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Mnga.z.ine Number.


-r?<he Readers of Student Liji will ~ do well to buy their Hose, Stockin!i':s, and Knit Underwear direct from the factory and thus build up Home Industry. We also make all kinds of Athletic Suits. Send in your orders and we will give them our special attention .

Coffee Kills Koffe-et Builds Coffee weakens the brain and the nerves;while KOFFE-ET builds up, every part of the system. Students need a clear brain and strong nerves.

LOGAN KNITTING FACTORY LOGAN, UTAH

The Dunbar-Robinson-Campbell Company Where the Students get those Handsome Gowns and Dresses, Beautiful Cloaks and Coats Classy Overcoats, Dressy Suits, Stylish Shoes, Nobby Hats, Etc. Etc. . . . One price to all

THE BIG WINDOW 59 Main Street, Logan, Utah


When You

Start Out after that new suit, Sir , st ar t in the right d irection. Start t owards the C l o t h in g H o use that h asawe ll estab li sh ed reputation fo r sellin g on l,' th e

Best of 00 tiles , Such a r esolution can n ot fa il t o bl"ing you d ir ec tl y l,e r e . The C l ot h e s you wi ll find h ere a re someth in g m0re th an jllst clothcs, \ life w ill do m ore

th an " j us t Clot h e you-we will

/J1'ess yOll,

Howell Bros. The College Store Copyright 1909 Th e H ouse of Kuppenheimer Chicago


<!E)ur ~botograpb5 are more than Good Photo.l[mphs. They are true portraits, bringin g out all that's best in character and individuality.

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When a nj('.kel alarm gds to be o n e year old, it looks ten y ears or more. But when an IRONCLAD gets to be five y ears old , it almost looks like new.

ODELt PHOTO STUDIO Corner Main and Center Street

LOGAN, UTAH

It rings to beat the band! PRICE $1.50

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of mixed Furniture, one car of the famous hot blast, besides an immense quantity of filling goods That's our record of buying during the present month. Our stock contains all the latest designs in Furniture and we shall he delighted to show you thru our store. Special rates to Students.

Spande Furniture Co. Logan's Greatest House Furnishers 51 to 55 North Main Street

LOGAN, UTAH


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don't know a man, not even yourself, who is so dressy and stylish a clothes-wearer, that he will not be completely satisfied with H art Schaffner ~ Marx fine Suits and Overcoats.

Stetson andNo-nameHats Regal Shoes

MORRELL CLOTHING CO. The Home of Hart Schaffher & Marx 57 North Main Street, Logan, Utah


Stt,.t.,t Rift M AG AZINE NUMRER FOR APR I L

1910

P UB LISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE

at.,,, «g~ftultu~a' eontgt LO CA ,. UTAH

I l is F irst Race. . .... . ... . .... . .. . . . . , .. L. A. Richa rd so n . . .. . . .. . Marg a ret Peart Ho\\' Pru e \ Nent to the Party. . . ..... . .... .. . . . . . . . . The Rave n The Que s t A n In cide nt o n the '''Ba r 0" . . , . .. . , .. . . , .. . . .. J. D. Pence Ed it o ri al . , .. . . , .... . . .. \ 71/. L . Pete rsoil Editorial . . .Jerem iah, Jr. . .. F . R . :\rn old Dra mati cs. I)ast a nd Pr esent. At hl et ic J lis to ry. . . E . P. Hoff . R. O. Po rter Debatin g . . . . Th e na nd .. . . J os. Grue . M em bel'S F rats a nd C lu bs. 1400 1s

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HIS FIRST RACE "Last cal' fo r th e mil e . /\11 o ut! " came loudl y t hro u g h th e ope n window. Th e loc ke r roo m wa s in an uproa r. Men we re struggling t o ge t into their cloth es in tim e to see t hi s last race . " It 's up to yo u, o ld man : yo u mu s t win it." " Y es, Be rt, th e m eet is in yo ur hand s, a nd if you co m e back he re with o u t wi nnin g that race-" The man to wh o m these remarks, with many ot h ers, were addresse d sat upo n a tab le s lo wl y tying hi s s pik ed s hoes, a nd t o a ll o u tward appearan ces , tak in g no 'lot ice o f hi s s u rro u nd i n gs . Ove r a nd ove r to hi mself h e ke pt say in g , ,,] must kee p qu ie t ; if ] ge t exci ted , it' s a ll up ," But keep ing qui et wa s no t so casy . All th e m e n were try ing to t a lk to him a t o nce. II is fin ge rs tre mbl ed so that he co uld hardl y ti e hi s s hoes . J I is hea r t was po undin g aga in st his r ib s a nd elro ps o f sweat stood on hi s fo reh ea r!. Jll s t t h e n t h e coac h e nt e red a nel ca me t oward s him. "Co m e, I\er t, th ey' re waitin g fo r you. 1-1 er e, pu t o n a n ex tra ro be. Kee p wa rm a nd el ry until yo u start, " O u ts id e a st ro ng breeze was bl o win g a nd a fin e, mi st y rain s truck cold again s t t h e ir fa ces . "A h ea\'y t rack and slow tim e," t ho u g h t B ert. As th ey walk ed to-

