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A~nUAL PUBUfAT,Ofi Of THE

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The Flow Sheet

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COPYRIGHT, E. J. Chapin Editor

J. F. Price Jr. Associate Editor

Oliver Grant Business Manager

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FOREWORD Looking forward to a new and greater Texas College of Mines-looking backward to note how far down the road of progress we have comedrawing accurately a cross section of one year of the transition between the old and the new-pausing for a while to view as a whole the many activities of the school-in that list our aims in compiling the 1927 Flow Sheet receive full expresion.


DEDICATION To Professor W. H. Seamon

\

The able scholar, the inspiring teacher, the progressive educator, whose fine personality and whose deep devotion to the highest interests of the students and to the service of the College of Mines and Metallurgy have enshrined him in the hearts of all.

cd


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The Flow Sheet

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ORDER OF BOOKS Book

I Faculty and Administration

Book II

Classes

Book III Activities Book IV Football Book V Ads and Jokes

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,

FACULTY

AND

ADMINISTRATION

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/


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BOARD OF REGENTS OFFICERS H. J. Lutcher Stark, Chairman. S. L. Batts, Vice-Chairman.

C. D. Simmons, Secretary. REGENTS R. L. Batts, Austin.

::\-JarcellnsE. Foster, Houston. Robert L. Holliday, El Paso.

n..T. LUCHER STARK 01ln;nnan

Ed Howard, ~Wichita Falls. Sam Neathery, McKinney. Mrs, H. J. O'Hair, Coleman.

H .• J. Lutcher Stark, Orange. R. G. Storey, Dallas.

I

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The Flow Sheet

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DEAN .J. W. JUDD

B. S. Oklahoma Agricultmal E. E. Texas Agricultnral DEitN

AND

and Mechanical College, 1904. and l\1ec~alljcal College, 1909.

PROFESSOR OF' ENGINEERING

AND

MATHEIII.l1'lCS

.

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The Flow Sheet

WILLIAM HENRY SElUlON B. S.,

University of Virginia, 1881. Professor of Natural Science, Miller School, Virginia, 188288; Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy, Missouri School of Mines, 1888-95; President and Professor of Mining, New Meadco Scbool of Mines, 1895-98; Superintendent of Lead and Zinc Mine, Missouri, 1890-92; Head of Exploring Parties in Alaska, 1898-99; Manager of Copper Bell Mining and Smelting Co., Arizona. 1900 ..02 : Superintendent of Tin Mine in North Carolina, 1903; ConsuIting Chemist and Metallurgist, Chihuahua. Mexico, 190410; Mining lead and silver in Chihuahua, Mexico, 1911-12; Superintendent o-f Swansea Copper Smelting Co., Arizona, 1912; Superintendent of La Dura Mines. Sonora, 'Ie'"i:ico, 1913; Superintendent of Santa Rosalia Smelting Co., Mexico, 1915; Assistant Su,perintendent Magistral Smelting Co., Mexico, 1916; in niter exp lor'ations in West Texas. 1917; Superintendent of Richmond Basin Silver Mine. Arizona. 1918; Professor of Mining and Geology. College of Mines and Metallurgy, Univeroity) of Texas, 1918-.

FRANKLIN HUPP SEAMON E. M., Missouri School of Mines and Metallnrgy, 189l. Assistant Chemist, Laughlin & Junction Iron & Steel Company, Mingo Junction, Ohio, 1891-92; Chemist and Asaaver, Motolina Consolidated Mining Company. Zacatecas, Mexico, 1892; Chemist, Vacas Mining and Smelting Company, Vacas, Durango, Mexico, 189294; Chemist, Baradon y Cabras Mining Company. Guanaeevi, Mexico, 1894-95; Ore Purchasing Agent, La Gran Fundicion Nacional Mexicana, Mexico, Proprietor of The Seamon Assay Company. Mining Engineering and Analytical Chemistry, El Paso, Texas, 1898路 1915; Professor of Chemistry and Assaying, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1915-.

LLOYD A. NELSON E. M., Texas

Scbool of Mines, 1916. Engineering Department, Can .. anea Consolidated Copper Company, 1916-17 ; Engineer, Phelps Dodge Corporation, Tyrone, New Mexico, 1917-18; Engineering Department, U. S. Reclamation Service, 1918: Engineer, Chino Copper Company, Santa Rita, New Mexico, 1918-19; Adjunct Professor of Engineering and Mathernaics, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1920-.


The Flow Sheet

EM~lET ADDIS DRAKE A.

Wisconsin University, 1882. A. M., Wisconsin University, 18 7. Instructor, Wisconsin University, 1883-4; Instructor, Missouri School of Mines, 188591; Mining in Southwest Missouri, 1 91-7; Professor of Languages, New Mexico School of Mines, 1897-1913; President of the Faculty, New Mexico School of Mines, 1908-13; ss ociate Professor of English ~ ~ and Economics, College of Mines and Metallurgy, Univer. fily of Texas, 1919-.

JOHN FRASER

H. E. QUI N

GRAHAM

E. M. (Geology) University of Minnesota School of Mines. 1918. Geological Survey. Oliver Mining Co., Wisconsin, 1919 ..20; Instructor Geology. University of Lll'in ois , 1921-22; Post Graduate work, Department of Geology, University of Minnesota, 1924; Adjunct Professor, Mining and Geology. Co llege of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1924-.

B ..

B.

S..

E.

M.,

Michigan College of Mines, 1905. Michigan College of Mines, 1922. Engineeri ng Pos itions in W voming, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada, 1905-11; Professor of Mining and Metallurgy, New Mexico School of Mines, Socorro, New Mexico, 1911-14; Mine Operation and Construction in Georgia, Texas. New Mexico, Arizona, and Sonora, 1914-21; Professor of Mining and Metallurgy, Wisconsin Mining School, Platts ville, Wisconsin. 1921-25; Professor of Metallurgy, College Of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1925-.

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The Flow Sheet

GEORGE BLANTON POWELL B. A., Rice, '2l. Graduate wor-k, Texas University; Instructor Engineering and Mathematics; Athletic Director, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1924-1926.

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MARY GREENE KEJ~LY B. A., Wellesley

College, 1922. Graduate Work, Columbia University; Teacher, El Paso High School, 1923-25; Adjunct Professor of History, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University uf Texas, 1925-.

MRS. ANITA WHATLEY I~ORENZ B. A. University of Texas, 1925. High Schools of Waco and San Antonio, 1915-19; Supervisor of Modern Languages, State Department of Education, 1919-20; Assistant Professor . of Spanish, S. M. U., Dallas, 1920-24: Instructor of Modern Languages, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas, 1925-.

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BURT FRANKLIN JENNESS ]IL D .• Dartmouth Medical lege, 1899.

Col-

Graduate

of Naval Medical School. 1903. Service in Medical Corps. U. S. Navy, 12 years; Lieut. Commander, Medical Corps. U. S. N a vy. retired; Lecturer of Hy giene and Sanitation and Eirs t Aid, College of Mines and Metallurgy, University of Texas. 1918-.

RUTH M. AUGUR Registrar.

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MRS. WEBB Secretary

to

the

Dean.

IJUOY MITCHELL Librarian ..

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CLASSES

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Seniors

The Flow Sheet


.CI.EVB AI,EXANDER STOVER Bachelor of Science In M'i'ning Engineering Executive Committee, '22 to '25. Secretary Treasurer, Students' Association, '25 to '26. President, Senior Class, '26 to '27. Sigma Alpha Theta. Scientific Club, '22 to '27. Football, '22 to '26. Captain, Football, 1926.路 Power Plant Assistant, '26 to '27. Junior Associate, A. 1. M. E.


The Flow Sheet

U

I

JOHN FRED PRICE JR Bach-elm'

of Science

in Mining Engineering Secretary 'I'reasurer, Sophomore Class, '23 to '24. Rifle Club, '23 to '2--1,Rifle Team, '27. Scientific Club, '23 to '27. President, Asociaciou de Ingeuieria, '24, '26. J 01111 Wilson Scholarship, '24. Studeut Assistant in Cbemistry, '24. Student Assistant in Metallurgy, '26 to '~7. Vice-President, Senior Class, '26 to '27. Editor, The Prospector, '26 to '27. Associate Editor, The Flow Sheet, '27. Junior Associate, A. 1. M. K Engineer, A. S. & R. Co., '24 to '25.


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The Flow Sheet

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EDWARD J. CHAPIK Bachelor' of Science In Mining Engineering New Mexico School of Mines, '23 to '25. Texas College of Mines, '25 to '27. Scientific Club, President, '26, '27. Alpha Phi Omega, President, '26, '27. Editor, The Flow Sheet, '27. Secretary 'I'reasurer, Senior Class, '26, '27. Student Assistant in Chemistry, '26, '27. Junior Associate, A. T. M. E.

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The Flow Sheet

JORD LEEPER GAY Bachelor of Science In Mining Engineering Entered from the University of Texas, 1923. Business Manager, The Prospector, '24, '26. Editor, The Prospector, '25. Dormitory Committee, '24 to '25. Executive Committee, '26 to '27. Power House Assistant, '25 to '26. Scientific Club, '24 to '27. Junior Associate, A. T. M. E.


