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CLASSIC


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FA L L 2 016 VO L U M E 2 0 N U M B E R 4

68 PHOTO ALAN AND WHITNEY WILBUR

62 PLANNED TO PERFECTION By Brad Mee Photos by Scot Zimmerman

today’s new

CLASSIC on the cover Classic design and fine craftsmanship infuse a new Highlan home.

Designer Bill Cordray and wife Brooke pulled out the stops when creating a new kitchen for their small Salt Lake City home.

68 MAKING CHANGE

By Christie Marcy Photos by Alan and Whitney Wilbur

Designer Jayson King transforms a spectacular Park City property, front to back and every space in between.

Cover photography by Russ Chandler Ford

92 A TIMELESS TALE

102 Y EAR-ROUND RETREAT By Brad Mee Photos by Scot Zimmerman

A couple’s longing for a mountain sanctuary leads them to picturesque Wolf Creek Ranch, where they and a talented team built a family getaway to enjoy across the seasons.

112 MODERN GESTURES By Brad Mee Photos by Lindsay Salazar

Homeowners Nick and Michelle Leukenga enlist a dynamic design team to help create a Fruit Heights family home that mixes contemporary and classic styles.

By Brad Mee Photos by Joshua Caldwell and Russell Chandler Ford

Rooted in tradition but designed for today, Brandon and Andrea Leroy’s new Highland home combines classic style with modern-day comfort and conveniences.

FALL 2 0 1 6

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CONTENTS

FA L L 2 0 1 6

121

50

STYLE FILE 35 Editor’s Pick 36 Runways and Rooms 38 In Good Taste 40 Architecture 42 By the yard 44 Profile 46 Entertaining

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136

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DEPARTMENTS

50 INTERIORS SMALL BATHS, HUGE STYLE

121

By Mary Brown Malouf Photos by Adam Finkle

By Kerby Hansen

Courtesy of savvy design and fantastic features, these 11 Utah bathrooms prove that while many powder rooms and baths may be short on space, they can be long on style.

56

Craving a fall flavor boost? Start roasting. This cooking technique belongs to the season just as grilling belongs to summer.

125 DESIGN DIRECTORY A resourceful guide of materials, products and services.

TRENDS

SEE-THROUGH STYLE By Don Skypeck

Design pros prove why acrylic furnishings are clear winners in today’s high-style décors.

DINING IN AND OUT

LET’S GET ROASTING!

132

SOURCES

A listing of this issue’s people, places and products.

136 THE HOT LIST LIGHT SHOW High-style sconces steal the spotlight throughout today’s most enlightened homes.

Find more design inspiration at utahstyleanddesign.com

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ONLINE

utahstyleanddesign .com WHAT’S COOKING If you love Bill and Brooke Cordray’s newly remodeled heart-of-the-home (page 62), you won’t want to miss our gallery of high-style kitchens in residences across Utah.

PHOTO SCOT ZIMMERMAN

utahstyleanddesign.com/ homes/kitchens

“In contemporary design, everyone likes horizontal lines,” says designer Bill Cordray of a recurring design element that elevates the style of his home’s new kitchen.

big-style bathrooms featured in this issue (page 50), we’ve rounded up some of Utah’s splashiest bathrooms, from tiny powder rooms to roomy master suites.

Designer Julie Chahine pairs a Bocci light fixture with a floor-to-ceiling mirror in a small Park City powder room.

PHOTO SCOT ZIMMERMAN

utahstyleanddesign.com/ homes/bathrooms

WHAT’S HOT NOW Modern leather chair, page 36

You won’t want to miss our Style File section, which begins on page 35, then look to our website for other hot decorating trends, entertaining tips and fabulous finds for your home.

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PHOTO RUSS CHANDLER FORD

BIG SPLASH Inspired by the 11 small-but-

Spectacular beams crown the Leroy home with timeless beauty.

MAKING HISTORY Our cover story on the Leroy family’s Highland residence (page 92) is only the beginning. Go to our website for a closer look at the home’s historically inspired design.

utahstyleanddesign.com/ timeless-tale

@utahstyledesign

Follow us on Instagram for your daily dose of Utah’s dynamic design scene.


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THE TEAM

PUBLISHER

COPY EDITOR

WEB EDITOR

Margaret Mary Shuff

Dan Nailen

Ashley Miller

EDITOR IN CHIEF

WRITING CONTRIBUTORS

OFFICE MANAGER

Brad Mee

Tiffini Porter Don Skypeck

Melody Kester

ART DIRECTOR

Trina Baghoomian

FOOD EDITOR

Mary Brown Malouf

Jeanine Miller

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Val Rasmussen

SENIOR DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Jarom West

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Janette Erickson Danielle Holmes Emily Lopez

Christie Marcy Glen Warchol

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Adam Finkle

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION

COPY EDITORIAL INTERNS

PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS

Anne Bailey Kerby Hansen

Joshua Caldwell Russell Chandler Ford Alan and Whitnew Wilbur Scot Zimmerman

Damon Shorter MARKETING MANAGER

Brittany Hansen

515 S. 700 East, Suite 3-i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 Phone

/ 801-485-5100

Fax

/ 801-485-5133

Email

/ magazine@utahstyleanddesign.com

J Squared Interiors Residential + Commercial

www.jsquaredinteriors.com 435.901.8554

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Website

/ utahstyleanddesign.com

PRESIDENT PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER & PUBLISHER

Margaret Margaret Mary Shuff Mary Shuff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Marie Marie SpeedSpeed CONTROLLER CONTROLLER

JeanneJeanne Greenberg Greenberg PUBLISHERS PUBLISHERS OF OF

Salt Lake Saltmagazine Lake magazine Utah Bride Utah & Bride Groom & Groom Utah Style Utah&Style Design & Design Boca Raton Boca Raton magazine magazine Worth Worth Avenue Avenue magazine magazine Mizner’s Mizner’s DreamDream DelrayDelray BeachBeach magazine magazine


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PHOTO ADAM FINKLE

CONTRIBUTORS

KERBY HANSEN began working as an edito-

rial intern for Utah Style & Design magazine after graduating from Weber State University last spring. She has enjoyed using her journalism degree and passion for writing on various projects, including this issue’s “Small Baths, Huge Style,” (page 50) focusing on the design of spatially challenged bathrooms. “I loved learning about the designers and the imaginative materials they use to create such unique spaces,” Hansen says.

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Twenty-Four years of Furnishing your Home and Garden.

CHRISTIE MARCY is the associate editor at Salt Lake magazine and a contributing editor and writer for Utah Bride & Groom and Utah Style & Design. In this issue, Christie talks with landscape designer Jayson King about his remarkable redo of a Park City landscape (“Making Change,” page 68) and how outdoor spaces have become an important part of the overall design of a home. Christie lives in a Salt Lake and has a small yard that she uses primarily as a spot to sip wine.

PHOTO NATALIE HAWS

The Ward & Child Garden Store Ad Salt Lake City Magazine 4.75” x 4.75”

Tweet. Pin. Instagram. Facebook. As a loggedin millennial, ASHLEY JOLLEY’S favorite verbs have to do with social media. As the Web Director and Social Media Manager for Utah Style & Design, she balances her time between tending to the website, Instagramming Utah’s latest trends (Lucite, anyone?), and pinning everything from dinnerware to design. “Social media is another opportunity for us to engage with our audience. Readers are welcome to tag their photos with #usdspaces for a chance to be featured!”

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EDITOR’S NOTE

WHYS GUY

“W

HAT ARE YOU, an interrogator?” an-

other guest sarcastically asked me during a cocktail party. It’s not the first time I’ve provoked the question in a social setting. As an editor and writer, I reflexively dig for explanations—the whys behind the whats. It’s what I do. And while my perpetual questioning sometimes isn’t well received over martinis, it’s almost always rewarding in my work. While creating this issue, I and other writers asked many designers, architects and builders about the daring moves and surprising gestures they infused into their featured projects. They’d tell us what, and we’d ask them why. Of course, not every detail requires an explanation, but for most thoughtfully conceived treatments, it’s the reasons behind the creations that provide the most interesting and inspiring information. Take, for example, the Leroy family’s large

kitchen island uniquely split in two (“Timeless Tale,” page 92). “A single island would have been too big and now the room flows and functions much better than it would have,” designer Elizabeth Wixom explained. In “See-Through Style” (page 56), designer Jenny Samuelson strategically chose a transparent Ghost Chair for a mountain project, not just for looks, but also “to avoid the weight, bulk or distraction that another material would provide.” Landscape designer Jayson King created low intersecting stone walls rather than a continuous one to border his client’s Park City property (“Making Change,” page 68). Why? “Staggered walls don’t obstruct views,” he said. In the Leukenga family’s Farmington home, the design team placed a bold mural in the kitchen not only for the visual punch but, as Jessica Bennett shared, to also disguise a large television mounted on the wall (“Modern Ges-

tures,” page 112). No question, the lure of this issue’s design is irresistible. As you turn the pages, you’ll see—and learn—why.

BRAD MEE, EDITOR IN CHIEF

Follow me on Instagram @brad_mee

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stylefile FALL 2016

PHOTO ADAM FINKLE

NATURALLY INSPIRED Perfectly imperfect, hand-made stoneware by Rina Minardi delivers nature’s beauty to autumn’s best-dressed table. Each piece captures honesty of form and color, and when paired with napkins woven of eco-friendly European flax and flatware in brushed gold, the look is both stunning and serene. Handmade stoneware bowls, $35 - $180; flax napkins, $48/4-piece set; gold flatware, $59/5-piece set; all from Glass House, SLC

FALL 2 0 1 6

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stylefile

RUNWAYS AND ROOMS

CARVEN 2016 FALL READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTION

2

3 1.Hammerton fireplace tools, $8,905, Elume Distinctive Lighting, Park City; 2. Kathryn McCoy votive holder, $1,000, O.C. Tanner Jewelers, SLC; 3. New Zealand wool Crossroad blanket, $150, Glass House, SLC; 4. Louis bed by Thomas Bina, $4,197, Forsey’s Furniture Galleries, SLC; 5. Stag horn pillow, $185, Glass House, SLC; 6. Leather round cocktail ottoman, $657, Gatehouse No.1, Orem; 7. Rugs, 8 x 10 foot, starting at $2,500, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC; 8. Bernhardt leather chair, $1,490, Thomasville of Utah, SLC; 9. Birch-wrapped pencil plant, $55, Orchid Dynasty, SLC

1

APRÉS-SKI ATTITUDE

4

The warmth and weight of aprés-ski-inspired fashions prompts modish mountain pieces for the home. 5

6

7 9 8

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stylefile

IN GOOD TASTE

SAVORY

Sauté a mix of sliced mushrooms in butter with thyme leaves until mushrooms have given up their juices and have nearly evaporated. Serve over toast and sprinkle with crumbled ricotta salata.

SWEET

TOAST MAKERS Why stop with Sunday brunch? French toast is a versatile favorite to be served and savored 24/7.

F

rench toast, or as the French poetically put it, “pain perdu,” is one of the best uses for leftovers ever invented: easy, economical, nutritious, delicious—what more do you want from a recipe? Here’s what: versatility. So why is French toast relegated to the culinary afterthought that is breakfast? It can be the basis for simple, sustaining and, yes, delicious supper and lunch dishes as well. Instead of powdered sugar and syrup, top it with fresh fruit, sauteed vegetables, mushrooms, turkey or chicken hash. Fact is, French toast can swing both ways: savory or sweet.

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Five Toast-Making Tips Forget the flaccid eggy slices so often served. The goal: golden crispy outside and custardy inside.

1 2

Use good bakery bread. You want an even grain without gaping holes, but don’t use soft packaged bread. Let the bread slices get slightly stale. A night outside the bag will dry the bread so it will soak up the batter better.

3

Soak the bread sufficiently. A quick dip will not do. Be sure the bread absorbs as much beaten egg as possible. This may mean you have to

use a spatula to move it from the soak to the skillet.

4

Heat vegetable oil to a proper frying temperature—375 degrees—before putting in the bread. The soaked bread should hiss and swell up when it hits the oil. You’re frying, not sautéing.

5

Turn it carefully to brown the other side, and drain it briefly on paper towels as you would any fried food.

PHOTO BY ADAM FINKLE; TABLEWARE AND LINENS FROM WILLIAMS-SONOMA, SLC

Cook mixed berries in a saucepan with a tablespoon of kirsch until saucy. Spoon over toast and add a dollop of mascarpone.


stylefile

PROFILE

FEAST FOR THE EYES Photographer Adam Finkle’s art captures local food creators and their passion for food. You may have savored many of Salt Lake's most acclaimed foods, but you may not know the people behind them. Photographer Adam Finkle is here to remedy that. In his Faces of Food series, Finkle creates compelling diptychs, art pieces that capture local culinary pros and the passion they express through food. Finkle has been shooting food and its makers for 20 years, and he enjoys the unique challenges of each. “I like the technical side of shooting food and the creative challenge of making it look different,” he says. Photographing people, on the other hand, is about personality. “I really like our food com-

MATTHEW LAKE, Alamexo chef-owner, concentrates on the authentic flavors of regional Mexico.

JIM SANTANGELO, sommelier and owner of Wine Academy of Utah, spreads the joy of wine as he teaches.

munity,” he says of the local chefs, restaurateurs, growers, small-market pros and others he snaps. “I try to capture what these creative people do and what makes them tick,” Finkle explains. His series currently includes 18 pieces and is growing. See it in person at Les Madeleines in Salt Lake City or online at ajfphoto.com

#instafood tip While Finkle’s stunning food shots result from years of experience and state-of-the-art equipment, he offers phone-camera foodies a quick tip. “If you want to photograph food well, choose indirect natural light that’s consistent.”

AMBER BILLINGSLEY, pastry chef at Amour Cafe, uses herbs and flowers in her delicious desserts and gelato.

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BY THE YARD

KILLING IT SOFTLY Velvet is one of today’s hottest textiles trends, and thanks to innovative fabric houses, it’s here to stay.

V

TOP TO BOTTOM: Mortora, Legno Di Rosa, by Rubelli Mohair Velvet, Burgundy, by Donghia La Closerie des Lilas, Lie de Vin, by Misia Mortora, Pesco, by Rubelli Cymbeline, Mauve, by Zoffany Vello D’Oro, Ametista, by Rubelli Clark, Beige/Off-White, by Sahco Aux Folies Bergère, Cuivre, by Misia Miami Playground, Prune de Vars, by Misia Gropius, Bordeaux, by Rubelli Shaggy, Rose, Dominique Kieffer by Rubelli Underground, Forest, Dominique Kieffer by Rubelli

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PHOTOS ADAM FINKLE

elvet may conjure images of Victorian settees and Elvis portraits, but forget all that. As textile pro Marvin Wilkinson explains, velvet is enjoying a renaissance and technology is allowing big creativity in producing updated versions of this old classic. “Color saturation, weave quality, weight and distinctive hand make velvets new again,” says Wilkinson, principal of John Brooks Inc. What’s more, the use of synthetic fibers such as Viscose creates a cost-effective option, making velvet more workable and attainable. And that dowdy granny vibe? Dead and gone. “Velvets are perfect for the casual, modern style so many of us want today,” he explains.


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stylefile

ARCHITECTURE

TAKING CENTER STAGE The George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater opens this fall in downtown Salt Lake City. OPENING THIS season, the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater is the culmination of a massive urban planning and construction effort. What does it take to design a building that changes the physical and cultural dynamics of Utah’s capital?

