dinner honoring the Bradshaw family

HEI Represented at Annual AAO and ASOPRS Meetings In October, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) each held annual meetings in Chicago, and HEI faculty were on hand to participate. At AAO, Clinical Professor Steve Charles, MD, FACS, FICS, presented two lectures at the Retina Subspecialty

Dr. Benjamin King presents his poster at AAO

Day and taught a course on macular surgery techniques. Professor and St. Jude Chair of Pediatric Ophthalmology Matthew W. Wilson, MD, FACS, presented a lecture at the Ocular Oncology Subspecialty Day. He also moderated a roundtable discussion on pediatric eye cancer along with HEI Associate Professor Mary Ellen Hoehn, MD. Dr. Hoehn presented a scientific poster at the meeting, as did third-year resident Benjamin King, MD, whose co-authors included Dr. Wilson and Assistant Professor Vanessa M. Morales-Tirado, MS, PhD. At ASOPRS, two posters and a video were presented by Director and Chair James C. Fleming, MD, FACS, Assistant Professor Brian T. Fowler, MD, and recent HEI oculoplastics fellowship graduate James Chelnis, MD. The annual HEI Alumni Reception was also held at the AAO meeting and was attended by many of our department’s outstanding residency and fellowship graduates. It was a pleasure to see so many dear friends and colleagues.

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FA C U LT Y

Barrett G. Haik, MD, FACS (Founder)

James C. Fleming, MD, FACS (Director & Chair)

Ralph S. Hamilton, MD (Emeritus)

Richard D. Drewry, Jr., MD, FACS (Emeritus)

Roger L. Hiatt, MD (Emeritus)

Edward Chaum, MD, PhD

Dianna A. Johnson, PhD (Emeritus)

Natalie C. Kerr, MD, FACS

Steve Charles, MD, FACS, FICS

Monica M. Jablonski, PhD, FARVO

Matthew W. Wilson, MD, FACS

Jorge I. Calzada, MD

Mary Ellen Hoehn, MD

William R. Morris, MD

Thomas J. O’Donnell, MD

Shiva A. Bohn, MD

Brian T. Fowler, MD

Aaron N. Waite, MD

Kathryn W. Byrd, MD

Lauren C. Ditta, MD

Rajashekhar Gangaraju, PhD

Vanessa M. MoralesTirado, MS, PhD

Nawajes Mandal, PhD

Andreea E. Partal, MD

Kathryn L. Patterson, MD

Ivan Marais, MD

Jesse M. Wesberry, MD, FACS

Elliott M. Kanner, MD, PhD

For more information about our faculty, please visit uthsc.edu/eye/faculty

John M. Freeman, MD

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Stephen Huddleston, MD

Robert C. Binkley, OD

H A M I LT O N E Y E I N S T I T U T E


CLINICAL & AFFILIATED

JOINT-APPOINTED

PROFESSORS Jerre M. Freeman, MD Thomas C. Gettelfinger, MD Audrey W. Tuberville, MD Thomas O. Wood, MD

PROFESSORS Michael A. Dyer, MD Eniko Pivnick, MD Anton J. Reiner, PhD C. Ryan Yates, PhD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Howard L. Beale, MD Andrew Lawton, MD Richard E. Sievers, MD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Erno Lindner, PhD, DSc Asim F. Choudhri, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Kathryn W. Byrd, MD Thomas A. Currey, MD James Freeman, MD Lawrence W. Gordon, MD Henry T. Grizzard, MD Ralph F. Hamilton, MD James C. Hart, MD, MPH J. Charles Henry, MD Faramarz (Fred) Hidaji, MD Tawan (Sunny) Khamapirad, MD Sidney Kriger, MD Melvin Litch, MD Gary Passons, MD William Bradford Priester, MD Alan R. Schaeffer, MD INSTRUCTORS Robert C. Binkley, OD Stephen Huddleston, MD Alan E. Oester, Jr., MD Steven Sterling, MD OPERATIONS Melissa Scurlock, MBA (Clinical Administrator) Monique Dailey, MA (Director)

