Page 1

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Utah’s Oldest & Largest Rug Gallery ARTISAN QUALITY | UNIQUE STYLES & SIZES | RESTORATION & REPAIR

Utah Rug’s offers more than 13,000 new, antique and vintage handmade rugs, from traditional to transitional and contemporary designs. Sizes range from small bathroom rugs to over-sized rugs, rounds, squares or hallway runners.

The on-site repair department is headed by renowned master rug weaver Hamid Bashir with half a century of weaving and repair experience. The only Utah rug company with a full in house cleaning facility using environmentally non-toxic herbal shampoos, and state-of-the-art dusting and drying machinery.


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3174 S. Highland Dr. Salt Lake City, UT 84106


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Open drawers. Turn knobs. Light burners. Welcome to a showroom unlike any other– a dynamic space to test-drive appliances, take classes, and taste every delicious possibility.

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Your New Home Deserves Nothing Less Than Sierra Pacific. We could tell you about the superb quality and distinctive designs of Sierra Pacific windows and patio doors. But what you really want to know is‌ will the morning sun warm your bare feet in your new bedroom? When you throw open the French door in your dining room on a perfect spring day, will the outdoors burst in like a fragrant blessing? Will your life pause as a glowing sunset turns the living room to gold? The answer is yes. Discover Sierra Pacific yourself, and let the show begin.

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www.SierraPacificWindows.com

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A Division Of Sierra Pacific Industries


SPRING 2018 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 2

94

62 A SECOND CHANCE BY VAL RASMUSSEN

PHOTOS BY LUCY CALL

In Salt Lake City, a team of professionals breathes new life into a ramshackle mid-century residence.

ON THE COVER

PHOTO SCOT ZIMMERMAN

A dazzling screen defines the light-filled entry of a Park City home, page 94.

66 OUTSIDE JOB BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY ALAN AND WHITNEY WILBUR

High-performance design combines with modern lines to transform a Salt Lake home’s landscape.

COVER IMAGE BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

74

house gets a delightfully irreverent makeover in Salt Lake City.

84 WOW FACTOR BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY NICOLE HILL GERULAT

In Orem, a traditionally styled home becomes an unexpected showcase for spaces infused with contemporary flair and exhilarating details.

94 HIGH STYLE BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

SPANISH REVIVAL BY TESSA WOOLF PHOTOS BY KERRI FUKUI

Talented pros turn a Park City mountain home into a showcase of sophisticated and surprising design.

A mid-century modern Spanish-style

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 | U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N

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CONTENTS |

SPRING 2018

DEPARTMENTS 36

DECORATING

OPENING ACT BY BRAD MEE

In rooms rife with cabinet doors and closed drawers, open shelves offer an alternative that opens our kitchens to high style, dynamic displays and up-front functionality.

40

ENTERTAINING

READY SET...SPRING! BY BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY JESSICA WHITE

105 ON THE LAMB

PHOTO ROCHELLE JAHDI

The success of any soiree depends on the details. As eventand-floral designer Amanda Schelin proves, the best springtime party captures the light-hearted style and lively colors of the season. DINING IN AND OUT

36

BY MARY BROWN MALOUF PHOTOS BY ADAM FINKLE

We may associate lamb with the arrival of spring, but here and across the world, we savor it year round.

DIRECTORY 108 DESIGN A resourceful guide of materials, places and products

111

112

SOURCES A listing of this issue’s people, places and products HOT LIST

SMALL WONDERS Given its size, versatility, mobility and countless styles, it’s no wonder we’re obsessed with the stool, indoors and out.

style file EDITOR’S PICK RUNWAYS & ROOMS IN GOOD TASTE ART BOOKMARKS TRENDS GARDENING

23 24 26 28 30 32 34

Find more design inspiration at utahstyleanddesign.com

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40


BEHOLD, THE COLOR OF

CREATIVITY

BOLDY DESIGNED INSIDE & OUT

MOUNTAIN LANDDESIGN APPLIANCES

PLUMBING

H A R D WA R E

Pairing premium color with premier design features, the new KitchenAid black stainless line is a softer, warmer alternative to to traditional stainless steel appliances. Designed to stand out on its own or blend with other black and stainless steel appliances, the suite makes a bold statement while complementing the design of your kitchen. Call for more information: (801) 466-0990 Or visit our website: www.mountainlanddesign.com

Salt Lake Showroom - 2345 S Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 & Provo Showroom - 50 E 500 South, Provo Utah 84606 Mountain Land DesignÂŽ

2016 All Rights reserved


ONLINE

utahstyle anddesign.com SEE IT HERE

Ever wish you could see more of the amazing homes we feature in these pages? Simply log on and discover web-exclusive photos of these remarkable residences, indoors and out.

Need design inspiration for your home and gardens? Get the latest decorating trends and ideas delivered right to your inbox. Visit our website and sign up for our monthly newsletter today.

TREND WATCH We seek out the hottest home decorating trends and celebrate them online. Discover the colors, patterns, materials and furniture trends we’re loving now. Pom-poms anyone? Roses are star performers in Utah gardens, but Crystal Kim— Red Butte Garden horticulturalist—shares the secret to making them look even better with the right companion plants.

utahstyleanddesign.com/rose-garden-pairings

@utahstyledesign Follow us on Instagram for your daily dose of Utah’s dynamic design scene.

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TREND PRODUCT: PILLOW, DETAILS, SLC; TOWEL, CACTUS & TROPICALS, SLC; LINDEN LAMP, ALICE LANE HOME COLLECTION, SLC. PHOTO ABOVE KERRY FUKUI

Style News


Anne-Marie Barton

DEFINING DESIGN FROM START TO FINISH INTERIOR DESIGN AND INSPIRATION AL VIDEOS 801.272.8680

AMB@AMBDESIGNINC.COM

ANNEMARIEBARTON.COM

INSTAGRAM @ANNEMARIEBARTON

AMB D

E

S

I

G

N


THE TEAM

PUBLISHER

ART DIRECTOR

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Margaret Mary Shuff

Jeanine Miller

Jessica Ohlen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

SENIOR DESIGNER

WEB EDITOR/SOCIAL MANAGER

Brad Mee

Jarom West

Ashley Baker

FOOD EDITOR

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

VIDEO DIRECTOR

Mary Brown Malouf

Adam Finkle

Andrea Peterson

ASSISTANT EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS

EVENTS DIRECTOR

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Val Rasmussen

Lucy Call Alan and Whitney Wilbur Kerri Fukui Nicole Hill Gerulat Jessica White Scot Zimmerman

Trina Baghoomian

Marie Speed

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

CONTROLLER

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Ashley Szanter Glen Warchol EDITORIAL INTERN

Madeline Slack WRITING CONTRIBUTORS

Damon Shorter

Crystal Kim Tessa Woolf

PRODUCTION

Amanda Pratt

PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

Margaret Mary Shuff

Jeanne Greenberg

Audrey Safman

PUBLISHERS OF

OFFICE MANAGER

Salt Lake magazine Utah Bride & Groom Utah Style & Design Boca Raton magazine Worth Avenue magazine Mizner’s Dream Delray Beach magazine

Melody Kester Danielle Hardy ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Janette Erickson Emily Lopez Kara McNamara Hannah Williams

515 S. 700 East, Suite 3-i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 Phone

/ 801-485-5100

Fax

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Email

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Website

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801-328-3245 buildingfromhere.com

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U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N | S P R I N G 2 0 1 8


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Stay in Touch @utahstyledesign


Direct Importers of the World’s Finest Rugs CAUCASIAN RUGS

We are a full service rug company, featuring the world’s finest rugs. We specialize in new, antique, and semi-antique hand-woven masterpieces from all over the world with one of the largest selections nationally. Adibs.com • 801-484-6364 3092 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City At the Historic Villa Theater

Caucasian rugs are named for their region of origin: the area of the Caucasus Mountains which links modern day Turkey and Iran. Bordering Iran to the North, the Caucasus ranks among the most grandiose and hostile landscapes in the world. A single narrow ridge of mountains stretching 400 miles east to west and containing twelve peaks higher than the tallest Alps, along with numerous glaciers and tumbling gorges that rival those of the Himalayas. The mountains are climaxed by Mt. Elbruz, towering to 18,493 feet above sea level. Here, in Greek legend, the god Zeus chained Prometheus for eternity as punishment for delivering fire to man. For centuries these mountains have provided refuge for nomadic peoples who were forced to go there after being driven out of more hospitable areas. These mountain peoples were known both for their spirited sense of independence and their longevity, with many tribal elders living decades past one hundred years. This harsh environment of either the high mountain meadows where they grazed their sheep; or the deep valley below where they waited out the winter, created a gratitude for anything that provided comfort or beauty. Perhaps as an expression of the deep joy of a people living and working close to the earth, the tribesperson wove rugs. These carpets he created were magnificent! The Caucasian carpet possesses an individuality, a boldness and deep sense of unity which is truly unsurpassed in the world of antique Oriental rugs. These rugs are most striking, containing a daring use of color, balanced not by shading, but rather through contrast. The predominant reds, blues, greens and yellows would seem clashing to the mind, yet the superb confidence of the Caucasian craftsmen created color combinations so harmonious that they have been marveled at and studied by Western artists for centuries. The entire evolution of tribal rug weaving can be seen in Caucasian antique carpets. The dragon motif, boteh, flowerhead, arabesque, palmette, birds, animals, cloudband and crab designs are all present. Sometimes many of these are found in a single antique rug. Determination and intensity side-by-side with humor and lightness demonstrate the dexterity of the Caucasian weaver. It is of little wonder that the weavings of the numerous Caucasian tribal groups enjoy a universal popularity among collectors of antique Oriental rugs today. They are living examples which speak to us of both the gaiety and deep understanding of life possessed by their creators – the mountain weavers of the Caucasus.

Come into the Gallery and select the Caucasian rug that speaks to you from our extensive inventory!


EDITOR’S NOTE

Surprise Delivery I

’m not going to speculate on whether putting a swimming pool inside your front door is a good idea, but I will say that when you have an opportunity to make your home special and uniquely yours, it seems silly not to do it. I admit, I didn’t see it coming. When I first visited Dorothy Day Lee’s remodeled Spanish-style home (Spanish Revival, page 74), I naturally expected to enter a foyer when I walked through the front door. Instead, I stepped into a sun-soaked courtyard anchored by a swimming pool, large fringed umbrellas, potted palms and a loggia leading to double doors painted peacock blue. This second doorway opened to an interior filled with equally surprising design. As an editor whose job it is to seek out strikingly unique homes to share with our readers, I’d just hit the jackpot. And as a result, so have you. Each room in this home is more inspiring than the next. These days, we all crave special spaces. We want to see them in magazines, and we want to live in

them. The key word here is special. Today, good design is no longer about perfection. It’s about personality. It’s the difference between a predictable, albeit pretty, model home and a delightful dwelling filled with wit, customized functionality and one-of-a-kind style. And of course, it’s about thought-provoking surprises. On that front, this issue delivers big time. From this courtyard pool in Salt Lake City and a wild black-and-white marble floor in Orem to dazzling screens in Park City, fabulous outdoor fire features and much more, daring design flourishes in the following pages, ready to prompt personalized spaces of your own.

BRAD MEE, EDITOR IN CHIEF

Gary Ernest Smith

Paul Davis

Ed Mell

Rebecca Campbell

Billy Schenck

177 E. 200 S. Salt Lake City, UT 84111 | MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | INFO@MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | 801.355.3383

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HUMBLE DWELLINGS HUMBLEDWELLINGSLIVING.COM


MOTORIZATION | DESIGNER DRAPERIES

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WINDOW COVERINGS

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We offer a full line of Visit our showroom or I N T R O D U C I N G S M A R T S H A D Eschedule S window coverings, draperies, a FREE in-home EXCLUSIVELY AT PARK CITY BLIND & DESIGN upholstery, custom fabrics, and consultation today! the newest, most innovative Smart Shades is the only innovative motorized window covering technology on the market BLIND & DESIGN designs in the industry. that combines a motorized sunshade with motorized drapery. Visit our showroom or schedule a FREE in-home consultation today!

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style file SPRING | 2018

PHOTO ADAM FINKLE

CHEEP THRILLS

Curved clay pottery feeders, $45 each, iron hooks, $7 each, Backyard Birds, SLC

Turns out bird feeders don’t have to be boring wooden boxes or ho-hum plastic cylinders. Today, there are many more exciting options. Take these handcrafted pottery feeders, for example. Beautifully glazed, richly colored and kiln-fired, these shapely feeders serve surprising style to gardens and their seed-seeking feathered friends alike.

S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 | U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N

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style file |

RUNWAY & ROOMS

PASTELS HIT THEIR PRIME Moving from playroom to showroom, today’s pastels are growing up and going gray.

2

3

1 Victoria Beckham Spring 2018 Readyto-Wear Collection

MOVE OVER GRAY, you’ve had your moment. We’re ready for something more cheerful but equally chic. Enter today’s pastels. These aren’t the candy-colored hues of kids’ rooms and Easter eggs, but rather earthier, more sophisticated shades reminiscent of charming Scandinavian design. Ironically, the trick to creating this grown-up palette is tinging pure pastels with a hint of, you guessed it, gray.

