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HOT COLORS

CONFIDENT DECORATING INSPIRING SPACES INDOORS & OUT

new mix the

PERSONAL STYLE MATTERS NOW MORE THAN EVER

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Utah Rug’s offers more than 13,000 new, antique and vintage handmade rugs, from traditional to transitional and contemporary designs. Sizes range from small bathroom rugs to over-sized rugs, rounds, squares or hallway runners.

The on-site repair department is headed by renowned master rug weaver Hamid Bashir with half a century of weaving and repair experience. The only Utah rug company with a full in house cleaning facility using environmentally non-toxic herbal shampoos, and state-of-the-art dusting and drying machinery.


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I T’S M O R E T H A N A S H O W R O O M. I T’S A F E A S T F O R T H E S E N S E S.

From cooking demos to appliance test-drives, you’re invited to taste, touch, and see the potential for your kitchen in a dynamic space free of sales pressure but full of inspiration.

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801.277.3927


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GET INSPIRED Interiors for a well lived life.

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3910 S. HIGHLAND DRIVE SLC, UT 84124 801.274.2720 www.glasshouseslc.com

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IDEAS. DETAILS. RESULTS.


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LOVE YOUR HOME

Since 1981 we have been the style leader in home decor for Salt Lake and Park City. We feature beautiful furnishings from around the world, including an extensive collection of Italian pieces. Whether you’re looking to furnish an entire home or just redecorating a single room, we can help design your space according to your taste and budget. Salt Lake (801) 467-2701 2970 Highland Dr.

Park City (435) 645-7072 1890 Bonanza Dr.

Mon.-Sat. 10-6. Sunday and evenings by appointment.

www.sanfrandesign.com


landscape architecture + planning Park City 435.649.3856 | Bozeman 406.586.3387


Visit our Salt Lake City showroom and choose from over 10,000 slabs imported from 34 countries. From the rarest natural stone to beautiful engineered slabs, we have something to satisfy every taste and budget. More choices to match your unique style.

2179 South Commerce Center Drive, Suite 500 | West Valley City, UT 84120 | 801.875.4460

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BUILDING

Memories BUILDING

FOR THE STORY OF YOUR LIFE

FOR THE STORY OF OF YOUR LIFE...

The Hallmark of a Home by

SHAW

BUILDING GROUP W W W. S H A W B G . C O M


F O R

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TEMB

Bernhardt Furniture Company has been selling luxury home furnishings since 1889. Our distinctive name has become synonomous with classic comfort and accessible luxury. And while we’ve gained the trust of designers and decorators across the country, we’ve never had a standalone store in the state of Utah—until now.

V I S I T O U R F I R S T- E V E R U TA H S H OW R O O M 5 2 5 3 S O U T H S TAT E S T R E E T I N M U R R AY, N E X T T O T H O M A S V I L L E

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W A I T I N G

E

W O R T H

OP

L U X U R Y


OV ER 3 0 YE ARS AG O, W E BECAME THE E XCLUSIVE PROVIDER OF THOMASVILLE F U R N I T U R E I N T H E S TAT E O F U TA H .

T H R E E D E C A D E S L AT E R , WE’VE BECOME SO MUCH MORE.

Our name may be Thomasville, but we carry high quality home furnishings from more than 50 of the world’s top manufacturers. With furniture from Century, Bernhardt, Henredon, Lexington, Hickory Chair, Theodore Alexander, and more, we’re the first stop for designers and discerning homeowners in the state of Utah.

5253 S. State Street

801.263.1292

Murray, UT 84107

ThomasvilleUtah.com

Visit us this summer during our Remodel Sale. We’re clearing 15,000 square feet of inventory to make room for Utah’s first-ever Bernhardt Furniture store, which will be located next door to our current showroom.


Discover The Doors That Make Walls Disappear. Most people have never seen a patio door like this, one that opens wide and says “Wow!� Sierra Pacific doors glide. They fold. They create a seamless transition between your home and the outdoors. They are moving walls of glass that can slide completely into a pocket in your wall, or even go around a corner. Our windows and doors can transform your new home from basic to boastful. Discover Sierra Pacific yourself, and see how our doors can turn your walls into something so much more. For more information, call (800) 824-7744, or email: SaltLakeSales@spi-ind.com

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SUMMER 2018 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 3

58

58 ROCK OUT BY BRAD MEE

Whether it forms a poolside patio, rugged retaining wall, meandering path or outdoor sculpture, stone creates a foundation for many of Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.

ON THE COVER

PHOTO SCOT ZIMMERMAN

Unique architecture and fearless decorating animate a Park City Home, page 72.

62 72

84 MODERN FAMILY BY TESSA WOOLF

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

BETTER THAN EVER BY BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

Scott Jaffa takes on an outdated Park City home, giving it a complete overhaul—top to bottom, front to back.

COVER IMAGE BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

property is the ideal setting for a contemporary home, where nature, expressive materials and eclectic decorating drive the compelling design.

In Orem, a talented team pulls out all the stops to create a contemporary dwelling that’s fashionable, functional and, most importantly, family-friendly.

94 PLAYING THE ANGLES BY BRAD MEE

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY BY NATALIE TAYLOR PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

In Park City, a bucolic mountain

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

A hillside site inspires a Park City home’s design defined by dynamic architecture and a compelling, clean-lined décor.

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CONTENTS |

SUMMER 2018

DEPARTMENTS 52

ENTERTAINING

TIEMPO DE FIESTA BY BRAD MEE PHOTO CLAIRE MARIKA

PHOTOS BY CLAIRE MARIKA

Event designer Megan Chytraus stages a spirited celebration where vivid colors and festive details are the life of the party.

105 FROM GARDEN DINING IN & OUT

TO GRILL

52

BY MARY BROWN MALOUF

This season, think beyond the beef and go to your garden or the farmers market to get fresh-picked goodies for the grill.

108 DESIGN DIRECTORY A resourceful guide of materials, places and products

111 112

SOURCES A listing of this issue’s people, places and products THREADS

style file EDITOR’S PICK MOST WANTED DISH WANDERLUST GARDEN VARIETY ART ROOM SERVICE

39 40 42 44 46 48 50

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PRINTS CHARMING Looking for the hottest look in performance (aka outdoor/indoor) fabrics? Here you go. Find more design inspiration at utahstyleanddesign.com

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JON M. HUNTSMAN BASKETBALL COURT CUFFLINKS

GAME-USED FOOTBALL CUFFLINKS

AUTHENTIC GAME-USED COLLECTION by

AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT


ONLINE

utahstyleanddesign.com Style News

■ GALLERIES Whether you’re seeking ideas

You’re just one click away from...

If you’re looking for ideas and inspiration for your home and gardens, we deliver right to your inbox. Visit our website and sign up for our monthly newsletter.

for your kitchen, bathroom or your entire home, we have hundreds of spaces for you to see.

■ DECORATING Get your fix on the latest in

color and decorating brought to you by the Utah Style & Design team.

■ ENTERTAINING Crave creative ways to entertain at home? We’ve got the recipes, floral and decorating ideas to help you host with flair.

@utahstyledesign Follow us on Instagram for your daily dose of Utah’s dynamic design scene.

architecture interiors aerials resorts 1.800.279.2757 scotzimmermanphotography.com

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Anne-Marie Barton CLASSICAL ROOTS MODERN EXPRESSION

INTERIOR DESIGN AND INSPIRATION AL VIDEOS 801.272.8680

AMB@AMBDESIGNINC.COM

ANNEMARIEBARTON.COM

INSTAGRAM @ANNEMARIEBARTON

AMB D

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THE TEAM

PUBLISHER

SENIOR DESIGNER

EVENTS DIRECTOR

Margaret Mary Shuff

Jarom West

Trina Baghoomian

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Brad Mee

Adam Finkle

Audrey Safman

FOOD EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS

OFFICE MANAGER

Mary Brown Malouf

Scot Zimmerman Claire Marika

Melody Kester DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION

Danielle Hardy

Marie Speed

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

CONTROLLER

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Val Rasmussen CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Damon Shorter

Ashley Szanter Christie Marcy

PRODUCTION

Amanda Pratt

WRITING CONTRIBUTORS

Natalie Taylor Tessa Woolf

MARKETING DIRECTOR

ART DIRECTOR

WEB EDITOR/SOCIAL MANAGER

Jessica Ohlen Megan Bartholomew

Jeanine Miller

PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

Margaret Mary Shuff

Janette Erickson Emily Lopez Kara McNamara Hannah Williams Elizabeth Gorey Alexandria Autrey Katie Holford

Jeanne Greenberg PUBLISHERS OF

Salt Lake magazine Utah Bride & Groom Utah Style & Design Boca Raton magazine Worth Avenue magazine Mizner’s Dream Delray Beach magazine

515 S. 700 East, Suite 3-i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 Phone

/ 801-485-5100

Fax

/ 801-485-5133

Email

/ magazine@utahstyleanddesign.com

Website

/ utahstyleanddesign.com

TOMATO DAYS TOMATO SANDWICH PARTY

Saturday, Sept. 8th 11am - 2pm 800 South 600 East SLC A FREE EVENT: Enjoy a delicious heirloom tomato & pesto sandwiches - our way of saying “Thank You!” to the community that has supported us for over 29 years!

TOMATO DAYS DINE-AROUND

August 15th - September 15th Support Wasatch Community Gardens while eating a special tomato-themed menu item at participating restaurants in the Salt Lake Valley.