The Challenge

“Our team was given the responsibility of designing a piece of the city,” says Mitchell Hirsch, design principal in charge for Pelli Clarke Pelli, one of two renowned architecture firms that collaborated on the project. “Functionally, the building has to work like a Swiss watch, but it also has to meet the aspirational needs of a cultural center.” Drawing on experiences designing public buildings around the globe, Pelli Clarke Pelli worked with HKS Architects to create a place where the community comes together.

Gina Narracci and Mitchell Hirsch, Pelli Clarke Pelli

The Right Fit

Local architect Emir Tursic, associate principal at HKS, explained that the design needed to be fresh and relevant while “integrating with a historic part of Main Street and respecting historic architecture.” The result is a contemporary expression that harmonizes with surrounding structures.

The Inspiration

The building’s façades evoke “the soul of Utah, which is the landscape, and in particular the canyons,” says Hirsch. White limestone, brick made from indigenous materials, and exceptionally clear, patterned glass recollect striations and colorations in Utah’s canyons.

The Neighbors Emir Tursic, HKS Architects

There is no “back” to the building. 360-degree activity is encouraged through a mid-block walkway between Main and Regent Streets, a galleria connecting the theater with the new 111 Main office tower next door, and a dedicated plaza on Regent Street. 111 Main partially cantilevers over the Eccles Theater, allowing both to fit on one city block, while glass walls under the theater marquee retract to open on Main Street, extending the lobby outside.

The Interior

A Full Cast

Led by GTS Development and Layton Construction, the Eccles Theater was built through the cooperation of several private and public sector entities. “There are so many great pieces of this building,” says Tursic. “Every so often, you work with projects that surprise you and turn out even better than you envisioned.” artssaltlake.org/venue/eccles-theater

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STORY BY TIFFANI PORTER

The Delta Performance Hall seats 2,500, yet the curving, three-tier layout feels intimate, with unobstructed sight-lines throughout and a ceiling that looks like a glittering star field. Two artworks were commissioned for the building’s interior: colored-glass balcony railings by Paul Housberg, and a terrazzo floor by local artist Laura Sharp Wilson.


LIGHTS. TREES. DÉCOR. IDEAS.


stylefile

ENTERTAINING

PRO TIPS “FOOD TASTES better when presented creatively,” says Maxine Turner, owner of Cuisine Unlimited in SLC. Turner has catered countless stylish soirees and knows serving pieces make all the difference. She loves boards and offers pointers for choosing and using them.   Create your own rustic, bark-edged wood board by cutting a cross section of a tree trunk. Sand the surface. Rub with water and coffee grounds to enhance the color and seal with food-safe mineral oil.   Freeze a marble board before using it to serve chilled foods: seafood to cold hors d’oeuvres, and even sorbet shots.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Enjoy board, $50, Bloomingsales, SLC; Slate with rope handles, $40, WilliamsSonoma, SLC; Round with pear ornament, $49, New Orientation, SLC; Monogrammed marble-and-wood board with knife, $43, Bloomingsales, SLC; Marble board with mouse knife, $86, Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC; Round marble board, $42, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC.

  Use a wire slicer rather than a knife to cut cheeses or similar items on wood. It won’t mar the surface. Non-serrated spreaders are perfect for soft cheeses.   Slate is very porous and can absorb bacteria easily. Treat it with food-safe mineral oil each time you use it.   Heat a marble board for serving warm appetizers. It’s ideal for foods like kabobs as it warms the meat without drying it out. Position the board above multiple candles (never Sterno) to help maintain heat.   Place one-sided gummed tabs on the bottoms of boards to prevent them from scratching your table surface.

ON BOARD

  Consider heated or chilled Himalayan salt blocks as serving pieces. They’re antibacterial and can be cleaned with a damp sponge or light scrubbing (never immerse in water). Pat dry.

Forget plates and platters—serve the season in style with the natural beauty and warmth of wood and stone boards.

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FOR EVERY SEASON, FOREVER MEMORIES. At Victory Ranch, year-round recreation and amenities await those seeking a Park City mountain home to call their own. It is a place for your family to escape the everyday, and where great moments in the great outdoors become memories to treasure for a lifetime. Come summertime, our Rees Jones Golf Course challenges your game while a 4,000acre backcountry offers miles of mountain biking trails, yurt camping and 5-stand shooting. Hit the legendary slopes of Park City and Deer Valley in the winter or fly fish along the Upper Provo year-round.

Experience the Good Life in

THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Parenting tips from

THE GREAT

6,700 Pristine Acres Near the Legendary Ski Resorts of Deer Valley and Park City • 18-Hole Rees Jones Golf Course • The Post Clubhouse & Pool • The Barn Activity Clubhouse & Spa • Ski-in/Ski-out Park City Clubhouse • World-class Fly Fishing • Freestone Lodge Riverside Dining • 20 Miles of Hiking and Mountain Biking Trails • 5-Stand Shooting • 4x4 ATV Adventures • Jordanelle Water Sports • Backcountry Yurts

Homesites from $425,000, Cabin Homes from $1,550,000 Call 800.771.6953 Find yourself at VictoryRanchUtah.com Victory Ranch does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. Read the property report for Victory Ranch before signing anything. No federal or state agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of property in Victory Ranch. Access to golf and other amenities is restricted to Victory Ranch Club members and subject to applicable membership fees and other limitations. Each office is independently owned and operated.


INTERIORS

Making a Splash 11 Utah bathrooms prove that while they may be short on space, they are very big on style. BY K ER BY H A NSEN

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2 In a Park City powder room, cypress-raked limestone walls add texture and contrast to the smooth surface of the freestanding basin. Strands of Italian pendant lights and fixtures by Duravit add sparkle, while a simple mirror accentuates the room’s verticality. A large mirror visually expands a Park City powder room while reflecting the shapes and light of three stunning pendant lights and a wall-mounted faucet. The team at LMK Interior Design lighted a glass sink from below and set it on a mirrorpaneled cabinet with dramatic results.

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN (2)

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PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN (4)

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Simplicity drove the design of this Salt Lake penthouse created by designer Kathryn Anderson. Unique sink and toilet fixtures from Agape add character without detracting from the room’s minimalist style. A custom vertical mirror and light shelf complete the room’s restrained décor. Wall sconce and faucet by Boffi. Designer Beth Ann Shepherd chose a shimmering chain links wallpaper by Astek Wallcovering for a Park City powder room. “The room is a tad small, but the larger prints make it feel much more expansive and it is certainly unforgettable,” Shepherd explains. Teerlink Cabinet constructed a large cabinet with crisscross detailing. “As always in powder rooms, drama, glamour, wow and a bit of the unexpected create a win-win,” Shepherd says.

As always in powder rooms, drama, glamour, wow and a bit of the unexpected create a win-win.

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—Beth Ann Shepherd

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Architect William Mammen combined curved forms against flat planes and sharp angles to help this powder room—and the rest of the Park City home— blend with its natural setting of rolling hills against the rocky backdrop of the Wasatch Back. A Stone Forest white onyx vessel sink sits on a Stone Forest slab pedestal. Designer Kay Mammen suspended a mirror in front of a wall clad in a strong tile pattern. In this Park City powder room, designer Julie Chahine created spa-like serenity by pairing a Bocci light fixture with walls dressed in soft beige tile. A floor-to-ceiling mirror accentuates the shape of the Lacava rectangular pedestal sink. “The color scheme is neutral, which showcases the geometry of the fixtures,” Chahine explains. Wall Mount Faucet by Graff. FALL 2 0 1 6

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INTERIORS

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A Holladay home’s pool bath features a mirror that meets the ceiling and a vanity with an “all sink” top. Designer Anne-Marie Barton avoided a sterilized modern design by adding the natural beauty of white oak to the more contemporary aspects of the space. She also raised the vanity off the floor to prevent any competition between the room’s two wood pieces. The custom mirror’s wood shelf adds a commanding, horizontal line. In a Park City home designed by architect Michael Upwall, a white angled wall is accentuated by striated ceramic tile walls and floor tile. A backlit LED mirror and a custom integrated quartzite sink fosters the room’s bold style. Design by LMK Interior Design. “Though this is a ski house, the client wanted to change the feeling to a lighter/brighter interior while still incorporating the general mountain theme items,” designer Jeff Landry says of a Deer Valley powder room. He painted the baseboards and window castings white and stained the rest of the details a rich dark color. To visually expand the room, Landry tiled the back wall with dimensional Ann Sacks tile.

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN (IMAGES 7, 8, 10); PHILLIP ISTOMIN (IMAGE 9)

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PHOTO BY DUNKER IMAGING

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“The lower level is more fun and casual, so using color was key,” designer Julie Chahine says of a Park City bathroom. To foster the room’s clean-lined, contemporary design, she paired a blue-tiled wall with a unique full-length mirror accented by a classic strip light from Artemide. A wall-mounted Aquasei sink by Lavaca and one-piece toilet by Ovale elevate the room’s streamlined style. Floor-to-ceiling glass mosaic emphasizes the curve of the wall of Park City guest bathroom designed by Cody Beal and Michele Dunker. A floating mirror is suspended from satin-gold rods and accentuates the airiness and height of the room. The asymmetrical drawers detailed with satin gold hardware merges the asymmetrical design of the wall.

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Listed by:

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AMERICA’S PREMIER SKI-IN/SKI-OUT PROPERTY, ONLY AVAILABLE IN AMERICA’S LARGEST MOUNTAIN RESORT.

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THE BEST ON-MOUNTAIN HOMESITES COME WITH A FALL LINE TO SHARE. Imagine you and your friends skiing and riding on 300+ trails and 14 bowls of Utah powder, then retreating to your home just steps away from it all. It’s almost too much to wrap your helmet-clad head around. But you’ll happily manage. Welcome to the Colony in Park City. Seamlessly nestled among aspens and meadows, your home is connected to the nation’s largest resort. Schedule a tour by contacting our sales team at 435.649.3411 or visit thecolonywpc.com. This is not an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy to residents of any state or jurisdiction in which the registration requirements for such an offering have not been fulfilled.

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Park City


Humble Dwellings home furnishings & inspired design

Draper UT humbledwellingsliving.com 801.613.9570


TRENDS

Designer Ashley Johnson chose acrylic barstools by Studio H to provide transparent seating in her modern St. George kitchen.

See-Through Style Acrylic furnishings are clear winners in today’s decors.

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veryone touts transparency and, these days, it’s hitting home. Having fallen in and out of favor over the decades, see-through furniture pieces made of acrylic—aka Lucite and Plexiglas—are enjoying yet another moment as they return to the design spotlight and high-style rooms alike. From

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shapely chairs to barely-there tables and boxed-in chandeliers, acrylic furnishings add modern flair and panache without detracting from an interior’s colors, patterns and textures. What’s more, they foster a light and airy interior and work brilliantly in small and freshly styled spaces alike.

PHOTOS SCOT ZIMMERMAN

BY DON SKYPECK


RIGHT: A Lucite-stemmed Jacques Sconce by Jonathan Adler illuminates with swanky brass accents. FAR RIGHT: In Park City, an acrylic base lightens the visual weight of a chic dining table. Custom design by Beth Ann Shepherd. BELOW: Lucite removes the visual bulk and stuffy style from the traditional game table. Modern table from Jonathan Adler.

“I typically incorporate Lucite into a design when I want to add something surprising to the space or when I need a piece to fulfill a specific functional requirement, but don’t want the weight, bulk or distraction that another material would provide,” says designer Jenny Samuelson, who recently paired an iconic Ghost Chair with an antique desk in a Park City project. “The combination personalizes the décor,” she explains. Design pros also add acrylic furnishings to rid rooms of predictability and stuffiness. “Due to its transparent nature, Lucite works in virtually any setting, from modern to traditional,” Samuelson explains. “It can be dressed up or down and adds interest in a way that other materials cannot.” More

and more, opaque furnishings including those made of brass, leather, wood or chrome are being accented with Lucite, adding a shot of modernity without clashing. It can also add clarity to a room’s design. “Stylistically, it’s the perfect option when one more stylized foot or tapered leg is too much,” says designer Cody Beal, citing the use of Lucitebased benches and stools, for example. “Their legs just disappear.” Lucite has a place in most any space and works well when doubling down on an existing material would be overkill. For example, a piece of acrylic is ideal in rooms in which adding one more wood piece would simply be too much, designer Michele Dunker explains. “It offsets the weight of wood

TAKE CARE Don’t use glass cleaner on Lucite as it can cloud the finish and possibly crack over time. Instead choose an acrylic cleaner and apply it with a nonabrasive, soft cloth or rag. Small scratches can be eliminated with an acrylic polishing cloth. More substantial scratches may require professional buffing.

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TREND

“Lucite works in virtually any setting, from modern to traditional.”

without competing with it. It doesn’t muddle the décor.” “Whether it is in a cabin or a city condo, a wood or metal console table might look too bulky in a room or detract from an amazing view. A Lucite alternative provides the desired function without distraction,” Samuelson adds. Whatever piece you’re considering, Beal advises selecting high-quality. “Choose thick acrylic with heft,” he says. But don’t go overboard with the material, the pros warn. As Samuelson explains, “With any unique or trending material, less is often more. Simple touches of Lucite can be used to highlight or minimize aspects of the overall design.”

In her Park City home, designer Jenny Samuelson gives her grandmother’s antique desk a modern twist by pairing it with a Lucite Ghost Chair.

IN THE CLEAR

Acrylic furnishings add chic modern style to any decor.

Mimi London walnuttopped table, to the trade, mimilondon.com

Aubrey Round Chairside Table, $2,268, LMK Interior Design, SLC

X-stool, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC

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Lucy Clear swivel chair, $2,540, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC

U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M

Bernhardt King Aiden acrylic canopy upholstered bed, $3,999, Osmond Designs, Lehi

Acrylic-lid boxes, $23 each, The Container Store, Murray

Kartell Louis Ghost Chair, $450, Dara Modern, SLC

PHOTOS SCOT ZIMMERMAN (2)

—Jenny Samuelson, J Squared Interiors


ACRYLIC: PAST TO PRESENT Lucite is actually a brand name for a kind of acrylic resin known by at least 18 different trade names (think Plexiglas and Perspex). Since it was formulated in the late 1920s by chemists at DuPont (Lucite) and Rohm & Haas (Plexiglas), this material has been used in everything from submarine periscopes to serving trays. Helena Rubinstein’s Plexiglas bed.

Lucite and its siblings became commercially available by 1937 and were quickly embraced by the design world. One of the earliest and most famous suites of Plexiglas furniture was commissioned in 1939 for cosmetic magnate Helena Rubinstein’s New York City apartment. Rubenstein, who was often at the forefront of cutting edge design trends, reportedly enjoyed her glamorous illuminated Plexiglas bed so much that she conducted her morning business meetings from it.

During World War II, Lucite fell from design favor, and its primary uses shifted to military applications. After the war, its many manufacturers needed commercial uses for Lucite again, and the material became a favorite for fashionable handbags and jewelry. Then, in the 1960s, it found its next resurgence with furniture designers, who found the material both flexible and chic. Lucite fell briefly from favor again during the 1980s, despite the regrettable rage for see-through platform shoes. Then a Lucite renaissance of sorts began with Philippe Starck’s introduction of the now famous Louis Ghost Chair in 2002. Lucite’s most recent moment has continued unabated, and it continues to dazzle us today as furniture designers, decorators and style-savvy homeowners embrace its transparent beauty.

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ENDURING Styles come and go. Many businesses disappear after a few short years. At Bartile, our commiment to quality and value have ensured our longevity just as our roof tiles will ensure the longevity of your roof. We have been making Utah more beautiful, one roof at a time since 1942.