FCT...OE Tela '1', ('0 Bucheior

SOLACTON

of Science

1 n ~JI!finin 9 Eng-in eet'ing

Born in Santo Domingo, Ilocos Sur, Philippine Islands, January 18th, 1900, High School in the Philippines, 1921. University of Arizona, '21 to '25. Graduate, Senior R. O. 'f. C., Cavalry, 1925. Collegc of Mines and Metallurgy, EI Paso, 'I'ex, '25 to '27. Worked his way through College. Consolacion expects to serve his countrymen to the best of his ability.


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The Flow Sheet

JACK HOUK NELSON Bachelor of Science In Mining Enginem'ing Entered, '22. Football, '24, '25, '26. Basket Ball, '24, '26. Executive Committee, '24. Editor, The Prospector, '24. President, Students' Association, '26, '27. Sigma Alpha Theta. Tennis Club. Scientific Club. Social Committee, '25.


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CARL E. TE)IPT~E Bachelor' of Science In Minillg Engilwel"ing Entered, 1921. Alpha Phi Omega. Scientific Club. . Junior Associate, A. J. M. E. Shift Boss, Presidio Mining Company, Shafter, Texas February to August, 1925. Engineer, Seaboard Engineering Company, Los Angeles, California, August, 1925 to February, 1927.


SENIOR CLASS HISTORY The class of 1927 did not distinguish itself as being the worst class ever graduated from the College of Mines, but then neither did it distinguish itself as the best. We had plenty to do without trying to distinguish ourselves. However, some of our men did a few things worthy of notice. For example, two of the little band of Freshmen who enrolled in the fall of '22 became in due time Football Captains; one became President of the Students' Association; some finished Calculus and Graphic Statics the first time they attempted to wade through these elimination contests of Cap's. Some of us came from other schools, but in the time that they have been with us we have been able to get a few things on them. Chapin, with his perpetual smile and his cheery voice never failed to liven things up a bit; Consolacion, tried to teach some of us Ju-Jttsu , and those to whom he gave lessons will never forget them; Temple, with his hard boiled disposition, soon earned the hate of all the co-eds and the respect of all the freshmen, who liked him so much from the start that they wanted to adopt him into their class; Leeper Gay and his Super-Six have become well known figures. The rest of us have been more or less continuous inmates of the school, and we have become known for a few peculiarities. Hawk Nelson became well known for his "industry" and in general for his studiousness; Cleve Stover has made himself famous for his crusade against tobacco, and pipes in particular; Fred Price has distinguished himself by his brilliant exhibitions of the latest steps at all the Mines Dances. In all, we believe that the classes that come after us will do well if they follow our footsteps. At any rate, they will have a wonderful knowledge of some courses, after they have taken them four times in succession, as we did. The future of this Class is not as clear as the past, but the rest of the school can rely on one thing: where ever we go, we will boost the old school for all we are worth, and we will send all of our future children to school here.


The Flow Sheet A RHYME OF THE MINERS' CREW Did you ever stand at the mouth of a shaft, At the close of a miner's day, When the shift comes off and the dripping cage Slides up the guides to stay, 'Til the night men's turn? The miner's job Demands an exacting toll. It asks for work of he.rnan kind, T'he scoffs at a laggard's goal Do you know of the life that the miner As he toils in his chamber deep? It's a job that calls for both brain and If one hopes to earn his keep. His heart must be strong with a will to And his eye is trained and true, He plans each task and he knows each The game of the miner's crew.

leads brawn, drive, move-

Do you know of the drive of the tempered steel, As it bites in the stubborn rock? Have you felt the pulse of the clicking valve? 'Tis the drill-god's tattoo knock. To the miner's ear must be known each sound, He must feel each throbbing plunge Of his drill machine, as every blow Is struck' with a telling lunge.

--

Did you ever stand at the station below, When the time for the blasting's near, Then count each shot and its sullen thud Sounds through the stillness clear? The miner must know as he sludges out Each hole, how the shot will break, That the powder's right and the tamping, too, And how much fuse t'will take. Have you been near the face of a drift or stope, And looked at the sweating gang, As they load the dirt that's broken down And trim the rocks that hang? It's work of the strong-back, gruelling kind, This mucking of ore and rock, To make all clear for another round When the next shift's "taking stock." Have you watched how the work of the timber Goes on when the mucking's through, So that slip or slide of the moving ground Gives warning to the crew? , For the stulls and caps and the lagging, too, Are wedged up tight to the line. It's not of the shiftless, careless sort, This timbering of a mine.

gang

Would you join in the work of the miner's crew? Would you toil in the drift or stope'? Have you strength and grit when the job is tough, Have you something more than hope? Though the task is hard, it's well worth while To know how the miners plan. But nothing short of "playing the game" Will make you a miner man.


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Juniors

The Flow Sheet


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The Flow Sheet

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HUGH D. McGAW ((Hugh)"

lTootllaH Manager, '25, '26. J unior Class Pres., '25, '26. Dormitory Committee, '2;''). "M" Clnb. Scientific Club.

EUGE:gE

R. POvVELL "Gene" Sec. Treas., Junior Class, '27. Sec. 'I'reas., Scientific Club, '27. Alpha Phi Omega.

EPITRAIM

B. DAGGETT ((Eph"

Sec. 'Preas., Student Assn., '26, '27. Scientific Club. A lpha Phi Omega. Associate Editor, Prospector, '~4, '25.

LOUIS

F. GREEN ((BUT"

Foothall, '24, '25, '26. Executive Committee, '25 to '37. Scientific Clu h. "1\1" Olub. Basketball, '2;5, '26.

OLAUDE

O. BOYKI

ÂŤ Olnud,(')'

Football, '26. Vice-Pres., Executive '26, '27. Scientific Club. "'M" Club.

Committee,


The Flow Sheet

A. OLIVER G HAN'!' {(Bookie" Business Manager, "'rhe Flow Sheet", '27. Social Committee, '26, '27. Dormitory Committee, ';W. Scientific Club. Junior Associate, A. 1. U. E.

WAL'l'EH

G. Kl~GELlN

(("Walt')) uGloo1n./f Gus"

Scientific

Club.

HOBERT I. SEALE ((Bob" Football squad. Scientific Club. Alpha Phi Omega.

J. BHOOKS aFt'cd" Hifle Team, '27. Scientific Club, FRED

HERBEHT

l\lcOOWAN

{(Hugady" Scientific Club. Football, '25, '26. "M" Club.

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The Flow Sheet

JOSE

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JR.

T. CAMACHO, a

Dist i'nguhUsimo"

Asociacion de Ingenierta, Scientific Clull.

RICARDO

Estudiantes

de

l'LACENCIA

«Chwrley" Rifle Team, '27. Asociaciou de Jngeuier-ia. Scientific Club,

Estudiautes

J. MAESE «J1iss" de Estudiantes

de

Al{TlllTR

,\ sociacion Ingeuieria. Scientific (;1 IIll.

CUAUHTEl\10C LOUSTAUNAU

de

T.

«Cicero" Asociacion de Ingenieria. Scien tif'ic Club.

Estudiautes

de

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Sophomores


The Flow Sheet

LEWIS

C. WOODUL ((Lefty" President Sophmore Class, '26, '27 Football, '25 & '26. Sigma Alpha Theta. Scientific Club. "M" Club.

HENRY G. CASS ((E'ight ball" Football, '2G & '26. Executive Committee, '26. Scientific ('In b. "M" Club.

HUGH

WOI{'I.'HJ~GTOX ((Hugh" Vootball, '2:> & '26. "1\1" Club.

LEE

C. S)IITH

"Uherrs]" FootlJall, '25 & '26. Hifle 'I.'eam, '26 & '27. Scientific Club. "M" Club. Basket Ball,. '26.

MARSHA T,I. :B'ootIJall, '26. "M" Club.

l\IUS'rAIN


The Flow Sheet

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PHlLIP BImWN «Phil)) Football squad. Scientific Club. Alpha Phi Omega. Executive Committee, '::l6. Prospector Staff.

L]~E C. GHAME.ERS «Pot)) Football squad. Scientific Club. Alpha Phi Omega.

HOWARD O'HARA {(lI··i.~h)) Alpha Phi Omega. Scientific Club.

,J. SAM j)IS~IUKES «Sa/It))

F'ootball squad. Scientific Club. Rifle Clnb. Track, '26. Alpha Phi Omega.

VTK(,E~'T A. ('OLLI~S()N {(Good 'j'·ime" Scientific Club. Junior Associate, A. 1. :U. E.

I

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The Flow Sheet

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CHARLES RUTLEDGE ({Oh'ick"

Rifle Club.

FORNEY FLEl\IING ({FUppy" Executive Committee, '26. President Tennis Club, '26 & '27.

KEKNE'rH PADEN ((Eagle Beak" Nifle team, '26 & '27.

WOODLIEF

1

1'.

BROWN

aWoodliej'J

Scientific Club.

JAMES S. BAKEH «Jimmie"


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The Flow Sheet

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PAUL MUSTAIN ((P(bul"

Football, '26 & '27. Executive Committee, Sigma Alpha Theta. "1\'1" Club.

l\IAHGARET

'27.

KNO'l"l'S

((Maggie" Tenuis Ulub Omega Phi Delta.