4

1. Facetted glass bowls, $70-$260, Glass House, SLC 2. Cement side table, $3,500, ABC Carpet & Home, abchome. com 3. Guapa leather arm chair, $899, San Francisco Design, SLC 4. Pebble Affinity silk pillow, $127, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC 5. Visconti fountain pen, $289 and notebook, $8, Tabula Rasa, SLC 6. Lampert Lounger, starting at $2,695, Jonathan Adler, jonathanadler.com 7. Star votives, $10 each, Cactus & Tropicals, SLC 8. Winchester Tile ceramic 5-inch tiles, $17.75 sq. ft., Inside Out Architecturals, SLC

7

5

8 6

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OV ER 3 0 YE ARS AG O, W E BECAME THE E XCLUSIVE PROVIDER OF THOMASVILLE F U R N I T U R E I N T H E S TAT E O F U TA H .

T H R E E D E C A D E S L AT E R , WE’VE BECOME SO MUCH MORE.

Our name may be Thomasville, but we carry high quality home furnishings from more than 50 of the world’s top manufacturers. With furniture from Century, Bernhardt, Henredon, Lexington, Hickory Chair, Theodore Alexander, and more, we’re the first stop for designers and discerning homeowners in the state of Utah.

5253 S. State Street

801.263.1292

Murray, UT 84107

ThomasvilleUtah.com


IN GOOD TASTE

Classic

SPEAK OF THE DEVIL We’ve hatched four devilishly delicious recipes for boiled eggs. YOU MIGHT NOT care that the deviled egg can be traced back to ancient Rome. Or that deviling refers to using seasonings to make foods spicy. Or that deviled eggs are very on-trend and are starring on the menus of many of today’s top restaurants. All this knowledge is secondary to your simple need for hard-boiled egg recipes. Well, dare we say, it’s time to get cracking.

STEP 1: Mash yolks from 6 hard-boiled eggs. Add 1/4 tablespoon mayonnaise (or yogurt), 1/2 teaspoon ground mustard, pinch of salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper. STEP 2: Fill the halved egg whites with the yolk mixture. Sprinkle with paprika.

Bacon & Paprika Begin with Classic recipe’s step 1. Stir in 2 strips bacon, cooked and crumbled. Fill the halved egg whites with the yolk mixture. Sprinkle with paprika and garnish with a bacon bit.

Wasabi & Unagi Begin with Classic recipe’s step 1. Stir in 1 1/2 teaspoons Chinese mustard, 1 teaspoon wasabi paste. Fill the halved egg whites with the yolk mixture. Top with unagi.

HOW TO (REALLY):

BOIL AN EGG Place eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a rolling boil, then remove pan from heat and cover. Let eggs remain in the water for 15 minutes. Drain eggs and put them in a bowl filled with ice water. Wait half an hour, then carefully peel.

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Sriracha & Cilantro Begin with Classic recipe’s step 1. Stir in 2 Tablespoons chopped green onions. Fill the halved egg whites with the yolk mixture. Top with 2-3 stripes of Sriracha sauce; sprinkle with paprika and top with a cilantro leaf.

PHOTOS ADAM FINKLE. SMALL PLATES, GLASS HOUSE, SLC

style file |


style file |

ART

SPRING AWAKENING Jennifer Rasmusson embraces color to showcase this season’s natural palette.

Budding Beauty

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Rasmusson's Nightsong, oil on canvas, shown at A gallery/Allen+Alan Fine Art, SLC.

INSPIRED COLORS

Kimono Violet SW 6839 Sherwin-Williams

Avalon Teal CSP-645 Benjamin Moore

Yeabridge Green No. 287 Farrow & Ball

Sunny Veranda SW 9017 Sherwin-Williams

Peruvian CSP-1100 Benjamin Moore

BY ASHLEY SZANTER

“I’ve always loved color, so the biggest mark of my work is the color,” says artist and Cedar City resident Jennifer Rasmusson. Her work, which vacillates between oils and mixed media, often incorporates an array of brilliant hues. Because of her love for natural coloration, she’s particularly inspired by springtime. “Coming up from all the grays of winter and seeing all the pops of color, that’s what I love. The little bit of green that comes out, the blues. Everything is crisp and sharper in the spring,” says Rasmusson. And this was definitely the case in Nightsong: “The pansies came right from the nursery, and I decided I wanted to paint them immediately. I liked the idea of these flowers looking around and seeing where their new home was going to be.”


Guild Hall Where Modern meets Traditional

Beautiful showroom ❇ Inspiration ❇ Experienced Design Team ❇ Retail ❇ To the Trade 3640 South Highland Dr. (801) 277-6534 utahguildhall.com


style file |

BOOKMARKS

EDITOR’S PICK Inspired design, gorgeous photos and engaging read

McAlpine Home stool and white pomegranates, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC

SPEAK VOLUMES Displayed on your table or stacked on your shelves, books say a lot about your personal style, interests and love for home and garden. We offer a few inspiring titles we discovered around town.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

“The creation of a garden has to transform not only the site but also the person who lives there; otherwise it serves no purpose.”

“Quality in what we live with affects the quality of our lives. And we all deserve to live beautifully.”

“When the world does not look the way it should to our hearts, we need to create one that does.”

The Finer Things Christiane Lemieux

Poetry in Place

“The element of surprise is fantastic for your guests, but as the host with the most, you don’t want to be the one surprised.”

Secret Gardens

“...an object that has the thumbprint of the artisan has an expressiveness that cannot be replicated by machine-made products.”

“Truly connecting with our homes can have an extraordinary effect on our psyches. It can calm us, strengthen us, help us put our values in order.”

Abrams, $50, Glass House, SLC

Clarkson Potter, $60, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC

Alain Le Toquin

Bobby McAlpine and Susan Sully Rizzoli, $75, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC

The Artisanal Home

Jorge Almada and Anne-Maire Midy Rizzoli, $55, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC

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Veranda Entertaining Clinton Smith

Hearst, $40, Cactus & Tropicals, SLC

The Inspired Home Karen Lehrman Bloch Harper Design, $35, Details, SLC


venetian tile & stone gallery our stone, your style...

CROC MOSAIC

Visit our unique selection of slabs on our website www.venetianstonegallery.com

Two locations to serve you 825 West 2400 South, Salt lake City, UT 84119 | 801.977.8888 17275 Daimler, Irvine Ca 92614 | 949.261.0146 BORDER: IRON WOOD SLAB


style file |

TRENDS

1

TURNING A NEW LEAF

2

Floral Patterns Move from Rigid to Relaxed

WANING: REALISTIC AND PRECISE

3

WINNING: ABSTRACT AND ARTSY SEE YA, predictable floral prints. This year, realistic renderings are losing ground to more abstract takes on garden-inspired designs. Think loose scatterings of obscured leaves, brush-stroked silhouettes of shadowy blooms and overlapping forms of petal-shaped daubs. These perfectly imperfect patterns are naturals when paired with today's all-the-rage rich woods, veined stones and free-form ceramics. Fabrics and wallpaper (clockwise from top): Delphiniums Grape by Sanderson; Mille-Feuille by Christopher Farr Cloth; Wisteria Falls Mineral by Zoffany; Rhodera Grape by Zoffany; Standing Ovation by Harlequin; Rose Mint by Zoffany, all to the trade, John Brooks Inc., SLC

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1. Velvet pillow, $185, Glass House, SLC 2. Wisteria lampshade, from $99, bluebellgray, bluebellgray.com 3. Oyster Collection salad plate, $95, ABC Carpet & Home, abchome.com 4. Miro vase, $343, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC 5. AVA Mercury pedestal, $65, Jayson Home, jaysonhome.com


FURNITURE & INTERIOR DESIGN

G AT E H O U S E S T Y L E . C O M 6 7 2 S . S TAT E S T R E E T | O R E M , U T | 8 0 1 . 2 2 5 . 9 5 0 5


style file |

GARDENING

Crystal Kim, Red Butte Garden Horticulturalist

4 TIPS

SELECTING COMPANION PLANTS

2

PERFECTLY PAIRED

3

Like most of us, plants thrive with companions. The trick, says horticulturalist Crystal Kim, is choosing the perfect partners. She offers the following gardening tips to help you do exactly that. IT’S EASY to fall in love with a plant and want it to fill your garden. Perhaps for that reason, many beautiful gardens consist of one primary type of plant, a star performer such as hosta, rose, iris or daylily. But a star deserves carefully chosen companion plants that highlight

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its beauty. They are supporting players, much like a prima ballerina has the corps de ballet. Whether it’s through their form, color, texture or bloom time, companion plants complement the best features of your garden star, as well as provide interest during its down times.

4

Some companion plants are more suitable in certain situations. For example, a ground cover can be difficult to maintain if it’s growing around thorny rose canes. Consider growth rates and size to avoid extremely vigorous plants that will become weeding headaches or garden thugs that overwhelm your star.  se a variety of shapes and textures U to complement your star. Plants can be upright, like feather reed grass, elegant as foxglove spires, low and full like a mound of coral bells or the spreading carpet of stonecrop. Plant textures can range from fine-leafed bluestar to bold-leafed hosta. Plants can also be airy and open like prairie dropseed or dense and structured like boxwood. Consider the play of color in your garden. Depending on your preferences, you can choose colors that either harmonize or contrast with your star plant. Pay attention to both the color of the foliage and the flower, as well as other attributes such as fruit or bark.

BY CRYSTAL KIM; PHOTO COURTESY OF RED BUTTE GARDENS; PORTRAIT BY ASHLEY BAKER

1

Companion plants should have habitat requirements similar to your star plant. Consider sun exposure, soil type, nutrient requirements and watering needs. Choose disease— and pest—resistant plants to reduce maintenance and chemical use.


DECORATING

OPENING ACT In a room often defined by cabinet doors and closed drawers, open shelves offer an alternative that opens your kitchens to high style, dynamic displays and upfront functionality. BY BR A D M EE

PHOTO BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

1

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1 U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N | S P R I N G 2 0 1 8

Deep shelves appear to float on a backdrop of white Macubus quartzite in the kitchen of a chic Orem home. Easy to access, everyday tableware and glasses are joined by gold-toned accessories and framed art to create an eye-catching display in the light-filled room. Interior design by AMB Design; architecture by Lloyd Architects.


2

4

3

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN (2, 5), DAVID LIVINGSTON (3), ROCHELLE JAHDI (4)

5

2

Wood shelves mounted on black iron brackets add depth and character to the tiled wall of a farmhouse-styled kitchen in Midway. The shelves frame a wood-faced hood, reinforcing the key focal point while providing symmetry to the broad wall. The unpainted wood shelves visually link to similarly finished bin-style drawers below. Design by Caitlin Creer with homeowner Lee Ann Myers. Builder: Lane Myers Construction.

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In the galley kitchen of a small Salt Lake City home, designer Anne-Marie Barton rejected a bulky “stand-out” hood above the range. Instead, she created an open frame of unlacquered brass that’s inset with glass shelves and hangs from the ceiling with hooks. The see-through feature lightens the compact room while making it look and feel roomy. “They make efficient use of the limited space in the small footprint of this gourmet kitchen,” she says. To foster a classic masculine vibe in the engaging

space, Barton displayed monogrammed glassware and gold-trimmed dishes on the shelves. Home builder: Jackson & Leroy.

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To help make this loft’s kitchen feel open and bright, McKenzie Dickson with Denton House Design Studio mounted open shelves on a wall clad in brick-stacked ceramic tile. “Exposing a collection of the owners’ coffee mugs adds charm and gives the space character,” says Dickson, who wrapped the shelves in steel to link them visually to the ceiling beams and range hood made from the same material.

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In a Park City kitchen, a marble slab creates a dramatic backdrop for underlit floating wood shelves topped with artfully arranged dishes and glasses. The lighting illuminates the richly veined marble while backlighting the displayed tableware. Design by LMK Interior Design; built by Craig Construction.

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DECORATING

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Fish-scale patterned tiles in brilliant blue create an eye-catching backdrop to thick wood shelves in the kitchen of a Victory Ranch cabin in Kamas. Designed by Jill Self, principal of Sticks & Stone, these shelves are placed next to a large window that provides generous light for the pieces they display. Self integrates open shelves into many of her kitchen projects to provide a place for clients to showcase favorite dishes, glasses and collectibles. “It encourages more style and design in the space,” she says.

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In the kitchen of his modern Lehi home, builder Ezra Lee incorporated inset open shelves into a wall of rift oak cabinetry. Uniquely wide, these open shelves accentuate the horizontal lines of the modern décor as does the wood’s horizontally oriented grain. Lee integrated a sleek light strip into the front edge of each shelf to illuminate the care-

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fully displayed pieces, while adding a shot of drama to the room.

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In a modern Emigration Canyon home, open glass shelves span a wood surround of quarter-sawn walnut. Backed a by an expansive wall dressed in matte blue glass tiles, the shelves are lit with LED lighting built into the backside of the shelves. Built by Jackson & LeRoy; design by Pradhan Design; architecture by R.D. Nielson Design.