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P R E M I U M

R O O F

T I L E


WINNING RECIPE Designer Bill Cordray and wife Brooke pulled out all the stops when cooking up a new kitchen for their small Salt Lake City home. BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

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1. CUSTOM ISLAND “It was all about giving the barstools a home,” Bill says, describing the inspiration for his distinctive waterfall island design. Rather than conventionally running the quartz countertop down opposite ends of the island, Bill used Pental quartz to frame only one end of his island and then used it along one side to create an L-shaped nook for counter stools at the island’s end and along the adjoining side. The design isn’t just eye candy. “It’s much nicer visiting when you can face each other rather than sitting side by side,” he says.

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ven after 13 years of designing kitchens and cabinetry for homes—ranging from big-budget mountain homes to hip urban lofts (and winning national design awards from SubZero and GE)—Bill Cordray remains modest about his masterly ability to craft a spectacular kitchen. So, it came as no surprise that when asked about whether he’d be open to showing off the new kitchen he and his wife Brooke created for themselves in their small 1,800-square-foot Canyon Rim-area home, he was reluctant. “It’s not all that,” he claimed. Wrong. This kitchen may be short on size, but it is very big on that. Consider the Himalayan Salt wall, for instance, or the island’s modified waterfall design. And then there’s the modern soffit edged with light. The list is long. As with many of Bill’s projects, this new kitchen was reborn from the remodel of an outdated, inefficient space. He and Brooke spent two years designing and planning this new kitchen before removing a wall separating the old dining and cooking areas and then tearing everything else down to the studs. Their goal: create an open kitchen that connects to the outdoors and caters to Brooke’s passion for cooking and the couple’s love of entertaining and relaxing at home. They did all of that and more. “It’s hard to put a value on how much this kitchen has improved our lives at home,” Bill says. Brooke agrees. “I’ve always wanted a ‘Billy’ kitchen,” she says, branding her husband’s acclaimed work. “Now we have one and its everything I hoped it would be.” While there are many elements that make this kitchen a winner, these 12 top our list.

2. CORNER NOOK

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The Cordray’s cozy new breakfast nook performs long past the first meal of the day. “We sit here all of the time,” says Brooke who, along with Bill, eats, works and relaxes in the charming space. Bathed in views and dappled sunlight flowing through broad windows, the nook feels like it has one foot outdoors. To link it with the rest of the kitchen, Bill designed a narrow wall at the end of the bench that connects to the perimeter’s lighted soffit. Marble backsplash tile dresses the wall surrounding the nook’s windows, storage drawers hide in the base, and attached back cushions provide comfort and anything-but-fussy style.

Above: The Cordrays: Bill, a designer with Teerlink Cabinet, and Brooke, a holistic nutrition advocate, member of Slow Food Utah, personal chef and cooking instructor.

3. DUAL SINKS Bill advises clients to install two sinks if they have the space. In the Cordray’s kitchen, the large basin sits beneath a new perimeter window while a smaller prep sink is strategically positioned in the island opposite the range. “The prep sink let’s me work while facing guests seated at the island or while teaching small cooking classes,” Brooke explains. The couple chose single-basin sinks (they handle large pots and pans with ease) and passed on stainless steel, instead choosing Blanco Silgranit. “It’s so easy to clean, and I love the dark brown color,” Brooke adds.

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4. HORIZONTAL LINES

5. TWO-TONE CABINETS

“In contemporary design, everyone likes horizontal lines,” says Bill of this recurring design element in the kitchen. The room showcases them with horizontally oriented open shelves, wood grains, a modernized soffit and decorative “kerfs,” or notches in the cabinets’ doors and drawer fronts.

Notable in the kitchen’s design is the upper cabinets’ two-tone treatment. The cabinet boxes are elm and their doors are painted white. “It’s a small kitchen and by making the upper cabinets light rather than dark, it feels more spacious,” Bill explains.

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6. EXPANSIVE TILE

7. SURPRISING WINDOW

Lenox gray marble tiles cover the walls completely, running from the countertops all the way to the ceiling. “It’s a unifying material,” Bill explains. “You don’t want to see random pieces of drywall that break up a cohesive look.” The elm cabinetry has very little visual movement and the gray-toned tile adds just enough interest without being overwhelming, he explains. “We wanted something that would never look dated but wasn’t boring,” Brooke says.

The Cordrays didn’t want to loose the generous light that flowed through an old doorway’s opening, so rather than boarding over the gap, they installed a door-sized window fronted by floating shelves, a countertop and open storage shelves below. A wine rack and pull-out spice drawers frame this lower opening. Light now washes over the west side of the kitchen and offers views to a secluded patio.

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New Window Opening

8. RECESSED REFRIGERATOR DW

Taking advantage of a jog in the wall between the dining and kitchen areas, Bill positioned the refrigerator so that it appears to be a mere 12-inches deep from its right side as seen from the entry and dining areas. The fridge’s left side connects with the countertop at full depth. “I didn’t want the space to feel congested and the recessed refrigerator helps keep it open,” he says.

KITCHEN Water fall Return

BREAKFAST NOOK

Prep Sink

Water fall Return

New Window Opening

R/F

Fridge recessed

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DINING

Salt Wall Recessed

New Window Opening

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9. OUTDOOR LINK “We bought the house because of its connection to the yard,” Bill says. To unite indoors and out, the Cordrays limited themselves to only a few upper cabinets making room for large windows that draw in natural light and frame views of the backyard and patio areas. A kitchen door opens to a spacious deck located directly off the kitchen. Brook adds, “It’s our outdoor living room much of the year.” FALL 2 0 1 6

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10. SALT WALL Bill and Brooke transformed a blank wall into an dramatically illuminated niche by insetting a plane of back-lit, brick-stacked Himalayan salt blocks. It’s not just for looks. “Himalayan salt is said to give off negative ions that offset the radiation emitted from appliances and electronics,” says Brooke, explaining one of the material’s reported health benefits. Glass shelves add unobtrusive display space to the feature.

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WHAT’S COOKING?

B & B (Brooke & Bill) Hot Cereal

“It’s our fall and winter Sunday morning staple—warmly spiced and so comforting.”

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11. ROOM TO ROAM “The most important part of any kitchen design is the space planning,” Bill says. Guided by the shape of the room, he and Brooke divided their modestly sized open kitchen into three zones— the main cooking area, the dining space and the window-framed corner housing a nook. The room’s island sits at the center of the kitchen surrounded by wide walkways. “We wanted generous passages,” explains Bill, who devised 46-inchwide alleys between the island and counters.

—Brooke Cordray Serves 2 Prepare and combine: Spiced cooked oats Vanilla maple sweet potatoes

12. STYLIZED SOFFIT A wood-faced, modern soffit defines the Lshaped perimeter of the ceiling. It also visually unifies a mix of elements running along the two adjoining walls including the refrigerator, hood space, upper cabinets and the sink and nook areas. Along the soffit’s edge, a narrow trough houses LED lights that accentuates the room’s clean-lined design and injects a glowing shot of hip, sophisticated style. “It’s one of my favorite features,” Bill says of the illuminated channels.

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Top with: Bischoff Cookie spread Coconut butter Chopped walnuts Ground chia seeds (See complete recipe and instructions on page 130)

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Making Change

Designer Jayson King transforms a Park City property, front to back and every space in between. BY CHRISTIE MARCY

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PHOTOS BY ALAN AND WHITNEY WILBUR


Before

Landscape designer Jayson King transformed a dated Park Meadows Country Club home into an outdoor oasis with loads of curb appeal. He and his team executed a front-of-the-home overhaul with spectacular, non-structural changes. They created a new patio seating area anchored by an in-theground fire feature. They also added custom planters, low stone walls and smaller, big-impact landscape elements.

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e calls it a “lipstick redo.” Jayson King, owner and lead designer of Landform Design Group, says that after his clients bought their Park Meadows Country Club home, they fully renovated the dated ‘80s interior. When finished, they set their sights on the backyard. King and his team began landscaping, but soon discovered that it was going to take more than that to create the clients’ desired results. “We kept going back to the fact that the house didn’t look that great either,” King says. “We needed to update the exterior.” So, they changed the entire look of the house and its outdoor spaces—and this is where the “lipstick” part comes in—not with major structural changes, FALL 2 0 1 6

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Before

but with use of stucco, stone, softened fascia and an attention to detail. As King explains, this is the latest trend in home landscaping— a whole-home approach in which the outside of a property is viewed as an extension of the living space inside of it. “The overall idea is that you have this beautiful home and you have this beautiful property—let’s connect them,” King says. “When you buy a home, it’s its not just a home and a separate landscape. It should all be cohesive.” The homeowners had a list of items they wanted in their outdoor space, says King, including “a great entertainment space where they would feel a little more connected to the golf course and the views.” Their wish-list included a kitchen space and shaded areas, and because they have children and pets, they also wanted privacy from the golf course located just beyond their rear property line. The end result is an amazing transformation. King and his team created a shaded structure with tie-off beams that point toward the mountain view. They loaded the area beneath with cozy, high-style furniture and features including heaters, built-in audio and electric shades. They installed architectural umbrellas, each covering a 10-by-10-foot area, to provide shade over the patio’s outdoor kitchen. The canopies slide down the poles so that they shade the setting sun without blocking the view from inside the house. Off the patio, short and staggered boundary walls intersect and establish the fence line for the property without blocking views of the golf course beyond. Each showcases a unique water detail—for instance, a channel fills with

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STAGGERED WALLS

FIXED UMBRELLAS

Low stone walls provide visual property boundaries without closing off the golf course views.

Large umbrellas provide shade without blocking the views from inside the home.


The finished project features an outdoor kitchen, open-air lounge, covered living area and green spaces. King and his team left no detail unattended in this backyard re-do. A heated walkway leads the way to the grill and the fire element starts with just a flip of a switch.

CUSTOM PLANTERS

REPETITION

COVERED LIVING

A trio of rusted steel planters perform as art, adding texture and rhythm to the outdoor living area.

Mexican pebbles are one of many materials repeated to create continuity within the design.

A covered patio lengthens the time the homeowners can live outdoors during the year. FALL 2 0 1 6

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Jayson King

King’s Fab Five What five things does Jayson King think every landscape needs? Well, “It’s difficult,” he says, “Everybody’s five things will vary. Your priorities might be different than mine.” But for him, as a recent homeowner, his top five must-haves include:  Covered Structure 1. A

“A shady place, so you can get out of the sun.”  Fire Element 2. A

“It creates ambiance, a place to gather and warmth on chilly nights.”  3. Curb Appeal

“It adds a lot of value. It’s all about creating an ambiance and an entryway to your house.”  4. Outdoor Kitchen

“As crazy as you want to get with it, but at least a built-in barbecue grill. I’m a big fan of built-ins. They makes a space look cohesive .”  5. Built-in Seating

“We use a lot of walls and a lot of architectural elements that double as seating. They’re great for spillover.”

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ABOVE: The covered structure features automatic shades that lower to screen the setting sun. Built-in ceiling heaters allow the homeowners to warm the space and fight the mountain chill. LEFT: Spectacular fire and water features enliven the landscape and are designed so that they can be viewed both up-close and from the interior and upstairs patio area.

water and spills into pebbles. They also built track lighting into the walls to ensure the indirect light provides a visual treat from the upstairs balcony. It’s a feature King calls “a fantastic detail.” This was not only a backyard re-do. Landform Design Group transformed the front of the property as well, dramatically increasing the home’s curb appeal. New furniture and a fire element in the side yard are placed within eyesight of a built-in trampoline incorporating a cool spraying water feature. “It’s an

amazing property,” says King, “All the fun details came together—the umbrellas, the pots, the furniture— everything is cohesive.” King says that a few months after he completed the work, he received a photo from the homeowner of their friends enjoying the yard and sipping wine around the side yard’s fire feature. “That’s why we do what we do,” King says. “Only two years ago, enjoying that space would have been impossible for them.” Today his clients enjoy a home that lives large, front to back, inside and out.

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| Pro tip | Approach your landscape just as you would an interior floor plan. Do you cook outside?  Soak in a hot tub after skiing? Play sports as a family? Roast marshmallows around a fire pit? Plan your space with purpose and then accessorize appropriately.


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Tea Rex By Alessi

Louis Ghost Chair By Kartell

DARA MODERN 213 E. Broadway, Salt Lake City 801-891-9632 daramodern.com

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ant something really different and daring? Dara Modern has it all. Dara Modern offers hip furniture and home accessories. “We offer products not currently found in Utah,” says owner Dustin Matinkhah. “These range from modern pet accessories and unique kitchenware to modern Italian furniture.” This chic furniture store carries fresh brands such as Kartell, Alessi, Amura, Driade, Normann Copenhagen, Bernhardt Design, Menu A/S, Iittala, Calligaris, Gloster and more. “We are constantly looking for new brands that currently have no presence in Salt Lake City, or Utah for that matter,” says Matinkhah.

“A few years ago I built a modern home and found it difficult to find the contemporary furniture and products I wanted to furnish it with locally,” says Matinkhah. “So I purchased most items online or out of state. I saw a growing market that lacked the resources.” As Salt Lake City and surrounding areas continue to grow and become more diverse, appreciation for well-designed products has grown as well. Now, Dara Modern fills that gap. “Customers love coming to us not only to find great pieces for their homes, but also unique and well-designed gifts,” he says. “Customer service is

our number-one priority and we will do everything we can to make sure you find exactly what you are looking for.”

| trending now | Smaller spaces. The days of needing a 7,000-square-foot home miles from the city are over. Working millennials are opting for downtown homes, condos and apartments instead. We carry a range of products that are the perfect solution for small spaces.

Mitt Chairs By Bernhardt Design


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O.C. TANNER JEWELERS 15 S. State Street, Salt Lake City 801-532-3222 octannerjewelers.com

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f you are looking for the perfect gift or home accessory, stop by the third floor of O.C. Tanner Jewelers. The Home and Lifestyle Department brims with one-of-a-kind treasures for weddings, holidays, successes and special occasions. It’s been recently expanded to include home and lifestyle décor such as furniture, alpaca throws, pillows, traditional and contemporary glass, rock specimens and unusual fossils. O.C. Tanner works with craftsmen and artists on limited editions and small runs to ensure that each gift is as unique as its recipient. Because the department is constantly being edited and updated, you’re unlikely to find the same item twice. The same is true for seasonal décor that’s brought in for the holidays.

“We import Salviati barware from Murano, Italy,” says Bob Martin, visual director. “You can’t find this distinctive line anywhere else in the U.S. Our Home and Lifestyle Department is highly curated; we attend several markets a year to find the perfect items. Our vendors know how important exclusivity is to us, and we often buy an entire line of single pieces.”

just something thoughtful and beautiful for someone special.” Each gift is hand-wrapped onsite and adorned with a satin ribbon so the recipient knows the giver took time to find something that really spoke to them.

Customer service is of paramount importance. “Our sales ambassadors build relationships with our clients,” says Martin. “They are dedicated to help clients find exactly what they need—whether it is something for their homes, a business gift or

Organically inspired home décor and mixed metals. From frames and desk accessories with geode accents, lamps handcrafted from selenite quartz, to hand-hammered copper barware and gilded floral wall décor.