ward th e t rack th e coach sa id, " Rem emb er what I to ld yo u about the m a n with the red s tripe o n hi s jersey. I-:[e's you r man. F ind him and stick t o him , Don't let them draw y o u o ut. Th ey are o ne po int a head of I1 s. " Bert und e rs too d . Th e o ppos in g team wa s ju st one poin t a head a nd t hi s wa s t h e last eve nt in th e m ee t. H e was th e o nl y represe ntat ive hi s school had in t h e race , so the o utco m e d epend ed upo n him , As h e threw as id e hi s ro b e and step ped out upo n th e t rac k a g rea t ch ee r went up fro m th e g rand s tand and bl eac h e rs, w hi ch we r e c ro wded, in sp ite o f t h e ra in . .-\ lu mp ca m e up in hi s throa t a nd h e co uld hardly keep fr0 111 cho k ing . H e was tre mblin o' with exc it e m ent and lo nge d fo r a chan ce to tro t up and down th e trac k a few tim es "to limb e r I1P ," but he had no tim e, fo r th e o th e r me n w e re already wait in g fo r him. Th ere were fo ur o th e rs s ta rt in g and h e not ice d wit h reli ef that he was p lac ed nex t t o t h e m a n h e h ad b ee n t old t o fo ll o w. lI e had lit tle tim e t o lnok arn und , fo r a s soo n as h e was in pOS iti o n th e co mmand cam e, "Get o n yo ur m ::trks ! Get se t '" T h e p is tol cracked and th ey we re off. They left w it h a ru s h a nd had go n e a hundred ya rd s o r mo re befo re Bert no ti ce d that h e


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\Va s runllill g mu ch too fast. S till t h e o th e r me ll were a h ea d of him . I: e look ed mo re close ly a nd noticed th a t th e re we r e o nl y t h ree of th e m a n d th e red st rip e was no t th e re. Thi s was th e trap he h ad bee n warned aga in s t. The se m e n were drawing him o n to get him " wind ed," t h en th ey wou ld dro p o ut and let t h e o th er man w in t h e race. In the exc it em ent o f sta rtin g h e had fo rg;o tt en th e coach' s inst ru ctio ns. But he felt t hat it wa s no t too late. \;\f it ho ut g la ncin g back he g radu all y les~e n e d hi s speed a nd length ened hi s st ri de. Soo n h e h ea rd t h e thud o f feet at hi s elbow, a nd t urnin g s li g h t ly h e caught a Ras h of c rim so n. Slow ly h e fo rce d hi s man t o tak e t he lea d, a nd as he watch ed th e m ac hin e- lik e movement of hi s o ppo nent's mu sc ul a r leg-s, a lld h ea rd t h e c run ch o f cin d e rs und erfoo t , hi s brain clea red a n d h is o ld co nfid e nce ret urn ed. H e fo und hi s o wn lo ng, easy s tri c\e a n d fell in ju s t o n e pa ce behi nd . At th e b eginnin g o f t h e last la p Il e rt s till held h is place. T h e ot he r me ll had fall e n fa r b ehind. so t h e tw o we re !cft to th e ms elves . _-\ s t hey rol1 nd ed t h e fir st cur ve t hey bot h in c reased t h eir s pe ed a lmost at t he sa m e tim e. !1ert's h reat h was beginnin g to com e hard. but he st ill fclt st ro ng a nd was con fid ent t hat h e could ho ld o ut t o the fi ni s h. B ut wo uld h e ha ve s trength enou g h to mak e

t h e final das h co unt J H is co mpa n ion see m ed un ti ri ng a nd se t th e pace faste r an d fa st er. S till Bert hun g o n. As t h ey reac h ed the last t urn he tried to take the lead , bu t s l1 cceeded o nl y in coming a br ea s t . The o th er man a lso quickened hi s pace and t h ey ran s id e by side. \le it h er was ab le t o tak e t he lea d. T h e w hi te tape was no w o ni y two hun d red ya rds away . Th e t hun ders o f applau se we re d row n ed by t h e d ru mmin g in hi s ea rs. H is legs h ad los t al l t h e ir sprin g and eac h step jarred hi s achin g brai n. Th e track see m ed a ll t he t im e ri s in g to m eet him. r\ t t h e e nd o f o ne hundred yards h e felt. rath er than saw . t h at he was fa llin g b ehind. Now was t he t im e to ma k e hi s last supre m e effo rt- now o r n eve r! l':l e h ad lo ng ago los t a ll CO l1n t of t im e. 1t see m ed to h im t ha t h e had b ee n runnin g o n so fo reve r. J-l e kn ew that h e wa s again in t h e lead. bu t co uld not te ll ho w far . II e no lo nge r saw t h e fr a nti c cheering c row d. .-\ lo ng . w hi te co rd see m ed to g ro w and fi ll hi s hot eves. 11 is h ead roll ed loose ly up o n - hi s s ho uld e rs. r{ is kn ees we re bendin g b ell eat h hi s we ig ht. T heil so m e thin g c ut him sharpl y acro,.;s th e ch es t a nd s n a pped . r\t last ~ It see m ed t o cho ke o u t w h at s tre ngth r em a in ed in him and , with a fe elin g of re li ef, h e fell into th e a rm s a n x io u s ly wa itin g fo r him .