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Combining timeless styling and modernday functionality, open shelves feature elegant brushed gold-toned frames with white oak shelves in the kitchen pantry of a Highland home built by Jackson & LeRoy. The easy-to-reach shelves extend from the stone countertops to the ceiling, providing abundant storage and display space for the room. Design by Establish Design.

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PHOTOS BY ROCHELLE JAHDI (6), SCOT ZIMMERMAN (7), JOSH CALDWELL (8,9)

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ENTERTAINING

READY, SET...

spring!

The success of any soirée depends on the details. As event-and-floral designer Amanda Schelin proves, the best springtime party captures the light-hearted style and lively colors of the season. BY BR A D M EE PHOTOS BY J ESSICA W H IT E

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etails can make or break an event,” says Amanda Schelin, owner of Branches, an event floral company. When staging this cheery springtime scene for a small gettogether, she began with a theme—a must-have for any successful event, the pro insists. “I was inspired by the catchy lyrics of the song ‘Build Me Up Buttercup’ by The Foundations,” she says.

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She suspended a custom, wooden sign of the song’s title over a table set with sunny daffodils and carefully chosen tabletop pieces. The sign is just one of many elements Schelin devised to make the party’s setting special and inviting. We asked her to share ideas and inspiration that spurred the creation of this and the scene’s other delightful details.


ENTRY MAKER

FRESH FLOWERS

CUSTOMIZED CAKE

“Make it special from the start,” advises Schelin, who floated balloons from Zurchers over containers of fresh flowers near the entry. “I chose large balloons so it didn’t look like a birthday party.” Hi-Float solution allows the helium-filled balloons to last and float longer.

White vases filled with cut daffodils propped in glass pebbles brighten the center of the table. Schelin arranged the yellow and white blooms in separate containers. “This color-blocking approach looks more modern,” she explains.

“There is no bad time for cake,” says Schelin, who enlisted Cake Dame to make a special cake to foster the party’s special style. “Another easy option is buying a simple buttercream cake at the bakery and dressing it up with flowers and greenery.”

SPECIAL SIPS

MENU CARDS

CATCHY THEME

“A party can revolve around something as simple as pastries and a special drink,” Schelin insists. She gathered pretty bottles of ginger soda, sparkling glasses and sprigs of thyme to top a side table staged as a drink station where guest serve themselves.

“Menu cards add a personalized touch to a setting and let your guests know what’s coming up next,” Schelin says. She printed these on sturdy card stock and painted each individually with water colors to create a subtle ombré effect.

The song title ‘Build Me Up Buttercup’ inspired the party’s theme and was captured in a custom wood sign created by Impressions Shop for less that $50. Schelin suspended the sign above the table and dressed the string with fresh jasmine vine.

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ENTERTAINING

LESSONS LEARNED Spring tabletop tips from Amanda Schelin • Buy cut daffodils a day or two prior to your party to allows closed flowers sufficient time to open. Change water frequently. • Place a colored runner down the table’s center to promote an accent color and elevate the style of the tabletop. • Have craft paper and twine

on hand for wrapping small bunches of flowers that guest can take home.

• Handwrite a “Thank you for Coming” message on the back of menu cards.

• Add colored glassware to prevent a yellow and white palette from appearing one-dimensional.

• Use glass gems or polished pebbles to help keep cut flowers in place within a container.

• Use gold flatware to dress up place settings and add an element of surprise.

• Make certain tablecloths extend to the floor to hide the legs of folding tables.

Amanda Schelin, owner of Branches Floral

GET THE LOOK

Gold flatware, $59 for 5 pc. Set, Glass House, SLC

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Paper cups, $4 set of 8, Orson Gygi, SLC

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Juliska Berry & Thread scalloped charger, $72, New Orientation, SLC

Napkins, $50/ set of 6, Glass House, SLC

Villeroy & Boch goblet, $32, Macy’s, macys.com

Modway Gear dining chair, $96, Bed Bath & Beyond, SLC


VISIT ITALY

WITHOUT YOUR PASSPORT Come explore our recently remodeled Italian Loft. We’ve assembled the very best Italy has to offer from delicious dining to seductive bedrooms. Luxurious leather living rooms from Italian artisans – that’s amore! Whether you’re looking to furnish an entire home or just decorating a single room, we can help design your space according to your taste and budget. Salt Lake (801) 467-2701 2970 Highland Dr.

Park City (435) 645-7072 1890 Bonanza Dr.

Mon.-Sat. 10-6. Sunday and evenings by appointment.

www.sanfrandesign.com


ENVIRONMENTAL REPLICATIONS & NATURE SCAPES Our environmental replications are some of the best! We use actual rock and tree molds formed around natural elements. We study the environment and mimic each detail to bring the outdoors into your home, office, business, and event.

Out of the box interior design and room themes. Dentists & Doctors • Theme Parks

Zoos & Museums • Visitor Centers Any Business • Pools / Residences Public Attractions • Promotions

Events • FREE CONSULTATIONS

801.618.9776 IMPERSANATURE.COM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ST YLEMAKER S THE POWER OF THE PROS Creativity gives ho-hum projects an unmistakable flair. In this special section, we’re showcasing talented professionals who understand how to harness the power of creativity to infuse your home and life with vibrant energy. These designers, craftsmen and small business owners create oneof-a-kind designs based on your vision. It’s time to freshen your abode, plant a lush garden and throw a memorable party. Here, they share insider tips and give you insight into the latest news in design, stone, flooring and more. Photo by Scot Zimmerman; design and build by Fox Group Construction


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EUROPEAN MARBLE & GRANITE 2575 S. 600 West, Salt Lake City | 801.974.0333 | europeanmarbleandgranite.com

PAVERS · POOL · PATIO · PERFECTION

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T’S TIME TO start plan-

ning and envisioning your outdoor spaces for beautiful summer days and evenings. There are so many artful options for stone outdoor decking that will withstand our intermountain freeze/ thaw conditions. Visit our showroom to see Wisconsin Quarried Limestone, Pennsylvania Bluestone, Granite Cubes, Hampton Gray Limestone and Architrex Exterior Porcelain Pavers.

TRENDING NOW Bluestone, which transitions traditional to contemporary, is the clean new neutral for floors. Use whites and bright colors as focal elements with this beautiful, natural stone.


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FORSEY’S FINE FURNITURE + INTERIOR DESIGN 2977 S. Highland Drive | 2955 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City | forseys.com

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NGLISH TEXTILE designer William Morris once advised, “Have nothing in your home that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Too often, we are so overwhelmed by the abundance and easy access to quick and cheap items that we sacrifice beauty and quality.

“Here at Forsey’s, we strongly believe that it’s not just the family that shapes the home, but also the home that shapes the family,” says Jack Forsey, vice president and manager. “There are just some aspects of life—such as the home—that are too important, personal and permanent to cut corners.”

Since 1951, Forsey’s has furnished homes and designed beautiful spaces throughout Utah. Known for carrying the highest quality in home furnishings at affordable prices, and offering unmatched customer service, Forsey’s continues to be a one-stop destination for customers who want a truly magnificent home. Because of this dedication to service and quality, Forsey’s has fostered a reputation as one of Utah’s finest home furnishings and interior design businesses. Forsey’s has long-standing relationships with the industry’s most highly regarded and well-known manufacturers including Century, Hickory Chair, Taylor King, Thayer Coggin, Hancock and Moore, Vanguard, Precedent and many more. Forsey’s is also the exclusive Stickley Furniture dealer for the state of Utah and has an entire second showroom dedicated to the manufacturer. With its new versatile design center, veteran design staff, top-of-the-line product offerings and focus on exceptional service and quality, Forsey’s is a local leader in home furnishings and interior design.

TRENDING NOW Comfort, comfort and more comfort. The days of sacrificing comfort for style are over and now the two are inseparable. While you want something that will take your breath away, you also want a place to sit and reflect in absolute serenity.


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SIERRA HOME SERVICES 801.733.9401 | sierrahomeservices.com

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EMODELING YOUR HOME can be an exciting, albeit daunting, undertaking. But when you hire Sierra Home Services, you can focus on your vision and they’ll take care of the details.

Sierra Home Services opened in 2006 in the Sierra Nevada area. For several years, the company remodeled some of the most high-end homes in Lake Tahoe and Reno. Since moving to Salt Lake City in 2013, the company has expanded its services and now pro-

vides a one-stop shop for all your remodeling needs. “We provide complete home remodeling services including structural enhancements, room additions, engineering and architecture,” says Robert Morris, managing member. “You don’t have to source numerous trades—we’ll handle every step of the process from plumbing to electrical.” Whether your plans are to build, remodel, restore or repair, the team of engineers, architects and licensed lead technicians can help you transform your ideas into reality. Sierra Home Services won five stars in the Best of Home Guide 2017 and is a preferred contractor for the Salt Lake City ‘Fix The Bricks’ program—the seismic upgrade program facilitated through Salt Lake City Emergency Management. “Salt Lake City is on the fault line and subject to major destruction in event of seismic event,” says Morris. “We’re doing a lot of work to make sure homes can withstand an earthquake, like tying roofs to walls to keep them vertical and bracing chimneys so they don’t topple and crash into the living spaces.”

PRO TIP Skilled labor isn’t cheap, but cheap labor isn’t skilled. Because we do everything in-house, we have full control, and that means we keep our projects on time and on budget. We’ve grown our business over the last 12 years by providing high-quality services at an affordable price.


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LMK INTERIOR DESIGN 4626 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City | 801.272.9121 | LMKinteriordesign.com

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MK INTERIOR DESIGN is one of the most progressive contemporary design firms in the western region. Founded more than 17 years ago, this award-winning firm was at the forefront of modern design and still leads the region for high-end residential and commercial interiors. LMK Interior Design combines the passion for interior design and shared aesthetic sensibility of partners Rion Locke and Richard Miller. This dynamic team offers diverse options and expert guidance to help you create the home of your dreams.

“We’re committed to the principles of simplicity and modernism,” says partner Rion Locke. “We create inspired designs that combine close attention to each of our client’s sense of style, functionality and budget.” LMK Interior Design is a full-service design firm providing comprehensive interior services including construction management, interior architectural design, specification of materials, space planning, furnishing and accessorizing. “Clients value not only our creative design approach, but our commanding knowledge to manage and execute the construction process,” says Locke. Through the use of Auto CAD and other state-of-the-art technology, LMK Interior Design creates detailed construction documents that help with accurate bidding, budget and scheduling requirements. “Our projects feature simple, innovative and authentic designs,” says partner Richard Miller. “We communicate extensively with our clients during each project to create spaces where they can relax and live surrounded by beauty and style.” LMK Interior Design’s signature style brings out the personality of its clients while introducing fresh elements into the existing environment.

TRENDING NOW Sophisticated casual is the look. “It’s all in the mix,” says partner Richard Miller. “We love to mix clean-lined architectural elements with the right balance of furnishings, fabrics and accessories. Every material makes a difference in executing the design.”


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NORTHSTAR BUILDERS 1059 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City | 801.485.0535 | northstarbuilders.com

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HEN YOU CHOOSE to build a new

home, the price tag is a top concern, especially if it’s a moving target. This is why the experts at Northstar Builders believe your bottom line should not change throughout the construction process. They offer one fixed price to build your home. No surprises, no hidden fees, no guesswork or anxiety when it comes to the final cost. “We alleviate the concern of budgets getting out of control and off track right from the beginning,” says co-founder Greg Ross. “We want our clients

off the financial roller coaster so they can focus on the design process.” Northstar employs in-house sourcing staff dedicated to identifying quality, creative, and cost-effective products and services to keep costs down. “We stand behind the quality and craftsmanship of our work over the lifetime of the home,” says co-founder Phil Winston. Northstar believes success begins with trust. “The process must be open and collaborative between home owner, builder, architect and designer from the very first step,” says Ross. “Communication is paramount with so many decisions to be made. This is why we begin with a conversation about a clear, defined budget. This provides a guideline to ensure our clients are informed about how to make the best decisions to get what they want within their budgets.” Today, Northstar Builders is not only the industry standard when it comes to high-end residential construction and remodeling but is quickly becoming one of Salt Lake’s fastest growing boutique commercial developers. To see their work, follow them on Instagram @northstarbuilders.   

TRENDING NOW Mountain modern design that blends mountain elements with modern architecture. The more minimalistic approach embraces simple details and a primarily white color palette.


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THE STONE COLLECTION 2179 S. Commerce Center Drive, Suite 500, West Valley City | 801.875.4460 | thestonecollection.com

Neolith Pulpis and Arctic White

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O MATTER WHAT your design aes-

thetic is, the grandeur of natural stone can paint it into reality. Its variations in color, patterns and textures lead to unlimited potential. And because it comes from the earth, it’s a sustainable investment that stands the test of time. If you want to add the luxury of natural or engineered stone in your home The Stone Collection offers one of the broadest inventories available with more than 8,000 slabs from over 30 countries. “Our goal is to provide an amazing experience and give customers the tools they need to make the best decision for them,” says Pete Smith, general manager. The Stone Collection is Salt Lake City’s largest natural and engineered slab resource offering granite, marble, quartzite, semi-precious, engineered quartz, soapstone and tile in a variety of price points. It offers a well-designed facility and all the material in the showroom and warehouse is hand-selected. The Stone Collection carries Neolith, Caesarstone, Aurea Stone, Geoluxe, Vetrazzo, Flaviker, Avenue Mosaic, Unique Building Concepts and more.