For more information, visit

WASATCHGARDENS.ORG Thank you to our sponsors:

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THE BEST OF

Living

Furniture | Electronics | Appliances | Flooring | Mattresses Open 11 Hours A Day • 6 Days A Week Monday-Saturday 10am – 9pm • Closed Sundays • Shop online at rcwilley.com.


Furnishing the garden.

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Design services available

Stay in Touch 1987 South 1100 East 801-364-8963 detailscomforts.com

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@utahstyledesign


Direct Importers of the World’s Finest Rugs

It’s a tree-budding, flower-blooming and colorful time of year … Stop in, visit the new arrivals and refresh your world!

We are a full service rug company, featuring the world’s finest rugs. We specialize in new, antique, and semi-antique hand-woven masterpieces from all over the world with one of the largest selections nationally. At the Historic Villa Theater

Adibs.com 3092 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City 801-484-6364


EDITOR’S NOTE

Make My Day I

’d had better days at work. You don’t need the details, but just know that I’d had my fill of battling dangling modifiers, juggling deadlines and documenting gray’s decorative demise. It was Friday, and I was ready for the weekend and a reboot. Before clocking out, I headed to Park City to scout a home. That’s when my attitude did a big 180. I pulled up to Gwen and Patrick Reddish’s surprising modern dwelling fronted by a vibrant, chartreuse-colored pivot door (page 72). Inside, the wildly creative architecture and design statements were just what I needed. Charred cedar walls? Board-formed concrete? Vibrant colors? I was smitten. I was similarly captivated the first time I saw Vince and Teresa Criscione’s house (page 94). I trekked up a steep, snowed-in driveway to reach the entry where Teresa warmly welcomed me at the front door and watched as I melted over the interior’s dazzling light and dynamic architecture. Sweeping views poured through slanted floor-to-ceiling windows, and a palette of modern forms and edited color calmed and excited me at the same time.

Group Exhibition:

I felt the same thrill in Orem, when Dave and Larissa Allred proudly walked me through their family’s contemporary glass house (page 84). A mix of lively architecture, spirited spaces and energetic, personalized colors made it crystal-clear this high-style home was designed and built specifically for the young, active clan. The fact is, expressive design always excites me, and one of the biggest perks of my job is finding it and featuring it in our pages. Another is the opportunity to meet homeowners who are passionate about creating and living with confident, personal style. This all comes to life in the following pages, where you’ll discover inspiring ideas you can adopt and make your own.

BRAD MEE, EDITOR IN CHIEF

WEST-The Effect of Land and Space

|

J u l y 2 0 - A u g u s t 31, 2 018

Kiki Gaffney

Liberty Blake

Beatrice Mandelman

Rebecca Campbell

Al Denyer

Petecia Le Fawnhawk

177 E. 200 S. Salt Lake City, UT 84111 | MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | INFO@MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | 801.355.3383

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DRAPES-SHADES-SHUTTERS-BLINDS-MOTORIZATION-UPHOLSTERY DRAPES-SHADES-SHUTTERS-BLINDS-MOTORIZATION-UPHOLSTERY WWW.PARKCITYBLIND.COM | 435.649.9665 | 1612 UTE BOULEVARD #109, PARK CITY UT WWW.PARKCITYBLIND.COM | 435.649.9665 | 1612 UTE BOULEVARD #109, PARK CITY UT


ENDURING Styles come and go. Many businesses disappear after a few short years. At Bartile, our commiment to quality and value have ensured our longevity just as our roof tiles will ensure the longevity of your roof. We have been making Utah more beautiful, one roof at a time since 1942.

75

YEAR Limited Warranty

www.bartile.com BARTILE ROOFS, INC.

725 North 1000 West, Centerville, UT 84014 Tel: 1-800-933-5038 or 801-295-3443 FAX: 801-295-3485

P R E M I U M

R O O F

T I L E


THE ART OF THE

BUILD

CREATED FOR THE WAY YOU LIVE. Whether it’s the residential place that your family calls home or the professional place where you connect with customers, the space you build must meet your unique needs. To suit your style, Northstar offers a wide variety of energy-efficient, functionally designed custom builds that range from warm and rustic mountain to sleek and ultramodern. But when it comes to the bottom line, we offer just a single option: one-fixed price. No surprises, no hidden fees and no moving targets. Our satisfied customers agree: the foundation of a successful relationship with your contractor is built on trust.

Building upon a foundation of trust

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1059 EAST 900 S., STE 201, SALT LAKE CITY | 801-485-0535 | NORTHSTARBUILDERS.COM


style file SUMMER | 2018

PHOTO ADAM FINKLE

TAKE A TUMBLER We know you’re picky about your summer drinks, so why pour into plastic? These crystal tumblers by Salviati make a strong case for treating yourself to the good stuff— glasses that are as special as the guests and drinks you serve. Salviati tumblers, $450/set of six, O.C. Tanner Jewelers, SLC

TIP

Sure they’re stunning, but the assorted patterns on these tumblers also help guests keep track of their drinks.

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style file |

MOST WANTED

1

3 2

4

5 1. Parosol brass and wicker pendant, $987, Forsey’s Fine Furniture, SLC; 2. Outdoor Square Chat table, $1,471, Leisure Living, SLC; 3. Yala Mirror, $198, Anthropologie, SLC; 4. Seagrass napkin rings, $20/set of 4, Williams Sonoma, SLC; 5. Double Vis a’ Vis in Bianco Calacatta Gold Marble by Kreoo, $30,680 plus shipping, European Marble & Granite, SLC; 6. Kettal Outdoor Basket armchair, to the trade, John Brooks Inc., SLC; 7. Caicos baskets, starting at $32, Jayson Home, jaysonhome.com

DREAM WEAVERS Wicker to rattan, straw to seagrass—woven objects give any space, indoors or out, the laid-back summer vibe we love all year long. 6

7

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style file |

DISH

BY THE SLICE Hot and heavy? Not this summer. When making pizza, ditch the dough and begin with a cool “crust” of juicy watermelon. Then pile on the toppings. Whether you like your slices sweet or savory, watermelon provides the perfect foundation for summer’s most refreshing pies.

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Cut a round piece of watermelon 1-inchthick and cut into wedges like a pizza.

SWEET Toppings: Shredded coconut, chopped mint, mixed fresh berries, Greek yogurt, slivered almonds Spread yogurt to cover watermelon, leaving room to hold the rind. Sprinkle watermelon slices with toppings as desired.

SAVORY Top watermelon slices with goat cheese, arugula, prosciutto and drizzles of balsamic glaze. Pepper to taste.


venetian tile & stone gallery our stone, your style...

Introducting

by Sicis now available Glass slabs & tile suitable for all applications. We ship material Nationwide & Overseas Visit our unique selection of slabs and tile at our showrooms 825 West 2400 South Salt lake City, UT 84119 801.977.8888

17275 Daimler Irvine Ca 92614 949.261.0146

www.venetianstonegallery.com


style file |

WANDERLUST

WRIGLEY MEMORIAL AND BOTANICAL GARDEN

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CATALINA ISLAND ESCAPE From the moment you step off the ferry, in your head, you’re already on the beach, strolling along the harbor and savoring seafood. On this SoCal island, there are many ways to escape.

DESCANSO BEACH CLUB

GARDEN-TO-SKY TRAIL

CATALINA CASINO

Located at the end of a charming boardwalk in a beautiful cove just beyond the casino, this resort-like beach club offers private cabanas and lounges with waiter service and a serene beach for swimming or sunning. Nearby, people gather around the open-air bar and restaurant and celebrate under the sun at a regular beachfront dance party complete with DJ.

The island’s most popular hike is the Garden-to-Sky Trail, an excellent extension to a botanical garden visit. The payoff is dazzling views over Catalina and the surrounding sea. The 1.1 mile trail begins at the Wrigley Memorial, but you must check in with the office of the Catalina Conservancy in town for a trail map and permits before you embark.

This iconic, circular Art-Deco structure has hosted dances and screened movies since 1929. Its guided tours are a must and include a walk on the stage. The artistically executed interior is the highlight with its massive painted and mosaic murals of a fantasy undersea world and opulent use of gold and silver leaf on period architectural details.

PHOTOS BY DON SKYPECK

A short stroll up Avalon canyon is a beautifully curated 38-acre desert garden with, at its apex, a dramatic Mediterranean-Art Deco memorial to William Wrigley Jr., of chewing gum fame. The towering memorial was built with as much native Catalina material as possible but still succeeded in achieving the look and feel of the 1930s Mediterranean coast. Quarried Catalina stones form most of the walls, local blue flagstone surfaces the ramps and terraces, and the red roof tiles and colorful handmade glazed tiles used for finishings came from the Catalina Pottery plant. The locally-sourced building is a particularly fitting memorial for Wrigley, who once owned 90 percent of the island and is responsible for its ongoing protection—he left his holdings on the island to the Catalina Conservancy to preserve them permanently.


Guild Hall Where Modern meets Traditional

Beautiful showroom ❇ Inspiration ❇ Experienced Design Team ❇ Retail ❇ To the Trade 3640 South Highland Dr. (801) 277-6534 utahguildhall.com


style file |

GARDEN VARIETY

POT SHOT Fresh herbs are a summertime staple. Plant them in containers to keep them close at hand.

WHEN YOU’RE playing chef and mixologist this summer, it’s your job to have fresh herbs ready for the picking. Nothing makes that easier than pots. Why wander far into the yard to harvest herbs when planted containers can be conveniently placed on your patio, perched on your porch or set on the windowsill? From basil to rosemary, lavender to sage, herbs thrive in portable pots and require minimum care. Just don’t fall into the oh-so-predictible clay-pot trap. Instead, seize the opportunity to give your herbs a high-style home.