ROBERT

W. TAYLOR ((Bob)) Sig-ma Alpha Theta. Scientific Club.

CARRIE 1\f. UROSBY ({Kitty)) Sec. 'I'reas. Omega Phi Delta, '25. Pres. Omega Phi Delta, '26.

EDWI~ CADY uEdn


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The Flow Sheet

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H. DEAN BEVAN ((Bevo" 'I'ennis Club. Scientific Club. Football squad.

ROYAL B. .1ACK1\1A~ "J(wkguy)} Reieutific Club. Tennis Club, Prospector Staff.

HAROLD KERSEY "Sunbeam" Sd('ntific Club. '!'ell n is Club.

Football squad.

lIOLCOL:U KEXKEDY "Hokl~m)} Scientific Club.

Latin

AG S'l'lX A. RUJZ merican Club.

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The Flow Sheet

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WESLEY 1\1. NAGLE ((TT' es" F'ootball squad.

MARGARET EWALD ((Half pint"

HERMON JOLLY ((,Tolly" Scientific Club.

GERTRUDE SEIDEL ((Corky"

GENARO ARROYO "Gene" Rifle Team, '26 & ''27. Tennis Club.

...


The Flow Sheet

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LULA McDANIEL

«ua«

F. ELIZABETH 'l'ERREUJ "Libby"

LA VORA E. NOR~L\ ~


Freshmen


The Flow Sheet

Pres.

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JOHN GREENE "Johnny" Fish Class, Alpha Phi

Secretary Associate Secretary

Omega.

MARY E. McGHEE "Mickey" Treasurer Fish Class. Editor "The Prospector". Treasurer Tennis Club.

A. LINCOLN HAWLEY "Bull" '26.

Football,

Tennis

J~UCILLE LOWRANCE "Tu ice" Club.

Tennis

Club,

BEN

D. ROBERTS "Dave" Ri fie Club.

MARGARET ARONSTEIN "Il{enstel n"

.TOHN R. JOHNSON "Red"


The Flow Sheet

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I

FRANCES Fos'rER "Stub"

EDWIN

B. DOUGLAS "Eddie"

CLARENCE

H. ROBERTS "Bob"

MALCOLM

E. RIGDON

.T AMES K. COLE ",Timmie"

'I'. BROWN '''i'ed'' Omeg-a,

WENDELL Alpha

Phi

MALCOLM MADERA "Cowboy"


The Flow Sheet

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JOHN RUSSELL "Baby Russell"

ROGER

McDANIEL

FRANK

JOSE

FRED

1I{cCORD

FLORES

N, WARD

"F.

HUNTER

N,"

E. AKARD

ARTHUR C. HALL "Art" Cheer Leader, Tennis Club, Alpha Phi Omega.


The Flow Sheet

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CHARLOT'J'E HAYES "Charley"

ROBER T M. ARNOLD "Duke"

ELOISE

.JONES

SAM RUSSELL "Sam"

ELIZABETH KEMERER "Lizzie"

RICHARD

SANDERS, JR. "Dick"

DOROTHY MAE ALLEN


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The Flow Sheet

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G. ALTON DUNW AY "Prof."

ADA ZLABOVSKY

JAMES

JOHNSON

llJimmie"

Football,

'26, "M" (,Iub.

CHARLES

W.

"Ch ar l ey"

HUGH

DAVIS

HERBERT

JOHN

SEXTON

"Johnnie"

THOMAS L. O'CONNOR '''I'om''


The Flow Sheet

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I

LOUIS BRYANT "Louie"

WILLIAM D. COPE "Bill" Tennis

Club.

CHARLES D. YAFFE "Taffy'-

ULA MUSTAIN

ELON GISH, JR "Lillian"

BUFORD

ORNDORFF

"Pew ford"

JOHN WILLIAMS "Sheeny"


The Flow Sheet

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Far in the past, more real in memory

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than in fact, huddles the

small Texas College of Mines that was the forerunner school.

On in the future,

of the present

dimly outlined

behind the misty veil that

shields us from our fates, rises a towering

Texas College of Mines of

the days to come.

And we, midway between

equally dim future,

strain forward

of future attainment.

eagerly as we reach for the goal

We remember

ginning is a spur to greater striving; be carried on; because effort.

The future,

the dim past and the

the past because its hopeful bebecause its pulsing wishes must

it is the inspirational

challenge

to continued

a tome whose endless pages of weeks and days

glow with opportunity, magic pen of vision.

is before

us; and at our hand lies ready a

It is for us to see that we shall have wrought

well, that the gleaming

outlines

of a greater college, real now only

to those who dwell in thought

beyond the veil of mist, shall to-mor-

row be our lasting monument

in the quick-receeding

We look forward in distinction vice.

of faculty;

past.

to a greater Texas College of Mines; Greater greater in facilities for work;

greater in ser-

I


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The Flow Sheet

Irregulars


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The Flow Sheet

S'l'ANJ...EY BEVAN S

MARTHA PEARCY

KA'fHU ...EE POWlWS

ERLJ NE SADLER


ACTIVITIES


Photogravure


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Organizations

I

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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE J. H. NELSON ... C. H. BOYKIN E. B. DAGGETT

President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer l\1El\lBERS

Senfors R. Rangel J. L. Gay

Juniors L. Green H. E. Brown

Sophomores H. Cass P. Mustain (L. Woodul)

Freshmen J. Cole J. Johnson

'I'he Executive Committee is made up of representatives from all the classes. Two from each class are elected annually, and their terms expire at the end of each school year. It is the duty of the Executive Committee to handle all the finances of the student body and to pass on matters pertaining to the student body's welfare.


The Flow Sheet

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SCIENTIFIC CLUB The Scientific Club, affiliated with the A. 1. )1:. E., is the only organization of its kind within the College. It was organized, October 6, 19:?O, for the purpose of fostering interest in scientific subjects and to inspire the spirit of seeking knowledge among- the students. 'I'his end 11m;been attained to a certain degree by discussions and lectures given by prominent men along various scientific lines at luncheons which the organization held once a month. The Club has been an invaluable source of knowledge and pleasure to all the members. Although membership in this organization is limited to the three upper classes, this year a number of interested freshmen were allowed to attend the meetings of the Club. Considerable interest was shown among the students in 1he fact that all of the meetings and luncheons held were well attended. The membership of the Club was about thirty-five in all for the past year. The Scientific Club is a worth while organization and deserves the support of the entire student body. Prospects for the coming year look VPl'y promising and the organization should he hig-I-!:CI' than eve)" E. J. CHAPIN -

OFFICERS Pres.; J. H. NELSON - Vice-Pres.;

E. R. POWELL -

Sec.-Treas.


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I

THE SPONSOR'S CLUB The Sponaors' Club was founded in ] H2.J. hy a group of public spirited club women of El Paso. The purpose of the orcanisation is to promote, eneourage, and assist all student activities that go into tho making of real college life. Among the many things they have done for the school may be mentioned the building of the tennis courts, the decoration and the furnisb ing of the recreation room in Kelly Hall, the furnishing of the girl's room in the main building, and the moral support that they have given the school in athletics. The Officers of the Club are as follows: Miss Nell Pollard, President; Mrs. M. P. Schuster, First Vice-President; Mrs. Volney Brown, Second Vice President; Mrs. J. W. Kidd, Third Vfce.Presf dent : Mrs. V. E. Ware, Secretary; Mrs. Ballard Coldwell, Treasurer. The Board of Directors are as follows: Mrs. R. M. Holliday, Mrs. Kuno Doerr, Mrs. E. A. Drake, Mrs. J. A. Pickott and Mrs. W. H. Burgess. Top Row, Left to Right: Mrs. Ballard Coldwell, Mrs. R. W. McAfee, Mrs. J. A. Pickett. Bottom Row, Left to Right: Mrs. M. P. Schuster, Miss Nell Pollard. Mrs. C. E. Kelly.

I

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The Flow Sheet

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ALPHA PHI OMEGA O}1'FICERS E. J. E. B. SAM L. C.

CHAPIN DAGGETT DISMUKES CHAMBER'S

- .-- .------- --. --. .__. President ---. -------------- -__ _ Vice-President '-- ----.-.---------. ._. Secretary-'rreasurer - .. - -- . __. Master at Arms

IN COLI~EGE

ALUMNI

OUT OJ!' SCHOOL

E. J. Chapin, '27. C. E. Temple. '·27 R. 1. Seale, '28. E. R. Powell, '28. E. B. Daggett, '28. L. C. Chambers, '29. Sam Dismukes,. '29. Philip Brown, '29. Ted Brown, '30. Howard O'Hara, '30. Arthur Hall, '30. J. R. Gree.ne, ':30.

J. P. Savage. R. W. Tighe. J. E. Crenshaw. Tom Clements. A. E. Millar. T. A. Doxey, Jr. W. E. Dickinson. G. M. Smith. H. C. Vacher. !<'loyd Dale. A. C. Wheatley. W. L. Russell. L. A. Summers. W. J. Thorp. T. J. Woodside. E. M. Thomas. L. M. Robinson.

Reed Winterburn. J. F. Bennett, Jr. Ira Bacon, Jr. O. C. Campbell. Ro bt. Colvin. Milton Towner. Chas. Skidmore. Scott Skidmore. Qeo. Elliott, Jr. C. D. Fletcher. Ben Scott Smith. G. Ragsdale. C. M. Smith. Ben Howell. K. C. Hamilton. R. R. Mullen, JI'. Rex Kipp. E. Harris. G. Hughes

E. C. Lythe.

.....