Smokey Quartz

PRO TIP Bring your design inspirations—such as a cabinet door, paint chips or pictures to aid in the selection of countertops, flooring, backsplashes or wall applications. If choosing a natural stone, it’s best to view the actual slab you want to use, understanding that natural stone varies.

“The new facility is a fabulous resource that expands your knowledge of stone and tile,” says Smith. “Our experienced and knowledgeable staff is ready to answer any questions and make expert recommendations.”

Geoluxe Nestos Gray and Eramo

The sleek, sophisticated 60,000 square-foot facility in West Valley City serves as an inspiring space for guests. “The showroom sets a higher standard,” says Mike Hitchcock, managing director. “We designed it to provide collaborative work spaces as well as to host industry events.”


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LEISURE LIVING 2208 S. 900 East, Sugarhouse | 801.487.3289 | leisurelivinginc.com

vibrant colors and energetic patterns or serene and sophisticated neutrals? Ultimately, the activities and ambiance you desire for your outdoor living space should dictate what furniture will work best for your personal lifestyle,” she says. Leisure Living is a local, family-owned business that has been in Sugarhouse for 36 years. “Collectively as a family, we have been in the furniture business since 1925,” says Marc McDonald, president. “We love furniture, we love the outdoors, and we love what home stands for. Being able to help to furnish peoples’ outdoor patios and living spaces is the perfect way to blend these generational enthusiasms.” Leisure Living offers the largest selection and in-stock availability of outdoor furniture in the Mountain West. All inventory is available for immediate, courtesy delivery. “We have an array of style and design options to suit many tastes and home styles, from contemporary and mountain modern to transitional and traditional,” says McDonald-Ross. “And we can also customize and special order many products.”

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N OUTDOOR LIVING space is one of the top must-haves for any home. “When designing an outdoor space, the first thing to consider is how you want to use it,” says Michelle McDonald-Ross, manager. “Will it be for entertaining, for relaxing in your personal sanctuary, or for playing together as a family? The second thing to consider is your vibe. Do you like

They offer patio furniture in a wide array of materials such as plantation-harvested teak or ipe woods, wrought iron, aluminum and synthetic wickers. “We pride ourselves in sourcing the best quality products made with premium raw materials and skilled craftsmanship,” says McDonald. “We provide furniture that stands up to the elements and everyday living, at trustworthy prices.”

TRENDING NOW Wood looks, mixed-media detailing, and fire pits, fire pits, fire pits.


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BARTILE 725 N. 1000 West, Centerville | 801.295.3443 | bartile.com

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OR THE PAST 75 years, Bartile has perfected the art of premium roof tiles. “Customization is our forte,” says Nick Evans, general manager. “We apply a unique blend of innovation and creativity to produce custom designs, more than 600 custom colors, and 19 distinct styles ranging from Yorkshire and English Tudor to French country and everything in between. That’s why architects and designers come to them when they need something really unique. “People bring us photos of roofs they saw all over the world and we recreate them,” says Evans. “We can match colors from paint swatches and create the blends of colors our customers desire.” From shake and slate to mission tiles, Bartile does it all. In addition to manufacturing the tiles, they also provide expert installation services in Northern Utah. “We handle every step so you know it’s done right the first time,” says Evans. By focusing on details such as underlayments and flashings, they can

TRENDING NOW ensure that you get a quality roof that will pass the test of time. Incombustible, Bartile roof tiles far surpass a class-A fire rating and have a 75-year warranty. “Our roof tiles are made using local quarried materials and every tile is made in our Centerville facility,” says Evans. “From winter snow and ice to scorching desert summers, Bartile is specifically made to handle all of Utah’s harsh climates.” Bartile concrete tiles are lightweight enough to go on any new construction or replace an old roof.

Replacing wood shake roofs with fireproof concrete tiles. People can still enjoy the look of a shake roof but enjoy peace of mind knowing it’s fireproof and comes with a 75-year warranty. It is perfect for those with new construction jobs who want to replicate shake as well.

Environmentally responsible, the ultra-light roof tiles are made from at least 50-percent recycled material and meet LEED requirements.


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THOMASVILLE OF UTAH 5253 South State Street, Murray | 801.263.1292 | ThomasvilleUtah.com

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HEN THOMASVILLE of Utah opened 30 years ago, it was Utah’s exclusive provider of Thomasville furniture. Since then, it has become so much more. “It’s not just a Thomasville store anymore,” says president and owner of Thomasville of Utah, Chris Ross. “We’ve evolved.” Now, you can find high-quality home furnishings from more than 50 of the world’s top manufacturers in one place.

With furniture from Century, Bernhardt, Henredon, Lexington, Hickory Chair, Theodore Alexander and more, it’s the first stop for design-

TRENDING NOW Rich colors: Cool neutrals are supplemented by rich, earthy shades with warm gray and taupe tones. Add depth with rust, tobacco, red, burnt yellow, olive or the Pantone color of the year, ultra violet. Lavender may turn out to be the “it” color of 2018 design trends.

ers and discerning homeowners in the state of Utah. Thomasville of Utah has furnished many of the most beautiful homes in the state of Utah, including numerous Parade of Homes People’s Choice Award winners. Thomasville’s commitment to providing gorgeous, enduring home furnishings has earned the company a reputation as one of Utah’s finest furniture establishments. High-end furniture doesn’t just look great, it also helps to create unique spaces, precisely because it’s not available through mass retailers. With one of the largest showrooms in the state—30,000 square feet—Thomasville of Utah is a great place to find an impressive array of luxurious options. “We stay current with the trends so we can provide something for every interior design project and every individual taste and style,” says Ross. “We know what high-quality craftsmanship looks like and what having a timeless design feels like. Great home furnishings don’t start at ordinary and don’t stop at traditional or contemporary.” When you’re looking for inspiration, look no further than Thomasville of Utah.


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TUCK LANDSCAPE 237 W. Berger Lane, Murray | 801.266.1802 | tucklandscape.com

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O YOU NEED a space to get away from all the noise? Wouldn’t it be nice if that space could be your own backyard? The professionals at Tuck Landscape can help you work with what you’ve got and create what you need and want.

For example, simply adding a fire pit is a beautiful and easy way to enhance your outdoor living space. If the scent of campfires brings fond memories, choose a wood-burning fixture. Or, choose an environmentally friendly gas version that meets local air quality restrictions. Not only do fire pits provide a focal point for your landscape design, they are the perfect gathering place to entertain family and friends. Or, just relax while watching the flames dance.

University of Alabama researchers found that the warm glow and crackling sounds of fire can even lower blood pressure. Imagine how convenient it would be to step outside and bask in the radiance of a sophisticated fire pit—all from the privacy of your home. Tuck Landscape is a full-service landscaping company with unsurpassed strengths in design, installation, and maintenance, not to mention a solid reputation of commitment to quality. “We have been in business for more than 36 years,” says owner Rob Radcliffe. “People use Tuck Landscape because they know quality is our top priority.” Since its inception, Tuck Landscape has been committed to the environment; its team has extensive knowledge in LEED design strategies related to landscaping. Visit the blog (www.tucklandscape.com/blog) for more inspiring ideas on how to transform your backyard into the ultimate outdoor environment.

PRO TIP When you add outdoor living space, you add up to 20 percent more value to your home by creating an attractive environment for entertainment, relaxation and active lifestyles.


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K. ROCKE DESIGN 3910 E. Highland Drive, Millcreek | 801.274.2720 | krockedesign.com

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IGHLY ACCLAIMED DESIGNER Kristin Rocke melds her clients’ needs and aspirations into spectacular interiors that are as livable as they are uniquely personal. “My clients trust me to push the envelope and take them somewhere unexpected, knowing that each project ultimately represents their individuality,” says Rocke, principal and owner of K. Rocke Design. This Utah-based interior design firm has been widely recognized by the top tastemakers around the globe.

The experienced design team has been NCIDQ-certified, so it’s no surprise that many of its notable, award-winning residential and hospitality projects have been recognized in numerous magazines. Designing livable, artistic spaces that create a comfortable context for people as their lives evolve is a passion for Rocke. She also owns Glass House, a pulsating design store furnished with unique items that delight shoppers and elevate the style of their homes. Visit the online store at GlassHouseSLC.com.

PRO TIP Pay close attention to the details and subtleties of your design. Carefully created and expertly executed, They are the difference in making any space extraordinary.


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JEFF LANDRY DESIGN, INC. 1534 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City

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| 801.533.8530 | jefflandrydesign.com

UR CLIENTS TELL us our projects are so varied, so different,” says Jeff Landry, principal at Jeff Landry Design, Inc. “That’s because, while some interior design firms provide their look, we listen carefully and work tirelessly to give our clients exactly what they want.”

high-end residential properties, as well as selected commercial and hospitality interiors. “While most of our projects are in the resort areas of Park City and Deer Valley, Utah, we have completed projects across the country from California and Nevada to Georgia and Connecticut.

For the past 25 years, that focus on customers and attention to detail has earned Jeff Landry Design, Inc. the reputation of impeccable customer service. Jeff Landry Design, Inc. is a full service interior design firm specializing in

Whether you need interior design and furnishing services, are building a new home, or renovating an old one, Jeff Landry Design, Inc. can help. “We’re artists when it comes to furniture, furnishings, lighting, accessories and art,” says Landry. “We understand spaces from a two-dimensional floor plan, and can help translate that for you while you’re working with an architect.” From space planning and interior architecture to demolition, construction, site management and final installation, the firm can help guide you through your renovation. “While creating new and exciting spaces, we provide schematic sketches and drawings, floor plans, elevations, finish boards and complete construction drawings,” says Landry. “We are at the site during construction on a regular basis so you don’t have to be.” 

PRO TIP Color, color, and more color. Say goodbye to neutrals, tans, taupes, grays. We’ve been around long enough to know that a good economy equals richer and brighter color trends. This year we’ve done entire rooms in lavender, cinnamon, emerald and azure. Go for it.


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O.C. TANNER JEWELERS 15 S. State Street, Salt Lake City | 801.532.3222 | octannerjewelers.com

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ROM HOME DÉCOR and accessories that are truly unique, to the perfect gift to celebrate special occasions, O.C. Tanner Jeweler’s Home and Lifestyle department is a hidden gem in Salt Lake. The third-floor department brims with treasures for weddings, successes, holidays and special occasions. You’ll find shagreen, metal and wicker homeware combinations from Aerin, and Baccarat barware you can use every day for juice to cocktails, as well as mixed patterns in a set. The Home and Lifestyle Department also offers Kendra Scott Home Décor featuring gold filigree, semi-precious stones, frames, boxes and coasters.

find the perfect items,” says Martin. “Our vendors know how important exclusivity is to us, and we often buy an entire line of single pieces.” Customer experience is of paramount importance. “Our sales ambassadors build relationships with our customers,” says Martin. “They are dedicated to help clients find exactly what they need—whether it is something for their homes, a business gift, or just something thoughtful and beautiful for someone special.” O.C. Tanner works with craftsmen and artists on limited editions and small runs to ensure that each gift is as unique as its recipient. The Home and Lifestyle Department abounds with unique ideas for décor and gifting. “Stop in and experience it for yourself,” says Bob Martin, buyer. “We have an outstanding selection presented in vignettes that help you visualize what each piece would look like in your own personal space.” The department is highly curated and updated regularly. “We attend several markets a year to

TRENDING NOW Mixed materials: burled wood and wicker, metal and stone, metal and shagreen. We’re seeing a resurgence of gold as well as mid-century modern design. Luxury homeware designers such as Tina Frey and Georg Jensen are elevating the level of everyday items from cheese boards and salad bowls to serveware.


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DUNKER BEAL INTERIOR DESIGN 620 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City | 801.961.8511 75 W. 300 North, Logan | 435.713-0561 | DunkerBeal.com

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ESIGNERS MICHELE DUNKER and Cody Beal have created some of the most elegant, yet functional designs in the intermountain area. The duo specializes in residential, corporate, hospitality and restaurant design. Cody and Michele share a common passion for transforming concepts into finely edited spaces by personally detailing, sketching and documenting each project. They work with unique artisans, craftsman and tradesmen to deliver awe-inspiring creations. Individual collaboration with each client makes Dunker Beal a rare and excellent design firm.

Entry in harmony

TRENDING NOW Simplicity, balance and strong lines in entries that welcome all. The space’s color palette creates a relationship between the different planes of the room. Compose your own harmony by using soft grey accents to bring warmth to lighter and darker elements.


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FOX GROUP CONSTRUCTION 370 E. 500 South, Salt Lake City | 801.671.8090 | foxgroupconstruction.com |

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USBAND AND WIFE team Tom and Cara Fox concentrate their talent on creating homes that stand the test of time in terms of both quality and style. They offer full architectural services as well as custom home building/renovations and tailored interior design. Together, they bring more than 25 years of experience to each project. They are passionate about building timeless homes and building lasting relationships. “We take a lot of pride in each client’s happiness and focus on that relationship during the entire process,” says Tom.