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THOMASVILLE OF UTAH 5253 S. State Street, Murray 801-263-1292 ThomasvilleUtah.com

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ver the past 40 years, Thomasville of Utah has furnished many of the most beautiful homes in the state of Utah, including numerous Parade of Homes People’s Choice Award winners. That’s because Thomasville of Utah only carries high-quality furniture sourced from the world’s

top furniture manufactures. “In a world of cheap, synthetic throw-away furniture, Thomasville provides an alternative for people that still value quality home furnishings,” says Chris Ross, president and owner. “Every piece on our showroom floor will stand the test of time, while making your home feel more luxurious.” With one of the largest showrooms in the state (30,000 square feet), Thomasville of Utah is a great place to seek out design and decorating inspiration. “There’s something here for every interior design project,” says Ross. “We offer complimentary interior design services because great furniture looks even better when it’s been planned, paired and placed by a trained professional. And we staff only experienced designers, so our customers know that they will receive professional design advice. In addition to the Thomasville brand, Thomasville of Utah carries Henredon, Hickory Chair, Drexel Heritage, Lexington, Bernhardt, Massoud and many more distinctive lines. “Our customers come back because we help make their homes beautiful by always offering products suited to the most current trends,” says Ross. “We carry the finest furniture at affordable prices, so you can find everything you are looking for here in our store. We take great care of our customers, ensuring that they are happy and treated fairly.”

| trending now | Because more and more people are recognizing the value of using a professional interior designer, we can offer great services at affordable prices.


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INSIDE OUT ARCHITECTURALS, INC. 3410 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City 801-487-3274 | insideoutarchitecturals.com

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nside Out Architecturals is Utah’s decorative tile specialist, with more than 50 exclusive sources of tile including ceramic, stone, porcelain, glass, metal and wood. Utah’s leading resource for historical tile, Inside Out Architecturals represents premier collections that help clients recreate authentic designs. Owner Leah Wynn and decorative tile special-

ists Kathy Shumate and Jenny Dabrowski continually gather exemplary artisan lines, many of which have provided historical tile for generations. Once you visit the Inside Out Architecturals showroom and see all the options, you’ll appreciate the selection. “We provide unique products and specialize in custom design tile layout to make sure each client has a wonderful experience,” says Wynn. “Customization brings your vision and personality into your home. We’ll help you stay true to your style and what you love.” These experts are always at the forefront of trends. Here, they share a few pro tips: “This year, it is all about brick,” says Leah Wynn. “Brick designs range from interpretations of old brick walls to painted brick and new designs in brick format.” Consider a 3D wall. “We can create tiles with three-dimensional folds, wavy ridges and raised geometry,” says Jenny Dabrowksi. “When you put these materials together, it creates a 3D wall that really draws the eye.” And finally, mix and match.

“Fragmented patterns on square and rectangular tiles produce large and unique compositions,” says Kathy Shumate. “By mixing and matching geometric shapes such as a hexagon and patterns, we can create spaces that ‘pop,’ giving a kaleidoscopic effect.”

| trending now | Cement tiles are so popular. The new hot way to express this trend is underfoot, with colorful, intricately patterned cement tiles that can make a statement in any space. From vintage to contemporary, these unique patterns result in a truly show-stopping look.


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K. ROCKE DESIGN 3910 E. Highland Drive, Millcreek 801-274-2720 krockedesign.com

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ince launching K. Rocke Design in 2004, Kristin Rocke has quickly set herself apart as a fearless designer. Her interior design firm is widely respected for stunning residential and hospitality work that has been recognized in multiple regional and national magazines. Rocke also shares design tips during local news TV segments.

Rocke has built a reputation for intelligent, personalized and creative designs. “I love getting to know people and what they respond to,” she says. “I love creating something fabulous for them.” Access to the top artisans and craftsmen from around the world

lends K. Rocke Design’s projects a tailored aesthetic with distinctive details.

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Rocke also owns Glass House, a pulsating design store furnished with new and unique items to delight and elevate your tastes. Glass House carries a variety of gifts for everyone, starting from budget-friendly items of $10 up to high-end furniture, lighting and accessories. Visit the online store at GlassHouseSLC.com.

Pastels. Bold, striking, saturated hues are on the horizon. Blue perseveres and red emerges. Steel, whites, shiplap, modern. Oh, and an abundance of green plants not seen since the 70s: succulents. What never goes out of style is listening to clients and having a vision for what can be.

MODERN CRAFTSMAN Salt Lake City | 801-699-7675 | modern-craftsman.com

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yler Thomas Blaine seamlessly blends a world of composition, colors and shapes to create hand-crafted, functional works of art. “I knew I couldn’t settle for anything less than a hybrid career,” says Tyler Thomas Blaine, owner. “I wanted something that mixed an architect, builder, scientist, geologist and furniture maker with just a splash

| trending now | Hand-crafted furniture is in high demand. We see more and more requests from residential and business clients who want to create showpiece works of functional art for their home or business.

of Sherlock Holmes’ curiosity. I am thrilled that I have manifested my childhood dreams by becoming a modern craftsman.”

To let the honesty of materials shine, Modern Craftsman uses locally sourced and eco-friendly materials including concrete, steel and wood and its trademarked products OrganiCrete® and IronClad®. Blaine specializes in exceptional quality and attention to detail in every step of the process, from consultation and design to fabrication and installation.


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MADISON MCCORD INTERIORS 3960 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City 801-277-5555 madisonmccordinteriors.com

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n 2012, Madison McCord Interiors moved to Highland Drive with its fresh look and Utah got a little more hip and interesting. Founder Marsha Holfeltz began her career in textile buying and traveled all over the world in search of luxurious fabrics. She added home and office furnishings into the mix when she opened her first retail store in the San Francisco Bay area 14 years ago. Luckily for Utah, she felt that Salt Lake needed some of her high-glam and mid-century modern looks and opened her location at 3960 S. Highland Drive. Since then, Madison McCord Interiors has become the mid-century modern and contemporary furniture headquarters in town, known for its custom upholstery. With stunning sofas, sectionals and chairs in more than 700 frames and available in over 1,000 fabrics and leathers, it’s easy. “First you select a style, then the size and configuration that best suits your needs, and finally the fabric,” Holfeltz

explains. “In just three weeks, it will be nestled in your home.” You can also custom design dining chairs, beds, tables and settees. Holfeltz welcomes a challenge and encourages customers to bring in pictures or drawings. “Our custom design team will make your personal vision a one-of-a-kind beauty,” she says. “With our custom capabilities, you can have exactly what you are dreaming of.” The showroom features a large selection of artwork including prints and giclée from local and

national artists. “I love to use artwork as pops of color,” she says. “But if you want a teal or orange sofa, go for it. Don’t be afraid of color.”

| trending now | Concrete and industrial. Our clients love pairing concrete with live-edge woods, solid walnuts, steel and contemporary glass to get a hip, industrial look.


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HOUSE OF JADE INTERIORS 801-592-4591 houseofjadeinteriors.com

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he dynamic duo at the helm of House of Jade Interiors, co-owners and head designers Erin Morgan and Kirsten Krason, consider business a passion. “We love being creative and coming up with original and sophisticated designs,” says Morgan. One of the top design firms in the state, its distinctive design has adorned homes in both the Salt Lake and Utah County Parade of Homes and received numerous mentions in press and online. A signature style: mixing beautiful patterns and color infused with white and clean lines. “We specialize in being on top of current trends while still maintaining a classic and sophisticated look,” says Krason.

building new homes, remodeling or decorating large spaces in their homes,” says Morgan.

| trending now | Modern farmhouse. Our clients are clamoring for some type of farmhouse feel. We love this trend because it brings in so many pretty textures, including natural wood, and also lets you mix rustic pieces with modern, streamlined items.

The firm provides full design services as well as eDesign—a virtual package. Browse its refreshing array of textiles, art, rugs and accessories online. “We offer an intimate experience for clients who are

GREGG HODSON INTERIOR DESIGN

knowledge to your project, but also draws on the aspects of architecture, environmental psychology, product, and furniture design as well as traditional decorating.

“When creating and designing a space, it’s important that the space is conducive to your life and how you live it,” says Hodson. “We always ask what is missing in the design in terms

of the ‘feel’ of the space. It’s important that each client is heard and acknowledged, and together, we explore solutions that culminate in functional and appealing spaces.”

1360 E. South Temple Salt Lake City | 801-532-4465 gregghodsondesign.com

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ncorporating your personal aesthetic with design principles is no small task. But when Gregg Hodson, owner of Gregg Hodson Interior Design, is involved, it is a seamless process. Gregg Hodson Interior Design is a full-service interior design firm specializing in custom residential interiors and commercial projects. Hodson has been designing beautiful, distinctive interiors for more than 20 years and not only brings his experience and

| pro tip | Through the study of human behavior, an interior designer is able to manipulate the architectural integrity of the interior space to create a lifestyle experience that thrills and delights.


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FLUENT FLOORS

| pro tip | We’ve done our research to offer the most popular widths, textures and colors. Our products are CARB-compliant and designed specifically for this climate. Invest in highquality flooring that adds value to your home. Trust us to help you find your floor.

2705 S. 600 West, Salt Lake City 801-977-1171 fluentfloors.com

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aving a hard time choosing your new floor? Fluent Floors simplifies your selection by offering only the most popular products at the best prices. Fluent Floors is proud to deliver superior quality flooring. We’re constantly working to ensure that our products meet the highest industry standards, from raw materials to the finished product. Fluent Floors is only sold through our exclusive dealer group in order to provide you with the best service and technical installation support.

With so many options, the possibilities to get the look and feel you want for your home are endless. The Fluent Floors Engineered collection combines the look and feel of solid wood with cross-ply construction, providing a more stable, versatile, and affordable option. The Fluent Floors Solid collection unites authentic wood characteristics with strong and durable elegance

for a naturally warm look. The Fluent Floors Laminate collection features distinctive grains and textures to provide the realistic look and feel of natural wood at an affordable price. And finally, the Fluent Floors Vinyl collection provides a water and scratch-resistant combination which makes it especially durable in high-traffic kid and pet areas. We’re proud to offer a simplified buying experience with no waiting and no hassles. We have a large, local inventory with all of the products in our display in stock. If you end up with too much or too little material, simply return cartons for a refund or pick up another carton. It’s that easy. To find a dealer near you, visit fluentfloors.com.


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tailor a space reflecting your individual personality and preferences,” says Winn. The Black Goose Design offers quality home furnishings, accessories, custom window treatments, and wall coverings. “Our award-winning design team offers a variety of styles, expertise and personalities to create the perfect client-designer relationship,” she says.

THE BLACK GOOSE DESIGN 7652 Holden Street, Midvale 801-562-1933 theblackgoosedesign.com

| Trending now | Shiplap is on point. Everyone loves the personality of this amazing wall treatment, (we even used it in our showroom), but it doesn’t have to be all white. We love the light stain on this beautiful poplar, enhancing the natural grain of the wood.

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ncorporating texture to monochromatic design adds depth and warmth,” says Kelly Winn, senior interior designer at The Black Goose Design. “Elements like shiplap, grasscloth wallpaper and metal work together to soften the space.” For the past 30 years, The Black Goose Design has been providing high-end furniture and fresh designs. “We work with the best vendors to provide the resources you need to

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veryone has their own definition of home, a small word for such an important place. And no one knows this better than the folks at Details Comforts for the Home. This charming shop is filled with vintage treasures, new quality furniture and bedding that will stand the test of time. “We love to help you make your home feel safe, warm and comfortable, a place that reflects the people who live there, filled with things that you love,” says owner Rebecca Hatch.

DETAILS COMFORTS FOR THE HOME 1987 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City 801-364-8963 | detailscomforts.com

Details Comforts for the Home has everything you need. Find the perfect sofa or chair that supports your busy life, mirrors that reflect your unique style, modern lighting fixtures that help set the right mood, or art that brings color and interest to a room. It also offers some of the best bedding lines in the industry as well as plush towels and bath rugs that add a touch of serenity to your most private spaces.

| trending now | It’s all about bringing color, comfort and texture to your home. Focus on the details with rugs, an assortment of eclectic photo frames, and floral prints that add a fresh pop.


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REGENCY ROYALE 331 S. Rio Grande St #105, Salt Lake City 801-575-6525 regencyroyale.com

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or the past 33 years, Regency Royale has been providing quality custom area rugs, wall coverings and specialty broadloom carpet to the interior design community. “We source from all over the world to meet the needs of any project, large or small,” says President Kathleen Emery.

Regency Royale specializes in historical preservation and working with architects, interior designers and contractors to provide the most cost effective and appropriate product for any design project. “We encourage our customers to be creative,” says Emery. “It all starts by exploring the variety of options that could be brilliant simply by changing color, scale or even overall construction. We make it as easy as possible to choose the best option that fits each customer’s time frame and budget.” Regency Royale takes a classic approach by not necessarily following trends, but by using color and technique to enhance the inherent integrity of a space. “Recognizing both individual needs and the truth of place are critical in achieving results that last,” says Emery. “We believe that decoration can be great when it includes personal expression.” Regency Royale frequently holds inspiring, informational events in Salt Lake City. Recently they welcomed Mr. Alex Kimia, founder of Banu Home and former senior executive vice president of floor covering for ABC Carpets in New York City. He shared his expertise in exploring an interior space by starting with the flooring. After all, the floor is the foundation of the overall design.

| pro tip | When choosing carpet and/or rugs, color is important. Do you want the foundation of the room to be a focal point or to blend in unobtrusively? If possible, choose your carpet/area rug before deciding upon paint, upholstery or window treatments because those colors can inspire the entire space.


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ARTESANO A PLASTER 163 N. State Street, Salt Lake City 801-410-0528 | artesanoplaster.com

ncient frescos, Italian villas and Roman palaces all share an elegance bound by a common thread: lime plaster. With more than 20 years of lime-plastering experience, Ryan Chivers—owner of Artesano Plaster—is passionate. “We combine

pure materials and our love of craftsmanship to speak to the soul of homes,” he says. Trained in Marrakech in the ancient art of tadelakt, a Moroccan waterproof plaster finish, Chivers is an innovator in tadelakt for contemporary applications. The smooth polish of tadelakt makes an unforgettable experience for bathrooms, fireplaces and backsplashes. “We love the process of collaborating with design professionals and homeowners,” says Chivers. “From accent walls to plas-

| trending now | Surfaces with texture and depth. Refined and smooth or edgy and rough, elemental lime plaster is versatile, durable and unique. Specializing in clean lines and minimalist colors, Artesano’s mineral-based finishes are easily applied over drywall, making plaster a natural, yet sophisticated, option.

DUNKER BEAL

Chivers has been featured in the NYTimes Style Blog, Denver Post and 5280 Magazine. One of a few tadelakt artisans in the U.S., Artesano Plaster recently relocated to Utah from Colorado.

| trending now | Embrace wall coverings. Durable, resilient and functional–this alternative to paint has incredible potential. Capitalize on overlooked square footage by expressing your aesthetic with added texture and interest. Apply a bold print to one side of a blasé hallway, stairwell or powder room and transform it from ordinary to extraordinary.

620 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City 801-961-8511 | DunkerBeal.com

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esign partners Michele Dunker and Cody Beal share a passion for exquisite detail. These Beehive State locals are quite a buzz in the intermountain design community, so it’s no surprise that Dunker Beal Interior Design has earned a distinct collection of clients spanning the western states. Dunker and Beal are resourceful, purposeful visionaries. This experienced team is known for retaining lifelong clients due to the amount of tailored attention they provide each project. It doesn’t matter if you are breaking ground, breathing fresh life into an existing space, or even just looking for a thoughtful gift; these two will always have your back. If it can’t be found in their stunning artillery of

tering an entire home, your unique vision fuels our inspiration.”

décor, they will hunt it down for you. Don’t believe it? Drop by their inspiring Salt Lake City showroom and put them to the test. Treat your senses to an array of rich textures, unique art, exotic accessories and fabulous finishes.