THE PROSPECTOR THE STA.FI<': JOHN FRED PRICE MARY McGHEE ROYAL JACKMAN PHIL BROWN PROF. E. A. DRAKE J. LEEPER GAY

_ Editor in Chief Associate Editor School News Editor Athletic Editor Faculty Advisor Business Manager

The Prospector succeeded this year in raising a little Cain, this being the ambition of the staff. The student body as a whole contributed far more material to The Prospector than on any previous year, and the staff wishes to thank all these contributors.


The Flow Sheet

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RIFLE CLUB This year the work of the Rifle 'ream improved over the work of proceeding years, the final score ill the six matches being higher than the last score ill the seven matches of last year. THE OFFICERS: KENNETH PADEN ------------- . Executive Officer JOHN GREENE ------------------------------Secretary Team Members and their averages: Richard Placencia: 375; Genaro Arroyo, 370; Fred Price, 368.4.

Fred Brooks, 377; Kenneth Paden, 376. 374.6; Felipe Arroyo, 374; Lee Smith,

'fHE RESULTS OF THE MATCHES ARE AS FOLLOWS University of Montana, El Paso High School, New Mex. Mil. Inst., Kansas Aggies, Univ. of Idaho, Oklahoma Aggies,

o 1828 1880 1894 1905 1923

College of Mines, College of Mines, College of Mines, College of Mines, College of Mines, College of Mines,

1813 1881 1889 1889 1890 1925

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-The Flow Sheet :Jr#ir#ir#Jr#ir#lrยงJI I THE FLOW SHEET THE STAFl!': E. J. CHAPIN J. F. PRICE, JR. OLIVER GRANT PROF. E. A. DRAKE

Editor in Chief Associate Editor Business Manager Faculty Advisor

'I'he compiling of the Flow Sheet was started early last fall and only with a great deal of effort on the part of the staff was the material finally collected. The staff has spared no effort in making this year's Flow Sheet the best ever produced in the college, and we hope that the pages contained herein will bring back pleasant memories in the years to come. The staff wishes to thank the advert isera for the support they gave in making this publication a financial success.

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COACII GEORGE BLANTON POWBLL Coach Powell, better known as "'Chuck", came to this iustitution ill the fall of ]924 to try to produce a team that would be second to none. His first year was expended in training a squad of green men ill the art of handling a football as well as handling themselves. In his second year he produced a team that went through the season with only aile defeat. The past season was not so successful from the standpoint of games won but showed that "Chuck" conld work wonders with the limited material he had to work with. He left after the football season was over and his leaving was marked with regret.


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The Flow Sheet ::Jr#ir#ir#lr#ir#Jr§l1

I

REVIEW OF THE SEASON After the moleskins were laid away for another year, and an account taken, we find the Miners with three victories and four defeats. The season as a whole did not 100m up very brightly, yet it was successful from the standpoint of those who watched the Miner team play. No team ever brought into a gridiron ever fought any harder than the team that played last season, and the only reason that any of our defeats can be attributed to is that the breaks were against us. Not once did the Miner spirit wane. Each STOVER game was fought to the end. Coach Powell emerged from CAPTAIN the preceeding year with a "Champ" team and had practically the same line-up left over from the last season, except that Waugh was missing, as well as Amasa Smith and Gnauck, The lack of reserves was probably the most important factor in each of the defeats. We had an eleven man machine-the finest that ever showed on,a gridiron-but a machine cannot be efficient without spare parts. Thus, when one of our men was hurt, the loss was almo t irreparable. This fact was instrumental in allowing New Mexico University to score two touchdowns in the fourth quarter, thereby winning the game. This was also true in the games with St. Edwards and SuI Ross,


The Flow Sheet REVIEW OF THE SEASON Green and Byrne were undoubtedly the outstanding players on the team. Their work deserves a great deal of credit, as without them the team would have had some pretty difficult problems to meet. Worthington was a valuable man, and although his 'work perhaps was not as noticeable as that of either of the other two men mentioned, he was all there and deserves a place with them. Nelson and Stover were at their peak the last season. The remainder of the squad worked as no other squad has ever worked before, and' even when facing certain deWORTHINGTON feat they still battled, never saying "die." 'I'his quality CAPTAIN ELECT. of not knowing when they were beaten and their clean playing \\'011. the admiration of all those who watched them. In fact, it was this dean playing that won over to our side many town people who formerly were either indifferent or openly hostile. A great deal of appreciation is due to Prof. F. H. Seamon, Gradual e Manager Muller, and the business men of EI Paso for their unselfish and untiring aid in putting over the season and making the nearest approach to a financial success we have ever had.


.:Jr¥ir¥Jr#Jr#Jr#Jr¥J The Flow Sheet SILVER CITY

va

3j#1t#1i¥1i#Jr#i@

TEXAS MINES

PLAYBD A'f SILVKH CL'l'Y Teachers, 3; Miners, 25 Doggie Byrne, who played second fiddle to Waugh in '2;"'1,tuned in on the first violin and left a string of broken Mustangs while he helped turn in a 25 to 3 victory for the Mines. Byrne's team mates helped at times, hut it was Doggie who twisted, squirmed, and side stepped and smashed the S. C. line and who twice crashed through the goal line, finally winding' lip the afternoon's work by making a field goal. Aside from Doggie, the team as a whole did not make as sensational opening as in '25, although it showed flashes of brilliant work in the first quarter. Bill Green showed his old reliability as a line plunger, and broke 1hrough repeatedly for long gains. Stamp, playing at quarter, and Boykiu, who started at full, also had flashes of form. The Mines' line stiffened when its goal line was threatened while the Teachers seemed unable to keep Doggie from sifting through. The new Miner eleven in its first appearance showed the same ability to get the jump on its opponent and even in the fir·t few minutes of play showed that the same characteristic of the 1925 team was also theirs. It was exactly five minutes and twenty seconds after the whistle blew that Bill Green smashed through for the first touchdown. The final whistle blew with the Mustangs in possession of the hall hut on the short end of a 25 to 3 score. I

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The Flow Sheet U~IVERSITY

OF NEW MEXICO PLAYED

VI

TEXAS MINES

AT ALBUQUERQUE

N. l\L U., 19; Mines, 7 Although the Miners went down to defeat, and then only in the last few minutes of play, New Mexico had to earn its victory, The heavier Lobo 1iue battered the Miner line during- three quar-ters, gaining occasionally, but it wns not until the last quarter that thcy really succeeded in overwhelm. ing the Miner eleven. A lack of reserves proved fatal for us in this last qnarter. N. M. U. scored first in the first quarter and failed to convert. ]n the second period the )lIiners took the ball from their 25 yard line to the Lobo 9 yard line only to lose it. They then recovered a Lobo fumble on the 22 yard line and in fonr plays Green took the pigskin across for a touchdown. Byrne converted. In the fourth quarter the Lobos scored two touchdowns, the last one being made on an intercepted )llines pass, running it to the Miners 2:'}yard line and then scoriug by line smashing. Green and Byrne were the ontstanding players for the Mincrs. Doggie threw a chill into the Lobos when he converted Green's touchdown. Marshall Mustain was taken out of the game with two broken ribs sustained in the last half. Marshall was at the position of center when he was injured.


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The Flow Sheet

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NEW MEXICO MILITARY INSTITUTE va TEXAS MINES PLA YED AT ROSWELL 'I'oxns MineR, 20'

x.

M. U. 1., 7

This gmu(' was replete with tln-ills and ('J'Hit-al moments. The game was played on a muddy field with the temperature hovering around 40 degrees. Miners scored first on a pass f'rom Green to Nelson, ln-ingiug the ball to the Cadets 12 yard line. On the next play Green went over for a touchdown and Byrne con verted. The l\{iners again scored in till' 1 hi I'd quarter when Byrne ran 65 yards through the Cadet line for a touchdown. The run was made around right end. The Institute then completed a pass and took the ball to the ~1iner's one yard line and had to punch the lighter Miner line three times before they were able to score. 'l'he final SCOl'efor the Miners came in the last quarter, when ,Vorthington w nt over the Institute line after the Miners blocked It punt. Byrne failed 10 con vert. 'I'he Miners outclassed the Cadets in the finer points of the game, The Cadets completed ten forward passes while the ~Iiners completed six, hut the .l\Iinel'S made twelve first downs to the Cadets' six. Green and Byrne were the outstanding stars for the Miners. Doggie's kicking was one of the features of the game; his punts even under the most unfavorable conditions averaged 40 yards. The Miners line, although lighter than the Cadet line, held in pinches. 'I'he entire team displayed a decided superiority in practically every department of the game. This makes a second vie tory over the Cadets ill two years.