HERB HOW-TO • Plant different herb varieties in the same container for a smorgasbord approach. Herbs that share soil, light and water requirements make the best roommates. • Cut or harvest herbs in the morning when the level of aromatic oil concentrations peak.

Mixed basil arrangement with copper tags, $48; mixed herbs in urn, $60, Cactus & Tropicals, SLC

• Combine varieties of the same herb—like assorted basils or thymes—for a flavorful variety of uses in cooking and cocktails. • Regularly harvest or pinch back herbs to encourage fresh growth. Leave a minimum of two sets of leaves to foster regrowth.

TOOL SHED Small gadgets can be a big help for herb lovers.

SNIP IT

Long-nosed gardening scissors, $17, Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC

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TAG IT

Copper garden markers, $1.35 each, Cactus & Tropicals, SLC

STRIP IT

Herb stripper, $8, Williams Sonoma, SLC


LIVE YOUR STYLE

FUrniTUre & inTerior DeSign IvyInteriorsSLC.com

801.486.2257

3174 S. Highland Dr. Salt Lake City, UT 84106


style file |

ART

Karen Horne’s Covent Garden Diners shown at Horne Fine Art

HAVE TALENT, WILL TRAVEL Local artist Karen Horne transforms scenes from abroad into engaging art, steeped in vivid colors and lively compositions.

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Wisteria SW 6822 Sherwin-Williams

Golden Retriever 2165-30 Benjamin Moore

INSPIRED COLORS

Vardo no. 288 Farrow & Ball

Fun Yellow SW 6908 Sherwin-Williams

BY ASHLEY SZANTER

“I like to interpret photos from my travels, then I play with the composition and adapt it. I’m not a photorealist though,” says artist and Salt Lake City resident Karen Horne. Her work, on display at Horne Fine Art, often incorporates an array of vibrant colors due to her love for both oils and pastels—the latter of which she describes as “pure chroma.” Because of her commitment to color, she often uses her talents to capture the movement and striking light of outdoor locales—particularly from her travels abroad. “In the summer, you have all that wonderful outdoor dining, and patios with umbrellas,” says Horne. And this was definitely the case in Covent Garden Diners: “It’s from Covent Garden, but it happened to be quite warm for London, so it felt almost Mediterranean. You have more time to just take everything in when you travel—enjoy the scenery and the people.”


style file |

ROOM SERVICE

NOW & THEN Tom and Cara Fox’s new kitchen embraces the past without foregoing the modern-day functionality required by their young family. Cara offers insight into how she designed this space to be as serviceable as it is sensational.

Cara Fox

WHEN TOM and Cara Fox designed and built their Holladay home’s kitchen, they looked to the past for inspiration. The couple craved an old European feel—classic, lived-in and authentic. No problem there. The two are masters at selecting and curating materials that step a room back in time with elegance and ease. They also insisted on current-day livability and practicality. As Cara explains, “Every kitchen should have timeless appeal and modern functionality.” This kitchen has both and, thanks to these pros, offers lessons to be learned. Take a close look at this working zone of the room, for example. It

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teams a floor-to-ceiling brick pizza oven, a butcher-block-topped baking island and glass shelves stacked with everyday dishes. This is a busy, much-used space for the young family of seven (plus two golden retrievers). Fortunately, the room not only weathers heavy use, but actually welcomes it. “The butcher block looks better with every new knife cut, the floor warms with traffic and wear, and the marble practically hones itself,” says Cara, who intended this all along. That may be the most impressive part of the design: not that the kitchen is remarkably beautiful, but that it gets even more so the more it is used.

GET FLOORED

To foster the look of an old Parisian apartment, Cara placed narrow European white oak planks in a traditional herringbone pattern and purposefully left them unfilled and unsanded after installation. She simply finished them with oil to allow their beauty and imperfections to shine through.


CREATE CONTRAST

Cara painted the room’s walls, ceiling and trim in Benjamin Moore’s Simply White. “A single color creates a more custom look,” she explains. She then painted the baking cabinet Benjamin Moore’s Onyx. This promoted its appearance as a separate apothecary chest and visually linked its color to the room’s black Lacanche stove.

Simply White Benjamin Moore

Onyx Benjamin Moore

EDIT THE OBJECTS

“If you want the natural beauty of a room’s materials to shine, don’t over-accessorize the space,” Cara says. This kitchen’s accessories—antique pizza peels, copper boiler and potted herbs—are not only sparse but also functional—and that’s part of their charm.

Our version: European Pizza Paddle, $179, Ballard Designs, ballarddesigns.com

PLAY WITH MARBLE

Marble was an obvious choice for Cara who craved a classic material. “I chose Calcutta marble because its warm tones pair beautifully with the room’s woods.” She selected a honed, 3 cm (1 1/4-inch) thick countertop with a square edge. “It looks authentic and not overdone.”

PHOTOS: ROOM BY SCOTT DAVIS; PORTRAIT BY LINDSAY SALAZAR

STYLE YOUR SHELVES

Open shelves are a hot ticket in today’s kitchens, but Cara looked to the past for inspiration when deciding on hers. She selected 1930sinspired French bistro shelves and mounted the brass frame to a wall clad entirely in marble. The stunning glass shelves provide an easy-to-access spot to stack everyday dishes.

1930s French Bistro Shelving, $1,895, Restoration Hardware, RH.com

BUILD WITH BRASS

For many of the accents, Cara chose brass and treated some of these hardware and plumbing pieces to acetone soaks and heavy rubs to create the aged look and feel of raw brass. “A satin finish just didn’t give the authentic look we needed,” she explains.

Eastland Star-Pattern Ring Pull, $12, House of Antique Hardware, houseofantiquehardware.com S U M M E R 2 0 1 8 | U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N

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ENTERTAINING

TIEMPO DE

fiesta

Event designer Megan Chytraus stages a spirited celebration where vivid colors and festive details are the life of the party. BY BR A D M EE PHOTOS BY CL A I R E M A R I K A

E

vent designer Megan Chytraus of Perfect Statement proves a sensational summer party doesn’t have to be about intense planning or deep-pocket spending. Instead, she suggests creating a simple and fun theme and then piling on some scene-setting tricks. Here, she stages a vibrant fiesta and shares ideas so you can do it too.

DEVELOP A THEME A theme fosters a cohesive design, says Chytraus. “You need to hone in on one idea and take it to the top level,” she explains. After deciding on a lively summer fiesta, the event designer had a clear vision that drove her choice of the colors, motifs and accents she included. “This is the perfect theme for a fun summer party, and it allowed us to throw out the rules as we went overboard with bright colors and mixed-up patterns.”

GO BEYOND BLOOMS Chytraus teamed with Sax Romney florist Ed Kubicek to create surprising arrangements teaming bright summer blooms with fresh-from-the-market peppers and a mix of cacti and succulents. For the tallest of his arrangements, Kubicek filled glass vases with large red peppers and crowned them with water-soaked floral foam from which prickly pear cacti pads mix with colorful dahlias, aster, thistle, lilies, roses and others. “We bought a big bucket of prickly pear at Rancho Market,” Chytraus explains. Kubicek also “planted” a variety of small wood boxes with little rabbit ear cacti, echinocactus, assorted pint-sized succulents and vibrant short-stemmed blooms.

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SET THE SCENE Summer is the perfect time to pile on color and character.

Striped and floral napkins, $10 each, Williams Sonoma, SLC

Succulent in wood box, $22, Cactus & Tropicals, SLC

Turquoise plastic margarita glass, $13, Williams Sonoma, SLC

Small handmade bowl, $18, Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC

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This is the perfect theme for a fun summer party.” —Megan Chytraus

DO YOURSELF (AND OTHERS) A FAVOR Chystraus and Kubicek used empty, Mexican-style tomato sauce cans as tiny planters for miniature cacti and succulents. These playful arrangements amped-up the table settings and doubled as fun party favors that guests could take home at the end of the evening.

TAKE IT OUTSIDE Unbreakable glassware and dishes are naturals for summer outdoor parties. Chystraus formed the festive place settings with a mix of patterned melamine plates and plastic tumblers that made the compositions colorful and carefree. She rejected a tablecloth and, instead, chose a woodtopped table to foster the setting’s casual vibe and anchor the riotous mix of elements with a solid, warm-toned wood surface.

PILE ON THE DETAILS Chystraus elevated the style and fun-factor of the party with smile-making details at every turn. She staged mini bottles of Tabasco Sauce across the table top, accented settings with personalized place cards, hung streamers and bunches of paper flowers on walls and peppered the scene with, you guessed it, fresh peppers. Chystraus shopped Mexican markets, local nurseries, Pier 1, World Market and other spots for fiesta-style summertime accents. “They are so easy to find this time of year,” she says. Small votive candles sparkled in the soft light, while colorfully striped blankets and lightweight garden stools enabled guests to move to the lawn and lounge during the balmy evening.

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On the DEPT TK

BY BR A D M EE

Rocks

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PHOTO BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

Whether it forms a poolside patio, rugged retaining wall, meandering path or outdoor sculpture, stone creates a foundation for many of Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.


2 1. Over-the-Top Wall “A wall’s height dictates the sizes of the stones we use to build it,” says Cory Chapman, owner of Rockscapes. He staggered tightly fit stones—ranging from very large at the base to smaller at the top—to create this towering retaining wall in North Salt Lake. Water cascades over the edge of a massive stone into a pool below. Chapman sourced the perfect stone to throw the water from the ledge, out and over the stairs and into the pool.