@the_fox_group_

Take the stress out of the build and the design process and leave it to the professionals at The Fox Group. They use only the highest quality materials and employ the finest artisans and craftsman to create enduring, classic homes with refined palettes. To see some of their recent and wonderful projects check out their Instagram account. PRO TIP Make the bones of your home beautiful. The wainscoting, cabinetry and trim work, the tile work—all the background details—really matter. “Focus first on creating a backdrop so elegant and ageless that it can support any design elements you add or change over time, such as furniture, art and accessories,” says Cara.

DETAILS COMFORTS FOR THE HOME 1987 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City | 801.364.8963 | detailscomforts.com

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ANT TO FRESHEN up your abode? The designers at Details Comforts for the Home can help—whether you’re looking for full interior design services or just want a few new accessories to keep your space updated. This charming shop is filled with vintage treasures, high-quality furniture and bedding that will stand the test of time.

modern lighting fixtures that help set the right mood, or art that brings color and interest to a room. It also offers some of the best bedding lines in the industry as well as lush towels and bath rugs that add a touch of serenity to your most private spaces.

Nuterra Construction

“We love to help you make your home feel stylish, warm and comfortable,” says owner Rebecca Hatch. “Our interior designers can help you transform your entire home or add the perfect finishing touches to a room.” Details Comforts for the Home has everything you need. Find the perfect sofa or chair that supports your busy life, mirrors that reflect your unique style, TRENDING NOW One-of-a kind wood, metal and glass pieces with a slightly industrial look gathered from Eastern Europe, China and India. Colorful, soothing transitional, abstract landscapes and still-life art. And fresh new botanicals are making a comeback.

Nuterra Construction


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WALKER HOME DESIGN 1981 E. Murray Holladay Road, Salt Lake City | 801.930.9499 | walkerhomedesign.com

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HAT IS THE most important aspect of building your dream home? Is it affordability, livability or a pleasing design aesthetic? According to Jamie Walker, founder of Walker Home Design, when using its process, it’s possible to attain all three. “The homes we design are economical to build, functional to live in and attractive to look at,” Walker says. Walker Home Design is an award-winning residential architectural and design firm, that works closely with their clients to reflect their personalities and preferences in their home design. “We design spaces that expand each client’s vision. Whether that is capturing an incredible view,

designing a castle or superhero mansion, or secret passages. We’re able to maximize every square inch of our client’s homes, sometimes using areas of the home that most architects and designers fail to expose,” he says. Walker Home Design’s business model is unique for two reasons: First, their expertise at designing timeless architectural designs. Second, they’ve developed a four-step process that engages their clients from the beginning. Using this process, they can create your custom home plan in as little as eight weeks. “When we design a plan, we dive into the details of how that home will be built. This allows us to value engineer the plan to save our clients money

“It takes a great team, with an exceptional process and amazing vision to create worldclass house plans.” –Jamie Walker on the construction costs. We design more than an attractive home, we think through how it’s going to be built and try to eliminate any potential issues on the job site.” Follow them on Facebook, YouTube and Instagram @walkerhomedesign. PRO TIP A great way to begin conceptualizing your new home is to create an idea book using Houzz or Pinterest. Show the idea book to your design team as a visual representation of your vision.


REMODEL

A SECOND chance In the Salt Lake Country Club neighborhood, a team of pros breathes new life into a ramshackle mid-century residence. BY VAL R ASM USSEN

AF TER PHOTOS BY LUCY CALL

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e were immediate heroes of the neighborhood when everyone found out we bought the house,” says Phil Winston, co-owner of Northstar Builders about the derelict home set among the manicured streets of Salt Lake’s Country Club neighborhood. The vacant one-story, flat-roofed home had been an eyesore on the stately block for years, a ghostly shell of what had once been a mid-century gem.

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Before The Northstar team matched the addition’s new ceiling to the home’s original tongue and groove. It was originally constructed with quality timber, making this well-built home a candidate for restoration rather than a tear down.


Before Before the renovation, tattered curtains filled floor-to-ceiling windows, neglected landscaping led to a weathered cantilevered patio and a dusty carport sat empty. Interior designer Anne-Marie Barton updated the exterior with fresh features while accentuating its mid-century charm.

Before The sleek new Poliform kitchen is in the same spot as the old kitchen, but because the team removed a wall, it now opens into the great room, the dining room and entry.

“The house had incredible features, but it needed a lot of help,” Winston explains. Cardboard boxes, broken-down appliances and deserted furnishings were piled throughout the house. To make matters worse, squatters had broken in and damaged the property. Winston, and his Northstar partner Greg Ross, donated what was worth giving, salvaged what could be reused and discarded the rest. Then they began the transformation. First up: Create an entertaining space. “We started with the double-sided fireplace that we wanted to salvage,” Ross says. “There were only 13 feet on each side of the

fireplace, much too narrow for a modern entertaining space with an open kitchen and dining room.” So the team extended the back of the home 20 feet to provide space for a new open great room while leaving ample area for a newly re-landscaped backyard. Next on the list was a master suite crafted from an open carport. “This was an easy conversion because the tongue-and-groove ceiling ran throughout the home and, fortunately for us, into the carport,” Ross explains. “The carport enclosed 26 square feet, which was the perfect size for a master bedroom suite.” Voila, carport turned master. Autos now reside in a new detached garage.

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Before

Winston and Ross enlisted the help of designer Emily Foxley to refine the interior, while paying homage to home’s history. “My goal was to salvage what we could, Foxley says. The new home was a little mid-century modern, but not a pure mid-century, so we incorporated surprising touches throughout the space, starting with the entryway.” The team sanded the original entry screen and refreshed it with new paint. “I loved that we kept the railing in the entry. It needed a little love, and we raised it for code,” she explains. “The globe pendants are original, too. They were re-dipped and cleaned.” The team’s luck remained strong. “We met with Brent Jespersen at Poliform to discuss kitchen options,” Foxley says. “Customizing that space would have meant waiting four months for a delivery from Italy. Brent allowed us to purchase his showroom pieces off the floor, which coincidentally fit perfectly inside the new space.” One issue, however, did challenge the pros. “There are so many cool things about the home’s period that it was hard to control our spending,” Winston says. “We were like kids in a candy store.” In the end, the team hosted an open house for neighbors and the design community that met with rave reviews. “This was really a labor of love,” Foxley says of the heroic transformation. “It’s still true to form, but now has a functional flow for modern life.”

After being cleaned and re-dipped, the original globe pendants now sparkle in the entryway, giving guests a strong first impression of midcentury heritage and charm.

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“If we left it empty, we would have lost the flavor of the home,” says builder Phil Winston, who enlisted Studio McGee to outfit the revamped interior with new, midcentury-inspired furnishings.


“We started with the double-sided fireplace that we wanted to salvage.” —Greg Ross, co-owner of Northstar Builders

The pros clad the fireplace’s existing brick with slabs of honed, vein-cut limestone.

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OU TSIDEJOB

BEFORE

High-performance design combines with modern lines to transform a Salt Lake home’s landscape. BY BR A D M EE

PHOTOS BY ALA N A N D W H ITN EY W ILBU R

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ountain pasture or city garden. Suburban lot or sprawling estate. Regardless of a project’s location, size, style or budget, landscape designer Jayson King begins with two key considerations: the site and the client. Respect the former and

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satisfy the latter, and success is a sure thing. The owner of this single-level home near the Salt Lake Country Club wanted updated outdoor living spaces for her abode and turned to King, principal of Landform Design Group, and his team to create them. They did that—and so

Fresh paint, modified windows, and new chimney caps help to update the home while the transformed landscape dramatically visually connects the house to the street. A low enclosure wall and planter of painted brick pair with stylish plantings to define areas of the newly leveled front yard.


Anchoring an elevated patio near the back of the property, a 12-foot -tall fireplace formed from stone features a floating limestone hearth. A budget-friendly alternative to a built-in structure, two large umbrellas create a canopy for the outdoor living space and can be angled vertically to function as shades.

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BEFORE

A new masonry wall and row of trees provide a striking backdrop for the patio’s board-formed concrete bench inlaid with wood. The raised fire feature is formed with stone base and limestone top. Limestone steps lead to a second living area further back in the yard.

King designed large-slab limestone steps and walkways to provide flow from the front of the property, around both sides and into the back areas of the lot. There, large patios, layered plantings and a lush lawn provide year-round living spaces.

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much more. “When owners look at ways to upgrade properties, they think about individual elements like fences, outdoor kitchens or points of concern, like drainage,” King says. “Our job is to think of the big picture and to create a cohesive design that brings it all together.” When King first visited the property, he encountered an understated brick home, an outdated landscape and old vegetation that was spotty and overgrown. “It was nothing special,” he recalls. This was a redo waiting to happen. King’s goal was to transform the transitional-style dwelling with exterior updates and a modern-leaning landscape that relates to and elevates the style of the house and its grounds.

The transformation began at the curb. The designer visually connected the home and its front courtyard to the street by adding low brick walls that extend into the newly leveled front yard and form an elevated planter fronting the façade beneath its three vertical windows. “We used painted brick to link the landscape to the house and to accentuate its horizontal lines,” King explains. New plantings and a linear design add to the appeal. The breakout feature is a series of steps formed by under-lit slabs of limestone that appear to float as they lead to the front courtyard. The homeowner requested stone rather than concrete but wanted nothing small or busy looking. King responded


An eye-catching orange planter draws the eye from a side yard walkway into the back landscape. RIGHT: A series of stone slabs replace old railroad ties as steps providing access from the side yard to the main lawn area.

with massive, warm-toned limestone slabs used to form the new hardscape throughout. “They were cut off-site, shipped to the home and then placed like enormous puzzle pieces into the landscape,” he says. A new, horizontally detailed iron gate opens to a side yard, where a solid limestone walkway leads to the backyard. Along the side yard’s new brick wall, a screen of topiaried Japanese maple trees fills a narrow planting bed that widens as it migrates to a large covered patio newly equipped with an outdoor kitchen and built-in heaters. Steps away, a rectangular fire pit and a built-in bench anchor a handsomely furnished gathering area visible from the kitchen’s large picture window. Large limestone slabs form a garden walkway that leads to a second living area, where a tall fireplace, lounge area and large, architectural umbrellas draw visitors deeper into the yard. “The umbrellas can perform as overhead canopies or angle vertically to serve as shades,” King explains.

On the east side of the home, a new ornamental entry gate opens to a limestone walkway, masonry wall, lush plantings and vertical grain horizontal cedar fencing that unite to stylishly connect the front of the home to private outdoor living spaces.

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Jayson King

why it works UNIFIED MATERIALS King created a cohesive look by choosing materials and design elements that visually link to the home and its style, including painted brick, horizontally oriented wood fencing and boardformed concrete. YEAR-ROUND LIVING Heated limestone floors and paths, outdoor fire features and built-in space heaters stretch the seasons for outdoor living and entertaining. REPETITION King established an edited palette of materials and plants that he featured repeatedly across the property to foster a sense continuity and rhythm. GROUPED PLANTINGS King used plant groupings, from hedges of yew bushes to rows of hornbeam and Japanese maple trees to serve as living structural forms, screens and eye-catching layers that soften the hardscape of stone, concrete and brick. SURROUND SOUND Inconspicuous speakers and an underground woofer provide level volumes of music throughout the landscape. “This eliminates the need to play music loudly in one area so that it can be heard in another,� King explains. FOCAL POINTS From single planters and vivid orange umbrellas to fabulous fire features and inviting sitting areas, King strategically placed key elements that move the eye comfortably across the landscape and encourage movement throughout it.

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BEFORE

King replaced the landscape’s curved forms with straight lines and square angles. A segmented walkway of limestone fronts a hedge of yews that replaced two unsightly air conditioners that King moved from the back of the home onto its roof. Board-formed concrete walls pair with painted brick masonry to link to the home and its horizontal lines visually.

A rectangular swathe of lawn extends from the lounge patio and is flanked by a new, boardformed concrete wall and hedge-fronted columnar hornbeam trees. It ends with a sunning area furnished with two chaise lounges backed by a deep red screen of Japanese maples. Layers like these add depth and interest to the gardens at every turn. Nearby, another set of stone slabs step down to a side yard detailed with a built-in bench, walkway of segmented stones and an orange, sculpture-like planter. Soft music ema-

nates from the gardens throughout the property, courtesy of an inconspicuously integrated outdoor audio system. “It connects to a smart home system,� the designer explains. In the end, King transformed the home from ordinary to extraordinary. He provided his client with intriguing outdoor living areas, as she wished, as well as gardens and daring details that merge to make the property, front and back, much more than the sum of its masterfully designed parts.

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Homes

PHOTO BY NICOLE HILL GERULAT

Spring 2018 A freshly styled fireplace graces a Orem family room designed by Alice Lane Home Interior Design, page 84.

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In the living room, a light fixture by Nika Zupanc hangs above an antique settee from Seret and Sons and Lucite chairs. OPPOSITE: The home is accessed through a front courtyard. Lee replaced the timber posts with antique carved green posts. “They give the house depth and an aged look,� she says.