The Flow Sheet NEW MEXICO AGGIES vs TEXAS MINES PLAYED AT EL PASO Aggies, 10; NIines, 8 Defeat, at its best, is a bitter pill to swallow j but when it comes a~ it came to the Miners this day, it leaves an acid taste that swells up for years to come when men gather for love of the game. Outplaying the Aggies at every angle of the game, outgaming a team that outweighed them many pounds to the man, fighting through to what seemed certain triumph, the Miners saw the cup of victory dashed from their lips just as they were about to drain it; and the blow was not delivered from the front by a hard pressed foe, but from the back, by an official whose mistake proved fatal. The year's football record, from which there is no court of appeal and from which no score is erased, showed that the Aggies beat the Miners 10 to 8. But in the hearts of those who watched the game from the sidelines, and who followed the play in question as car-efully, or more so, as Captain Shea, there remains the knowledge that Shea was wrong and tbat the Millers team beat the Aggies 8 to 7. To Green alone should be given the credit fo" the scoring in this game. Byrne carried the ball over for the only touchdown after Green had brought it to within striking distance of the Aggie goal. Nelson showed out next to Green in this game, putting up the finest exhibition of end playing that has been seen here in many years.


The Flow Sheet SUL ROSS vs TEXAS MINES PLAYED 'l'exas Minprs.

AT EL PASO 0: Sul Ross,

:n

The Miners were defeated as the SCOl'eshows, but they were not in spirit, and those who saw the game knew that the Miner team was as far as football was concerned. 'I'he Miners were outweighed many but as {fir as speed and football tact irs were concerned the Orange

defeated superior pounds,

outclass-

ed tile Crimson. The Miners made 18 first down. as against the Lobo's 15. Thi aggre gation were either afraid of the Miners or else they did not know how to play football. All the success of the Lobo's was due to Alford, who did all the work with the rest of his sqnad far behind. The lighter ~Iiner line wrought havoc with the heavier Lohos' and when on the defensive stood well the shock of their attack. It was a good football game-good, because the Miners, hadly crippled awl badly ontweighed, didn't know when they were beaten, Bif l Green left a ick lied the day before 11l(> game and was finally taken out ill the third quarter badly battered. IT' showed his hue form throughout the fil'si half, bu t drcumstances were agai nst him. Dog-gie Byrne, although knocked out twice, stayed in the game until the end. TIe kicked, passed. and ran the hall in Hiarring fashion, breaking through the Lobo line for many long gains. Jimmie Johnson and Lee Smith also played Lobo line hard. Stover, \Yorthington, and Mustain selves.

U

good game, hitting the also distinguil'\hed them,


The Flow Sheet NEW MEXICO MINES

VI

3t=J@rEJr=Jr#Jr#J

TEXAS MINES

PLAYED AT EI~ PASO Texas Mines, 40; New Mexico JUilll's,0 The Texas Mines outclassed the New Mexico Miners in every respect. Through most of the game it was a big parade for the Orange, second stdng men filling the line positions. The Texans faced an inexperienced team and a team in its first season. Although the opponents fought gamely to the end, the Orange could not be stopped. The gold jerseyed backs from Socorro twice carried the ball to within striking distance of the goa] but lacked strength to put the pigskin across. Hugh Worthington was the whole show for the Texans. This was Hugh's first chance in the backfield, playing left half. He raced through the opponent's line almost at will for long gains and booted four goals after touchdowns. His passing was accurate also. Worthington raced 3~ yards for the first touchdown and then cover-ted. He made a second touchdown and coverted. Lee Smith looked particularly good and scored the third touchdown. Hugh bucked the hall over for the fourth touchdown HIlCI kicked goal. The fifth touchdown was put across hy Jimmie Johnson. Anothoi touchdown was rung up by the Orange in the scuffle, although the specat tors had long since lapsed into an awed silence. Green, Byrne, and some other firRt string men were put in for a few minutes, and while they were in they gamboled over the field at will.


The Flow Sheet SAINT EDWARD'S UNIVERSITY

VI

TEXAS MINES

PJ~AYliJD AT EL PASO St. Edward's,

32; Miner-s, 6

Although defeated 32 to 6, the Miners registered 14 first downs to the Saints' 13, and scored on the Saints when even Baylor failed to dent the goal line of the Austin aggregation. These facts will be remembered by the Miners who fought a game, plucky battle against a stronger team. Lack of reserve strength hurt the Miners, for they were forced to play the game with only two substitutes, while the visitors used twenty two men throughout the game. Green, Wor-thington, and Byrne were the outstanding stars for the Miners. Green not only showed the same ability to puncture the opponents' line that he had demonstrated in previous games but he was also a power on the defensive. His record for this game shows this; one 40 yard run through the line, one 20 yard run, and six runs over ten yards each. During the game Bill made 183 yards, making 35 yards on passes, Byrne carried the ball 142 yards for the Miners, including the 95 yardl'l made on a run from kick off. He also outwitted the visitors and used great judgement in placing his punts. Worthington's preformance included 72 yards gained against the Saints, 54 yards of which were gained OJ] passes. He scored the only touchdown made by the Miners. Jimmie ,Tohnson and Lee Smith preformed well and made several short gains. A record crowd witnessed the game, there being Rome twenty-five hundred persons present.


1IยงI@j##h#J@@i#!

The Flow Sheet

::J@t#Ir#JยงJl#Jr#I.

CAPTAIN C. A. S'l'OVER Cleve is as reliable as the calendar. IIe has plenty of grit, and his team showed EI Paso the most sensational Football it ever Raw.

Captain-Elect HUGH WORTHINGTON

IIugh's work at end was the best ever had. It was his reputation that helped boost the gate receipts.

JACK NELSON Somebody thought that Jack could not run, but we have Sf'f'n him beat Doggie in a hundred yard dash. Jack was worried last year only by the fact that we are to lose him.

BILL GREEK Bill, at half, played the best football he ever played for the Mines. This was Bill's Iast year here and his desire to win grimes from OUl' old rivals showed him at his best at all times. Rill was Rejected quarterback on the All South western eleven.

I


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DOGG IE BYRNE Doggie's running did not show up as well as the year before, mainly because the other teams were always watching him, but have you ever seen anyone out here beat him at punting? Doggie was selected to fill the quarterback position on the AllSouthwester-n second team.

LEE K\IJTH Lee, from way bnck East Texas, shows that hia part of the Slate can put out a mighty good little man.

IIAG )IcGOW AX Mnc, affectionately called Hag and Hog, is like Lee Smith, one of the best little men in the Stnte,

LEWIS WOnDUL Lewis likes to play football, and held his job down all right. If he iF! not in Peru next year, we shall have the pleasure of R{'ping him on the line again.


::J@r#ir#i@@r#i

The Flow Sheet

::J@@i=lr#Jt#lf#J

HEXHY

('ASS

Eig-ht Uall ('aKS waf! a Iwu YS the stand by. When Chuck \\~anted twenty yards, he wouLd send ('ass in to intercept a paas and make them.

CLAlTDB

JJOYKI

N

Boykiu. ulthongh hand icupped by a had shoulder, played a good game e\'l'l'Y time he had a chance. 'Ve hope to have him in the line this fall.

JDDIJE ,JOHXSOX Jimmie, as a full buek, is a hard nut to crack. His work a 11 season was of the best, IIe will proha bly hI' with us agn in next fall.

3L\ RSITA LL )It路ST.\ I X 3Iclrshal1. th芦 "(Ialoofus" of fit1iou, held down the posifiun of center. III' was all 1l1t'I'C, and then' was plenty of him to be there. ",,'Vehope to have him again next fall.


The Flow Sheet

A. I~INCOLN HAWLEY Bull played center on eqnal terms with Mustain, and made a good job of it. He will be back again this fall.

MAKAGER

HUGH D. McGAW

Mac did his dnrndest, was plenty.

and it


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The Flow Sheet

3t=Jt=Jt#!t#Jj#I@ I

ALUMNI

CLASS OIi' 1916 Clyde Ney. Vere Leasure. Lloyd A. Nelson.

R. Barbarena. George Johnson. Alfred Black. Lynn L. Pomeroy. Carroll Ronan. Orban Walker. Henry Backer. R.

CLASS OF 1918 Mann Prettyman.

CLASS OF 1919 John Weldon

Wilson.

CLASS OF 1920 John Frederick Schaffer. Rolin B. Tipton. Walton H. Sarrels. Fred Whiston Bailey. Oscar Rheinheimer.

('LASS OF 1923 AlQxander John Bull. Floyd Dale. William Elridge Dickinson. John Kenneth Hardy. William Lee Miller. Robert Henry Maese. Lewis Martin Robinson. Arthur Cornwallis Wheatley. Jose Refugio Yanez.

CLASS OF 1924, Horace Henry Beck. William Wilson Binford. Roscoe Hartt Cannon. John Herndon Cheavens. John Leonidas Bonner Coffey. Ralph Willis Crosby. Justin Wanek Foster. Paul Harmon Hale. l<Jmil James Muller. Felix Erasmus Risacher. Willard Lozane Russell. Lloyd Andrew Summers. Webster Jones Tharp. Thomas Lee White. Fredrick Antonio Wilhelmi.

CLASS OF 1921 John P. Savage. Richard W. Tighe. Ernest C. Kennedy. Rolston Cooper. Raymond N. Concha. Leopoldo E. Maldonado. John O'Keefe

CLASS OF 1922 Thomas Clements. Thomas Adams Doxey. Fredrick Lewis Fox. Nathan K. Karchmer. Ewald Kipp, Jr. Albert Elmsley Millar. Gordon McCUlloch Smith. Herbert Carrol Vacher. Bernardo Villegas.