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H&H DESIGN Located in Sugarhouse, SLC, Utah 801-556-7823 amberhobbs.com

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aving grown up in a creative family—an architect father, urban planner brother and carpenter grandfather—it came as no surprise when Amber Hobbs established boutique design company H&H Design in 2009. Specializing in residential and hospitality interior design

and styling, H&H offers unique, authentic and award-winning interior design services to clients throughout the state. Hobbs works to design and implement a collaborative vision with each of her clients, professional associates, architects and experienced builders. “We aim to conjure warm, inviting spaces that feel like your home,” says Hobbs. “While many design trends have an appeal all their own, what’s most vital to H&H is that our clients love the end result. We work together in conceptualizing and executing customized living spaces that make residents—and their guests—happy just being there!” With nearly two decades of experience in the interior design industry, Hobbs instinctively differentiates between ephemeral fads that quickly age and timeless style that maintains a classic appeal—a skill that has served her clients, who savor modern, refined design. Hobbs has accrued numerous awards in an industry that praises and admires her expertise, talent and drive: Best of Houzz (Utah, 2010-2013); a Chrysalis Award (National Winner of Whole House Remodel over $1 Million, 2001); and recognition from Salt Lake Parade of Homes (Best in Show, 2009).

| trending now | Support independent local makers. Wellcrafted and timeless pieces that reflect your personal life, such as; collections from traveling, your hobbies and lifestyle all tell the story about who you are. Display such artifacts from room to room – via furniture, art and even personal collections.


Masterpiece

T I M E L ES S T R E A S U R E 1220 Yale Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah Offered at $8,700,000

Historic French Chateaux | Artfully Restored | Exquisite Master Suite | Two-Story Library | Vaulted Ceilings Leaded/Stained Glass | Garden Pool | Spectacular Grounds | 0.83 Acre | Private Garden and Creek 1220YaleAvenue.com

Artfully Uniting Extraordinary Properties with Extraordinary Lives DEBBIE NISSON REALTOR® 801.739.5179 debbie@debbienisson.com debbienisson.com ©MMXVI Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty ® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company.

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated.


PHOTO RUSSELL CHANDLER FORD; DESIGN BY ESTABLISH DESIGN AND JACKSON & LEROY

Homes

Fall 2016

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A Timeless Tale

Rooted in tradition but designed for today, Brandon and Andrea Leroy’s new Highland home combines classic style with modern-day comfort and conveniences.

JOSHUA CALDWELL

BY BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY JOSHUA CALDWELL AND RUSSELL CHANDLER FORD

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uilder Brandon Leroy takes pride in two things: crafting homes meant to last for generations and bringing inspiring architecture to life. It comes as no surprise then that these were both top of mind when he and his wife Andrea teamed with Establish Design—architect Bradford Houston and designers Elizabeth Wixom and Kimberly Rasmussen—to create the Leroy’s new family home in Highland. “We wanted a home that would fit and inspire our lives,” says Brandon, principal at Jackson & Leroy, a premier builder located in Salt Lake City. Over the years, Brandon and Andrea had conceived such a house and presented preliminary drawings of it during their first meeting with Establish Design. “They had a strong vision of how they wanted to live in

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the home and asked us to help design the structure around that,” Houston explains. The process began with two months of soul searching and fact finding about the family, how they live and what they value. Then came vision boards—used to guide the creation of the house, start to finish. “This initial vision is crucial,” Houston says. “You don’t create a home before you know its character.” That character, they determined, would be modern in livability but classic in style. “You could describe the home as old-meets-new,” Rasmussen explains. She and the Establish team looked to architecture of the past for inspiration and information, focusing primarily on the century-old work of British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, re-

ABOVE: Authentic building materials, Lutyens-inspired architecture and timehonored craftsmanship give the sprawling home the look and feel of a century-old country manor. RIGHT: White-washed, Carpenter Gothic timbers join white-oak floors, a soaring limestone chimney, and a palette of natural shades and textures to soothe and charm the lightfilled family room.


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PHOTOS JOSHUA CALDWELL (3)

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A stained wood ceiling warms the large, symmetrically designed kitchen. “The hood lines up perfectly with the center of the family room fireplace across the great room space,” Wixom explains. Two islands anchor the kitchen, one for serving and the other uniquely split in two to ease movement and to ease Andrea’s cooking and baking tasks. UPPER LEFT: Designed to look as if added to the house, the pantry sits just behind the kitchen and boasts abundant windows, storage and counter space. A large vegetable garden flourishes just beyond the back door. LOWER LEFT: Located off the family and breakfast rooms, the main patio proves that outdoors living spaces can be as stylish and inviting as their indoor counterparts. Carpenter Gothic timbers support an overhead structure that shades and defines the patio’s broad area.

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Three walls of windows and doors enclose the breakfast room. Perfectly aligned with the outdoor fireplace, the room features ceiling beams, a flooring pattern, centered table and identically-detailed entry walls to create its compelling symmetry.

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JOSHUA CALDWELL

ABOVE: Flexibility flourishes in the large open study located off the kitchen. Built-in hutches feature drop-down writing surfaces, transforming them into individual desks. A large library table invites the kids to gather around for homework and projects or, when needed, serves as a dining table for large parties. RIGHT: A herringbone-patterned bluestone floor, a Visual Comfort chandelier and a hand-crafted door adorned with custom hardware foster the entry’s appeal.

RUSSELL CHANDLER FORD

JOSHUA CALDWELL

nowned for his English country manors. They also traveled to Europe to study English farm houses and collaborated closely with the Leroys to weave much of what they learned into the dwelling’s design, inside and out. The home’s exterior exudes a classic beauty, shaped by time-honored design, authentic materials and finely crafted architecture. Painted brick walls, for instance, rise directly from the earth rather than from a modern-day exposed foundation. Leroy recessed the home’s floors into the foundation rather than setting them on top to eliminate any separation of indoors and out caused by elevation changes. “Seemingly small details, these both add substantially to the unique look and feel of the house,” he says. These include everything from swooping roofs formed of cedar shakes and copper flashing to the oversized brass pull centered on the handcrafted front door painted robin’s egg blue. “We agonized over every

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detail,” Rasmussen says. The home’s interior benefitted similarly from their efforts. A cozy, light-filled entry welcomes visitors into the house and introduces a large family room, emanating church-like tranquility. The scale is grand, but the interior is serene, warm and welcoming. On one end, a hand-built limestone chimney draws the eye up, underscoring the sense of soaring space. Framed with large dormer windows that flood the room in heavenly light, the vaulted ceiling boasts massive beams softened with gentle curves and a whitewashed finish. Below, openings providing entrée to the home’s private quarters feature similar arched timbers. “They’re beautiful, almost Carpenter Gothic portals that feel like they wrap around you,” Houston says. Enriched with a

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: In the master suite, soothing tones and comfortable seating define a sitting area that opens to an walkway leading to an over-the-garage exercise room. Shaped by hand-crafted, white-washed beams, a Carpenter Gothic-like portal opens into the family room. Handmade, ninefoot doors accentuate the large yet comfortable scale of the spacious interior throughout. The master suite’s canopy bed occupies a “bay” shaped by a pitched ceiling, built-in storage and a trio of dormer windows.

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Lantern chandeliers softly illuminate the master suite located at the top of an iron-railed staircase. A soaking tub anchors the luxurious bathroom area, awash with natural light.

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1. The spacious laundry room offers abundant storage space and backyard views. Cabinets by Craftsman Kitchen; faucet by Waterworks. 2. Wixom designed a unique vanity for a powder room dressed in Phillip Jeffries wallpaper. 3. Hand-wrought iron railing adorns the stairway leading to the master suite. 4. The light-filled family room opens to the kitchen where a lowered ceiling fosters coziness. 5. Principals of Jackson & Leroy­­—homeowner Brandon Leroy and Jeremy Jackson—with Establish Design’s Bradford Houston, Elizabeth Wixom and Kimberly Rasmussen 6. From the back, an allée with newly planted trees leads to the main patio and family room beyond. Swooping roofs, painted brick walls and tailored gardens shape the English country manor style.

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Located steps from the main patio and breakfast room, an inviting sitting area features a stately outdoor fireplace and views of the property and mountains beyond.

palette of natural shades and textures that soothe and charm the room, the custom furnishings have a decidedly collected look. The mix of these tailored pieces foster the room’s flexibility and relaxed, timeless style. The room’s opposite end opens to a spacious, symmetrically styled kitchen. There, the family room’s soaring vaulted ceiling gives way to a lowered wood ceiling that shelters the kitchen with warmth and comfort. Replete with a windowed interior wall and a unique split island devised by Wixom, the kitchen connects to a multi-purpose study, a window-wrapped breakfast room and a spacious pantry. “It’s a great room concept, but there are many visual barriers designed to make these open, connected spaces feel like separate, intimate rooms,” Brandon explains. “Our mission statement was to create a home that gathers our family,” Brandon says. The open floor plan does just that. The Leroy children, ranging in age from 8 to 14, flock to the study, family room and backyard, rather than retreating to their small bedrooms devoid

of desks and TVs. From the kitchen island, Andrea can monitor each of these active areas at a glance. “Everything about this design was meant to pull us into the open spaces,” Brandon explains. When he and Andrea want to escape or spend quiet times with the kids, they head upstairs where the serene master suite welcomes them with separate “bays” designed for sitting, sleeping and bathing. “It’s a huge suite but the individual pockets make it feel intimate,” Wixom explains. From the very start, the team conceived and created each space with the family’s needs and wants in mind. And yet, the design isn’t static. “The home is set up to evolve and change with us,” Brandon says. The study, he explains, can morph into a piano room or large dining space. The twin daughters’ main-floor bedroom can become a master suite for aging owners who can no longer manage stairs. The exercise room located above the garage is equipped to transform easily into mother-in-law quarters. This flexibility, along with superior craftsmanship, personalized design and timeless style, guarantees this home will inspire the Leroy family for many years to come. FALL 2 0 1 6

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Year-Round Retreat

A couple’s longing for a mountain sanctuary leads them to picturesque Wolf Creek Ranch, where they and a talented team create a family getaway enjoyed throughout the seasons. BY BRAD MEE   PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

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Designer Anne-Marie Barton “decked the halls� for the holidays. In the great room, a painting by Galust Berian hangs on the majestic stone fireplace. A ceiling clad in reclaimed wood and a framework of slip-peeled, precut Pioneer Log timbers add warmth and natural beauty to the space. OPPOSITE: A sense of permanence and scale defines the home. The main house offers more than 9,600 squarefeet of living space, with seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms.

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“If we could make our house a home, and then make it a sanctuary, I think we could truly find paradise on Earth,” penned author Alexandra Stoddard. The words perfectly describe the creation of Keith and Jennifer Gardiner’s spectacular mountain residence. “They wanted a generational retreat for themselves and their family,” says interior designer Anne-Marie Barton. She teamed with Think Architecture’s John Shirley and builder Chad Magleby of Magleby Construction to craft such a place: a warm and inviting estate that would serve as a year-round getaway located in Wolf Creek Ranch, a pristine 14,000-acre development just minutes outside of Park City. “The house was designed around a mountainranch concept,” says Magleby, who recalls walking the bucolic property with the Gardiners to determine the placement of the home on the 160-acre site. “When we zeroed in on where we would place the house, Jennifer got so excited she said could almost smell the coffee from the porch,”

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Urban Electric Company pendants hang above the kitchen island topped with leathered Uba tuba granite. Cabinets by Masterpiece Millwork & Door. UPPER LEFT: Walls of cut and chiseled stone frame the entry where a painting by Michael Coleman hangs above a white oak table crafted by Bradshaw Design. LOWER LEFT: The 160-acre estate serves as a mountain sanctuary for its owners. A 65-foot-long bridge crosses a man-made, 1.3-acre lake.

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Magleby recalls. Shirley, who also toured the property to perfect the dwelling’s orientation, adds, “As with all great homes, this design is truly a response to a fantastic site.” Jennifer’s love of art kick-started the estate’s design. The project began with an art studio that resembles an old homestead cabin, a small stone and timber structure. “It is one of the jewels of the whole property.” Shirley says. “Private, surrounded by aspens and on the water’s edge looking out towards the Wasatch, it’s one of my favorite parts of the design.” The large main house—with seven bedrooms and nine baths—and a separate barn/guest house appear to have been added later to the property. From the front, the home overlooks an acre-plus private lake designed by landscape designer Steven Gilbert. “What started as a small water feature became a key part of the entire project,” Magleby says of the trout-stocked lake. A large 65-foot bridge leads from the main drive, across the 18-foot-deep body of water to the home’s entry porch and motor court. “Great care was given to the approach,” Shirley explains. A mix of naturally rustic materials links the exterior of the mountain home to its site and elevates the interior’s style as well. Recurring reclaimed wood creates a sense of timelessness, cut and chiseled stone fosters the home’s handcrafted character, and artisan-crafted log timbers from Montana add raw yet refined beauty. “Rather than taking all the bark off, we left an under-layer of bark,” Magleby says of the log beams’ slip-peel treatment. “They’re somewhat rustic but also very elegant.” These two terms—rustic and elegant—aptly describe the home’s compelling interior.

A ceiling clad in reclaimed wood, a wood-planked wall, large window and lanterns by Gregorius Pineo tie the dining room to the mountain landscape. The oak-topped, painted table can seat 18 guests. The table and hutch are by Bradshaw Design. LEFT: The kitchen’s authentic pizza oven was a must-have for the family.

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Jennifer’s art studio occupies the small cottage on the lake. A custom work table by Bradshaw Design anchors the space while a funky, mixed-media bison art piece overlooks the room. UPPER RIGHT: Barton curated a collection of framed art pieces to hang above the uniquely upholstered bench in the home’s inviting entry. LOWER RIGHT: Kohler’s Bateau vessel sink sits on a white-oak floating vanity. Above, a barnwood oval mirror hangs on the wood-clad wall.

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RUSTIC ELEGANCE 1. Interior designer Anne-Marie Barton, principal of AMB Design. 2. A cast-iron, claw-footed tub by Cheviot bathes in light flowing through a guest bathroom’s window. 3. In the powder room, mirror tiles serve as a striking backdrop for an iron vanity by Lightning Forge and wall sconces by Urban Electric Company. The cork wallpaper is by Elitis and the leathered limestone vanity top is from European Marble & Granite. 4. A rustic stone fireplace anchors one of the home’s many guest rooms. Barton used luxurious draperies and rugs to add pattern and color to the calm, uncluttered interior.

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An antique rug, vintage pillow fabrics and custom built-in bunks create a warm, welcoming vibe in the home’s bunk room.