L. A . R.


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HOW PRUE WENT TO THE PARTY P ru e sat in th e library with a pile of books befo re h er. J a ke sat across the library fac in g h er ; al so with a pile of books . P ru e ope n ed on e of h er boo k s, read a few words, g lan ced across at Jake, read a few m or e word s, and s ig h ed. " \N hat do I ca re," s he thought, "w h et h er a m eat d iet o r a vegetab le o ne is best. I want to go to th e pa rty," and un consc ious ly s h e aga in g lanced acros at Jake . T h eir eyes m et and Jake s mil ed. but Prue Rushed and looked as ide and th en hast ily picked up he r book ." "Now, why did I do that?" s he th o ug ht , "I m ea nt to speak to him a n d-and b e nic e." Afte r aw hil e s h e looked u p fu rt ive ly, but J ake was ev id en t ly deep ill hi s lessons. Absent-mindedly, sh e pi cked up he r pencil a nd th e n was vexed beca use it wasn't s ha rpened. S udd e nly h er face li g ht ed up. " J wond e r," sh e mu se d, "I wonder if J a ke has a knife. " Impul s ive ly s h e stood up and mad e h er way a ro und th e tabl es to where Jake sat. "Have yo u a knife?" " \!\I hy, yes, I thi nk so," he said , awkward ly fumbling in hi s pocke ts . "Can I s ha rp e n it for you ?" Pru e sat down a n d watched him .

" I lik e th e way you s h a rpen pencil s. You take the wood off so evenly." Jak e looked pleased. " "Vhy that's nothin g," he lau g h ed, "anybody can sh a rpen them like that. \ !\I ait a minute and I'll put you r initial s o n it. " "Yo u carve beautifull y ." She rose. " Thanks awfully fo r sharpen ing it. \ V hy, som eb ody has my seat." Jake loo ked up. "Never mind, you can s it h ere. I was ju s t go in g a nyway." "O h don't go. I-I m ea n, don 't go on my account. I ca n get that cha ir ove r t h ere." " \V hy , o f course. No, I don't m ea n fo r you to get it. Let me ." T h ey both reac hed t h e chair at t he sam e tim e and Jake carried it ove r b eside hi s. Prue sa nk in to it w ith a littl e cont en ted s ig h and t h en sta rted up again. "M y books a re ove r there," s he sa id. a nd added as Jake sta rted fo r t h em , " It' s awfully ni ce of yo u. " "V h en h e ca m e bac k sh e s mil ed and repeated soft ly, " It' s awfu ll y ni ce o f you ." J ake liked the deliciou s lit t le way sh e had of drawlin g "awful ly." 'W h en they were finall y settled in their chairs an awkward pau se ens u ed, during which both of t h em pretended to b e deep in their


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boo ks , Jake soon s hu t h is boo k, ho wcv e r, and coug h ed, "Do yo u lik e sch oo l?" h c asked co n \'en tionally, " O h , awfully-'spec ially t h e socia l pa rt o f it. I ju s t 10l'e ga m es a nd-an d parties and things, do n ' t I'O U ?" J-I e r large eyes gaze d at him innoce ntl y , "J h acln 't t ho ug h t ab o ut it, but o f cou r se I do , I - I be li e\e th cre's a pa rty ton ig ht , is n 't there ?" " Ye-I mean - is th ere?" Jake was di sco mfi te d, "\\'c ll - I do n 't kn o w fo r s ure , \ \ ' hat are yo u studying?" "Fooels." P r ue wa s di sappo intcel. S h e t oye d w it h h e r pe ncil fo r a mom e nt and th e n as kcd abse ntly, " Are yo u go in g to play ba sketbal l J" ":\0-yes-1 do n' t know," H e was a nn oyc d at hi s ow n clumsi ness, A no th er aw k wa rd pau se a nd th e go ng ran g fo r classes, "1)0 YO ll ha ve a class no w Y' hc askcd, ":\0, but I'm a fraid J'111 k ee pin g yOll fro m s tud y ing," s h c a'lswe rcd st iffly , ":\-0, I do n 't wa nt to s tudy, I.c t' s go into th e hall. Th e librarian is loo kin g at u s," "\ \ ' e ll, I do n' t ca re, ha\'e n 't