ABOVE: PHOTO BY DOUG BURKE

2. Modern Moment In Park City, a small backyard gets a bigstyle overhaul. “Everybody wants to do mountain contemporary in Old Town, but they are limited by what they can do from the streetscape,” says landscape architect Seth Bockholt, principal of Bockholt Landscape Architecture. “But in the backyard, it’s no holds barred.” He and his team creatively integrated four contrasting stone elements. A colorful,

vertically staged marble slab towers over the patio of honed, non-slip basalt pavers bordered in Mexican Beach cobbles. Nearby, a salt-and-pepper granite fire feature grounds the space. The dark stones absorb the sunlight to help warm the mountain patio, and the mixed materials add interest and space-expanding dimension. “A single stone would make it feel too stark and small,” Bockholt says.

3. Hobbit House Landscape designer Dean Anesi, principal of Urban Garden Company, created a large berm to hide a bike path and garage, as well as to give height to a water feature on its backside. A “hobbit house,” made of local river stone from the home’s Big Cottonwood Creek area, tucks into the berm and features a red brick ceiling and handcrafted door and window. Plants play a part, too. “Whimsical plantings accentuate the storybook look of the playhouse,” Anesi says.

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4 5 To shape the terraces of a Park City property, landscape architect Seth Bockholt designed elegant curved walls to create a contrast between the site’s organic forms and the house’s hard edges. Using no footings, he designed the flexible, dry-stacked stone walls to move with the ground as it naturally shifts. Bockholt chose stone from the site and nearby Browns Stone quarries to form the walls, patio floor and raised fire pit, fostering a natural look and feel for the design.

5. Slowly Paced Path In Salt Lake City, landscape designer Willie Eschenfelder bordered a tranquil stream with rocks and select plantings to make the water feature look freeform and natural. Informal paths of crushed limestone—softened by ground cover along their edges—slow the pace as they meander through lush gardens and connect to stone steps that traverse the water.

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ABOVE: PHOTO BY DOUG BURKE, LEFT: PHOTO BY ADAM FINKLE

4. Curve Appeal


Cory Chapman, Rockscapes

Rock The House With breathtaking views, this North Salt Lake home and its landscape appear to have been carved from stone. Cory Chapman, owner of Rockscapes, designed, sourced and installed the stone features throughout the challenging hillside property. “We look at a property and see opportunities,” Chapman says. Here, he saw many. At every turn, stone shapes features that showcase the material at its best, solid in both function and form.

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Flames rise from a fire pit built on a stone patio leading to a negativeedge pool. Water pours into the pool from a large stone structure housing stairs and a hidden waterslide that goes through the falling water.

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For the home’s driveway, Chapman selected large stone slabs and cut them into smaller stones on site to create the timeless, random pattern. “We didn’t want them all the same color, so we chose from a variety of pieces to get the right mix,” he says.

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PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

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Running between the sidewalk and a 25-foot-high retaining wall, this babbling brook appears to naturally run from mountains into the home’s landscape below.

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Water spills from tall stone columns, over a bed of stones and into a stream that flows below a large stone slab that serves as a bridge. Stone benches offer front-row seats for the sights and sounds.

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BETTER than EVER

BEFORE

CHANGES MADE • Removed old windows, including a large arched window. Replaced them with squared versions raised to provide privacy from the home’s front • Removed yellow wood from ceiling, fireplace and moldings • Replaced flat, stone-faced fireplace with three-sided, horizontally oriented version in textured limestone • Raised the floor to match the level of the adjoining spaces

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Scott Jaffa gives an outdated Park City a complete overhaul, top to bottom, front to back. BY BR A D M EE PHOTOS BY SCOTT ZI M M ER M A N

BEFORE

CHANGES MADE • Separated the entry from the garages with an independent roof • Articulated the flat facade and added horizontal and vertical cedar siding in complementary colors • Extended living space above the garages while eliminating the outdated triangular shape by creating new rooflines • Added windows with horizontal mullions and rectangular panes to reinforce the contemporary design

G

olden-toned timbers? Choppy floor plan? Arched windows? So yesteryear. “The house needed to be brought into the 21st-century,” says architect/builder Scot Jaffa about the 1991 home he recently remodeled in Park Meadows—a Park City neighborhood enjoying sky-rocketing desirability and property values. As Jaffa explains, “People expect much more from homes here than they did years ago.” A lot more. Like other residences built decades ago, the house lagged far behind in style, livability and, perhaps most importantly for the clients who purchased the investment property, resale value. The house was extremely outmoded, but it was structurally sound and had a workable envelope, so Jaffa and his clients decided to save it rather than scrap it. To transform the property, Jaffa addressed everything from architecture to design and finishes, giving this 27-year-old home a new lease on life.

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BEFORE

CHANGES MADE • Replaced old windows with larger versions featuring horizontal mullions and squared-shapes that reinforce the contemporary design • Changed out a closed-in staircase with a freestanding steel alternate • Painted the walls with Sherwin-William’s Whitetail • Transformed the landing closet into an expansive loft encased in metal-mesh railing • Replaced a main-level closet with a glass-doored wine room

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Architect Scott Jaffa, CEO of Jaffa Group

ARCHITECTURE “It was like a witch’s hat,” says Jaffa describing the house’s shape. His goal: modernize the form and exterior detailing while working with the overall structure. To break up the triangular shape, he altered rooflines as he updated the exterior and added 800 square-feet of living space above the existing garages. He introduced horizontal lines and dimensional features to articulate the existing flat, plain facade and separated the entry from the garages by creating an independent flat roof. “Making the entry independent created a sense of arrival to the home,” he explains. He also changed the exterior’s material palette and color to create a contemporary feel while respecting the existing fabric of the neighborhood. He also modified the back of the home and redesigned the patios and decks to make the outdoor living areas inviting and connected to the refreshed landscape.

DESIGN “The interior simply needed to be cleaned up and opened up,” Jaffa explains. The transformation begins directly inside the new front door. Enlarged windows draw the eye from the openedup entry, through the home and out into the mountain landscape. “I like to walk into a home and immediately be drawn to views,” Jaffa says. To foster openness on the main level, he decompartmentalized rooms and eliminated level changes allowing the kitchen, living, dining and

BEFORE

CHANGES MADE • Replaced paneled double doors with a single, wide contemporary door inset with horizontal glass panes • Removed the low, wood-covered ceiling • Eliminated yellow-toned wood base and case • Displayed an oversized “Marilyn” painting by DeVon to inject surprise and fun to the entry

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BEFORE

family room areas to flow seamlessly into one another. Jaffa raised the sunken living room’s floor to make the space feel larger. He enlarged and reconfigured the decades-old kitchen, transforming it with modern cabinets, appliances, fixtures and finishes. He removed a wall separating the kitchen and living areas and installed a statement-making metaland-glass shelf unit between them. Jaffa similarly opened the stairway and second level above. He removed a walled-in staircase and replaced it with a freestanding steel version detailed with wood treads. The new

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staircase purposefully faces away from the public areas of the home. “This subtly indicates that its primary use is for the owners to access more private spaces upstairs,” Jaffa explains. There, a new loft overlooks the open living areas below. The architect also extended the second level over the garages for a new en-suite bedroom, second laundry room and office. He transformed the existing master bedroom with new windows, a corner fireplace and a remodeled ensuite bathroom adding rich marble, an enlarged window and a modern freestanding tub.

CHANGES MADE • Removed wall separating kitchen from the dining area and enlisted Carriage House Cabinets to handcraft glass-and-metal cabinets that hang from the ceiling • Expanded the kitchen into the family room space and removed a separating wall • Replaced outdated features and fixtures with professional-grade appliances, reconfigured modern cabinetry and stone countertops • Changed the primary sink location from wallfacing to beneath a large view window


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BETH ANN SHEPHERD

ON APPEAL Beth Ann Shepherd, principle of Dressed Design, created a décor with broad appeal for this remodeled investment property. She shares a few of her tricks of the trade. BEFORE

REFRESHING WHITE Shepherd painted the walls with her favorite white, Sherwin-William’s Whitetail. “It makes everything look clean and fresh and creates the perception of more space.”

SPACE-EXPANDING MIRRORS

CHANGES MADE • Rid the room of yellow-tone woods and beams • Added a steel corner fireplace • Placed the TV above the fireplace so that it would not interfere with views • Replaced windows including an arched version that was difficult to drape for privacy

The designer integrated large, custom mirrors throughout, including those flanking the living room’s revamped fireplace. “Mirrors are so important,” she says. “They make a room look alive and active.”

HEAD-TURNING ART Shepherd introduced oversized custom art pieces featuring playful themes, including the entry’s “Marilyn” by pop artist DeVon. “People come to Park City to have fun, and they want their homes to be fun, too.”

LAYERED TEXTURES She rejected busy patterns and relied instead on texture to deliver depth and dimension. “Tactile furnishings and materials add warmth and interest,” says Shepherd, whose choices include the living room’s leather chairs, mohair sofa, striped wool rug and rift-oak-topped table.

COLOR-POPPED NEUTRALS Shepherd chose a mix of light neutrals for the décor. “We wanted to warm and open the spaces, and this palette does exactly that,” she says. The designer animated the interior with colorful, strategically placed art and accessories.