“He is a hunter and she is an artist,” Barton says, explaining Keith’s desire for rustic character and Jennifer’s desire for something more refined and European. Barton took the owners’ personalities and styles to heart as she masterfully created an eclectic mix that resonates throughout. “From each room you feel the entanglement of rusticity and elegance,” she says. “There isn’t tension; it’s a perfect marriage of both.” When one walks into the grand entry, these interwoven styles become immediately apparent. A Michael Coleman painting of a bull elk hangs on a stone wall above a more refined white oak Denison console crafted by Billy Bradshaw. A faded antique rug surprisingly overlays a steer hide to warm the stone floor while, above, a wood-planked and beamed ceiling overlooks the voluminous space. “From the beginning, everything merges throughout the home,” Barton says. The hero of the main house may be the majestic great room that opens both east and west, capturing views of both the Wasatch and Uinta mountains. The grand space is anchored by a towering stone fireplace and crowned by a reclaimed-wood ceiling and a framework

of split-peel log beams positioned high to allow light and views to flow unfettered inside. Here, and throughout the architecturally dynamic home, Barton embraced “European layering,” a direction she relished after having recently designed many clean-lined modern interiors . “It was glorious layering again,” she says. Collaborating with her clients for more than two years, Barton turned her discerning eye to creating, finding and gathering custom and antique furnishings, vintage fabrics, animal hides, artwork, tribal rugs and eyecatching collections for display. From two 10-foot-long, linen-upholstered custom sofas in the great room to the kitchen’s limestone hood and a pair of lanterns hanging over the oak-topped dining table, Barton selected and mixed unique pieces to ensure that the home felt warm, welcoming and, above all, a reflection of its owners’ tastes and style of living. The house appears to have been there for decades, Barton explains. “It’s not a quick-build chalet; it has depth,” she says. “It’s a family heirloom.” It’s an heirloom the Gardiners and their clan will enjoy for seasons and years to come. FALL 2 0 1 6

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In the home’s entry, a white oak chest sits below a modern take on the classic sunburst mirror. OPPOSITE: A metal-banded pendant by Visual Comfort hangs in the entry where light flows through a custom walnut door’s horizontal windows. Honed Nova Blue Limestone floors are from European Marble & Granite.

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MODERN GESTURES Homeowners Nick and Michelle Luekenga enlist a talented team to design a Fruit Heights family home that mixes contemporary and classic styles with comfort and ease. BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY LINDSAY SALAZAR

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hen Nick and Michelle Luekenga were looking for a spot to build their new family home in Fruit Heights, they only needed to look up. Set high on the east bench, the steep lot offered spectacular views and was located in their desired neighborhood. The couple bought the property and then enlisted architect Stephen Howard, a new principal at GSBS Architects, to design a house that is decidedly modern but also respects the enclave’s traditional bent. “The design suits both me and Michelle,” Nick explains. “I would have gone even more contemporary and she a little less.” The Luekengas didn’t need to look far to find their interior designer, either. Nick’s sister is Jessica Bennett, co-owner and principal designer at Alice Lane Home Collection. Bennett is renowned for creating freshly


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A refined finish and carved horizontal bands transformed the great room’s original roughcut walnut beams into modern architectural elements. A light puttycolored paint warms the walls. The round metal cocktail table is from Bernhardt and the room’s white oak floors are from KT Hardwoods. The floor-to-ceiling fireplace is clad in slabs of horizontally oriented Calcutta Zebrino marble from Italia Granite. A walnut hearth runs below a firewood niche and the firebox is framed in black mosaic tile, visually enlarging the opening. The Luekenga’s home, designed by architect Stephen Howard, sits high on the bench overlooking Fruit Heights. “From the back, it’s very contemporary, and a little less so from the front,” Nick says.

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Designer Stacie Graves describes the stairway wall’s graphic paneling as a “deconstructed plaid” created from panels— rather than molding— that stand out from the surface. In the open kitchen, Super White polished quartz from European Marble & Granite tops a pair of walnut islands. A photographic wall mural spans an entire wall on which a TV is mounted. White-oak flooring runs diagonally to the base of the kitchen island then changes its angle as the planks clad the island’s face.

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styled traditional decors for A-list clients, so when the couple hired her to satisfy Nick’s modern cravings as well as Michelle’s appetite for warmth and comfort, Bennett and lead designer Stacie Graves were excited to get started. “This project allowed us to flex a different design muscle,” Bennett says enthusiastically. The duo set to work conjuring a décor that combines clean lines, modern forms, organic elements and notable nods to the Mid-Century design. “Sometimes contemporary can be too hard-edged but we were committed to making it warm and inviting,” Bennett says. The designers’ devotion to surprising treatments—a trademark of their work—is also evident. Case in point: a

20-foot-tall tower of offset marble framing an asymmetrical fireplace that anchors the great room with heroic proportions and head-turning style. “It’s the home’s big wow moment, second only to the views,” Nick says. The home’s stairway is equally impressive. To befit Howard’s striking open staircase, Graves dressed the stairwell’s wall with a twist on traditional paneling. Rather than creating a conventional grid of panels using molding that stands out from the wall, she reversed it and made a “deconstructed plaid” pattern from panels that protrude instead. “Stacie’s work as a graphic artist translated spectacularly on this project,” Bennett explains. FALL 2 0 1 6

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MODERN FAMILY 1. An Arteriors chandelier hangs in the open dining area where a 12-seat table is surrounded by white leather chairs. 2. The Luekenga family (left to right): Easton, Miyah, Michelle, Corah, Nick and Deacon. 3. A large, 48-inch round mirror hangs on a wall clad in Bedrosians tile. Below, a custom walnut vanity—sans hardware—is topped with Super White polished quartz. 4. The home’s open staircase allows light to flood the entry and illuminate the stairwell’s uniquely paneled walls. 3

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In the master bedroom, walnut uniquely frames each window with a shadowbox effect. Dark walnut chests by Noir and an Arteriors mirror foster the room’s comfortable, modern style.

Graves’ play on patterns and angles hit the kitchen as well. There, she ran the diagonal white-oak flooring to the base of the stoolfronted island and then changed its angle as the planks continued to run up the island’s face. “It’s as if the planks ricochet off the island and go a different direction,” Bennett observes. Nearby, a colorful blurred wall mural also packs a bold visual punch. “I wanted a big Banksy graffiti-type thing on the wall,“ Nick says. The kitchen’s mural also prevents the wall-mounted TV from becoming a focal point. “They wanted the TV to all but disappear,” Graves explains. The room’s gleaming backsplash also tricks the eye: What appears to be a slab of onyx is actually a thin sheet of porcelain that spans the area below an impressively large hood. “We stretched the hood over the entire counter to add mass and weight,” Bennett explains. Despite its one-of-a kind treatments and daring details, the interior remains calm and cohesive. A neutral palette of light, putty-toned walls paired with white oak and limestone floors creates a quiet backdrop for modern forms, pops of color and refined wal-

nut beams, furniture and cabinetry. “Walnut is primary,” Bennett explains. “It is strong, sophisticated and adds depth.” The walnut is also used to encompass windows with thin, shadow-like frames. “It’s a hybrid,” Graves says of the window treatment. “Walnut makes it Mid-Century, the application makes it modern and the wood makes it traditional.” This compelling combination of styles repeats throughout. In the great room, for example, an Eames chair pairs with a contemporary abstract canvas and gold floor lamp. In the guest bath, a hardware-free walnut vanity sits below channeled walls faced with a large 48-inch mirror. And in the entry, a graphically composed walnut door juxtaposes with limestone floors and a ‘50’s-inspired credenza. Room-to-room, this smartly curated mix shapes the interior’s fresh and seamless design. When they were finished, the team succeeded in creating the modern, inviting home the Luekenga family desired. “We wanted to hit the sweet spot between really contemporary ideas and traditional comfort and graciousness,” Graves explains. From the architecture down to the accents, mission accomplished.

A freestanding tub performs like a sculpture beneath wallmounted wings in the master bathroom.

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DINING I N & O U T

Let’s Get Roasting! Craving a fall flavor boost? Start roasting. This cooking technique belongs to autumn just as grilling belongs to summer. BY MARY BROWN MALOUF

PHOTOS BY ADAM FINKLE

A medley of roasted veggies showcases the flavor-bump and food-beauty that this so-easy cooking technique provides.

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TOOLS OF THE TRADE

DINING I N & O U T

CHEMISTRY CLASS Louis Camille Maillard (February 4, 1878 – May 12, 1936) was a French physician with a marvelous handlebar mustache and a bent for chemistry—he was admitted to the science faculty at the University of Nancy when he was only 16. His knack for chemistry allowed him to join the faculty of medicine at the University of Paris, where he specialized in kidney illnesses. But it was work on the reaction between amino acids and sugars that brought him fame and attached his name to the mouthwatering effect we savor.

Cuisipro nonstick roasting rack, $20, Williams-Sonoma, SLC

Roasting scoop, $25, Williams-Sonoma, SLC

Mauviel M’héritage roasting pan, $340, Sur La Table, SLC

‘TIS THE SEASON THINK ABOUT IT: Roast beast—turkey, beef, pork—is synonymous with holiday feasting. So let’s fire up the oven. To begin, know the facts: Roasting is cooking foods with a dry (no moisture added) heat (at least 200 degrees) surrounding the food on all sides. Originally, food—mostly meats—were roasted on a revolving spit over fire. Now most of us roast in a pan in the oven which, technically, is the same as baking. Or toasting. But the deep-brown flavor imparted by roasting doesn’t need to be confined to animal proteins. Lots of other foods benefit from roasting’s extra flavor. The secret of roasting is the Maillard reaction, a

ROASTING UPGRADES From roots to shoots, leaves to legumes, veggies enjoy a falltime flavor boost

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chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars that results in that caramelized, bittersweet flavor. It accounts for crisp, brown crusts on bread and cakes, for the various flavors of coffee, for the heightened flavor of roasted nuts. Fact is, a toasted marshmallow is a perfect example of the Maillard reaction. And how about veggies? Roasted mixed vegetables are a great side dish to meat and make a vegetarian main dish, especially if you add nuts, grated Parmesan, crumbled blue cheese, goat cheese or ricotta salata. They also “winterize” a green salad—try adding a few unsweetened roasted cherries, nuts or apricots for contrast.

Silicone-Tipped locking tongs, $16, Sur La Table, SLC

Silicone oven mitt, $3.50, Orson Gygi, SLC

GREEN VEGETABLES

WHOLE CAULIFLOWER

Preheat oven to 425. You can use green beans, Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower florets and green asparagus. Make sure the pieces are approximately the same size. Toss the pieces with quartered onions in enough olive oil to coat them lightly. Put them in a roasting pan with plenty of room between the vegetables and sprinkle with kosher salt. Use two pans if you need to, but don’t overcrowd. Roast vegetables uncovered, stirring and turning occasionally, about 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400. A great centerpiece for a vegetarian feast or a winning side dish. Trim a whole cauliflower of its outer leaves and cut out a lot of the main stem, without disconnecting the florets. Grind 2 cloves of garlic in a mortar and pestle with a teaspoon of smoked paprika, 2 tablespoons of fresh thyme leaves and a 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt. Mix this into 1 1/4 cup Greek yogurt and slather the whole head of cauliflower in the yogurt. Place on a greased baking sheet and roast until tender, about 40 minutes. Sprinkle with toasted sliced almonds or chopped parsley and lemon zest. Present whole and cut like a cake.

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Roasting Around Town Restaurants across SLC offer a variety of roasted dishes you’ll relish.   From Scratch. Chunks of roasted beet with wild arugula, candied pecans, goat cheese and a sherry shallot vinaigrette. 62 E. Gallivan Ave., SLC, 801-961-9000   Garage on Beck. Roasted Brussels sprouts with Dijon mustard and balsamic vinegar. (Note: Great with beer.) 1199 N. Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904   Provisions. Roasted asparagus with

XO sauce, black garlic aioli, rye crumbs, poached egg yolk. 3364 S. 2300 East, SLC, 801-410-4046   Log Haven. Pan-roasted cauliflower with dates, green raisins, almonds and cherry molasses. 6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Rd., SLC, 801-272-8255   HSL. Root vegetables with ancient grains, golden raisins, harissa and kale. 200 S. 418 East, SLC, 801-539-9999

Provisions’ roasted asparagus with poached egg.

R(T)OASTED NUTS CHOOSE YOUR METHOD—you can roast nuts in the oven, on the stovetop or in the microwave. The only trick is watching them carefully. Nuts go from brown to burned in seconds. For all methods, spread the nuts in an even, uncrowded layer and remove from the pan as soon as you take them off the heat. Otherwise, they can continue cooking. MICROWAVE: Use a glass plate and microwave the nuts in one minute intervals, tossing them between each minute. OVEN: Preheat your oven to 350 and spread the nuts on a baking sheet. Timing varies from about five minutes for pine nuts to 15 minutes for peanuts. Most nuts take about 12 minutes, but like I warned, keep an eye on them.

ROOTS AND GOURDS Preheat oven to 400. Peel all the vegetables (two pounds of vegetables will serve 4–6 people)—winter squash, pumpkin, celery root, parsnips, carrots, beets, yams, potatoes, turnips, rutabagas—and cut them into similar-sized pieces. Toss the chunks with two quartered onions and coat lightly with olive oil. Put in a roasting pan with plenty of room between the vegetables and sprinkle with kosher salt. Use two pans if needed. Roast vegetables uncovered, stirring and turning occasionally, about 1 hour 15 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and the outside is brown. Toss with chopped thyme before roasting, if desired.

STOVETOP: Put a dry skillet over medium heat and add the nuts when the pan is hot. Stir them often to prevent burning. Nuts are high in fat and relatively high in protein, meaning they are ripe for the Maillard reaction. The addition of toasted nuts—to vegetables, especially—lends substance, mouth-feel, umami and satisfaction to leaner, more austere flavors. The classic example is green beans amandine, but there are other great vegetable-nut combinations. A little butter never hurt anything. Stir-fry spinach and toss with toasted cashews. Sprinkle toasted walnuts over roasted butternut squash. Mix Brussels sprouts with toasted hazelnuts. Garnish cauliflower with toasted pine nuts. Toasted pecans over sweet potatoes.