an y th ing e lse t o clo," sh e a ns wercd indiffe re ntly, Th ey stoo d by o ne of th e hall radiato rs, Prue turned h er back aild gaze d into space, Jake b eat a tattoo o n t h e h eate r, " I sn 't it colel ?" h e s aid, "-Everyt hin g's like ic e, A ren' t yoi.{ cold?" ":\ 0, but I'm s i-c k o f s ch oo l. r think it's th e s tupic1 est~lace , " " \ V hy, 1 th o ug h t yo u liked it. " " \ Ve ll , I donl,", .;;he ~;~ napp e d , " ?\ot eve n t~ e s6~la l part of it?" ":\-0," ,,;'" "I don 't ;s(j'ppose yo u 're inte reste d, t h en, but I beli e\'e there is a dan ce t o ni g ht ?" I' ru e t urn ed he r heac! ju st th c lea s t bit. "Ye-s?" sh e murmu red s ugges ti ve ly, " I was goin g to as k yo u if YO ll wou ld lik e to go, " S h e turn ed her h ead the leas t bit mo re, "Ye-s?" " W ell , w o uld yO ll lik e t o go?" ~': h e blurt ed o u t. I'ru c was a lm os t fa cin g him by no w, "o r co urse , y o u- goos,e , Th ere's a no th er b ell - m us t go, but sa y , I do lik c sc hool. afte r a ll, I t h ink it 's ju s t awf ull y nice ," a n d s h e disapp eared a ro u n d th e co rn er. ~l.

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THE QUEST J ack lea ned against th e wall abso rb ed in the fillin g o f hi s p ipe. a nd afte r fi ve minu tes o f pa instakin g lab o r, th e feat wa s accom p li s h ed. Then he a iml ess ly fum bled f01- hi s match case . r\ st ranger, pass in g by, gazed atte nti\'e!y at the pipe, and we ll he mi g ht. Pipes were Jack's h o bby, and thi s o ne was cur iou s ly inl aid w ith go ld and ivo ry. B illy , i\' infi e ld , J ack's chum, had o nc e sai d that J ac k co uld t ell a st ran ge tal e co ncernin g t he p ipe, if he w ish ed . As the s moke laz il y rose abo u t him , Ja ck st ret ched him self on a hosp itabl e law n fo r th e perfect en joy mellt t h at o nl y a s111 0 ker kn o 'vv s. Th e confu s in g sound s of t h e uni on station did no t b oth e r h im; t he clangin g, po undin g roa r of t h e rail road yards, th e sharp click of h eels o n th e pavement, t h e a iml ess chatte r of a g1'O Up o f to ur ists were as 10 t o n him as th e ru s tling of the wi nd in the co rn of hi s nat ive stat e. A n automobil e st o ppin g at th e curb, fro m w hi ch s t ep ped a sle nder, g raceful g irl , ca u g ht J ack's wand e rin g g aze a nd h e ld it . I-I e watc h ed t h e yo u ng lady come a lo ng t h e platfo rm a n d e nter t he stat io n. Then he awoke as fro m a d ream , a nd s tretchin g him se lf abse nt ly, walked in side. He caug ht s ig ht of h e r again as s h e stoppecl for a moment at the magazi ne

count e r, and the n he saw he r app roac h th e ticket windo w and hea rd a m elod io u s \'O lce ask fo r a ticket to Brady .

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ho rse climb ed wea ri ly u p ab ove the foot h ill s o f th e L ost 1\1ed icin e ran g路e . Th e young ma n in th e sa ddle was deep In day dreams, as th e pat ie nt anima l und er him fullowed the famil iar trail. At about noo n th ey eme rged 11 po n the s ho re of a li tt le mOU:1 tai n lak e, and th e horse . freed fro m the sadd le a nd br iell e, wand e red off among t h e trees . Th e man so ug ht the s ha ele of th e hu ge pin es wh e re h e pre pared to fill hi s p ipe. The ta s k ac co mpli s hed. he stretc hed at full le ngt h o n th e g ro u nel and p illowe d his h ea d o n hi s sa ddl e. :\ few s u n beam s s t ea lin g t hro ug h th e den se fo li age s ho n e upo n th e po li s hed pip e bow l. curi o us ly inlaid w it h gold and ivory . In a few rninut es th e tired m a n was in t he land of dre a m s. So me lit t le t im e late r t h e sleep e r o pe ned his eyes t o behold a few rod s away a g irl s ittin g o n a ho rse idl y watc hin g h im . Th e ir eyes met fo r a second , then th e g irl g a\'e th e ho rse a cut a nd va nis h ed b ehind a clump o f mapl es. B u t as the ho rse turn ed, so me t hin g dropped from h er h and. a nd aft e r a futil e effo re o n h e r part t o regain it , Autte red to th e g ro und r\