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FINISHES and FURNISHINGS “From the start, our primary directive was to remove all of the yellow woods, arched windows and logs,” Jaffa says. These dramatically updated the interior, as did adding larger wood windows and painting their frames to resemble metal. “I love the industrial look of steel windows and how their dark frames accentuate views,” Jaffa says. New white-oak floors treated with a custom white-gray stain infuse the interior with warmth. “People are moving away from colder grays to shades with more taupe.” From this grain-rich wood to sleek steel, leathered quartzite countertops to smooth drywall, a mix of dissimilar surfaces adds depth

and character throughout. “A house should be about contrasting textures,” Jaffa says. Interior designer Beth Anne Shepherd, principal of Dressed Design, agrees. She furnished the home, masterfully integrating elements, including texture-rich materials, custom mirrors, large-scale art and strategically selected furniture that maximize the interior’s appeal. “The right furniture can make a space appear 35 percent larger,” says Shepherd, who stages luxury homes for many of her clients. As Jaffa explains, “Our goal was to create an open, fresh, modern interior and a warm mountain modern exterior.” In the end, that’s exactly want they did.


BEFORE

CHANGES MADE • Replaced window with larger modern alternate • Added a freestanding tub • Installed new cabinets, fixtures and finishes • Introduced wire-brushed, leather-finished marble flooring and polished marble shower walls • Replaced wall-to-wall vanity mirror and light soffit with two framed mirrors paired with three modern pendant lights

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Homes

PHOTO SCOT ZIMMERMAN

Dynamic architecture shapes the allure of an unforgettable Park City home, page 94.

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Bohemian Rhapsody In Park City, a bucolic mountain property is the ideal setting for a contemporary home, where breathtaking nature, expressive materials and eclectic elements drive the compelling design. BY NATALIE TAYLOR PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

A shou-sugi-ban wall contrasts with boardformed concrete walls in the great room. A cantilevered fireplace hearth extends directly onto the patio where it serves as a bench. OPPOSITE: The welcoming foyer features an engaging mix of art pieces including an antique chest, hand-thrown Buddha statue by Genkey and a Nine Francois photograph of a sheep.

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“I

t’s not how old you are, it’s how you are old.” This statement by author Jules Renard captures the challenge Gwen and Patrick Reddish faced when they considered the condition of their beloved 105-year-old farmhouse after 14 years of residency. The Park City couple treasured the Thayne’s Canyon house, but, when they had to wear camping gear to survive the drafty interior’s wintertime chill, they knew it was time for an update. Initially, they wanted to remodel, but, with a foundation beyond repair, they knew they had to start from scratch. “It was heartbreaking to tear it down,” Patrick recalls. “I loved that home.” The Reddishes faced a second dif-

ficult decision: What to do with the property’s veritable forest of Norway spruce, blue spruce and cottonwoods. “Our neighbor planted them 76 years ago,” says Gwen. “Patrick and I were committed to saving them; we weren’t going to cut them down.” Enter architects John Sparano, Anne Mooney and Seth Striefel, principals at Sparano + Mooney Architecture. This team designed an inspired house that saved the trees and fit perfectly in the vernacular of the old farmstead site. Gwen—an art teacher, artist and landscape designer—started by researching iconic Scandinavian and European farmhouse forms. “We simplified and updated the traditional Homeowners Gwen and Patrick Reddish

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Concrete steps lead from the great room into the entry where an oversized pivot door opens to the wooded property. OPPOSITE: The wild, natural site informs the home’s façade, composed of organic elements such as Corten steel, charred wood siding and stone. An oversized chartreuse pivot door defines the entry

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The living room, dining room and kitchen are all connected by concrete slab floors and a large window wall that opens to a back patio. Douglas fir beams, stained black, add crisp detail to the long and narrow space. A Danish 1963 Horst Bruning sofa, Arco lamp and classic Charles Eames chaise furnish the living space while art animates it: Mother Nature commissioned by Dolan Gieman, Owl by Jay Kelley, and Poppies by Donald Sultan.

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forms to give the architecture a modern attitude,” Sparano explains. The 4,300-square-foot home features a long, narrow barn form that weaves in and out of the trees. “It’s approximately 18- to 22feet deep throughout,” says Gwen. The two-story home features three bedrooms, four bathrooms, a great room, media room and library. Patrick—a ski guide and photographer—wanted to maintain the experience of an old house in an established environment, so they kept or recycled as much of the materials from the original house as possible. For example, an existing silo made by architect Hank Lewis, now serves as a home office. “Petrified wood on the site inspired us to think about how materials can change over time,” says Mooney. “The exterior combines stone, charred cedar and Corten steel that expresses time as it rusts. It doesn’t look like a new house. In fact, it started aging during construction.”

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Nature informed the home’s design throughout. Inside and out, the team included walls featuring shou sugi ban, an ancient Japanese technique of charring wood to preserve it without using chemicals. The rich, organic texture adds captivating contrast to neighboring walls of board-formed concrete. The site is a private meadow with commanding views of Thayne’s Canyon, so the house was designed to seamlessly reach into the environment at every turn. In the great room, for example, the fireplace features a cantilevered concrete hearth that extends directly onto the patio. “It’s both a bench and a hearth, and it draws the eye out onto the incredible landscape,” Mooney explains. Towering trees surrounding the media room give it a dark, cozy atmosphere. “The corner window has a strong connection to the dense canopy of the conifers just outside,” says Sparano. “We

TOP LEFT: Collections of treasured objects, beloved books and favorite photos fill the shelves of a cozy, light-filled library located just steps from the kitchen and great room spaces. TOP RIGHT: Large, open counter and bar areas offer ample work space in the airy kitchen featuring a recycled barnwood floor, engineered wood cabinets and a Caesarstone-topped island. OPPOSITE: The floating oak-and-steel-beam stairs are designed to connect the exterior and interior through natural materials. Charred shou-sugiban walls provide a texture-rich backdrop for the banister’s laser-cut metal panels, inspired by a Moorish design reminiscent of both flowers and snowflakes. Rabbit and Goat painting by Brian McGuffey.


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played with scale and employed a low ceiling to create an intimate space with a fireplace to reinforce this connection.” Light changes dramatically through the house as it connects to the breathtaking views. “In the kitchen, the double-height ceiling brings southern light into the space,” explains Striefel. “And in the entry, the open stairs look straight out onto the meadow.” To play up the lively melange of organic elements, the couple kept as much of their original artwork and furnishings as possible. “The house was finished with a neutral palette of black, gray and white,” explains Andrew Parker, owner of Andrew Parker Construction. “But with Patrick’s photos and Gwen’s art, the home came alive with vibrant colors. Gwen really drove the vision and kept us focused.” Throughout, the couple kept the truth of both the building and the setting. “The downstairs concrete floor is warm while the upstairs floor is natural wood,” says Parker. “Just like barns of yesteryear.” Of course, the warmth doesn’t go unappreciated. Today, Gwen and Patrick have as much love for this home as the old farmhouse it replaced, and, what’s more, they don’t have to wear jackets indoors to enjoy it.

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The architecture anchors the home with soulful private spaces, including this media room. Threedimensional ceramic tile clads the fireplace while a floating menagerie of colorful glass lights, purchased at a roadside stall in Mexico, sparkle in the light of a window.

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ARTFUL LIVING 1. A collection of original art pieces and accessories delivers personal style and lively forms to the decor. 2. Bright light and views of the meadow flood through the open staircase and spill into the entry. 3. Through a rusted metal railing, one catches a glimpse of a front-of-thehouse grass roof that forms a verdant upper deck. 4. A colorful sculpture and a large, chartreuse pivot door provide a strong clue of the bold style waiting inside the home.

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The back patio makes a subtle elevation change as it transitions from the house to the site. The inside cantilevered hearth extends to the patio and serves as a bench. Vibrant furniture welcome guests to enjoy space, soak in the hot tub and gaze over the meadow beyond.

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MODERN

family

In Orem, a talented team pulls out all the stops to create a contemporary dwelling that’s fashionable, functional and, most importantly, family-friendly. BY T ESSA WOOLF

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PHOTOS BY SCOT ZI M M ER M A N


A floating staircase, large landing and glass-walled, upstairs loft overlook a spacious and light-filled great room below. A towering fireplace clad with horizontally oriented wood panels warms the dĂŠcor while cool concrete floors and fresh white walls visually link the living spaces.

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hen you hear the term “family home,” you likely picture a wholesome Leave it to Beaver-style abode. But today’s modern families are living in spaces that offer far more design drama than the set of a sitcom. Case in point: Dave and Larissa Allred’s contemporary glass house in The Berkshires, a luxury neighborhood located in Orem. “We knew we wanted a modern home with a lot of glass, but we also wanted something kid- and family-friendly,” says Larissa. The couple’s wish list included a large play area, a killer master suite, a separate kids space, indoor-outdoor living and views for days. They also wanted to incorporate mid-century modern furniture and a minimalist, less-is-more approach to interior design.

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To make their dream home a reality, they turned to the team at Ezra Lee Design & Build, including principal Ezra Lee, architect Kelly Swan and senior interior designer Landon Taylor. “A young family’s lifestyle is a reflection of how they set up their home,” says Taylor. “There’s less stuff, more technology and everything is lighter and brighter.” “The modern family wants a home that’s efficient, with amenities in cross-utilized spaces so the family can function,” adds Lee. “They want to do more in their home than just eat and sleep— they want to recreate.” To that end, the team designed a large entertainment area and indoor recreation center on the home’s bottom level. “Our top priority was to create epic experiences for our


A pivoting front door frames a view through the two-story entry into the great room and swimming pool beyond. Opposite: The design and layout of the home were dictated by the wedge-shaped lot and the surrounding landscape. “It was all about the views,” says architect Kelly Swan. “The architecture is impactful, but the interior is clean, simple, and minimal.”