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CUISINE UNLIMITED CATERING CATERING AND AND SPECIAL SPECIAL EVENTS EVENTS

Celebrate this holiday season in style. 801.268.2332 801.268.2332 || CUISINEUNLIMITED.COM CUISINEUNLIMITED.COM


PHOTO JOSHUA CALDWELL

One of many striking details in Brandon and Andrea Leroy’s kitchen (page 95): Regulator Gooseneck Double Spout Marquee Kitchen by Waterworks, waterworks.com

DESIGN DIRECTORY Architectural Elements and Details INSIDE OUT ARCHITECTURALS 3410 S. 300 West, SLC 801-487-3274 insideoutarchitecturals.com

LLOYD ARCHITECTS 573 E. 600 South, SLC 801-328-3245 lloyd-arch.com

UPWALL DESIGN ARCHITECTS 1025 S. Hollywood Ave, SLC 801-485-0708 upwalldesign.com

ARTESANO PLASTER 163 N. State Street, Salt Lake City 801-410-0528 artesanoplaster.com

Arts and Antiques MODERN WEST FINE ART 177 E. 200 South, SLC 801-355-3383 modernwestfineart.com

PHILLIPS GALLERY 444 E. 200 South, SLC 801-364-8284 phillips-gallery.com

Builders/Contractors/ Construction JACKSON & LEROY 4980 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-277-3927 jacksonandleroy.com

MAGLEBY CONSTRUCTION 1291 W. Center St, Lindon 801-785-9998 maglebyconstruction.com

MARSALA & CO. 2196 E. Fair Winns Lane, Draper 801-652-2899 marsalaco.com

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DESIGN DIRECTORY Cabinetry MODERN CRAFTSMAN 801-699-7675 modern-craftsman.com

WOOD-MODE FINE CUSTOM CABINETRY 408-296-1020 wood-mode.com

TEERLINK CABINET 4689 S. Holladay Blvd, Holladay 801-278-4400 teerlinkcabinet.com

US CABINET DEPOT 770-767-3800 uscabinetdepot.com

Flooring ADIB’S RUG GALLERY 3092 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-484-6364 or 800-445-RUGS adibs.com

BARTILE 725 N. 1000 W, Centerville 801-295-3443 bartile.com

FLUENT FLOORS

DECONDE’S

801-977-1171 fluentfloors.com

3130 S. Highland Drive, SLC 801-355-1727

REGENCY ROYALE

3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC 801-466-2996 decondes.com

Closeouts

331 S. Rio Grande St. #105, SLC 801-575-6525 regencyroyale.com

FORSEY’S FURNITURE GALLERIES

UTAH RUGS

Traditional

2876 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-359-6000 utahrugs.com

Contemporary

Furniture COPENHAGEN WEST 5410 S. 900 East, SLC 801-266-5818 copenhagenwest.com

2955 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-463-0777 forseys.com

GATEHOUSE NO. 1 672 S. State St., Orem 801-225-9505 gatehousestyle.com

DARA MODERN

HUMBLE DWELLINGS

213 E. Broadway, SLC 801-891-9632 daramodern.com

1265 E. Draper Parkway, Draper 801-613-9570 humbledwellingsliving.com

DETAILS COMFORTS FOR THE HOME 1987 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-364-8963 detailscomforts.com

2977 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-487-0777

JOHN BROOKS INC 601 S. Broadway Denver, Colorado 303-698-9977 johnbrooksinc.com

FINE FURNISHINGS INTERIOR DESIGN

3130cS.cHighlandcDrive,cSLC,c84106 801-355-1727 www.deCondes.com

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SAN FRANCISCO DESIGN

Interior Design

2970 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-467-2701, 800-497-2701

AMB DESIGN

Salt Lake City Park City

1890 Bonanza Dr., Park City 435-645-7072, 800-497-7072 sanfrandesign.com

THOMASVILLE OF UTAH 5253 S. State St., Murray 801-263-1292 ThomasvilleUtah.com

4680 Kelly Cir., SLC 801-272-8680 annemariebarton.com

BARCLAY BUTERA INTERIORS 255 Heber Ave., Park City 435-649-5540 barclaybutera.com

THE BLACK GOOSE DESIGN

WARD & CHILD— THE GARDEN STORE

7652 South Holden St., Midvale 801-562-1933 theblackgoosedesign.com

678 S. 700 East, SLC 801-595-6622

DENTON HOME

Home Accessories and Gifts MODERN DISPLAY 424 S. 700 East, SLC 801-355-7427 moderndisplay.com

O.C. TANNER JEWELERS 15 S. State St., SLC 801-532-3222 octannerjewelers.com

4640 S Holladay Village Plaza Ste 105, Holladay 801-333-8160 dentonhomestudio.com

DUNKER BEAL INTERIOR DESIGN 620 E. 100 South, SLC 801-961-8511 dunkerbeal.com

GREGG HODSON INTERIOR DESIGN

1360 E. South Temple, SLC 801-532-4465 gregghodsondesign.com

H & H DESIGN 801-556-7823 amberhobbs.com

HAMILTON PARK INTERIORS 174 E. Winchester St., Murray 801-892-3444 hamiltonparkinteriors.com

HOUSE OF JADE 801-592-4591 houseofjadeinteriors.com

INNOVATIVE DESIGN CONCEPTS 602 East 500 South D131 801-936-1306 idcutah.com

IVY INTERIORS 3174 S. Highland Drive, SLC 801-486-2257 ivyinteriorsslc.com

J SQUARED INTERIORS Park City 435-901-8554 jsquaredinteriors.com Instagram: j_squared_interiors info@jsquaredinteriors.com

John Berry, Synthetica, 60”x48”

177 E. 200 S. Salt Lake City, UT 84111 | MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | INFO@MODERNWESTFINEART.COM | 801.355.3383

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DESIGN DIRECTORY JEFF LANDRY DESIGN

OSMOND DESIGNS

LANDFORM DESIGN GROUP

1534 S. 1100 East, SLC 801-533-8530 jefflandrydesign.com

Orem

511 W. 200 South, Suite 125, SLC 801-521-2370 landformdesigngroup.com

1660 N. State Street, Orem 801-225-2555

Lehi

K.ROCKE DESIGN/GLASS HOUSE

151 E. State Street, Lehi 801-766-6448 osmonddesignsfurniture.com

3910 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-274-2720 krockedesign.com

Kitchen and Bath Showrooms

LMK INTERIOR DESIGN

Salt Lake City

4626 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-272-9121

THE STONE COLLECTION 2179 S. Commerce Center Dr., Suite 500, West Valley City 303-307-8100 thestonecollection.com

Palm Springs, Calif. 760-325-2959 lmkinteriordesign.com

MADISON MCCORD INTERIORS

EUROPEAN MARBLE AND GRANITE

3960 S. Highland Dr., SLC 801-277-5555 madisonmccordinteriors.com

2575 S. 600 West, SLC 801-974-0333 europeanmarbleandgranite.net

MOUNTAIN LAND DESIGN

Salt Lake City

Landscape Design

2345 S. Main St., SLC 801-466-0990

BIG ROCK 4980 Highland Dr., Ste. B, Holladay 866-288-9501 bigrockinc.com

Provo

50 E. 500 South, Provo 801-932-0027 Mobile App_SLMag mountainlanddesign.com

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CMY

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1:45 PM

Listen to RadioWest, All Things Considered, This American Life and other programs on-demand.

TUCK LANDSCAPE 801-266-1802 tucklandscape.com

Media/Television KUER 90.1 FM/HD 101 S. Wasatch Dr., SLC 801-581-6625 kuer.org

KRCL 90.9 FM 801-363-1818 krcl.org

Photography SCOT ZIMMERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY Heber City 435-654-2757 scotzimmermanphotography.com

Real Estate IKE BLACKMAN - REAL ESTATE 801-652-3418 searchsaltlakehomes.com meganblackmon.com

Wake up to Morning Edition as your alarm clock or fall asleep to BBC’s World News at night.


CITY HOME COLLECTIVE

SUMMIT SOTHEBYS -

645 E. South Temple, SLC 801-718-5555 cityhomecollective.com

DEBBIE NISSON 801-739-5179 debbienisson.com

THE COLONY AT WHITE PINE CANYON

WOODSIDE HOMES

2455 White Pine Canyon Rd, Park City 435-658-0048 thecolonywpc.com

SUMMIT CREEK 801-639-0944 summitcreek7.com

RED LEDGES Heber City 877-733-5334 redledges.com

SUMMIT SOTHEBYS VICTORY RANCH 7865 N. Victory Ranch Drive, Kamas 435-785-5000 VictoryRanchUtah.com

SUMMIT SOTHEBYS BETH MCMAHON 435-731-0074 beth.mcmahon@sothebysrealestate.com

460 W. 50 North #200, SLC 801-299-6700 woodsidehomes.com

YOUNGBLOOD REAL ESTATE 916 N. Main St, Logan 435-787-4499

Solar RANLIFE HOME LOANS | SOLAR 844-342-2233 ranlifesolar.com

Windows SIERRA PACIFIC WINDOWS 1880 N. 2200 West, SLC 801-973-7170 sierrapacificwindows.com

Restaurants/Catering/ Dining ARISTO’S 801-581-0888 aristosslc.com

CUISINE UNLIMITED 4641 Cherry St, SLC 801-268-2332 cuisineunlimited.com

PARK CITY RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION parkcityrestaurants.com

What are you craving? Find it here > www.ParkCityRestaurants.com Your complete guide to Park City area dining

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Main se on

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SUMMER 2016

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DESIGN DIRECTORY

B & B (Bill and Brooke) Hot Cereal (page 67)

needed), whisk in the maple syrup. Keep the oats

OATS

1 medium garnet yam (the bright orange flesh

1/2 c. steel cut oats (soaked overnight in water and

variety, roasted in the oven at 400 degrees until

1 T. lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, drain and

knife tender, about 45 minutes. Let cool and store in

rinse under cool water, drain and set aside until

fridge until ready to use)

ready to use)

1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped out (you will

2 1/4 c. liquid (I use 1 1/4 c. homemade nut milk

use the pod and seeds)

and 1 c. water) 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. fresh grated nutmeg 1 T. ghee (you can also use butter or coconut oil) 2 T. pure maple syrup (or local honey) Pinch of salt (I like himalayan or gray salt) Place a medium size sauce pan on the stove over medium heat, melt the butter and add the drained oats. With a wooden spoon, toss the oats in the but-

covered until you are ready to serve. VANILLA MAPLE SWEET POTATOES

1 T. ghee (you can use butter or coconut oil) 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. fresh grated nutmeg 1 T. pure maple syrup Heaping pinch of coarse salt (I like celtic gray salt) Peel the sweet potato and cut into medium cubes. Place a large saute pan on the stove over medium heat, melt the butter, then add half the vanilla pod

then move to the sweet potatoes, so when the oats are done the sweet potatoes shouldn’t be far behind). Add the maple syrup and toss one last time, turn off the heat and sprinkle on some coarse salt. Set aside until ready to serve.

and all of the vanilla seeds (you can add the other

SERVE

half of the vanilla pod into the oats). Add the cubed

Divide the cooked oats into two bowls, I then add

sweet potato, cinnamon, nutmeg and saute. Toss

2 tsp. Biscoff Cookie Spread (you could sub any

every few minutes, I like when mine get a little

nut butter of your liking) and 1 T. coconut butter

charred on the edges, this takes a little finesse but

to each portion of oats. Add the vanilla maple

totally worth it. If they are cooking too quickly

sweet potatoes with Âź c. (divided) soaked walnuts,

When oats are done and the consistency is to

turn down your heat. When the sweet potatoes are

chopped (soak overnight, drain, rinse), and ground

your liking (cook longer if too watery, add liquid if

cooked to your liking (I usually start the oats and

chia seeds (about 1 T. each).

ter, add a pinch of salt and toast them until they are brown and smell nutty. Add the liquids, cinnamon and nutmeg, turn the heat to low, cover with a lid and let the oats simmer on low for 20 minutes. Whisk about every 5 minutes.

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U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M


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SOURCES STYLE FILE

Page 35 Editor’s Pick Glass House, SLC, glasshouseslc.com Page 36 Runways and Rooms Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC, dunkerbeal. com; Elume Lighting, Park City, elumepc.com; Forsey’s Furniture Galleries, SLC, forseys.com; Gatehouse No. 1, Orem, evansgatehouse.com; Glass House, SLC, glasshouseslc.com; O.C. Tanner Jewelers, SLC, octannerjewelers.com; Orchid Dynasty, SLC, orchiddynasty.com; Thomasville of Utah, Murray, thomasvilleutah.com Page 38 profile AJF Photography, SLC, ajfphotography.com Page 40 In Good Taste Table linens, dinnerware, stemware: WilliamsSonoma, SLC, williams-sonoma.com Page 42 By the Yard John Brooks Inc, johnbrooksinc.com Page 44 Architecture Layton Construction, Sandy, laytonconstruction.com; GTS Development, SLC, gtsdevelop.com Page 46 Entertaining Bloomingsales, SLC, shopbloomingsales.com; Cuisine Unlimited, SLC, cuisineunlimited.com; Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC, dunkerbeal. com; New Orientation SLC, neworientation. com; Ward & Child—The Garden Store, SLC, 801-595-6622; Williams-Sonoma, SLC, williamssonoma.com

E

WINNING RECIPE

ven after 13 years of designing kitchens and cabinetry for homes—ranging from big-budget mountain homes to hip urban lofts (and winning national design awards from SubZero and GE)—Bill Cordray remains modest about his masterly ability to craft a spectacular kitchen. So, it came as no surprise that when asked about whether he’d be open to showing off the new kitchen he and his wife Brooke

Designer Bill Cordray and wife Brooke pulled out all the stops when cooking up a new kitchen for their small Salt Lake City home. BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

created for themselves in their small 1,800-square-foot Canyon Rim-area home, he was reluctant. “It’s not all that,” he claimed. Wrong. This kitchen may be short on size, but it is very big on that. Consider the Himalayan Salt wall, for instance, or the island’s modified waterfall design. And then there’s the modern soffit edged with light. The list is long. As with many of Bill’s projects, this new kitchen was reborn from the remodel of an outdated, inefficient space. He and Brooke spent two years designing and planning this new kitchen before removing a wall separating the old dining and cooking areas and then tearing everything else down to the studs. Their goal: create an open kitchen that connects to the outdoors and caters to Brooke’s passion for cooking and the couple’s love of entertaining and relaxing at home. They did all of that and more. “It’s hard to put a value on how much this kitchen has improved our lives at home,” Bill says. Brooke agrees. “I’ve always wanted a ‘Billy’ kitchen,” she says, branding her husband’s acclaimed work. “Now we have one and its everything I hoped it would be.” While there are many elements that make this kitchen a winner, these 12 top our list.

The Cordray’s cozy new breakfast nook performs long past the first meal of the day. “We sit here all of the time,” says Brooke who, along with Bill, eats, works and relaxes in the charming space. Bathed in views and dappled sunlight flowing through broad windows, the nook feels like it has one foot outdoors. To link it with the rest of the kitchen, Bill designed a narrow wall at the end of the bench that connects

Above: The Cordrays: Bill, a designer with Teerlink Cabinet, and Brooke, a holistic nutrition advocate, member of Slow Food Utah, personal chef and cooking instructor.

to the perimeter’s lighted soffit. Marble backsplash tile dresses the wall surrounding the nook’s windows, storage drawers hide in the base, and attached back cushions provide comfort and anything-but-fussy style.

3. DUAL SINKS

1

Bill advises clients to install two sinks if they have the space. In the Cordray’s kitchen, the large basin sits beneath a new perimeter window while a smaller prep sink is strategically positioned in the island opposite the range. “The prep sink let’s me work while facing guests seated at the island or while teaching small cooking classes,” Brooke explains. The couple chose single-basin sinks (they handle

1. CUSTOM ISLAND “It was all about giving the barstools a home,” Bill says, describing the inspiration for his distinctive waterfall island design. Rather than conventionally running the quartz countertop down opposite ends of the island, Bill used Pental quartz to frame only one end of his island and then used it along one side to create an L-shaped nook for counter stools at the island’s end and along the adjoining side. The design isn’t just eye candy. “It’s much nicer visiting when you can face each other rather than sitting side by side,” he says.

62

3

large pots and pans with ease) and passed on stainless steel, instead choosing Blanco Silgranit. “It’s so easy to clean, and I love the dark brown color,” Brooke adds.

FALL 2 0 1 6

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63

WINNING RECIPE

Pages 62-67 Designer: Bill Cordray, Teerlink Cabinet, Holladay, teerlinkcabinet.com; Contractor: Harold Johnson, HK Johnson Construction, Bountiful, 801-296-1790; Cabinets: Teerlink Cabinet, Holladay, teerlinkcabinet.com; Pental quartz countertops: Atlas Granite, SLC, atlasgranitecountertops.com; Kohler Purist faucets and Blanco granite composite sinks, Ferguson’s, SLC, shop.ferguson.com; Electrician: Rex Fletcher, Arrow Tech Electric, West Jordan, 801-968-8900; Tile installation: Ensign Tile, Bountiful, ensigntile.com

Making Change

INTERIORS

Pages 50-53 Anne-Marie Barton, AMB Design, SLC, annemariebarton.com; Beth Ann Shepherd, Dressed, Inc., Park City, dresseddesign.com; Cody Beal and Michele Dunker, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC, dunkerbeal.com; Designer: Kathryn Anderson, Atelier 93, Park City, atelier93.com; Jeff Landry, Jeff Landry Design, Inc., SLC, jefflandrydesign.com; Julie Chahine, J Squared Interiors, Park City, jennysamuelsondesigns.com; LMK Interior Design, SLC, lmkinteriordesign.com; William P. Mammen and Kay Mammen, Mammen Associates Architecture, INC., Park City, mammenassociates.com

2

2. CORNER NOOK

Before

Landscape designer Jayson King transformed a dated Park Meadows Country Club home into an outdoor oasis with loads of curb appeal. He and his team executed a front-of-the-home overhaul with spectacular, non-structural changes. They created a new patio seating area anchored by an in-theground fire feature. They also added custom planters, low stone walls and smaller, big-impact landscape elements.