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BY TESSA WOOLF

PHOTOGRAPHS BY KERRI FUKUI

S PA N I S H

R EV I VA L

A mid-century Spanish-style house gets an irreverent redo in Salt Lake City. S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 | U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N

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In the downstairs media room, patterned floor tiles pair with Timorous Beasties wallpaper featuring giant iguanas. OPPOSITE: For a classic Spanish vibe in the living room, Lee and Holmberg replaced the white shag carpet with dark herringbone wood flooring. They left the walls white, stained the wood beams, and kept the pre-existing arched bookshelves intact.

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hen it comes to finding her dream house, you might call designer Dorothy Day Lee something of a house whisperer. Take her previous residence, for example: a midcentury modern dwelling in Salt Lake’s St. Mary’s neighborhood. It was love at first sight, but the home wasn’t for sale. Lee made repeated phone calls to the owners, and she was so convinced she would live there one day she even took the liberty of enjoying takeout dinners on the front porch of the vacant property. “I basically just stalked the home,” she says, laughing. Her persistence paid off—she eventually got the keys and

completely remodeled the property. It was home sweet home for four years, but she started itching to work on a new project. Lee called upon her friend and real estate agent Cody Derrick, owner of CityHomeCollective (CHC), to help her sell the St. Mary’s house and begin her quest for a new spot to hang her handbag. When the duo visited a unique Spanish-style home, Lee fell head over heels all over again. “This home is one of the most interesting examples of midcentury modern, Spanish-style architecture in the entire state,” says Derrick. “I knew that it was the right fit for Dorothy. She’s unique

Homeowner Dorothy Day Lee of Dayhouse Studio

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and likes things to be different, but the home still kept in line with the era that she likes.” The 4,000 square-foot casa was practically untouched, and Lee was excited to dive into the remodel. Cue the design team. Susannah Holmberg, a senior designer at CHC, worked in tandem with Lee to feather her new nest. “The goal was to play up both the mid-century modern and the Spanish elements,” explains Holmberg. They also wanted to bring the outdoors inside—the lush natural surroundings and the creek in back were important design elements to the home. To marry modern design and Spanish style in the kitchen, the duo paired sleek black cabinets with a terracotta and black-and-white marble wall tile. Outdated appliances received an upgrade, and a custom-built island made with layers of marble, copper, and walnut now takes center stage. They hung organically shaped, handwoven pendant lights above the island and plastered the walls for texture. A dark herringbone ceramic floor tile accented with a copper inlay adds depth underfoot. In the living room, they mixed bohemian furniture and modern lighting with a Spanish-inspired palette of white walls, stained wood beams, and dark herringbone wood flooring. The large room features a dining area and a sitting area. For the latter, they chose a zebra-print rug, Lucite chairs, an antique settee and a pair of gold cherry-shaped light fixtures sourced by Holmberg. For Lee, they’re the cherry on top. “They totally made the room,” she says. “They’re weird

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In the dining area, Lee and Holmberg paired plush pink chairs and a bench made from a tree with a large oval table, an overdyed rug and a contemporary Patrick Townsend chandelier.

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“The kitchen was very dated—an 80’s interpretation of Spanish style with faux terracotta and pastels,” says Holmberg. The existing drop-down ceiling made the space feel closed off and dark, so they bumped it to the roofline to open things up. Wall tile by Tabarka Studio, cabinetry by Poliform and pendants by Louise Tucker.

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TOP RIGHT: Lee opted to turn the small dining room off the kitchen into a conversation room. They enlarged the kitchen fireplace and made it doublesided with a copper surround so the cozy space would have access to the flames. BOTTOM RIGHT: Dark walls provide a dramatic backdrop for collections and pops of color in the remodeled kitchen.

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TAKEN BY SURPRISE 1. “From the very beginning when you walk into the front courtyard and the pool, it’s one discovery after another,” says Cody Derrick, who helped Lee find the property. “And then it’s surprise after surprise in the home.” 2. A pair of carved wood columns flanking the kitchen fireplace boost the room’s Spanish vibe. The columns and all of the doors in the home were sourced from Seret & Sons, a showroom of antique treasures that Lee discovered in Santa Fe. 3. In the entry hallway, the design team commissioned a mural by artist Andrew Moncrief. “We had him paint it in a primitive, naïf style,” says Holmberg. “The hope was to create a home that was almost a museum of original, unique pieces.” 4. In the master bathroom, Lee added a steam shower, a marble tub, and a trough-style sink that she designed. The sink features two whimsical jackalope heads built into the wall for the water faucets.

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The pool in the front courtyard adds to the allure of the overall property. “It’s a killer lot tucked away in the trees,” says Holmberg.

and unexpected. The living room is probably my favorite room in the home. It looks like a rock star lives there.” Another rock star worthy element? The pool Lee added to the front courtyard. To ensure privacy, Lee swapped the existing front gate for large antique wood doors. Rather than stepping into the home through them, you step into a courtyard oasis. The house itself is accessed through the courtyard via a second pair of doors painted peacock-blue. “I like that element of surprise,” says Lee. “It makes the home more of a secret.” In total, the remodel took about three years to

complete, and Lee couldn’t be happier with how it turned out. “The house has soul—it has a real personality and depth,” she says. Derrick agrees. “There are parts of the home that are flashy and gorgeous, and parts that are deep-rooted and soul-connected,” he says. But Lee enjoyed the process of remodeling so much, that just like with her previous St. Mary’s dwelling, she soon started itching for a new project. So she sold the Spanish house last fall and moved on to her next dream home. “What I love about remodels is they teach you about life,” she says. “You tear things down and you rebuild. It’s a great metaphor.”

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FACTOR In Orem, a traditionally styled house becomes an unexpected home to contemporary flair and exhilarating details. BY BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY NICOLE HILL GERULAT

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‘It’s been said that the entry of a home is like an appetizer. It gives you a taste of what’s to come,” says Jessica Bennett, design principal of Alice Lane Home Collection. That being true, this Orem home offers a flavorful journey from the moment one enters the front door. OPPOSITE: Beneath a contemporary chandelier by Jonathan Browning, a black piano gleams in the natural light that fills the living room’s turret. A silver-front chest by Bolier adds a shot of glamour and shine to the space.

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Beneath the dining room’s shimmering silver-leafed vaulted ceiling, Milo Baughman chairs surround a zebrawood table crafted by Magleby Construction.

hen an Orem couple decided to build their ideal family home in the city’s gated Berkshire enclave, they craved a sanctuary that comfortably caters to an active clan of eight with personalized spaces, contemporary style and surprising treatments, from room to room. In the end, that’s exactly what they got thanks to a team of pros that included Alice Lane Home Interior Design, Think Architecture and Magleby Construction. “From the very start, this was a home designed to be celebrated and enjoyed,” says Jessica Bennett, design principal at Alice Lane Home Interior Design. From the outside, the 22,000-square-foot house resembles a traditional Hamptons estate, while inside, fearlessly contemporary spaces abound. The intrigue begins at the entry where a broad, white oak-and-glass door—dressed with bold linear hardware—is flanked by large panes of glass. The door’s design is unexpected, but it is nothing compared to the surprise waiting inside. Stepping into the light-filled foyer, one is dazzled by a glamorous, high-octane décor anchored by a graphically patterned marble floor. “Our client wanted a black-and-white checkered floor because he loved the one his stylish, fake-eyelashwearing aunt had in her entry,” Bennett explains. Her team put a twist on the traditional checked motif by designing a graphic, “irreverent” pattern cut from large-scale marble tiles. “Naturally, we had to inject the space with steroids and do it our way,” she says with a laugh. The show-stopping floor not only infuses the entry with bravado, but also, as Bennett tells it, it established a “tuxedo moment” from which the design team could draw a sense of formality and sophisticated-yet-striking design for the rest the house.

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The nearby powder room is a case in point: black and copper Cole & Son wallpaper creates a dramatic backdrop for a shimmering tiered waterfall glass chandelier, framed black crystals and exquisite Kallista for Kohler fixtures. “The black space is the perfect answer coming off the black-and-white entry,” Bennett explains. The design team filled other rooms with similar statements of style and swagger. In the dining room, for example, a pair of Aerin Lauder Mill pendants hangs from a silver-leafed vaulted ceiling above a zebrawood table surrounded by 14 Milo Baughman chairs. “It was important to the owner that we include these modern chairs,” Bennett says. “He grew up in a home filled with furniture by the designer, who was also a family friend.” A high-contrast palette shot with shades of blue originates in the entry, flows into the dining room and repeats in the large, light-toned living room area. There, a circular turret houses a grand piano staged like a jet-black sculpture. The turret’s cylindrical shape informs the gentle curves and rounded forms found throughout the room. Among them are the custom

ABOVE: Decorative details flourish in the open kitchen. TOP LEFT: In the pantry, a glass door opens to a bright space animated with lighted wood shelves for cookbooks, white cabinetry and colorfully patterned concrete tiles by Ann Sacks. BOTTOM LEFT: Velvet-backed, leather-seated chairs by Thom Filicia surround a table in a casual dining area located just steps from the open kitchen.

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Thomas O’Brien pendants hang above a pair of large islands designed distinctively to boost the room’s character and functionality. A sliding barn door opens to a homework room.

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ceiling trim detail and luxurious furnishings, including kidney-shaped coffee tables and a barrel-backed chaise. “They take the edge off the design and soften the space,” Bennett explains. A more casual vibe infuses the family room and adjoining open-plan kitchen. Shades of warm gray enrich the kitchen’s two-toned cabinetry. Caesarstone and classic marble clad two distinctively different islands: A waterfall design defines the food prep island while a walnut base anchors another created for serving and casual dining. “It would be so boring to let the islands be identical twins,” Bennett says, “so we tricked them up to give them separate identities.” A dressed-up pantry boasts a patterned concrete floor, and across the kitchen, a sliding barn door opens to a large homework room that elevates the dynamic kitchen’s functionality, style and fave-status in the busy family home. When the parents crave a little solitude, a master suite located on its own level satisfies the need for privacy. It

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also caters to the husband’s love of purple. “Because this area is removed from the rest of the home, we could treat it a little differently,” says Bennett referring to the black walls and vivid violet chairs in the suite’s office as well as the tranquil lavender canopy bed and lounge chairs in the bedroom. “It’s a luxury to have a grown-up zone when you’re raising six kids.” Thoughtful, one-of-a-kind design takes precedence throughout. The house is large, to be sure, but the designers worked masterfully to make each room unique. “Big homes can be boring, so it’s important to drill down and consider the function of each space while creating special moments,” Bennett says. “That way, everything doesn’t have the same look.” That’s an approach that helped shape the extraordinary interior—one that thrills its owners everyday as they live large in the high-style family home. “They wanted it to be extraordinary, and we wanted that too,” Bennett adds. “Helping to create this home was an opportunity of a lifetime.”


A his-and-hers desk anchors a swanky office located off the master bedroom. Black walls, vivid violet chairs and a bold chandelier hanging from a grassclothcovered ceiling add to the room’s memorable style OPPOSITE: Raised on a floating platform, a freestanding tub performs like sculpture in the spacious master bathroom. An inverted beveled design details the vanity’s marble waterfall edge mimicked by lipstick cabinet knobs. “Little things make a big difference,” Bennett explains.

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INSPIRING DESIGN 1.

Anchored by a comfortable sectional, the inviting family room opens to the spacious kitchen.

2. Cole & Son wallpaper enriches the strikingly chic powder room located off the foyer. 3. Oly Studio’s three-tiered Walt chandelier shimmers above the casual dining area. 4. Mirrored squares reflect the entry’s patterned floor and swank furnishings. 5. Located off the busy kitchen, a large homework room serves the six children. Sliding barn doors separate the two spaces. 6. With its cedar shake, peaked rooflines, copper rain gutters and crisp white trim, the home’s exterior captures the classic style of a traditional Hamptons estate.

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Upholstered in lavendercolored mohair, a canopy bed sets the tone for the master bedroom’s luxurious dÊcor. The designers repeated purple tones with curved lounge chairs and elegant accessories.

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A custom metal-and-glass screen from the Cristina Grajales Gallery visually separates the entry from the open living area. Layered pieces of handmade glass adorn a chandelier hanging above a Shir rug uniquely made with lengths of brass sewn into each end. OPPOSITE: “Rosie,� a wood statue by Harry Siter, overlooks a light-filled hallway located off the entry. Eva vertical sconce by Satori; rug by Tania Johnson.

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high style

In Park City, a talented team turns a mountain home into a showcase of sophisticated and surprising design. BY

BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY

SCOT ZIMMERMAN

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nne-Marie Barton knows how to make an entrance. For proof, one only needs to step through the front doors of her recent project, a remarkably remodeled Park City home. Once a space completely open to the home’s great room, the new, spatially defined entry captivates with a dazzling art screen through which glimpses of the home’s updated interior and chic, new décor flow. “We wanted to introduce the unexpected from the get-go,” says Barton, principal of AMB Design. Located in Park City’s Glenwild community, the home boasts an enviable location affording spectacular mountain views that loom large through broad walls of windows. Barton and her client knew they wanted to complement rather than compete with the vistas as they transformed the interior’s mountain style from predictable to sophisticated, warm and unmistakably modern. “The shell gave us great opportunities,” says Barton, who teamed with architect Michael Upwall and contractor Steve Dubell, who masterfully executed the transformation throughout. From the start, the client brought homebuilding know-how, a craving for the extraordinary and a certain avant-garde attitude to the project. Case in point: Rosie—a floral-headed wood sculpture—looks into

TOP LEFT: Throughout the home, new mixes with old, surprises mix with subtlety. In the living room, expanses of steel and a custom fireplace surround by Metalmorphic update a stone fireplace filled with stacked stone balls rather than firewood. Playa sectional by Holly Hunt; ottoman by Jean De Merry. TOP RIGHT: Displayed in a custom frame, an art screen bejeweled with sparkling rondels links the entry and great room. Upholstered bench by Holly Hunt; console by Gregorius | Pineo. OPPOSITE: A suspended wood ceiling trimmed in metal follows the curve of the original ceiling and serves as a canopy that visually warms and grounds the great room’s space.