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Open to the spacious living area, the kitchen boasts open shelves, a waterfall island and quartz countertops. TOP LEFT: The entry’s two-story, sculptural staircase features cable rails and floating wood treads that allow light to flow through its large structure. BOTTOM LEFT: A dazzling modern chandelier brightens the kitchen and dining areas.

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In the master bathroom, a cantilevered platform with square openings overhangs the vanity, defining this area of the high-ceilinged space and making it feel cozier. OPPOSITE: The master’s custom headboard wall is made from individual, vinyl-leather wall panels, while the fireplace is crafted of interlocking steel panels. The high ceiling’s dark hue makes the room feel more intimate.

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children,” says Dave. The space includes a home theater, stage for music, poker and pool tables, home gym, sports court, golf simulator, and a combined rock climbing wall and foam pit with a jumping platform off of the kitchen. Naturally, “It’s the kids favorite area of the home,” says Dave. Epic play zone? Check. The home’s non-traditional floor plan fulfilled more of the Allreds’ wishes too. The great room, kitchen, dining room, and a luxurious master suite are all on the main floor, while the children’s bedrooms and a communal kids’ loft are located upstairs. “We built a loft upstairs that all of the kids bedrooms encircle where they can do their homework, play games, watch movies and socialize,” explains Dave. Peace and quiet for mom and dad? Double check. “The floor plan creates privacy for Dave and Larissa, and there’s an independence factor for the kids, as well an element of security,” says Swan. But that doesn’t mean the kids are completely out of sight—a large glass wall along the loft area located above the open kitchen allows Dave and Larissa to keep an eye on their kin. “The design of the home is very much about visibility and transparency,” adds Swan. The overall glass structure and open, fluid layout have the added bonus of producing lots of natural light, beautiful views of the surrounding valley and mountains and a seamless connection to the outside of the home. Sliding glass doors open up to an outdoor pool, hot tub and fire pit. Easy indooroutdoor living and sweeping views? Triple check. By the time the Allreds moved in, all of their wishes had been granted. “The kids love the home, and we’re able to spend time together both indoors and outdoors,” says Dave. What more could you ask for in a family home than that?

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Sliding glass doors open from the great room and master suite to the backyard featuring outdoor living areas, a large pool, hot tub, fire pit, trampoline and playground. BOTTOM LEFT: Homeowners Dave and Larissa Allred gather with their children (from left): Cadance, Aria, London and Mason. OPPOSITE: The lower level’s combined rock climbing wall and foam pit is directly below a jumping platform located off the kitchen above.

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Walls of floor-to-ceiling glass and the side of a massive stone pillar frame the cube-shaped entry. A Foscarini chandelier hangs above the pivoting walnut door, imported limestone floors and a glass-doored, built-in closet by Poliform.

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PLAYING THE ANGLES A hillside site inspires a Park City home’s design, defined by dynamic architecture and a compelling, clean-lined dÊcor. BY BR A D M EE PHOTOS BY SCOT ZI M M ER M A N

On the back deck, the floating hearth of a corner fireplace juts from a stone monolith shared by the great room where a twin fireplace resides inside. Floor-to-ceiling angled windows capture mountain and golf course views from cantilevered interior spaces that include the great room, office and master suite.

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Homeowners Vince and Teresa Criscione.

I European white oak floors span the great room where white walls and ceilings allow the dynamic architecture to take center stage. Santa & Cole pendant lights crown a dining table surrounded by B&B Italia chairs. A custom sofa by Baker sits on a wool rug from Regency Royal.

f ever there were a home that takes advantage of its site, it’s the Park City residence architect Michael Upwall designed for homeowners Vince and Teresa Criscione. Located in the Glenwild community, this decidedly contemporary structure—clad in light-toned cedar—sits high on its hillside property. The house looks deeply rooted to the land on its entry side, yet poised to take flight on the back, as cantilevered sections jut out toward the mountains and golf course below. “The design is definitely sitedriven,” says Vince, who performed as the general contractor for the project. “We wanted it to be one with the side of the mountain.” When guests approach the home from its long, steep driveway, they enter a motor court framed by the house and an attached four-door garage. The large garage hunkers into the mountainside to downplay its presence. “We wanted

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The entertainment-oriented Poliform kitchen features double islands of Spessart oak and white, back-painted glass. Artemide pendant lights team with Zanotta barstools, a Herman Miller lacquered table and Gaggenau appliances to furnish the clean-lined, contemporary space.

to prioritize the human factor into the arrival, and sometimes garages can challenge that intimate entry experience,” says Upwall. The architect added “lantern-like” translucent glass garage doors and an outdoor fireplace at the front door to serve as glowing, welcoming gestures. “It’s about a sense of arrival, the first experience” he says. Memorable experiences continue inside a large, pivoting walnut door where light and mountain views flood the cube-shaped entry through expansive walls of glass. There, a massive pillar of stone—one of three that anchor the structure—helps form the entry space and

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counters the windows with its heroic bulk and scale. “The three monoliths ground the house, allowing the rest of the architecture to spring from them and fly,” Upwall says. And fly it does. The main passageway’s design, for example, soars. Enclosed by the stone pillar on one side and a wall of floor-to-ceiling, angled glass panes on the other, the broad “bridge” feels like a suspended walkway connecting the entry to the great room. “The windows actually lean out,” Upwall explains. “They engage one with the views much more so than if they were just perpendicu-


Framed by angled walls of stone and floor-to-ceiling glass, a bridge-like passage leads from the entry to the great room. A wide set of steps connects the spaces, following the natural rise of the site as the level of the main living area ascends with the land.

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In the master bathroom, angled windows frame a cantilevered space anchored by a Phillip Starck freestanding tub by Duravit. Butterflied marble slabs TK tktktk from Italia Granite perform ABOVE: Tk tktktk like art underfoot.

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The view-laden master bedroom cantilevers out above the tops of the landscape’s gambel oaks, creating a tree-house effect. A custom Cumulus pendant hangs above a woven leather bed by McGuire.

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1

2

ELEMENTS OF STYLE 1. A pair of walnut-framed, velvet upholstered chairs lend a shot of color and modern form to the great room’s light-filled living area. 2. A small fireplace provides visitors with a warm welcome near the front door. 3. Inset inside the entry area’s stone pillar, the powder room boasts a Stone Forest limestone vanity, hand-blown glass pendants, a waterfall faucet and walls dressed in Phillip Jeffries grasscloth. 4. Palacek’s Beacon pendant hangs above the McGuire table and chairs in an outdoor dining area located outside the great room, just steps from the main deck. 3

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The front of the home sits low on the land while the back stands two-stories tall and reaches out over the landscape. The four-door garage tucks into the mountainside to visually diminish its scale. Landscape design by Pete Gillwald, Land Solutions.

lar.” Angled windows recur throughout the home, creating striking architectural statements while expanding enviable vistas at every turn. In the light-filled great room, a wood-burning fireplace notches into the corner of a second stone monolith that extends to an adjoining outdoor deck and rises from the lower level through the roof. “We didn’t want the rock to cover walls, we wanted it to be foundational,” Vince says. White walls and ceilings balance the stones’ mass and accentuate the interior’s bold architectural forms. “The architecture is the art of the home,” Theresa says. For that reason, she and Vince teamed with interior designer Dawn Keil to choose clean-lined, contemporary furnishings and fixtures— including those in the spacious kitchen—that, while eye-catching, allow the structure and scenery to prevail. They also edited the decor’s palette to soft, natural materials and a single hue. “Eggplant is the only color except those in the art,” Theresa says. This tightly choreographed design unifies the interior spaces and flows naturally into the master suite. There,

serene sleeping quarters and a gleaming, marblefloored bathroom feel like they’re floating in air as they overlook the site steeply sloping away from their end of the home. Angled floor-to-ceiling windows fortify the feeling. “We call it the treehouse effect,” Vinnie says. When the Crisciones aren’t enjoying the breathtaking views from inside the house, they’re living with them on the expansive deck and covered patio located off the great room. These outdoor areas sit level with the sloped mountainside, allowing the couple to easily step onto and connect with their land, where wildlife thrives—from elk to bobcats, moose to owls. Like its lively site, the house is dynamic. “It’s not static, it’s like a sculpture in mid-flight,” Upwall explains. The structure follows the slope of the land, reaches out to the views, embraces surrounding nature, pulls in light and captivates its owners every day. “Most architecture looks better on paper than in person, but this house is just the opposite,” Theresa says.”It looks better in person, and we love it more and more the longer we live here.”

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DINING IN & OUT

from GARDEN to GRILL We love summer, grilling and fresh-from-the-garden foods. No wonder we get so fired-up when they join forces. This season, think beyond the beef and go to your yard or the farmers’ market to get fresh-picked goodies for the grill. Need some ideas? We have plenty. BY M A RY BROW N M ALOU F

Utah peaches capture the flavor of summer. For the perfect appetizer, pair grilled peach slices with mozzarella then wrap in prosciutto. Garnish with rosemary sprigs.

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GRILLED WATERMELON RECIPE AND IMAGE COURTESY OF WATERMELON.ORG

DINING IN & OUT

FIRE AWAY FRESH GARDEN FRUITS and vegetables are the delight of summertime—full of fresh sweetness when they are harvested and eaten before the natural sugars turn to starch. What could be better? Well, give them a grilling. The caramelization and the smoky aroma from food meeting fire are things you can’t achieve with any other cooking method.

Three Easy Meals

1 2 3

Fold grilled vegetables inside a flour tortilla, sprinkle with cheese and serve with avocado salad for a light summer supper. Top grilled vegetables with a poached or fried egg and serve on toasted peasant bread.