Designer Jayson King transforms a Park City property, front to back and every space in between. BY CHRISTIE MARCY

68

PHOTOS BY ALAN AND WHITNEY WILBUR

H

e calls it a “lipstick redo.” Jayson King, owner and lead designer of Landform Design Group, says that after his clients bought their Park Meadows Country Club home, they fully renovated the dated ‘80s interior. When finished, they set their sights on the backyard. King and his team began landscaping, but soon discovered that it was going to take more than that to create the clients’ desired results. “We kept going back to the fact that the house didn’t look that great either,” King says. “We needed to update the exterior.” So, they changed the entire look of the house and its outdoor spaces—and this is where the “lipstick” part comes in—not with major structural changes, FALL 2 0 1 6

U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M

69

MAKING CHANGE

Pages 68-73 Landform Design Group, SLC, landformdesigngroup.com

com; General contractor: Brandon Leroy and Jeremy Jackson, Jackson & Leroy, SLC, jacksonandleroy.com; Landscape design: Big Rock, SLC, bigrockinc.com; Cabinetry: Craftsman Kitchens, SLC, craftsmankitchen.com; designed by Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Countertops: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net Page 92 Exterior Stonework: Artistic Stone Masonry, Lindon, artisticstonemasonry.com Page 93 Family Room Wood floors: KT Hardwoods, West Jordan, kthardwoods.com; Chandeliers: Visual Comfort through Establish Design, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Custom rug, Foremost Interiors, SLC, foremostinteriors.com Page 95 Kitchen Soapstone and marble: Italia Granite, SLC, italiagranite.com; Appliances: Mountainland Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com; Waterworks kitchen faucet: Mountainland Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com Page 96 Breakfast Room Lantern chandelier: Visual Comfort through Establish Design, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Table: Noir through Establish Design, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com Page 97 Entry Stone floors: Artistic Stone Masonry, Lindon, artisticstonemasonry.com; Chandelier: Visual Comfort through Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Door hardware: Mountainland Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com Page 100 Powder Room Vanity: custom designed by Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Wallpaper: Phillip Jeffries available through Establish Design, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com Page 100 Laundry Waterworks faucet: Mountainland Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com

A Timeless Tale

Rooted in tradition but designed for today, Brandon and Andrea Leroy’s new Highland home combines classic style with modern-day comfort and conveniences. BY BRAD MEE PHOTOS BY JOSHUA CALDWELL AND RUSSELL CHANDLER FORD

B 92

uilder Brandon Leroy takes pride in two

the home and asked us to help design the structure

things: crafting homes meant to last for generations and bringing inspiring architecture to life. It comes as no surprise then that these were both top of mind

around that,” Houston explains. The process began with two months of soul searching and fact finding about the family, how they live and what they value.

when he and his wife Andrea teamed with Establish Design—architect Bradford Houston and designers Elizabeth Wixom and Kimberly Rasmussen—to create the Leroy’s new family home in Highland. “We wanted a home that would fit and inspire our

Then came vision boards—used to guide the creation of the house, start to finish. “This initial vision is crucial,” Houston says. “You don’t create a home before you know its character.” That character, they determined, would be modern in livability but classic

lives,” says Brandon, principal at Jackson & Leroy, a premier builder located in Salt Lake City. Over the years, Brandon and Andrea had conceived such a

in style. “You could describe the home as old-meets-new,” Rasmussen explains. She and the Establish team

house and presented preliminary drawings of it during their first meeting with Establish Design. “They had a strong vision of how they wanted to live in

looked to architecture of the past for inspiration and information, focusing primarily on the century-old work of British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, re-

Year-Round Retreat

ABOVE: Authentic building materials, Lutyens-inspired architecture and timehonored craftsmanship give the sprawling home the look and feel of a century-old country manor. RIGHT: White-washed, Carpenter Gothic timbers join white-oak floors, a soaring limestone chimney, and a palette of natural shades and textures to soothe and charm the lightfilled family room.

U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M

A couple’s longing for a mountain sanctuary leads them to picturesque Wolf Creek Ranch, where they and a talented team create a family getaway enjoyed throughout the seasons.

RUSSELL CHANDLER FORD

Pages 56-59 Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Cody Beal and Michele Dunker, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC, dunkerbeal.com; Dara Modern, SLC, daramodern.com; Jenny Samuelson, J Squared Interiors, Park City, jennysamuelsondesigns. com; Jonathan Adler, jonathanadler.com; LMK Interior Design, SLC, lmkinteriordesign.com; Mimi London, mimilondon.com; Osmond Designs, Lehi, osmonddesignsfurniture.com; The Container Store, Murray, containerstore. com/welcome.htm

JOSHUA CALDWELL

TREND

FALL 2 0 1 6

BY BRAD MEE

93

102

A TIMELESS TALE

Pages 92-101 Interior designers: Elizabeth Wixom and Kimberly Rasmussen, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.com; Architect: Bradford Houston, Establish Design, SLC, establishdesign.

PHOTOS BY SCOT ZIMMERMAN

U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M

Designer Anne-Marie Barton “decked the halls” for the holidays. In the great room, a painting by Galust Berian hangs on the majestic stone fireplace. A ceiling clad in reclaimed wood and a framework of slip-peeled, precut Pioneer Log timbers add warmth and natural beauty to the space. OPPOSITE: A sense of permanence and scale defines the home. The main house offers more than 9,600 squarefeet of living space, with seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms.

FALL 2 0 1 6

103

YEAR-ROUND RETREAT

Pages 102-111 Architect: John Shirley, Think Architecture, Inc., SLC, thinkaec.com; Contractor: Chad Magleby, Magleby Construction, Lindon, maglebyconstruction.com; Interior Designer:

USD (ISSN 1941-2169) Utah Style & Design is published quarterly (Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall) by Utah Partners Publishing, L.L.P. Editorial, advertising and administrative office: 515 S. 700 East, Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, UT 84102. Telephone: 801-485-5100; fax 801-485-5133. Periodicals Postage Paid at Salt Lake City and at additional mailing offices. Subscriptions: One year ($9.95); two years ($17.95); outside the continental U.S. add $20 a year. Toll-free subscription number: 855-276-4395. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Utah Style & Design/Subscription Dept., PO Box 820, Boca Raton, FL 33429. Copyright 2016, JES Publishing Corp. No whole or part of the contents may be reproduced in any manner without prior permission of Utah Style & Design, excepting individually copyrighted articles and photographs. Manuscripts accompanied by SASE are accepted, but no responsibility will be assumed for unsolicited contributions.

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Anne Marie Barton, AMB Design, Inc., SLC, annemariebarton.com; Landscape Designer: Steven Gilbert, ArcSitio Design, SLC, arcsitiodesign.com; Millwork and doors: Masterpiece Millwork & Door, Inc., Lindon, masterpiecemill.com; Custom cabinetry: Masterpiece Millwork & Door, Inc., Lindon, masterpiecemill.com; Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Artisan crafted log timbers: Pioneer Log, Hamilton, Montana, pioneer-loghomes.com; Kitchen and bathroom stone countertops: European Marble and Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Oak flooring: KT Hardwoods, West Jordan, kthardwoods.com; Interior and exterior stone veneer and all flagstone: Artistic Stone, Lindon, artisticstonemasonry.com; Pond, water feature and retaining wall work: Waters Edge, Park City, utahwatersedge.com; Design coordination and installation of lighting and electrical: Anytech Electric, Orem, 801-221-0986 Page 103 Great room Custom sofas, high-bar table: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Leather-and-hide counter stools: Arteriors, arteriorshome.com; Lillian August cocktail table: Hamilton Park, Murray, hamitonparkinteriors.com Page 104 Entry Console: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Elk painting: Michael Coleman, Coleman Studios, Provo, colemanart.com Page 105 Kitchen Custom cabinetry: Masterpiece Millwork & Door, Inc., Lindon, masterpiecemill.com; Custom limestone hood: Artistic Stone and Masonry, Lindon, artisticstonemasonry.com; Uba Tuba leathered-granite countertop: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Pendant lights: Urban Electric Company, urbanelectricco.com Page 107 Dining room Custom dining table and hutch: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Tivoli Hanging Lantern light fixtutes: Gregorius Pineo, gregoriuspineo.com; Dining chairs: Restoration Hardware, SLC, restorationhardware.com Page 108 Art studio Custom work table: Bradshaw Design, SLC, bradshawfurniture.com; Leather Pendant: Noir Furniture, noirfurniturela.com Page 109 Guest bathroom White Oak Floating Vanity: Masterpiece Mill, Lindon, masterpiecemill.com Page 110 Powder Room Iron vanity: Lightning Forge, Murray, lightningforge.com; Sconces: Urban Electric Company, urbanelectricco.com; Elitis wallpaper: John Brooks Inc, johnbrooksinc.com; Leathered limestone countertop: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net Page 110 Guest Bath Cheviot Iron claw-footed tub, Mountain Land Design, SLC, mountainlanddesign.com Page 111 Bunk room Custom built-in bunk beds: Masterpiece Mill, Lindon, masterpiecemill.com; Industrial Pendant: Bobo Intriguing Objects, bobointruiguingobjects.com

MODERN GESTURES Homeowners Nick and Michelle Luekenga enlist a talented team to design a Fruit Heights family home that mixes contemporary and classic styles with comfort and ease. BY BRAD MEE

PHOTOS BY LINDSAY SALAZAR

In the home’s entry, a white oak chest sits below a modern take on the classic sunburst mirror. OPPOSITE: A metal-banded pendant by Visual Comfort hangs in the entry where light flows through a custom walnut door’s horizontal windows. Honed Nova Blue Limestone floors are from European Marble & Granite.

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MODERN GESTURES

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Pages 112-119 Designers: Jessica Bennett, Design Principal and Stacie Graves, Designer, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Architect: Stephen Howard, GSBS Architects, gsbsarchitects.com; Contractor: Alan Bird, Hobble Creek Contractors, American Fork, hobblecreekcontractors.com; Millwork, kitchen and bathroom cabinetry: Jim Malone, Wood by Design, Pleasant Grove, 801-722-5205; Flooring: KT Hardwoods, West Jordan, kthardwoods.com Page 113 Entry Chandelier: Visual Comfort, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com ; Geneva Media Cabinet: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com ; Nova Blue limestone flooring: European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net Page 114 Great Room Living Area Fireplace stone: Calcutta Zebrina, Italia Granite, SLC, italiagranite.com; Flooring: KT Hardwoods, West Jordan, kthardwoods.com; Bernhardt Carnaby cocktail table and Vanguard Milbank sofa: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman: DWR, dwr.com Page 116 Stairwell Bevilacqua Chandelier, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Stairs runs: Wood by Design, Pleasant Grove, 801-7225205; Custom railing balusters: Cornaby Railing Co., cornabyrailing.com; Global Views Folded Sconce: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com Page 117 Kitchen Countertops: Super White Polished Quartz, European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Kitchenaid appliances: Orson Gygi, SLC, gygi.com; Faux Onyx porcelain backsplash: Bedrosians, SLC, bedrosians.com; Hickory Chair Bar Stools: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome. com; Grohe Minta Single-handle deck-mount kitchen faucet, Ferguson, SLC, ferguson.com Page 118 Dining Area Vanguard Bradford dining table, Karna dining chairs and Arteriors Royalton oval pendant: Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com Page 118 Powder Bath Noir Argie round mirror, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome. comCountertop: Super White Polished Quartz, European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Shizen Moss wall tile: Bedrosians, SLC, bedrosians.com

Page 119 Master Bedroom Noir Bedside Chests and Arteriors Olympia mirror, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com Page 118 Powder Bath Noir Argie round mirror, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Countertop: Super White Polished Quartz, European Marble & Granite, SLC, europeanmarbleandgranite.net; Shizen Moss wall tile: Bedrosians, SLC, bedrosians.com Page 136 Hot List Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC, alicelanehome.com; Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC, dunkerbeal.com; Urban Electric Company, urbanelectricco.com; Ironware International, to the trade through John Brooks Inc., ironwareinternational.com; Elume Distinctive Lighting, Park City, elumepc.com; Boyd Lighting, to the trade through John Brooks Inc., boydlighting.com Sources are acknowledgements of services and items provided by featured design principals and homeowners. Those not listed are either private, pre-existing or available through the professionals noted.

Statement Required by 39 U.S.C. 3526 showing the Ownership, Management and Circulation of UTAH STYLE & DESIGN magazine, published four times a year. ISSN 1941-2169. Annual subscription price: $14.95 1. Location of known Office of Publication is 515 S 700 E Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 2. Location of known Headquarters of General Business offices of the Publishers is 515 S 700 E Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 3. The names and addresses of the publisher and editor are: Publisher: Margaret Mary Shuff, 515 S 700 E Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 Editor: Brad Mee, 515 S 700 E Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 4. The owner is Utah Partners Publishing LLC, 515 S 700 E Suite 3i, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 5. Known bondholders, mortgages, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities are: None. 6. Extent and nature of circulation Average No. No. Copies Copies Each of Single Issue Issue During Published Preceding Nearest to 12 Months Filing Date A. Total Number of Copies Printed

20,128 20,097

B. Paid Circulation 1. Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions. 2,904 3,208 2. Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions. - 3. Paid Distribution Outside the Mails including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPSR. 1,343 1,500 4. Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail. - C. Total Paid Distribution

4,246

4,708

D. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution 11,089 1. Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies 11,397 2. Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies - 3. Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes - 4. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail 1,340 1,340 E. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution

12,737

12,429

F. Total Distribution 16,983

17,137

G. Copies Not Distributed 3,145 2,960 H. TOTAL I. Percent Paid 7. I certify that all statements made by me above are correct and complete.

20,128

20,097

25.00% 27.47%

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HOT LIST

Cascade Wall Bracket by Boyd Lighting, to the trade, boydlighting.com

Girandole sconce by Urban Electric Company, $1,920, urbanelectricco.com

Gisele by Ironware International, to the trade, ironwareinternational.com

Aerin Clemente double sconce, $690, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC

E.F. Chapman Covington for Visual Comforts, $483, Dunker Beal Interior Design, SLC

136

U TA H S T Y L E A N D D E S I G N . C O M

Light Show High-style sconces steal the spotlight throughout today’s homes.

Kelly Wearstler Strada for Visual Comforts, $440, Alice Lane Home Collection, SLC

Quattro Cover Sconce with glass shade by Hammerton Studio, $440, Elume Distinctive Lighting, Park City

Blown Glass Elisse Sconce by Hammerton Studio, $525, Elume Distinctive Lighting, Park City


601 South Broadway, Suite L Denver, CO 80209 phone: 303-698-9977 fax: 303-698-9797

303H AABC Aspen, CO 81611 phone: 303-698-9977 fax: 303-698-9797

2712 North 68th Street Scottsdale, AZ 85257 phone: 480-675-8828 fax: 480-675-7722


®ROBERTOCOIN

POIS MOI COLLECTION

Utah Style & Design Fall 2016  
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