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the entry from an end-of-the-hall inset where a coat closet originally existed. The hall, once dark and dreary, is now window-lined and light-filled. Its openness accentuates the sculpture’s head-turning presence. “The homeowner allowed us to dream big and go out of bounds,” Barton says. “It was so liberating and fun for everyone involved.” The transformed entry opens to a large, glass-walled great room that flows beneath a soaring curved ceiling and is comprised of the main living, dining and kitchen areas. Barton updated the existing stone fireplace with

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a dark steel facing and surround. The same steel detail trims a spectacular dropped wood ceiling devised by architect Michael Upwall. “The suspended ceiling helps to warm and ground the space,” says Barton, who furnished the sitting area below with a Holly Hunt sectional, Jean De Merry ottoman and a vintage Laverne cocktail table, all set on Warp & Weft rugs. “We layered the rugs to instill a little visual tension,” Barton says. In the adjoining dining area, Barton suspended a light fixture comprised of hand-blown glass tubes above a custom walnut-and-brass table. Above the nearby


ABOVE: A Coup Studio chandelier comprised of hand-blown glass tubes hangs above a custom walnut-and-brass table paired with Holly Hunt chairs. An Ochre antique mirror layered with art by Jill Barton rests on a custom console. Nearby, a uniquely designed island anchors the kitchen space beneath Roll & Hill pendants. Barton cleverly hid the hood in cabinets above the range. “This kitchen is all about restraint,” she says. TOP RIGHT: Integrated into the upper cabinets, an open shelf of stained wood displays a small collection of glasses and tableware. BOTTOM RIGHT: At the island’s end, a “block” of walnut appears to shoulder the slab of light-toned, honed stone. The wood also clads the underside of stone that frames the counter seating area.

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kitchen island, reflective origami-shaped pendants showcase a decidedly dissimilar style. “The lights don’t compete but are both surprises,” she explains. The remodeled kitchen, while “quiet and sublime,” is riddled with similarly unexpected and intriguing features. The island, for example, boasts a wood “block” that extends beyond the light-toned, honed stone at one end and a waterfall stone detail on the other. A pocket-doored breakfast bar, dressed with over-scaled nickel handles, opens to easily accessed appliances, and a stained-wood shelf notched into upper cabinets displays a small vignette of clustered dishes. While some features are eye-catching and others discreet, all are impressive design elements. Perhaps most notable is what is not visible at all. “We hid the hood in the cabinets above the range,” says Barton, who rejected an obvious hood to enable the island’s unique design to prevail. Barton didn’t save all her surprises for the public areas of the home. Far from it. Large-scale floral wallpaper animates a guest bedroom, vibrant blue encaustic cement tile enlivens the laundry room, and flourishes of luxurious, sophisticated treatments elevate the style and comfort of the master suite. There, mountain views surround a freestanding tub and tear-like lights hanging above. RIGHT: The light-filled office adjoins the master bedroom. Plum blossom wallpaper by De Gournay spans an entire wall. An antique crystal chandelier and a screen from Cristina Grajales Gallery add sparkle to the elegant space.

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MASTERING THE DETAILS 1. Brass trims the mirrors and the window in the master bathroom. Cabinetry by Premier Woodwork & Design. 2. “Wallcovering changes the spirit of any room,” Barton says, as proven by this bedroom enlivened with Lotus Mustard paper by Harlequin. 3. Narrow brass shelving flanks the right side of the master bedroom’s floor-to-ceiling marble fireplace. 4. A tufted bench uniquely merges with a center island in the multipurpose mudroom/laundry. Encaustic cement tile from European Marble & Granite brightens the room.

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A floor-to-ceiling marble fireplace warms the serene bedroom, and oversized plum blossom patterns span the wall of an ultra-chic office area. Perhaps most memorably, the art screen showcased in the entry makes a second appearance in the suite, making one fall in love with the unique feature all over again. It all adds up to an engaging interior that is refined and understated, but full of memorable mo-

ments. “It was a mountain home begging for a sophisticated transformation ,” Barton recalls. Thanks to her deft use of detail and passion for compelling design, that’s exactly what it received. ABOVE: In the master bath, a Hydro Systems freestanding tub sits below a patinated-bronze-and-solid-glass droplight by Ochre. Views of the home’s Park City mountain setting flood the lux space. RIGHT: Anne-Marie Barton, principal of AMB Design

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ON THE LAMB We may associate lamb with the arrival of spring, but here and throughout the world, we savor it year round. BY M A RY BROW N M ALOU F PHOTOS BY A DA M FI NK LE

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ast year, the Australian Lamb Board caused a big flap with an advertisement featuring Jesus, Ganesha, Moses, Zeus and other deities sitting together and enjoying a lamb feast. The ad caused a lot of controversy, but the message was clear, no matter how you took the medium: Lamb is one of the most-consumed meats in the world. And one of the most symbolic. We eat it in spring to herald the fresh season, and we crave it year round.

Lamb chops at Saffron Valley are served in a Chettinad curry along with a semolina cake and spice-roasted vegetables.

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DINING IN & OUT

World of flavors All lamb-eating cultures have added signature spices that make the meat their own.

Greek: oregano and lemon

Lamb Seekh Kebabs from Saffron Valley in SLC.

Indian: coriander

Lamb in Translation Lavanya Mahate, owner of Saffron Valley, enlightens us about lamb in Indian food. “INDIA IS A DIVERSE COUNTRY with over 1.3 billion people. Nearly 80 percent of the population is Hindu, and Muslims are the largest minority at around 15 percent,” says Lavanya Mahate, owner of Saffron Valley. “Hindus refrain from eating beef, and Muslims do not eat pork. So it’s no wonder that chicken is the most popular choice of meat followed by goat and lamb, frequently called mutton in India. Americans are still wary of eating goat, so lamb usually replaces it on menus in Indian restaurants in America, though goat is being more accepted gradually. Although goats and lambs are both slaughtered when young, are classified as red meat and are closely related, they are two different species. In India, goat meat ranges in color from light pink to bright red. It is better suited to long, slow cooking over low temperatures to preserve the moisture and break down the collagen in the meat. A sheep in its first year is a lamb. The meat varies in color from a tender pink to a pale red. In general, the darker the color, the older the animal. There is more fat on lamb, fewer bones, and a less gamy flavor than goat.

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Warm spices such as cardamom, cloves and cinnamon are used with lamb, as are fragrant ones such as fennel seeds and saffron along with the famous Kashmiri red chilies, ginger and garlic that add great depth and complexity to lamb dishes. Lamb is often braised and slowcooked in yogurt or milk to cut the gamy smell, replacing it with a creamy and aromatic taste.” Lavanya Mahate

Chinese: cumin

Syrian: zaatar

French: rosemary, garlic

Lebanese: allspice


DINING OUT

Global lamb is on the menu in Utah. COPPER ONION 111 E. Broadway, SLC, 801-355-3282 Chef Ryan Lowder gives braised lamb shanks a North African accent with chermoula,pomegranate, pistachio tahini, parsnip, olives and citrus. $27 ARISTO’S 224 S. 1300 East, SLC, 801-581-0888 Lamb tacos at Aristo’s are a backward flip on Greek-style lamb, folding pulled lamb, horiatiki pico, mint and feta in a tortilla. Better order two. $5

Pasture to Plate

A Utah tradition

JAMIE GILMORE’S FAMILY has been raising lamb for generations, but in 2001, he and his wife Linda started marketing Morgan Valley Lamb to Utah’s burgeoning restaurant scene. The sweet organic meat became a chef’s staple and the family story, a media darling. In 2012, Gilmore’s family decided they wanted to sell the ranch, and it looked like the end of the line for lamb.

Then Wes Crandall, owner of another heritage Utah ranch, Jones Creek Beef, stepped in. Crandall’s family used to raise lambs, and he was determined not to let another old family business disappear. “I got together with Jamie and offered to run Morgan Valley Lamb as part of Jonas Creek, preserving the brand and the continuing the philosophy of raising all-natural lamb—no hormones, no steroids. Jamie still has a hand in it.”

Lamb fell out of popularity for awhile, says Crandall, but people are rediscovering it in the context of other cuisines. Morgan Valley supplies lamb for shwarmas and kabobs, lamb belly and lamb bacon (great for the Jewish community), and bratwurst as well as chorizo and sausage with herbes de Provence— even the merguez sausages used in the Machine Gun sandwiches at Bruges Waffles & Frites. Morganvalleylamb.com

In Praise of the Butterflied Leg Slow-braised shank and seared lamb chops are the most popular cuts of lamb, but please, reconsider the leg. We don’t cook big cuts of meat as often as we used to—Sunday roast lamb with mint sauce and peas is rare now. And unlike Greek restaurants and tavernas, most of us don’t have a rotisserie grill. But ask your butcher to butterfly a leg, removing the bone and flattening the meat so you can grill it like a steak. Marinate it—olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and rosemary— and grill it for about 15 minutes per side to form a crust, then grill until a thermometer registers 145F for medium rare.

SPENCER’S 255 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-238-4748 Lavish double cut lamb chops rubbed with Moroccan spices, sided with tahini-potato puree and preserved peppers. Order two chops for $42 or three for $55. MANOLI’S 402 E. Harvey Milk Blvd., 801-532-3760 Little lamb riblets are called paidakia here—grilled and topped with a caper chimichurri and sea salt. $14 FIREWOOD ON MAIN 306 Main Street, Park City, 435-252-9900 Chef John Murcko serves a firegrilled lamb chop on chicory salad extravagantly accompanied by a confit duck leg on cassoulet. Of course, rosemary is involved. $43

Where to buy local lamb You can buy whole and half lambs, as well as other lamb products directly from morganvalleylamb.com. Black Cherry Market and Liberty Heights Fresh sell Morgan Valley lamb and lamb products.

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DESIGN DIRECTORY

Landscape design by Landform Design Group. See more of this project on page 66.

DESIGN DIRECTORY INSIDE OUT ARCHITECTURALS 3410 S. 300 West, SLC 801-487-3274 insideoutarchitecturals.com

LLOYD ARCHITECTS 573 E. 600 South, SLC 801-328-3245 lloyd-arch.com

WALKER HOME DESIGN 801-930-9499 walkerhomedesign.com

Arts and Antiques MODERN WEST FINE ART 177 E. 200 South, SLC 801-355-3383 modernwestfineart.com

Builders/Contractors/ Construction BARTILE 725 N. 1000 West, Centerville 801-295-3443 bartile.com

FOX GROUP CONSTRUCTION 370 E. 500 South, SLC 801-671-8090 foxgroupconstruction.com

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JACKSON & LEROY

4980 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-277-3927 jacksonandleroy.com

NORTHSTAR BUILDERS 1486 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-485-0535 northstarbuilders.com

SHAW BUILDING GROUP 801-943-6417 shawbg.com

SIERRA HOME SERVICES 801-733-9401 sierrahomeservices.com

PHOTO BY ALAN AND WHITNEY WILBUR

Architectural Elements and Details


Flooring ADIB’S RUG GALLERY

3092 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-484-6364 or 800-445-RUGS adibs.com

UTAH RUGS

2876 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-359-6000 utahrugs.com

Furniture DECONDE’S

LEISURE LIVING

O.C. TANNER JEWELERS

2208 S. 900 East, SLC 801-487-3289 leisurelivinginc.com

15 S. State St., SLC 801-532-3222 octannerjewelers.com

RC WILLEY

Interior Design

Draper

13300 S. 200 West, Draper 801-567-2200

Murray

861 E. 6600 South, Murray 801-261-6800

Orem

693 E. University Parkway, Orem 801-227-8800

AMB DESIGN

4680 Kelly Cir., SLC 801-272-8680 annemariebarton.com

DUNKER BEAL INTERIOR DESIGN

Salt Lake City

620 E. 100 South, SLC 801-961-8511

3130 S. Highland Drive, SLC 801-355-1727

Riverdale

Closeouts

4045 Riverdale Rd., Riverdale 801-622-7400

3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC 801-466-2996 decondes.com

Salt Lake City

2301 S. 300 West, SLC 801-461-3800

DETAILS COMFORTS FOR THE HOME

1693 W. 2700 South, Syracuse 801-774-2800 rcwilley.com

IMPERSA NATURE

SAN FRANCISCO DESIGN

IVY INTERIORS

1987 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-364-8963 detailscomforts.com

FORSEY’S FURNITURE GALLERIES

Traditional

2977 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-487-0777

Contemporary

2955 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-463-0777 forseys.com

GATEHOUSE NO. 1 672 S. State St., Orem 801-225-9505 gatehousestyle.com

GUILD HALL

3640 Highland Dr. #1, SLC 801-277-6534 utahguildhall.com

HUMBLE DWELLINGS

1265 E. Draper Parkway, Draper 801-613-9570 humbledwellingsliving.com

JOHN BROOKS INC 579 E. 100 South, SLC 303-698-9977 johnbrooksinc.com

Logan

​ 5 W. 300 N, Suite 110, Logan 7 435-713-0561 dunkerbeal.com

Syracuse

Salt Lake City

2970 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-467-2701, 800-497-2701

801-618-9776 impersanature.com

3174 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-486-2257 ivyinteriorsslc.com

Park City

1890 Bonanza Dr., Park City 435-645-7072, 800-497-7072 sanfrandesign.com

THOMASVILLE OF UTAH 5253 S. State St., Murray 801-263-1292 ThomasvilleUtah.com

WARD & CHILD— THE GARDEN STORE 678 S. 700 East, SLC 801-595-6622

Home Accessories and Gifts CACTUS & TROPICALS

2735 S. 2000 East, SLC 801-485-2542 12252 S. Draper Gate Drive, Draper 801-676-0935 cactusandtropicals.com

JEFF LANDRY DESIGN 1534 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-533-8530 jefflandrydesign.com

K.ROCKE DESIGN/GLASS HOUSE 3910 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-274-2720 krockedesign.com

LMK INTERIOR DESIGN

Salt Lake City

4626 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-272-9121

Palm Springs, CA.