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by hi s side . He stretch ed out hi s arm and picked it up, and sta red at it stupid ly. T h en a s trange express ion stole ovel- hi s countenance and he ab se ntly be ga n to fumble for something. His face pucke red into a puzz led fro wn. The bit of paper was a ph otograph of a tall yo uth in a col lege sweate r, ho ldin g a n inlaid pipe in hi s hand -a picture of him se lf. O n t h e corner was w ri tten "J. F. c., May 24, 190- ." H e had g i\' e n that pi ctur e t o Billy \ i\l infi elcl during hi s Sen io r year . Th e pi cture recall ed hi s pipe to hi s mind, and h e turned to loo k fo r it. A hasty sc rutiny did not re\'ea l it, and h e pi ck ed up hi s sad dle, only t o dro p it, and quickl y kne el to exa min e so mething o n the g ro und . F o r the re, n car th e plac e whe re h e had bee n ly in g, was the imprint of a daint y he e l in a bit of moss. J ac k slow ly rose, pu s h ed b ac k hi s hat. and dri vin g hi s hand s deep int o hi s trousers' pocket s, t ri ed to think. Thin gs we re a trine co mplicat ed to say the least. T h at fa ce haunt ed him , a nd was vagu ely suggest i\'e o f so m e o n e h e knew. It was a rat h e r unu sual ex pe ri enc e fo r a yo un g man t o awake ami find a g irl loo kin g at him , curiously, as if h e were so m e new o r st ran ge s pec ies of animal. Then, for th e wood nyl11 ph to di sappea r, a nd in so do in g, drop a ph otograph of him se lf-what wa~ h e to make of it ? H ow had that picture 'w andered fro m a n easte rn

co ll ege t o wn to a so litary spur of th e Rockie s? B ill y, h e kn ew, was in Canada, and hi s home wa~ in Ne w York, that is, wh e n h e was at hOl11e. Besides, thi s nymph had ab se ntly car ri ed off hi s pipe , wh ich h e ch e ri s h ed far above all hi s ot her possess io ns . \ t\' alkin g O\'e r to a rock, h e s at down , chin in hand , and thought. W h ere h ad h e see n that face befo re? H e mu st so lve th e puzzle in so m e way . I fal f a n ' h our passe d, and a chipmunk, approa c hi ng to exa min e this stran ge creature, that h a d encroac hed upo n hi s so li t ud e, reac h ed the base of th e roc k . S uddenly h e forgot hi s c uri os ity a nci sc urri ed madly fo r s h e lt er , as Jack sp ran g up, and bega n t o whoo p and cap er ab o ut exc it ed ly. II e kn ew h e had see n the g irl befo re. S he it wa ~ wh o h ad a ttracte d hi s a ttention iii the uni o n s tation, the g irl wh had purchase d a t ic ke t t o 13 rad y. Well. t h at ex plain ed h ow s uc h a dainty c rea ture had co m e t o be there; s h e was probably stayin g at th e SUlllmer h o t el ove r t h e rid ge. Gut w ho was sh e? \Vh e re was s h e fr O Ill ) \ Vh e re had she obta in ecl hi s pictur e? And, w h at wo rri ed him th e n10 st , what o n earth did sh e want wit h hi s pip e:' \,V e ll. he woule! not b e long find in g o ut a few th in gs. II e would se arch Braciy a nd the cou nt ry ro unci until h e found h er.

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A ve r y badly di sgu s t ed yo un g man boarded an east-bou n d trai n at Brady, resolved t o hun t up B il ly \"' infi e ld , a n d asce r ta in how h e had los t t h e picture, o r ho w it had co m e into the possess ion of the yo un g lady . Dame Fo r t un e had ce rta inl y not been ve r y anxi o u s that hi s sea rch be success ful thu s fa r. F irs t, h e h ad fo und a c rippl ed horse; n ext, h e h ad been ca ug ht in a s torm, and soa ked to th e s kin. And finall y, he had a rri \路ec! at Brady on ly to find that a yo un g lady, a nswe rin g hi ' desc ri pt io n, had left for th e cast, hurri ed ly. but an hOllr before hi s a rr iva l. T h e hot el clerk had evi" dentl y be e n we ll tipped, as no iil furm at ion co uld b e ext racted fro m hi 111 . \\ ' he n. afte r weeks o f troub le a nd hardsh ip. he finally unearth ed Ilill y. up in a ta ngled swamp in Ontario, h e lea rn ed that Billy had left t he pi ct llre in hi s den a t home. a nd s upposed it to be s till th e re. T h en h e had wande red b ac k to Hracly, in t h e hopes of bribing that lT1Uli s h hote l cle rk to al low h im to g lance at the reg iste r, but to no avai l. If he co uld o nly lea rn he r name! li e was a lm ost ready to g ive up and ackn o wledge h imself b eate n as h e sat o n t h e s hady s id e of the Veranda o ne day, lost in a futil e day dream, in w hi c h the Ul1known g irl played the pri nc ipal

part . H e wo nd e red if h e would eve r see h e r aga in . :;:

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.-\. n aut o m ob il e came up the driv ew ay a nd he hea rd two gi rl ish \' oices tal kin g a nd la ug hin g toget her. H e s uddenly re mem bered that hi s s iste r was ex pectin g he r \ I\ "e ll es ley chum fo r a v is it and icil y wo nd e red who s he was 11 i~ re\'e ri e "vas in ter ru pted in a few m inu tes by sOllle o n e calling. "'Jack 1 Jack! Jack! Wh ere a re yo u ). . .-\. g runt from th e porch b ro ught h is s iste r o ut t h e re. 路'O h . he re you a re! COllle ins ide, Jac k . 1 wa;;t you to m eet Ed na ." Jack hea \'ec! a s ig h. knocked thr as h es fro m hi s pip e a nd follow ed hi s s iste r in to the hOll se . :-\ s lender, g raceful fi g ur e wit h it s back toward th em turned as t h ey e n " tered , and h e found him se lf loo king into the blue eyes of t he gi rl of hi s d rea m s! li e ma n aged to Illllmbl e o ut so methin g as t h ey were introd u ced, and to s uppress hi s desi re to ca rry he r off before she agai n s li pped away from him. \ \ . he re ha d h e see n h e r befo re ? The qu es ti o n he had so often a s ked hi mse l f was at Iast answe red . S h e was B ill y's littl e s iste r, th e littl e gi rl in pinafore and pigtail braid w ho had pou ted a nd called him na m es once, years ago, w he n h e a nd Billy hac! teased h er. After a ll hi s w ild a n d eage r ques ting, here she was in hi s


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ho m e for a m o nth 's v is it with hi s s iste r! H is good lu ck mad e him dizzy! Befo r e th e m o nth was ove r a pai r of blue eyes laug hed tende rl y

iLift

into hi s as hi s d r eam g irl gave him as h e r an w e r t o a ce rt a in q u es ti on, a p ipe curio u s ly inlaid with go ld and Ivo ry .

TH E RAVEN.

AN INCIDENT ON THE uBARO" "Chri sto! I kill you ! Sabe?" "No, I do n' t sa vy, and yo u i(ee p yo ur paw s away fro m th at s hoot in g iro n o r I da h o will b e ri d o f anothe r g r ease r, pronto." T hi s outbreak betw ee n J e rr y and Pablo had bee n expected fo r so me time by th e vaq ue ros of the ho rse camp, for th e American pun ch er pla ced M ex ican s and rattl es nake s in th e sa m e cla ss and did 11 0 t ma ke any atte mpt t o hid e hi s fee lings . O n t h e o t h er ha nd , I'abl o, unl ik e m os t o f t he grease r wrang le rs, felt a prid e in th e blood o f t h e o ld Span is h fa mil y t h a t r~owe d in h is ve in s, a nd rese nte d a ny s li g h t o r s neer at hi s nation ality. Conseq uent ly. w h e n h e heard Ilimself refe rr ed to as "th at damned g r easer, " th e a bove m ent ione d quarre l bro ke o ut a nd pro b a bl y IVo uld ha\路e e nd ed se ri o u s ly at the tim e had not t h e d ay 's ga th e rin g of ho rses a ppea re d on th e h ill. makin g it necessa ry fo r every lTI a ll in calllp to t urn ou t. The ba nd \\路as u n u s uall y ha rd to ho ld th at day because of the la rge numb e r o f three and fo uryear-o lel ho rses that had neve r been round ed up befo re. O ne g lossy black stalli o n m o re darin g

than th e res t alte mp ted t o break th ro u g h t h e lin e of watc hful , we ll m o un ted m e n . F in a ll y , by a qui c k bo lt dow n t h e hillsid e, h e got pas t th e men a nd wit h ta il a nd man e st r ea m i ng, das hed a W dy towa r d th e dese r t. J e rr y. be in g th e n ea rest to him , fo ll owe d, urg in g o n hi s cayu se; a nd bot h we r e soo n lost from s ight in th e low ro llin g hill s that r ecede d to th e pa r ch ed and di stant waste. L o ne ho rses w h e n br ea kin g ;:tway in thi s m a nn e r a lways cir路 cle in th e ra di us of a few mil es. t he refo re it is cu st o mary fo r a ma n w ith a fre s h horse to st ri ke o ut iii th e o ppos it e dir ec ti o n to wa;t fo r th e wea ri ed fug itive to pass : th en wit h the fresh m o un t . h ead him b ac k to th e h erd . "Get a not h er mu s tan g a nd cln se t h at fl1 zz- ta il bac k, " s ho uted t h e fo r (' nlall to I'abl o as h c rode pa st , add in g : " I l urr y up and ge t back fo r we' ll nce d yo u bot h to h elp pa r t 路em ." I'ab lo obeye d q ui et ly e no ug h . but co uld t h e boss ha\'e see n hi s eyes li g h t up o n rec ei\' in g th ese o rd e rs . pro babl y anot h e r man i\'o uld ha ve ha d the jo b. .-\ s hi s po ny loped eas il y alo n g ,