VISITING CLINICAL PROFESSORS Spencer Thornton, MD Ralph Wesley, MD ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Ernesto A. Calvo L., MD David J. Harris, Jr., MD, FACS Scott D. Lawrence, MD Peter A.D. Rubin, MD, FACS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Robert S. Dotson, Jr., MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Rachel C. Brennan, MD

FELLOWS OCULAR ONCOLOGY Anita Barikian, MD OCULOPLASTIC SURGERY Tara Goecks, MD PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY Ayman O. Suleiman, MD VITREORETINAL SURGERY Michael Hood, MD Nicholas Marchase, MD

RESIDENTS

PHYSICIANS AT HEI BY OPHTHALMIC SUBSPECIALTY OPHTHALMIC ONCOLOGY, ORBITAL DISEASE, OCULOPLASTICS James C. Fleming, MD, FACS (Director & Chair) Matthew W. Wilson, MD, FACS Brian T. Fowler, MD COMPREHENSIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY William R. Morris, MD Jesse M. Wesberry, MD, FACS CORNEA, EXTERNAL DISEASE, CATARACT & REFRACTIVE SURGERY Aaron N. Waite, MD GLAUCOMA Elliott M. Kanner, MD, PhD NEURO-OPHTHALMOLOGY Thomas J. O’Donnell, MD Lauren C. Ditta, MD PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY Natalie C. Kerr, MD, FACS Mary Ellen Hoehn, MD Shiva Bohn, MD Lauren C. Ditta, MD RETINAL DISEASES Edward Chaum, MD, PhD Jorge I. Calzada, MD

THIRD YEAR Juliet Kim, MD Benjamin King, MD Andrew Meador, MD Emily Prouet, MD Hank Wynn, MD

LOW VISION REHABILITATION Thomas J. O’Donnell, MD Orli M. Weisser-Pike, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV

SECOND YEAR Rocio I. Diaz Sanjur, MD Sarah Queck, MD Cody Richardson, MD Elizabeth Rosenberger, MD Devin West, MD

ORTHOPTICS Chantel Devould, CO, COA Ebony Murchison

OPTOMETRY Robert C. Binkley, OD

FIRST YEAR Claire Kiernan, MD Cale Hildebrand, MD Josh Little, MD Matthew Hartman, MD Whitney Potter, MD

INSTRUCTORS Michael S. Galloway, MD Alan E. Oester, Jr., MD Steven Sterling, MD

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930 Madison Avenue, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38163

Locations

Events Calendar

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center Hamilton Eye Institute

UTHEI/Southern College of Optometry Joint Meeting Friday, April 7, 2017 — Noon-5:00 p.m. at SCO

Adult Specialty Clinic, Suite 200 Pediatric Clinic & Orthoptics, Suite 400 Lions Low Vision Center, Suite 400 930 Madison Avenue Memphis, TN 38163 Ph: (901) 448-6650

Cordova Location 8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 101 Cordova, TN 38018 Ph: (901) 448-6650

HEI Ambulatory Surgery Center

John C. Montgomery, Sr., MD Distinguished Visiting Professor Guy M. Kezirian, MD, MBA, FACS, Refractive Surgeon President, SurgiVision® Consultants, Inc., and Founder, Refractive Surgery Alliance, Scottsdale, Arizona Wiliam “Billy” Cochran, OD, Distinguished Visiting Professor Nimesh Patel, OD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Optometry University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas For more information, please contact Jeanie Snider at jsnider@sco.edu.

Lions Leaders Weekend April 7-8, 2017

For further information, please visit www.midsouthlions.org.

Learn more about these and other events at uthsc.edu/eye/events.php

930 Madison Avenue, Suite 370 Memphis, TN 38163 Ph: (901) 448-3900 www.hamiltoneyesurgery.com

Clinical Research Ph: (901) 448-1201 Fax: (901) 448-1299

HEI is Instagram’s #1 eye institute! Thanks to research fellow Jason Jensen, MD, who posts there daily. We’re also on Facebook and Twitter!

uthsc.edu/eye

instagram.com/hamiltoneyeinstitute facebook.com/hamiltoneye twitter.com/hamiltoneye

Fall 2016 HEI Eyelights  
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