Cut grilled vegetables into bite-size pieces, toss with soaked bulgar wheat, fresh chopped parsley and mint in a lemon-olive oil dressing for a savory twist on tabouleh.

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GRILLED WATERMELON AND KALE SWEET AND SMOKY GRILLED WATERMELON BALANCES NUTRIENT-DENSE AND BITTER KALE INGREDIENTS: 1 bunch dinosaur kale 2 cups torn baby kale 1 watermelon small seedless, cut into 1-inch-thick wedges bottle olive oil varied amount salt and pepper 6 ounces goat cheese, crumbled 1/2 cup silvered toasted almonds For the Dressing: 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 clove garlic, crushed 1 tablespoon honey varied amount salt and black pepper

Preheat your grill to high. Brush the watermelon with olive oil and season with salt and pepper on both sides. Grill each side for 2-3 minutes or until you have nice grill marks. Transfer the watermelon to a large plate and set aside. Remove the stems from the kale and cut the kale into thin strips (julienne). Place in a large bowl and top with the crumbled goat cheese and the slivered almonds. Whisk the dressing ingredients together in a liquid measuring cup until well-combined. Drizzle over the salad and toss to coat. Serve the kale salad with a wedge or two of the watermelon.


How To:

GO-TO GRILL TOOLS

FRUIT + FIRE • Cut fruit into large pieces so that it keeps its form as it heats up and doesn’t fall between the grates. • Use skewers and baskets to grill small fruits like strawberries, plums and kumquats.

Remember, a clean grill is a healthy grill. Weber 12-inch grill brush, $8. Orson Gygi, SLC

• Most fruits cook best with lower heat. Put them on the outside edges of your grill, not over the hottest spot. • Before placing fruit, heat grill to medium high for 10 minutes, then scrape and oil the grates. • Brush fruits with oil before grilling, and select a neutral-tasting oil that works with high heat, such as safflower and grapeseed oils. • Choose firm, not-overly-ripe fruit that will maintain its structure as it heats.

Keep your goodies out of the flames. Non-Stick Barbecue Skewers, $10/set of 12, Crate & Barrel, Murray

Brush on the flavor. Traeger silicone basting brush, $12, Orson Gygi, SLC

No more falling through the racks. BergHOFF Carbon Steel medium universal grill basket, $23. Bed Bath & Beyond, SLC

Handle with care (and don’t get burned). Tongs, $20, Williams Sonoma, SLC

• The natural sugars in the fruits require a lower cooking temperature to prevent the sugars from burning. For caramelized, but not burnt fruit, cook your fruits over indirect heat or wait until the coals begin to die out and the temperature is less intense. • To get grill marks and char, grill fruit over high heat for about 3 minutes without moving or flipping it (depending on fruit’s size and thickness). Turn and cook for another 1 to 3 minutes.

Hot Off The Grill Utah chefs are on top of the new grilling trend,serving delectables we love on local menus. PROVISIONS, 3364 S. 2300 East, SLC, slcprovisions.com Grilled baby Gem lettuce, dates with smoked bacon ranch dressing and blue cheese ALAMEXO CANTINA, 1059 E. 900 South, SLC, alamexocantina.com Elotes—Mexican-style grilled corn with cotija cheese and crema. TAQUERIA 27, 149 E. 200 South, SLC (and multiple locations), taqueria27.com Grilled pear and roasted beet tacos in flour tortillas with spinach and balsamic drizzle. EVA, 317 Main St., SLC, evaslc.com Grilled asparagus with jalapeño aioli, pancetta, romano cheese and a poached egg.

Eva’s grilled asparagus

• Have your meal ready to serve before you start grilling fruits and vegetables. They cook quickly and are best served right from the grill. • Try grilled fruit as a side dish with your main protein— pineapple and banana with fish, peaches with chicken, apples with pork.

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DESIGN DIRECTORY

Landscape by Rockscapes. See more of this project on page 58.

DESIGN DIRECTORY Architectural Elements and Details

Beauty & Wellness

jacksonandleroy.com

Form Medical Spa

Northstar Builders

Inside Out Architecturals

6322 S. 3000 East, #170, SLC 801-513-3223 formmedspa.com

1486 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-485-0535 northstarbuilders.com

Shaw Building Group

Walker Home Design

Builders/Contractors/ Construction

801-930-9499 walkerhomedesign.com

Bartile

Flooring

Arts and Antiques

725 N. 1000 West, Centerville 801-295-3443 bartile.com

Modern West fine art 177 E. 200 South, SLC 801-355-3383 modernwestfineart.com

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Jackson & Leroy 4980 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-277-3927

801-943-6417 shawbg.com

Adib’s Rug Gallery 3092 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-484-6364 or 800-445-RUGS adibs.com

PHOTO BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

3410 S. 300 West, SLC 801-487-3274 insideoutarchitecturals.com


Utah Rugs

John Brooks Inc

2876 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-359-6000 utahrugs.com

579 E. 100 South, SLC 303-698-9977 johnbrooksinc.com

Furniture

Leisure Living

Bernhardt Furniture Store

2208 S. 900 East, SLC 801-487-3289 leisurelivinginc.com

5253 South State Street, Murray 801-263-1292

RC Willey Details Comforts For The Home 1987 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-364-8963 detailscomforts.com

Gatehouse No. 1 672 S. State St., Orem 801-225-9505 gatehousestyle.com

Guild Hall 3640 Highland Dr. #1, SLC 801-277-6534 utahguildhall.com

Draper

13300 S. 200 West, Draper 801-567-2200

Murray

861 E. 6600 South, Murray 801-261-6800

Orem

693 E. University Parkway, Orem 801-227-8800

801-774-2800 rcwilley.com

San Francisco Design

Salt Lake City

2970 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-467-2701, 800-497-2701

Park City

1890 Bonanza Dr., Park City 435-645-7072, 800-497-7072 sanfrandesign.com

Thomasville of Utah 5253 S. State St., Murray 801-263-1292 ThomasvilleUtah.com

Ward & Child— The Garden Store

Riverdale

678 S. 700 East, SLC 801-595-6622

Salt Lake City

Home Accessories, Stationery and Jewelry

4045 Riverdale Rd., Riverdale 801-622-7400 2301 S. 300 West, SLC 801-461-3800

Syracuse

1693 W. 2700 South, Syracuse

Ari Diamonds 807 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale

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DESIGN DIRECTORY

Kitchen and Bath Showrooms

Media/Television

O.C. Tanner Jewelers

European Marble and Granite

15 S. State St., SLC 801-532-3222 octannerjewelers.com

2575 S. 600 West, SLC 801-974-0333 europeanmarbleandgranite.net

101 S. Wasatch Dr., SLC 801-581-6625 kuer.org

Tabula Rasa

Mountain Land Design

330 Trolley Square, SLC 801-532-5780 tabularasastationers.com

Salt Lake City

801-255-8992 814 W. 1500 North, Layton 801-776-8830 aridiamonds.com

Interior Design AMB Design 4680 Kelly Cir., SLC 801-272-8680 annemariebarton.com

Ivy Interiors 3174 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-486-2257 ivyinteriorsslc.com

Jeff Landry Design 1534 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-533-8530 jefflandrydesign.com

K.Rocke Design/Glass house 3910 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-274-2720 krockedesign.com

LMK Interior Design

Salt Lake City

4626 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-272-9121

Palm Springs, CA.

760-325-2959 lmkinteriordesign.com

2345 S. Main St., SLC 801-466-0990

Provo

50 E. 500 South, Provo 801-932-0027 mountainlanddesign.com

The Stone Collection 2179 S. Commerce Center Dr., Suite 500, West Valley City 303-307-8100 thestonecollection.com

Sub Zero Wolf 1400 S. Foothill Dr. #212, SLC 801-582-5552 subzero-wolf.com

Venetian Tile & Stone 825 W. 2400 South, SLC 801-977-8888 venetianstonegallery.com

Landscape Design Bockholt Landscape Architecture 750 Kearns Blvd., suite 230, Park City 435-649-3856 104 E. Main St., suite 210, Bozeman, MT 406-586-3385 bockholtlandscapearchitecture.com

KUER 90.1 FM/HD

Photography Scot Zimmerman Photography Heber City 435-654-2757 scotzimmermanphotography.com

Real Estate City Home Collective 645 E. South Temple, SLC 801-718-5555 cityhomecollective.com

Oakwood Homes 206 E. Winchester Street, Murray 801-270-6400 oakwoodhomesco.com

Red Ledges Heber City 877-733-5334 redledges.com

Woodside Homes 460 W. 50 North #200, SLC 801-299-6700 woodsidehomes.com

Windows/Window Coverings Park City Blind & Design 1612 W. Ute Blvd. Suite 109, Park City 435-649-9665 parkcityblind.com

Tuck Landscape Osmond Designs

Orem

1660 N. State St., Orem 801-225-2555

Lehi

151 E. State St., Lehi 801-766-6448 osmonddesignsfurniture.com

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801-266-1802 tucklandscape.com

Lighting Hammerton Lighting 801-973-8095 hammertonstudio.com

Sierra Pacific Windows 1880 N. 2200 West, SLC 801-973-7170 sierrapacificwindows.com