Pab lo's th o ug hts s urged ho t ly thro ug h hi s brain. "No chan ce t o kill Am e ri ca na in camp - he watch and t oo qu ick with pi sto lkni fe in t h e noc h e-no, th e ho mbres s u spect and" -h ere th e upturn ed palm s and ex press ive s hru g di spose d of that idea-Ubut h e re ve r y fa c il e to wait and s hoot dam n A m e ri ca no as h e rid e up. " :\ ow hi s mind was m ade up, h e re, mil es away fr o m a nyone , w hy co u ld h e no t s hoot J e rry w h e n h e s ho uld co m e u p to turn th e c hase o l'e r t o him ? Thu s d e t e rmin ed, h e mo un ted a s li g ht e lcl'atio n and wa ited . lI e clid not hal'e lo ng to s tay qu ie t, for t he c hase had bee n a hard o ne . a nd soo n t h e bla ck s t alli o n appea red a linle to the left wit h J e rry close be h ind I'abl o with hi s r('\'o ll'er in

h is ri g ht h a nd a nd he ld dow n by hi s. s id e. start ed o ut s lowly in th e saill e dir ect io n as th e approac hing pa ir we re runnin g. in o rd e r t o keep hi s w ea po n hid . Th e s tal li o n sped by, too ti red and wo rn o ut t o fea r a ma n. th e n J e rr y passe d by pullin g up to s top hi s ho rse, Th at Ivas Pa bl o's ch ance. R aisin g hi s g un qui c kl y t o a leve l, h e a im ed it at J e rry as de lib e rately as if he we re poi n tin g at a coyote in stea d of a fell o w man. Th e g un po pped. J e rry 's ho rse s pran g fo rward rid e rl css. and th e man fell wit h a t hu l11p uncl e r a sage bru sh. Pabl o sa t s till a 111 0 m e n t. hurlin g :\l ex ica n oat h s at t he s tiffe nin g bo dy . th en rein ed hi s h o r se t o ward th e :\ cI'a da lin e. ]. D, I',


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\;\' e a re li vin g in an age o f acti vity, o ne in w hi ch th e s trenu o u s w o rk of t oday o ft en c ro wds [Jut th e vie w of t o mo rro w. So many of u s cann o t see beyo nd o urse lves a nd t h e littl e s ph e re th at s uppo r ts o ur ow n p erso nal a mbi t io ns : so mu ch t im e and e ne rgy is put in to wo rk that ea rn s m o n ey o nl y, t h a t we .find no t im e to look at so m e of t h e oppo r tuni t ies fo r acl\'an cin g o urse lves a nd th e co mll1uniti es in w hi ch w e li ve . I l o w m a ny o f u s eve r sto p fo r a n ili stan t to think ho w mu ch we w o uld be ben efittin g o ur. elves socia ll y a nd in t ell ectu all y, and he lpin g o thers in th e sa m e way, if we s ho uld ta ke a n ac ti\'e part in so m e club o r soc iety? ' ''' h e n w e cons ide r t h at we ha\'e O\'e r a th o u sa nd stu dents, it see m s imposs ibl e t h at we h ave so fevv o rgani zat io ns