CLASS OF 1925 Clarence Edmonds Burbridge Jr. Daniel Connely Cooney. Arthur McConnell Evans. Burte Rolph Haigh. John Covey Holford. Robert E. Lee Kidd. Austin Rhedus Rhew. Morriss Carl Scherer. Thomas James Woodside.

CLASS 01" 1926 DeWitt Samuel Helland Eugene

Clinton DeWitt. D. Hendricks. Valdemar Olsen. McRae Thomas.


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A

sWt'rI tITTL!: you KNOW 11-l' K' "iD - NO'" IJ.. NICE V1"iLB Jl\fIIl:" I1UT A boot> L\Tl'l., 1>111\1(,'

~tRL

A\l S~€'s

601"

~ ~ELLA. -"00 A."ID ~E' TA-:e-o, '1 ~J:l "-0 o;~<lUJ S- aUT Nor Z)ANC~.

~

~

r\~~ 'fie

/

~;

K(NO

.lJAT

of

I NW,Qt:S

A. BolO 1'otrS TO

IJJ12Ili; AE/l)uT Aa-1t>£IVTS' ItA.' \lJQeQc.Jl tiN' (;,ENEIlALNEG.ATIVE S'vB JELT S· . '. He I(EALL'" '\IINK.I' TllA,. ,.~~ ~MSOJJ Wl:;Qf ARE' l\JO CLAS';£S ON SuNDAY IS ~li CoIWs€, 11('<;. TOO l./lZ)" T'O beT A~' Go.

~

u,

BoT ,"8<€'S' OtJ\; It.! EVtRy S(.~oo L. 1\ E t>\tHJ, SA Y '" \lIORt> lOoR:3 ~O~ s iE9TF1l[)A'I JuST <.AuSl>

Ill:

COL)LD~'r

1'I\1NK,

\AU1AT 'TO SA i " WE BEuEl/E l+c'~ <::SOT ACAn. ~ TIl lIT S lN4I 'f UFS ,So I'OfIJLAf'.?

~-

!Jc

t30I..\'Tffi:X)S

BAeY

IYPE TI\AT {{NO wJl ALL A&'olff" .. DOlI/.\) SouTH"

/;N' WILD PARnES usuaLL'I DR.!\(;,S'

A~D

A-

"t>"~~

'DAME: "to TI1E AND ~8J£1< f1AS ,0\5 Goot> A TIME AS H€"DID 'aAcK

~

!-lOME'

L,4S'T SU/\lU-~

.


1I#It=Jt=lt=li#Ji#li#J

The Flow Sheet

3i#1i#1i#1i#1r짜:Jel

A TOAST TO THE PROSPECTOR To you who have camped in the Yukon, To you who have roamed on the Rand, To the chap with a tan, to the type of a man Who has patience, endurance, and sand; To you who've gone down in the tropics And to you who've mushed in the SIlOW, To you in the West, and to all of the rest, No matter where you go; You have followed the magnetic ne dle, You have trailed where th outcrop was thin, You have shouldered your pack 'long the unbeaten track, And ill spite of it all yon still grin. From sun-up to sun-down you've wandered III search of some fault plane or fold, All of the time you've dreamed of a mine Rich in copper and silver and gold. "There the burro i u ed for a packsack, And the desert sun burns like a flame And the water you drink makes a man stop and think That mining's, a Hell of a game. Of course there's the lure of a fortune The city, it's bright lights and all, But it's true, just the same, that the thrill of the game Makes you answer the Pro pector's call. So, here's to you, prospector-miner1n a toast you'll join in, I knowHere's to the Hanging and Foot may they al ways stay put, Never meet-bottoms up! here's a go!

I


Doctor : "Mandy, isn't thai baby a little spoilod 't" Mandy: "NawsnlJ, Doctah, all cullud babies smells thataway." There's a reason for the affinity Letween a colored gentleman and a chicken. One is descended from Ha~ and the other from eggs. Fred: "There was an accident in the Popular today." Ed: "How's that?" Fred: "A sign in the window read, 'Dresses half off ill the basement'. Two men were almost trampled to death." The world's most absent minded tractor user is no more. to crank a mule.

He tried

Chapin, Oll Sunday morning : "0 ive me dJ:lJlge for .1 dime, please." Druggist : "Sure, and T hope yon enjoy the sermon." Mannishly dressed lady: "Did you catch auy fish, little boy?" Country Boy: "No." M. D. L.: 'C~O, what'!" Boy (gazing at her rig) : "Durued if I know." "Santa Claus certaiulv was good to that girl." "How is that?" "See what he put in her stockings," A hen is the only living critter that call sit still and produce dividends." City Boy, looking at a windmill: "Gee, I. nele Tom, that's some electric fan out there cooling the cows." Leeper: "You're three quarters of an hour late. What do you mean by keeping me standing around like a fool T" Mrs. Leeper: "I can't help the way you stand." "Does that smile mean you all forgives me?" "Stay away, niggah, I'se jest smiling to rest ma face," Pat died on his way to America, and was buried at sea. 'l'he lead weights generally used in such cases were lost, and chunks of coal were the only things on the vessel that could be substituted. Everything WIlS set for the last rites. His friend Mike said sorrowfully: "Well, Pat T always knew where you were going, but I never thought you'd have to take along your coal." Mr. Seamon (in Chemistry): "Having ~ompleted the study of sulphuric acid, tomorrow I will take carbolic acid." Great bursts of applause resounded through .he room.

I

.ii::i#J==r:@=r.@=:Ti#J=:'r-i#l=r.i#J=~t=J='I~@=r.@=:'I't=J=:T.:t=@='I=::r::@=r.@=f:@=:or=@=1:;:t=J=r.t=J==1i@:=:tt=Jr:;::r.:@=1r.:t=J=r.,.-


......

-=OWt=Jj#li#Ji#Ji#Jj#J

The Flow Sheet

:Jt=Ji#lj#li#lr#lL§1

I Prof. (in Eco.) : "WlJat was one of the evil effects of the World War?" Camacho: "Fat ladies in army pants." .Johnny's Diagon 'is: "l\Iotht>r," said little ,\fary, as she rushed into the farm hou e they 'were visiting, ".Johnny wants the Listerine. He's just caught the cutest little black and white animal, and he thinks it's got halitosis." Prof. Seamon was giving a lecture in Geology class on Dinosaurs. He found hi cla s unattentive, 0 he said: " TOW, students, if you want to realize the true hideous nature of this animal, yon must keep your eyes fixed on me." "The next person who interrupt .Judge sternly. "Hooray!" shouted the prisoner.

will be thrown out of court!"

aid the

0111' Told By Wnrd: Before the trolley cal' i. run off the streets by Fords, thereby making this joke obsolete, I must tell about the young thing who boarded the crowded trolley car and was compelled to stand beside a portly man, Present ly the conductor came through for the fare and the sweet young thing began to search frantically about for her purse. As she continned to earch, the portly chap began to blush, then to perspire, and at last stammered: "Pardon me, Mi s, but may I pay your fare 't" Young MiRS,. til! searching: "Yon may not!" Portly party: "Really, now, this is most l'mbarrasshlg, but I should be much relieved to pay Y01!l' fare." Young thing, still groping. searching: "Don't you dare speak to me again, you big brnte!" Portly party: "In that case, miss, may I, that i , will you stop unbuttoning my suspenders?"

Terrence: "'Tis a foine lad ye have here. A magnificent head and noble features. Could ye lend me a couple, of dollars?" Pat: "I could not, 'Tis me wife's child by her first husband." "Chorus girl have a hard. time, don't they?' "Yes, they have to bare a great deal." A group of Chinese boys were di cussing the relative marits of the two billboards, one advertising Carnation Milk, the other Bull Durham. One of the boys expla ining the signs to the others ill this way: "In America they have he cows and she cows. The he cows give milk and the he cows give tobacco."

I

Phil Brown: "I want a tooth brush." Clerk : "What size?" Phil: "Gimme a big one. ThCl'c's ten in the family."

I

•• 'i#Ji==:r.:@=1r.t=J=Tii#J;::::::f:@:=:r.:t=J=1i.t=J=r:@=f:@:=:tt=J=:r:t=J:lr:@=:a:r:I#I=:a=r:t=J=:a='l'=i#J:lI:t=J=,r:i#I~:a~r


INGERSOLL-RAND CO. OF TEXAS E1 Paso, Texas

Mexico City

MANUFACTURERS

OF

COMPRESSED AIR MACHINERY FOR EVERY PURPOSE

This Book is a Specimen Of Our Work

BAPTIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 800 Myrtle Ave.

Phone M. 4675

E1Paso, Texas


OOMPLETE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT I

eLUDING

HEUSSER BALANCES

SAMPSON CRUSHERS

McCOLL PUL VERIZERS

ASSAY FURNACES

HEAVY AND C. P. CHEMICALS FOR lNDPR'f'RfA L AN J)

.1L]i]'1'~tLLl nate. tL

WORK

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES路 GENERAL SUPPLIES路

MACHINERY

FOR MINE, MILL AND SMELTER

THE MINE & SMELTER SUPPLY CO fPANY iUUllufuctm'ers

NFlW YORU

nnrl Jobber fo'AUP

WESTINGHOUSE A D MANUFACTURI

I,A KJ<~

orrv

ELECTRIC (} OOMP

El Paso, Texas

Y


AMERIOAN SMELTING &

REFINING

00.