SOURCES STYLE FILE

Page 39 Editor’s Pick O.C. Tanner Jewelers, SLC, octannerjewelers.com Page 40 Most Wanted John Brooks, Inc., SLC, johnbrooksinc.com; Jayson Home, jaysonhome.com; Leisure Living, SLC, leisurelivinginc.com; Forsey’s Fine Furniture, SLC, forseys.com; European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.com; Anthropologie, SLC, anthropologie; Williams Sonoma, SLC, williams-sonoma.com Page 46 Garden Variety Cactus & Tropicals, SLC and Draper, cactusandtropicals.com; Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC, 801-595-6622; Williams Sonoma, SLC, williams-sonoma.com Page 48 Art Horne Fine Art Gallery and Studio, SLC, hornefineart.com Page 50 Room Service Cara Fox, Fox Group Construction, SLC, foxgroupconstruction.com; Restoration Hardware, SLC, RH.com; Ballard Designs, ballarddesigns.com; House of Antique Hardware, houseofantiquehardware.com

ENTERTAINING

pages 52-54 Williams Sonoma, SLC, williams-sonoma.com; Cactus & Tropicals, SLC and Draper, cactusandtropicals.com; Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC, 801-595-6622; Perfect Statement Events & Design, perfectstatement.com

ROCK OUT

Pages 58-61 Rockscapes, SLC, rockscapesutah.com; Urban Garden Company, SLC, urbangardencompany.com; Eschenfelder Landscaping, eschenfelderlandscaping.com; Bockholt Landscape Architecture., Park City, bockholtlandscapearchitecture.com

BETTER THAN EVER

Pages 62-69 Scot Jaffa, Jaffa Group, Park City, jaffagroup.com; Beth Ann Shepherd, Dressed Design, Park City, dresseddesign.com

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

Pages 72-83 Architects: Anne Mooney, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, Seth Striefel and John Sparano, FAIA Sparano + Mooney Architecture, SLC, sparanomooney.com; Contractor: Andrew Parker, Andrew Parker Construction, Park City, andrewparkerconstruction.com; Landscape designer: Gwen Reddish, Gwen Reddish Design, Park City Page 72 Entry Sheep photo by Nine Francois: Julie Nester Gallery, Park City, julienestergallery.com; Board-formed concrete walls: Diamond Concrete Inc., Marion, 801-891-9974; DNA light fixture: Wasatch Lighting Inc., Park City, wasatchlighting.com Pages 74 Exterior Quartzite sandstone: Mountain Valley Stone, Peoa, mountainvalleystone.com; Masonry: RJ Masonry Inc, Heber City, rjmasonryinc.com; Corten steel: Noorda BEC, SLC, noorda.com; Shou-sugi-ban charred wood siding: Montana Timber Products, Caldwell, ID, montanatimberproducts.com

Pages 76-77 Great Room Concrete slab floors: Diamond Concrete Inc., Marion, 801-891-9974; Cherner chairs and George Nelson light: Design Within Reach, dwr.com; Danish 1963 Horst Bruning sofa, 1stdibs Furniture, 1stdibs.com; Jens Risom table and chairs: The Green Ant, SLC, thegreenant.com; Arco lamp: Light Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign. com; Owl painting by Jay Kelley: J GO Gallery, Park City, jgogallery.com; Poppies painting by Donald Sultan: Julie Nester Gallery, Park City, julienestergallery.com; Mother Nature painting, commissioned by Dolan Gieman Page 78 Kitchen Custom cabinets: Swirl Woodcraft, SLC, swirlwoodcraft.com; Backsplash tile: Contempo Tile, SLC, contempotile.com; Recycled barn wood floor: Topmark Floor and Design, Park City, topmarkfloor.com; Countertops and island: Phillips Marble Shop, Murray, phillipsmarbleshop.com; Isamu Noguchi pendant: Akari Light Sculptures, The Noguchi Museum, shop.noguchi.org Page 78 Library Jens Risom table and chairs: The Green Ant, SLC, thegreenant.com; Danish 1963 Horst Bruning sofa, 1stdibs Furniture, 1stdibs.com Page 79 Entry Stairs Laser-cut banister with old Moorish design: Wasatch Laser Processing, SLC, wasatchlaser.com; 10th mountain ski sculpture by Scott Gutierez, Trove Gallery, Park City, troveparkcity.com; Floating oak stairs with steel beams: steel beams by Arches Intermountain Fabricators, Heber City, archesfab.com Pages 80-81 Media Room Inset ceramic tile on fireplace: Daltile Stone & Slab Center, SLC, daltile.com; Tile installation: Luis Gomez, Gomez Construction, Park City, 801-641-0278

MODERN FAMILY

Pages 84-93 Architect: Kelly Swan, Ezra Lee Design+Build, Lehi, ezralee.com; Interior Design: Landon Taylor, Ezra Lee Design+Build, Lehi, ezralee.com; Contractor: Ezra Lee, Ezra Lee Design+Build, Lehi, ezralee.com; Furnishings and Landscape Design: Ezra Lee, Ezra Lee Design+Build, Lehi, ezralee.com; Custom Cabinets: Marwood Design, West Jordan, marwooddesign.com; Metal work: Brad Roberts Fabrication, Pleasant Grove, 801-763-8276 Quartz countertops: The Stone Shop, Lindon, thestoneshoputah.com; Concrete flooring: Rad Concrete Coatings, Bluffdale, radconcretecoatings,com; Engineered white oak hardwood flooring: National Flooring Brokers, Orem, nationalflooringbrokersutah.com; Swimming pool: Paradise Pools, Lindon, lindoningroundpools.com; Stone masonry: NPW Stone masonry, South Jordan, pwstone.com; Appliances: Wolf and Subzero, Roth Living, SLC rothliving.com; Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com

PLAYING THE ANGLES

Pages 94-103 Architect: Michael Upwall, Upwall Design Architects, SLC, upwalldesign.com; Interior Design: Dawn Keil, Design Pacific, Inc., Park City, 435-6029686; Landscape Design: Pete Gilwald, Land

Solutions, Park City, 435-901-3716; Contractor: Crisco Development, Park City; Doors: CR Doors & Moulding, Springville, crdoors.net; Custom cabinets: Poliform, SLC, poliformslc.com; European Oak flooring, Richard Marshall Custom Wood Flooring, Los Angeles, Calif., richardmarshall.com; Carpeting, Regency Royale, SLC, regencyroyale.com Page 94 Entry Pivot solid walnut door: CR Doors & Moulding, Springville, crdoors.net; Allegro suspension light: Foscarini, Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Bravoure wool rug: Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Inset closet: Poliform, SLC, poliformslc.com; Limestone flooring tile: Daltile, SLC, daltile.com Page 96-97 Living Room Custom sofa: Baker, bakerfurniture.com; Michel coffee tables: Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Custom wool rug: Regency Royale, SLC, regencyroyale.com; Walnut chairs with velvet upholstery: Planum, planumfurniture.com; Walnut floor lamp: Palecek, palecek.com; Sofa table: Oly Studio, olystudio.com; End table: Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Page 96-97 Dining Area Chairs: B&B Italia, Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Pendent lights: Santa & Cole, Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Silk and wool area rug: Nourison, nourison.com Page 98 Kitchen Cabinets: Poliform, SLC, poliformslc.com; Zanotta barstools Artemide lights: Lite Spot Modern Design, SLC, lightspotmoderndesign.com; Gaggeneau appliances and Dornbracht faucets: Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com Page 100 Master Bathroom Duravit walnut vanities and Axor faucets: Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com; Chandelier: Elume Lighting, Park City, elumepc.com; Marble flooring: Italia Granite, italiagranite.com Page 101 Master Bedroom Woven leather bed: McGuire, mcguirefurniture.com Page 102 Powder Room Solid limestone slab custom vanity: Stone Forest, Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign. com; Hand-blown glass lights: Shakuff, shakuff. com; Grasscloth wallcovering: Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries.com Page 112 Threads John Brooks Inc., SLC, johnbrooksinc.com Sources are acknowledgements of services and items provided by featured design principals and homeowners. Those not listed are either private, pre-existing or available through the professionals noted.

USD (ISSN 1941-2169) Utah Style & Design is published quarterly (Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall) by Utah Partners Publishing, L.L.P. Editorial, advertising and administrative office: 515 S. 700 East, Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Telephone: 801-485-5100; fax 801-485-5133. Periodicals Postage Paid at Salt Lake City and at additional mailing offices. Subscriptions: One year ($9.95); two years ($17.95); outside the continental U.S. add $20 a year. Toll-free subscription number: 855-276-4395. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Utah Style & Design/Subscription Dept., PO Box 820, Boca Raton, FL 33429. Copyright 2018, JES Publishing Corp. No whole or part of the contents may be reproduced in any manner without prior permission of Utah Style & Design, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Manuscripts accompanied by SASE are accepted, but no responsibility will be assumed for unsolicited contributions. S U M M E R 2 0 1 8 | U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N

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PRINTS

PRINTS CHARMING

IF THE FABRICS you’re choosing for your outdoor (and hard-working indoor) living areas are plain and predictable, you’re doing it wrong. We suggest the latest look in performance fabrics: prints. Unlike precisely patterned weaves, they deliver the shading and design imperfections that make prints, well, perfect.

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U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N | S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Konstatine Kakanias Talullah by Templeton; Tribe Outdoor by Cloth; Palma by Cloth; Slipaway Outdoor by Cloth; Sultan Suzanni by Martyn Lawrence Bullard; Konstatine Kakanias Madeleine by Templeton; Konstatine Kakanias Tangier by Templeton

Fabrics available to the trade, John Brooks Inc., SLC

Looking for the hottest look in performance (aka indoor/outdoor) fabrics? Here you go.


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Utah Style & Design Summer_2018  

Utah Style & Design Summer_2018  

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