760-325-2959 lmkinteriordesign.com

OSMOND DESIGNS

Orem

1660 N. State St., Orem 801-225-2555

Lehi

151 E. State St., Lehi 801-766-6448 osmonddesignsfurniture.com

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DESIGN DIRECTORY Kitchen and Bath Showrooms EUROPEAN MARBLE AND GRANITE

2575 S. 600 West, SLC 801-974-0333 europeanmarbleandgranite.net

VENETIAN TILE & STONE 825 W. 2400 South, SLC 801-977-8888 venetianstonegallery.com

Landscape Design 801-266-1802 tucklandscape.com

2345 S. Main St., SLC 801-466-0990

Media/Television

Salt Lake City Provo

THE STONE COLLECTION 2179 S. Commerce Center Dr., Suite 500, West Valley City 303-307-8100 thestonecollection.com

SUB ZERO WOLF

1400 S. Foothill Dr. #212, SLC 801-582-5552 subzero-wolf.com

SCOT ZIMMERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Heber City 435-654-2757 scotzimmermanphotography.com

TUCK LANDSCAPE

MOUNTAIN LAND DESIGN

50 E. 500 South, Provo 801-932-0027 mountainlanddesign.com

Photography

KUER 90.1 FM/HD

101 S. Wasatch Dr., SLC 801-581-6625 kuer.org

KRCL 90.9 FM 801-363-1818 krcl.org

Real Estate RED LEDGES Heber City 877-733-5334 redledges.com

Windows/Window Coverings PARK CITY BLIND & DESIGN

1612 W. Ute Blvd. Suite 109, Park City 435-649-9665 parkcityblind.com

SIERRA PACIFIC WINDOWS 1880 N. 2200 West, SLC 801-973-7170 sierrapacificwindows.com

architecture interiors aerials resorts 1.800.279.2757 scotzimmermanphotography.com

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SOURCES DECORATING

pages 36-38 AMB Design, SLC, annemariebarton.com; Caitlin Creer, holladay, caitlincreerinteriors.com; Craig Construction, Park City, craigconstruction.com; Denton House Design Studio, Holladay, dentonhouse.com; Establish Design, Holladay, establishdesign.com; Ezra Lee Design Build, Lehi, ezralee.com; Jackson & LeRoy, Holladay, acksonandleroy.com; Lane Myers Construction, Sandy, lanemyers.com; Lloyd Architects, SLC, lloydarch.com; LMK Interior Design, SL, lmkinteriordesign.com; Pradhan Interior Design, SLC, pradhandesign.com; R.D. Nielson Architecture, Park City, rdnielson.com; Sticks & Stones Furniture & Design, Park City, 435-615-2071

ENTERTAINING

Pages 40-42 Branches Event Floral, West Jordan, branchesfloral. blogspot.com; Bed Bath & Beyond, SLC, bedbathand​ beyond.com; Glass House, SLC, glasshouseslc.com; Macy’s, SLC, macys.com; New Orientation, SLC, neworientation.com; Orson Gygi, SLC, gygi.com

SECOND CHANCE

Pages 62-65 Architect: SugarHouse Architects, SLC, sugarhousearchitects.com; Builder: Northstar Builders, SLC, northstarbuilders.com; Interior design: Emily Foxley, SLC, emilyfoxley.com; Exterior Design: Anne-Marie Barton, SLC, annemariebarton. com; Furnishings: Studio McGee, Holladay, studiomcgee.com; Kitchen cabinets, stainless steel island counter: Poliform SLC, poliformslc.com; Kitchen countertops: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.com

OUTSIDE JOB

Pages 66-71 Landscape Design: Landform Design Group, SLC, landformdesigngroup.com; Furnishings: Furnish, SLC, landformdesigngroup.com

SPANISH REVIVAL

Pages 74-83 Interior Design: Dorothy Day Lee, Dayhouse Studio, SLC; Susannah Holmberg, CityHomeCollective, SLC, cityhomecollective.com; Contractor: Dorothy Day Lee, Dayhouse Studio, SLC; Landscape Designer: Jim Mellor, Mellco Landscaping, Draper, mellcolandscaping.com; Bathroom Countertops: Distinctive Marble and Granite, SLC, distinctivemarbleandgranite.net; Flooring: Signature Floors, SLC, signaturefloors.com; Pool: Odyssey Pools, SLC, odysseypoolsutah.com Page 74 Living Room Sitting Area Antique settee: Seret and Sons, Santa Fe, NM, seretandsons.org; Cherry light fixture: Nika Zupanc, nikazupanc.com; Lucite chairs: 1st Dibs, 1stdibs. com; Face pillow: Aelfie, Brooklyn, aelfie.com Page 76 Media Room Wallpaper: Timorous Beasties, Regency Royale, SLC, regencyroyale.com; Floor tile: Clé, cletile.com Pages 78-79 Kitchen Wall tile: Tabarka Studio, tabarkastudio.com; Cabinetry: Poliform, SLC, poliformslc.com; Countertops/Island: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Project

Sunday, SLC, projectsunday.net; Pottery: CM Ceramics, SLC, cmceramicart.com; Pendants: Louise Tucker, Paris, France, louisetucker.net; Chairs and stools: Euro Treasures Antiques, SLC, eurotreasuresantiques.com page 79 Conversation Area Light fixture: Vertigo Pendant Light, Petite Friture, petitefriture.com; Chest/Armoire: Euro Treasures Antiques, SLC, eurotreasuresantiques.com; Reupholstered black velvet chairs: Lenny Sharp, Sharp Upholstery, Midvale, 801-562-9001 Pages 80-81 Dining Area Chandelier: Patrick Townsend, townsenddesign. net; Dining table: Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com; Overdyed rug: Seret and Sons, Santa Fe, NM, seretandsons.org; Blue sofa: Anthropologie, SLC, anthropologie.com; Art: John Bell, John Bell Studio, SLC, artistjohnbell.com; Sconces: Design Within Reach, dwr.com Page 82 Master Bathroom Floor tile: Clé, cletile.com; Shower tile/plaster: Ryan Chivers, Artesano, artesanoplaster.com

WOW FACTOR

Pages 84-93 Architect: Think Architecture, SLC, thinkaec.com; Interior Design: Alice Lane Home Interior Design, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Contractor: Magleby Construction, Lindon, maglebyconstruction.com; Furnishings: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com Page 84 Living Room Silver front chest: Bolier and Co., bolierco.com; Petite Pentagone chandelier: Jonathan Browning, jonathanbrowninginc.com Page 86 Dining Room Pendant lights: Aerin Lauder through Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com Page 88 Kitchen Dining Natayla large brass chandelier:John Rosselli through Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com Page 88 Pantry Paccha Honeycomb concrete floor tile: Ann Sacks, annsacks.com Page 89 Kitchen Brass sink: Officine Gullo, officinegullo.com; Pendant lights: Thomas O’Brien for Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com; Cabinets: Magleby Construction, Lindon, maglebyconstruction.com; Page 90 Master Bathroom; Baldwin mirrors, Arteriors, arteriorshome.com; Faucets and plumbing fixtures: Kallista for Kohler, kohler.com; Cabinetry hardware: Rocky Mountain Hardware, rockymountainhardware.com Page 91 Office Desk: Magleby Construction, Lindon, maglebyconstruction.com; Dallas chandelier: Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Page 92 Powder Room Wallpaper: Cole & Son, cole-and-son.com

HIGH STYLE

Pages 94-103 Interior Design: Anne-Marie Barton, AMB Design, SLC, annemariebarton.com; Contractor: Steve Dubell , Steve Dubell Construction Group Inc., SLC, dubellcustomhomes.com; Architect: Michael Upwall Design, SLC, upwalldesign.com; Cabinetry:

Premier Woodwork & Design , Kaysville, premierwwd.com; Countertops: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Flooring Refinishing: KT Hardwood, West Jordan , kthardwoods.com; Furnishings: available through AMB Design, SLC, annemariebarton.com Page 94 Entry Custom rug with brass metal piece: Shiir, De sousa hughes, desousahughes.com; Custom metal and glass screen:Cristina Grajales Gallery, cristinagrajalesinc.com; frame by Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com Page 95 Hallway Wood statue: Coup D’Etat, coupdetatsf.com; Eva vertical dark bronze sconce: Satori, satoridesign.net; Tania Johnson rug: Sloan Miyasato, sloanm.com Page 96-97 Living Room Entry Saussure console: Gregorius Pineo, gregoriuspineo.com; Entry bench and Playa sectional : Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; Nugge Gris ottoman: Jean De Merry, jeandemerry.com; Custom walnut and bronze bookshelf: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Custom steel fireplace surround: Metalmorphic, SLC, metalmorphic.com Page 98 Dining Room Dining chairs: Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; Ozu chandelier: Coup D’etat, coupdetatsf.com Page 98-99 Kitchen Maxhedron Horizontal pendants: Roll & Hill, rollandhill.com; Leather Shadow barstools: Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com Page 100-101 Office Custom metal and glass screen: Cristina Grajales Gallery, cristinagrajalesinc.com; frame by Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Wallpaper: De Gournay, degournay.com; Antique crystal chandelier: Almond & Co., almondandcompanysf.com Page 102 Master Bedroom Custom bedside table: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Angelika bed and Beacon pendant over bedside table: Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com Page 102 Master Bathroom Custom brass mirror: Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com Page 102 Guest Bedroom Wallpaper: Lutus Mustard by Harlequin, John Brooks Inc., johnbrooksinc.com; Bed: Randolph & Hein, randolphhein.com Page 102 Laundry Room Pavé Bloom Bluebell encaustic cement tile: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.com Page 103 Master Bathroom Hydro systems freestanding tub: Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com; Linear 5 Celestial Pebble light fixture: Ochre, ochre.net

DINING IN & OUT

Pages 105-107 Saffron Valley, SLC, saffronvalley.com Sources are acknowledgements of services and items provided by featured design principals and homeowners. Those not listed are either private, pre-existing or available through the professionals noted.

USD (ISSN 1941-2169) Utah Style & Design is published quarterly (Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall) by Utah Partners Publishing, L.L.P. Editorial, advertising and administrative office: 515 S. 700 East, Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Telephone: 801-485-5100; fax 801-485-5133. Periodicals Postage Paid at Salt Lake City and at additional mailing offices. Subscriptions: One year ($9.95); two years ($17.95); outside the continental U.S. add $20 a year. Toll-free subscription number: 855-276-4395. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Utah Style & Design/Subscription Dept., PO Box 820, Boca Raton, FL 33429. Copyright 2018, JES Publishing Corp. No whole or part of the contents may be reproduced in any manner without prior permission of Utah Style & Design, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Manuscripts accompanied by SASE are accepted, but no responsibility will be assumed for unsolicited contributions.

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HOT LIST

Gia ottoman, $1,950, LMK Interior Design, SLC

McAlpine Home ottoman, $966, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC

Origin stool, $149, Crate & Barrel, Murray

Kenzie stool, $360, Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC

SMALL WONDERS Imagine a piece of furniture that can serve as a nomadic seat, space-saving table, one-man ottoman and even an iffy step. That’s a stool. Given its size, versatility, mobility and infinite styles, it’s no wonder we’re obsessed with the stool, indoors and out.

Inlaid shell hourglass stool, $774, Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC

Rudd stool, $945, Forsey’s Fine Furniture, SLC

Kahl black mahogany stool, $567, Glass House, SLC Domaine Blanc stool, $1,079, Thomasville of Utah, Murray

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Outdoor Safari stool by Link Outdoor, to the trade, John Brooks Inc., SLC


Utah Style & Design Spring 2018  
Utah Style & Design Spring 2018