EL PASO SMELTING WORKS EL PASO, TEXAS


"""'"

THE ATLAS DRILL o oLUl\fN SPIRAl EXTENSION JI"----ZZ-ADJUSTMENT

Designed for Economy, Simplicity and Practicability COMPANIA COMERCIAL, S. A. Sole Distributors

CLAMP

United

States

and

P. O. BOX 346 Al'ARTADO 93 APARTADO 112

NUT

Foreign

Countries

317 N. OREGON ST.

EI Paso, Texas Phoenix, Al.j,'Alna Parral, Chih., Uexico Torreon, Coah., ~lexico

INVESTIGATE ITS lUERITS FEATURES

JACK COlUMN

SLEEVE

SET-UP: Quick and simple to set up and take down. Tests have proven a saving 01 35 to 45 minutes on two men for set up. TDIE TESTS: One man only complete set up with drill hitting the face, range from 6 to 16 minutes on 3" column. SETTING: Sets at any angle to 40 degrees blocking. Solid ground does not require any block. Slips and loose ground requires only one block. This block will take any angle without wedges. LOAD: The success of tbe column is due to the loose ball top. The load is always at the center axis, irrespective of the po:;i. tfon in which the column has been placed. 'I'hi, s, combined with the flexible base, always gives It balanced load. OPERATIO TO SET P: Place the colunm on the foot block, as usual, loosen clamp with wrench and turn it on its seat, and the extension will feed up 01" down. In hard ground pick a small dent into the back to r-ecetve ball. 'Vhen extension is screw. ed tight against the back, tighten the damp with we-ench and take in slack with jacks at the bottom, as usual, TO 'rA]{E DOW : Loosen jacks II little, then loosen the clamp and run it up the extension about an inch and tighten it with the tinger ; then give the clamp II hit with the hunds and the column is l'eath to be let down. The operator is in no danger in taking down.

WE

PHOTOGRAPHED

1302

STUDENTS

ON CONTRACTS RECEI\1}JD THIS YEAR FOR SCHOOl; A

-r

UALS.

SCHOOL OF MINES Congratulations

for 1927

'I'hcr-e mu t be a, good reason tOI"this

BERG EL PASO

ER'S STUDIO

"T. E. MORGAN B ILDING

TEXAS

co

TRACTOR

-


'UFKIH

Tapes SECURITY-

STURDY & RELIABLE Insure Accuracy & Steady Service Under All Conditions WE OFFER PATTERNS J~SPECIALLY SUITABLE FOR 1.'HE MINING AND OIL INDUSTRIES SEND FOR CATALOGUE

T/oJE fuFK/JY RULE SAGINAW, MICH.

Co.

New York

Some money to your cre(lit in a, Savings Account gives It definite sense of secul"ity ItS vou go along. The added knowledge that the monel' is at ull times protected bl' a consistently conservative bank manage, ment adds matel'iailly to this feeling of security. This bank opens It Savings Account with One Dollar and invites \VOl'kel'S to avail themselves of this Department to the end that then- labor takes on a prortt, able character.

American Trust & Savings Bank EL PASO, TEXAS Established 1913 Capitol and Surplus, $350,000.00

CONCRETE FOR PERMANENCE

EL TORO BRAND SOUTWESTERN PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 613 TWO REPUBLICS BUILDING EL PASO, TEXAS

d


w4r i!;nttl Jusn btl N nrte 'aul ifarury 1JIIlanagr r Parties Cafe

Luncheons

Coffe Shop

Dinners Dances

"Where You Are Welcome"

II

THOMAS C. HOLLIDAY, General Agent C. JAY DEAN, Aetna-izer JOHN W. DUNN, Aetna-izer

AETNA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY (Life Department) 1101-1105 First National Bank Building PHONES

MAIN

584- and 721


ON We congratulate

YOUR

WAY

the members of

the 1927 graduating class of the College of Mines. You will soon be on your way to carve-or

you may have to dig-a

place

for yourself in the business world. We want you to carry the thought with you that a good appearance will always help you to declare a dividend on the investment you have made in an education. We hope that you will always carry pleasant recollections of the Popular Dry Goods Company with you.

Any

time in the future you think we can serve you, call upon us.

Popular Dry Goods Co. El Paso, Texas Mesa Avenue, San Antonio and Texas Streets


School Of Mines Congratulations For 1927

THE TREND Of the times is toward the saving of time. This, as applied to the duties of the Housewife, means the use of appliances that not only save time bl' the fact that they require no attention, but that are CII. pable of speed if it is requlred to effect a Saving of time.

GAS APPLIANCES HAVE ALL THESE

QUALIFICATIONS

Perfect Control of heat plus

DENVER ROOK DRILL MANUFACTURING 301 San Francisco St.

l\1.EN!

CO.

Your Summer Things Are Here

Mens Dept., Main Floor . -

-

.-

.-

TIILvVltlTB -

.

~

-

-

EL PASO GAS 00.

Phone M. 2777

Shirts -ties -hats -pajamas -straws belts -golf togs -undel'weal' -in fact an the accessortes Ior summer -and you'll finel both the pi-ice and the quality to your liking. /--

Beautiful Construction.

1I0U8E

Capital And Surplus $1,200,000.00


>

THE CUSTOM ASSAY OFFICE

Choose Now The Success Worthy

Phone j\Iain 334

Of Your Best Effort-

P. O. Box 811

Then keep an account growing steadily

210 San Francisco El Paso, Texas O. A. CRITCHETT

at this Bank until your purpose triumphs UUPffiE

THE STATE NATIONAL BANK

AND

CONTROL WORK REPRESENTA

EI Paso, Texas "SINCE 1881"

TIVE FOR ORE SHIPPERS GEO.FERGUSON

MANI{IND'S GREATEST SERV~L\NT Electricity is not only mankind's greatest industrial servant but it is mankind's greatest personal servant as well. Let electricity serve you in every possible way. Martin

Main

Building

3-4-6-0


An Eating Place of Rare Excellence COl\IPLIl\lENTS

TH~J METROPOLITAN OAFE Telephone Main

&

MILLER

Ice Manufacturers

PR.IV ATE BOOTHS

206 Mills Street

SPEARS

vms

OF

PHONE M. 2163

EL PASO, TEXAS

El Paso, Texas

GUNNING & OASTEEIJ DRUG 00. Wilson

Millican

The Master Cleaners and Dyers of EI Paso, Texas Phone M.4400

EDUCATION Is one of the essentials to success in life. Personal appearance is another. B - Many men who are known as "Good dressers" spend comparatively little for clothes. Tbey buy good clothes and then depend upon us to keep them always cleaned and pj-esrod.

3600 Hueco-Main

5349

907 N. Piedras-Main

1703

3332 Fort Blvd-East

426

2100 N. Piedras-East

138

A-

CLOTHES CLEANl<JD R.EGUIJAR.LY LAST LONGER.

WILSON -MILLIfJAN

AGENTS:\Vhitman's

and Miss Saylor's

Candies


>

WE ARE ALWAYS FOR

Compliments of

KELLY & POLLARD Wholesale Drugs

The School of Mines RHEINHEIMER LUMBER CO. MAIN 498

CONSUMERS ICE & FUEL COMPA.NY Compliments of

TEXAS AND DALLAS STS.

D. & A. COAL CO. V. B. Andreas

EL PASO, TEXAS "We Keep The Town Cool"


'.rHE RED

MILL

Amusement Park ALAMEDA AVE. NEAR WASHINGTON PARK ENTRANCE

Jack McDonald, Proprietor DANCI G EVERY NIGHT

MUSIC BY ~lABLE JACKSON'S JAYHAWKS

SCHOOL OF MINES STUDENTS ESPECIALLY INVITED

CIA FUNDIDORA DE FIERRO Y ACERO DE MONTERREY, S. A. Compliments

of

(l\lonterl路e.r Steel Plant) Montel'l'ey, N. L. l\lcxico

THE WESTERN PURCHASING CO.

Charles B. Woodul EL l"ASO REPRl<JSE 'J'NI'IVE First

Stationery

Bank

Building

Office Supplies

PARTY FAVORS PLACE CARDS TALLIES

ROBERT E. MCKEE CONTRACTOR

G. B. LAPOWSKI & 00. 109 Eexas St.

National

Main 1843

Los Angeles

EI Paso

THE GREATEST VALUE AT A GIVEN PRICE

"JACKSON'S JAYHA WKS"

ALWAYS-at Given "8ros' Stores you will find shoes that exactly meet the style Ideas of ~路oung men and that do so without straining the old pocketbook.

The Dance Orchestra

GIVEN BROS

LILLIAN .JACKSON

THREE EL PASO STORES 204 E. San Antonio St. 215 S. EI Paso St. B. B. B. Shoe Co., Overland at Mesa

That Know Rhythm l\lain 7171 BROADCASTING ORCHESTRA STATION KFXH


--After Graduation Think of HIXSON'S when you think of Jewelry. Our Diamonds, Watches and kindred articles are faJnolLS throughout, the Southwest foI-Quality, moderately priced,

In The Heart Of El Paso ACCO~IOJ)ATIONSFOR 300 GUESTS

HIXSON'S

RA1'ES $1.50 to S3.(;0 TOUl'ists Information

Bureau

MESA AVENUE AT l\lILLS

In Lobby

((For JO years-El

WARE

PalSO'1s J elVeler,~"

OOMPANY

CONSTRUCTORS

1614 E. Missouri Street EL PASO

- - - - - __TEXAS

Home made candies Lunches

SOHUID''lANN PHOTO SHOP

Fountain Service

MILLS BLDG.

FILMS

KODAKS

MILLS CONFECTIONERY

Phone ~Iain -112

KODAK FINISHING

1\1. 523

Again we wish to thank the men of the school of Mines for their patronage and assure you of your welcome to our store. This store has always been a meeting place for all the Miners.

Every absorb least

at four

glasses

of

Price's Milk and

SOL I. BERG INO.

watch

yourself GROW!

206-10 E. San Antonio St. L!o================

day

'I


220 EAST SAN ANTONIO STREET

LA.NDER LUMBER 00.

TROST & TROST

CORBIN HARDWARE

Architects, Engineers

)IONARCH 100% PURE PAINTS AND VARSISHES

EL PASO

BIG SPRING

BrIm'S ROOF} TG & ATLAS WALl~ HOARD BUII,Dl

PHOENIX

G ~IATERIAI~S

II

THE CHOCOLATE SHOP MILLS BLDG. CIGAR

STORE Appreciates

The Patronage

Of The

Ben Wade Pipes, Johnston Candies

SCHOOL OF MINES HIGH GRADE TOBACCO AND CIGARS l\lain 4050

THE CHOCOLATE SHOP 209 Texas St.

Phone 1\1 812

Evet'ything for the

JOHNSTON'S PURE FOOD SHOP The Restaurant

And Lightning Service OPPOSITE ELLA

Engineering

Student

of Qnality

from A to Z

AY THEA'.rRE

BROS •. INC.


pEA K-HAGEDON 'I

I

HOME GROWN

Cost Less and Last Longe st Flowers for all occasions in a II the appropriate arrangements by our experienced artists.

POTTER'S Hotel Orndorff

Day In And Day Out

FLOW ERS

Phone M. 8100

YELLOW CABS and

GRAY CABS HAIL THEM ANYWHERE PHONE MAIN 3500

OITY SERVIOE 00.

l'l:10,000

Liabilit~路 Insurance and 'I'ruck

Deser~ Gold -

-

EGGS -

Cab

Home of the Dl'~' Climate Pianos Est'd 30 Years

"Supreme In The Southwe st"

RUTTlm

On Each

2:15 Texas St. ICE

AT GOOD DEALERS

A Piano fOJ' Eyer:' Pocketbook .'

eRE -

DESERT GOLD DAIRIES, Inc.

STEINW AY - DUO ART SHUTES - BRAMBACH GULBRANSEN 'I

Kirschbaum Block and Fashion Park Clothes

Nettleton and W. L. Dou glas Shoes an d Oxfords

-

ITHE~ .. ~

~~

JAMES C. WHITE COMPANY REALTOR Fm-m Lands,

Ranches,

Residence

211 N. Oregon St.

...

Everything for Men & Young Men

(,ity Business

anrl

Pr-operty

She1l1on Hotel

Bldg,

Phones, )1. 553, :11:;.")3 WE TRADE WHAT YOU DON'r WANT FOR WHAT YOU DO WANT


"WE SERVE THE I'UELIC" Yoru- Pntronage "'ill Be Appreciated

Dress Well And Succeed

OSAPLE BARBER SHOP

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES

J. D. l'lTATJ]il~R, Proprtetor Res. P'hrme 1\lail1 0406

Will Help You

Electric Hair Cutters

UNION CLOTHING CO. Inc.

Ladies' Hail' Cutting, Dressing & Manicuring 105 E. San Antonio

se,

First Class Cleaners and Dyers

COl\lPLll\mNTS OF

DE KYLE SMITH China

Glass Toys

Housewares l07路10!)-1,U

R. SAN ANTONIO ST.

200.202

El Paso, Texas

N. Stanton

Att'cet

AIJTERATIONS

WRIGHT OLEANING & DYEING 'fORKS 2818 Montnnn

Phone-s

1\1. :143 3717 II

'Ve congr-atulate the Students of the EI Paso School of, Mines on the splendid record the)' have made, Not many of )'011 would have achieved that record without EYE SIGHT. Do not strain and abuse YOUI' eyes, they are the only ones you will eVeJ' have and are worth taking care of. "Te have cor-rected the Optical errors in the eyes of many thousands of patients in the past 22 years in El Paso. If in doubt about )'our eyes consult us,

GEO D. KENDALL OPTICAL CO. 107 N, OREGON ST.

l\IAIN 43

"Longwells" Fireproof Garage Repair Department Supplies, Painting Baggage Moving Storage LONGWELL'S TRANSFER Inc. C. B. Sampson, Pres. Phone l\'Iain 1 AIJL DEPTS.

117 San Pranctzco

St.

EL PASO TEXAS

RENFRO - CORDELL DRUG CO.

For Your Hair Dressings

2 Cut Rate Drug Store

JAMES Q. BYRNE CO., INC.

HOTET, SHELDON BLDG. HOTEl, ORNDORFF BT,DG.

Beauty Parlor and Barbers Supplies 113-115

S, Oregon

St.

1\Iain 1601


GUARANTEE

$ "REAL

P. E. JOHNSON AND COMPANY Hay, Grain and Fuel

STANDARDS

7.50

SHOES FOR REAL MEN"

P. E. Johnson, Mgr. T]<]LEPHONE MAIN 291 _ 292 1809-31 l\fn~offin Ave. EI Paso, Texas

GUAR ANTEE SHOE COMPANY

"Where Good Jewelry Costs Less" FLEI SCHER & ALBERTS Square Deal Jewelers eorller He raId Bldg.

SCOTT WHITE & COMPANY SAFETY FffiST DRUGGISTS the l\liners buy \Vbitmnn's F'Ine Candies MILU, BUILDING EL PASO, TEXAS

\Vbere

EI Paso, Texas

"

NATIO NAL PHOTO PRINT CO. Com mercial Photographers 420-21-22 Trust BI(Jg. A. J. REY NOLDS,

GLARDON'S THE RADIO STORE

Telephone M 2890 l\IANAGER

EVERYTIDNG 407 N. l\lesa

ELECTRICAL Main 759

'I

I

Compliments

of

MENTHAL'S (Pioneer Plaza)

J. M. BOOTH COMPANY

The finest line of Clothing and Furnis hings in the Southwest

Disinfectants, Insecticides, Liquid Soap Janitors' Supplies 322 TEXAS ST. EL PASO, TEXAS

Compliments of POMEROY'S EL P ASO TRANSFER CO.

EAT AT

BLU

I

CAFE DE LUXE The Best Place In Town 101 SAN ANTONIO ST.

EL PASO, TEXAS

·H+....-:-.r. ++-H

She: "Are Doggie:

YOU

"say,

a track

man?"

Miner,

girlie, you should see the

calotlses on m y chest from breaking

Motorist

tapes." 1"

When bette r dates are made, they won't be blind. Ask the m an who phones one.

(waving to motorist):

"Hey, I'm

going your way." (waving

back):

"So I see; but

get there before you do." "Come on, darn But

it, get hot."

it was only Hagadv's

comment

to

his shower.

.:•.:++~......... ~...:-:.

J


Professional Men VERNON L. SULLIV AN CONSULTING ENGIN]~ER 807 ~tms Bnihli1l2

A. P. COLES & BROS. RE'lll Estate, Loans 204

and

". Oregon sr.

Rents

EI Paso, TE'xll,

DR. W. E. VANDEVERE EYE. HAn,

08E

AND THROAT

J. G. MURPHY, E. M. Worthington Inc. 510 Mills Bldg. Phone M. 3646 DR. S. G. VON ALMEN Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 418 Mills Bldg. ORVILLE EGBERT, M. D. 404 Roberts Banner Bldg.

218 l\fills Bldg.

W. T. FARLEY CO. CI,OTHING FOR MEN

Schuster & Schuster M. D's. 403 1st Natl. Bank Bldg. WILLIS W. WAITE, M. D.

DR. FRANK N. BROWN, Sr. DENTIST Office Phone, l\I. 932

407路8 Mills Bhlg.

522 Roberts Banner Bldg. W. L. & C. P. BROWN, M. D's. 404 Roberts Banner Bldg.

P. H. & CHANNING BROWN D. D. 8's.

CATHCART

& MASON

X~Ray Laboratory

308路9 l\'Iills Bldg.

311 Roberts Banner Bldg. RAYMOND H. GUDGER, D. D. S. 313 Mills Bldg.

EI Paso, Texas

JAMES VANCE, M. D. 315 Mills Bldg.

PAUL GALLAGHER, M. D. 605 Mills Bldg. E. J. CUMMINS, M. D. 516 Mills Bldg.

STUDY MINING ENGINEERING in the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS The College of Mines and Metallurgy offers you tunity to prepare yourself for a professional career. cialize in Geology, Metallurgy or Mining. You can years of Academic work, Expenses here are low. For tion write to Miss Ruth Augur, Registrar.

l

every opporYou can speget two full full informa-

COME TO EL PASO

J


a;

)


Flow Sheet 1927  

The Year Book of the Texas College of Mines at El Paso