11. f f

t

fo r soc ia l ad va n tage a nd ge neral b ette rm e nt o f st ud e nt s. T h e call s fo r n e w club s a nd societi es a re lo ud a nd co ns t a nt , but t h e re is no va li d reaso n w hy ea ch o f th em s ho uld no t be an swe red by a bu sy and e n t hu s ia st ic gr o up o f s tud e nt s. Amo ng t h e act iviti es w hi ch s ho uld fi nd fe rtil e so il at th e C . A. C. are D ebatin g, J o urn a li s m . P hotogra ph y, T e nni s. Po-liti cs . Golf a nd C hess. ::\0 o n e ca n trut h fu ll y cha rge that we have no t m o re th a n e no ug h s tud e n ts inte r ested in t h ese to mak e a li ve . e n erge tic club o f eac h. Debating: Tak e, fo r in stan ce, o ur debat in g w o rk. wh ich prepares fo r o n e of OUf m a in in te rco ll egiate co n tests. is a n impo rtan t part of o ur E ng li sh cou rses. and m os t s ig nifica nt of all , is t h e m ean s of tra in in g u s in ready and


~~~BI_~

,Stub' f. ., t 11.fff. forceful exp r ess io n. O u r cl eba tin g soc ie ti es h ave not e nj oye d lo ng life. Ev id e ntl y th ey ha\"e a ll b ee n t op-h eavy with in act ive m embe rs.V\ ' ith o ur large st ud ent b ody th e re sh o uld be no less than six o r e ig ht debatin g clubs, each w ith its fift ee n o r twe nty me mber ~ . Th e fact th at we m eet an nually at leas t three ri val in stitu ti o ns in debate s h ould b e suffi cie nt in centive t o work , s in ce th ere a re ho no rs fo r n ea rl y t en men. Politics: At many schools ther e is a po li t ica l c lub , w hi ch a im s a t tc achin g it s member s poli t ica l th eo ri es a nd g iv in g th e m fir s t-hand acq u a in tance vvith th e tw ists and c ur ves of lnrty life: and rece n tly we h al'e h ea rd of a c urre nt el'e nt s club. wh ich ex ists to keep it s m e lllb er.- posted on imp o rt a nt h appen in o's t h e wor ld ol路e r. F o r some reaso n o r ot h e r bo th club s appea l to u s and we think o ne o r bot h-o r eve n a sin g le club with t he aims of b o thought to b e orga ni ze d h e re. O ne o f t h e first du t ies of edu cati o n is to prepare fo r citi ze nship, and in a sc hoo l as practical as o ur s, t hi s is apt t o be lost s ig h t of; but a poli t ica l club wou ld in st ru ct u s adm irabl y in th e politi ca l ri g hts, pri v il eges a nd du t ies of educated :-\m e rican s . S imil a rl y, edu cat io n o ug ht t o awaken and kee p ali ve o ur interes t in th e wo rld o f today, but th e d ee ds a nd tho ug h ts of li \" in g me n ofte n get lost in t h e

11

mi st o f sc ie ntifi c th eo ri es, rh eto ri ca l s quabbl es and dead hi s to ry in w hi ch we li l'e in th e sc hool. \\'h y not lis t e n occas io na ll y to th e hum o f t h e buzzin g w o rld and g ive o ur sy mpath y t o it s call ? \\' e wa it anxiou s ly fo r th e leade rs hi p of some e nthu s iast ic st ud ent o f prese n t-day hi s t o ry an d gove rn me n t. L itera r y: Th e ll e li co n . o ur on ly lit e ra ry soc iety. w hi ch was orga ni zeci o nl y last year a n d whic h p ro mi se d so mu ch. is dee p in what see m s to b e a Rip Van V\ ' inkl e s lee p. \!\l ith co urses in Engl ish nu m b e red fro m o n e t o twe nty. it is astonis hin g th a t we clo no t h ave a t leas t o n e lit e rary soc iety wort hy o f th e na m e. Th e E ng li sh depa rtment mi g ht h elp rel' il'e thi s dor ma nt o rga ni za ti o n. Journalism: \ \' h en the jo urnali stic s id e of o ur co ll ege grows a littl e m o re we m ay hope to h ave a small p ress clu b co n s isti n g of th e past a nd prese n t wo rk e r s o n t h e stud e n t publicati o ns . S u ch a n o rga ni zat io n se lected from t h e staffs o f the wee kl y. th e monthl y and the a n nua l would Le a g reat h e lp in ou r coll ege jo urn a li s m . and would , n o doubt , ha l'e a ve ry路 g reat te ncl e ncy t o raise t h e sta nd a nI of th e pub licat io ns . P hotograph y: And a Cam e ra C lub , w hy not? S uppose twe lve o r fifteen o f the th i rt y o r fo rt y ca me ra u se rs o f thi s st ucl e nt b o dy ge t th ei r h ea ds t oge th er, sec u re a 1'00 111 in t h e co ll ege for thei r meet-


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ings, and then require each m ember to pay a sm all fee t o ward s th e purcha ~e of photographi c m agazines, album s, book s on t h e camera, and picture s. Then once during t h e year let a contest be held, the winning picture to be hung in the library ane! let prize s be offe red for s pec ia l kincl s of work. \\ ' ould not thi s be o ne of t h e mo" t fascinat ing di\'ersiOIl S im ag inable? \\" oul e! it not be a gooe! way of increa s ing int erest ill the usefu l and int ere stin g art of ph otog raph y? \\" ouldn ot mem ber shi p in ~uch a club be at a premium in a \'e ry sh o rt tim e? Chess: :'-ios t of the bi g sc hools ha ve ch ess clubs, and in the las t year o r two so me o f the col leges of t he we s t h a\'e adde d su ch club s to t he ir li st of stu de nt o rgan izati ons. Ch ess w ill probabl y be pop ul ar h e re so n' e day- when so me few stud en t s make up their Illi .ids th at t h ey want it, t h en a n d then on ly shall we get a cl ub. Officers: .\t so me sc h oo ls the cade t o ffic e rs ha\'e a club. I t is on ly a suggestion that we make, but it see m s to u s that there is a s uffi c ien t numb e r of o ffi ce rs in the ba tt al io n for a la rge c lub. Su ch an o rga ni za ti o n mi g ht in spir e e nt hu s ia s m for the 'w ork, and make t h e ]Josition s m o re desirable . Tennis: The tenn is co u r ts are in better cond it io n than eye r before. yet we do not h ea r o r see mu ch of o ur (ennis club. T enni s is o ne of the best physical exe r-

iL i f f

cises. de mandin g agili ty. quick thinking and ni ce s kill. Bes ide s it takes but two-of eit h er sext o play the game, a nd it has this ach'antage, that it can be played all oli e's life , in sch oo l o r o ut. Why don't a few fa ilS aro u se so m e interest in their fa\'o rit e game? Golf: .If the deman d we re made. golf links w o u ld und o u bt edly b e la id o ut Oil t h e ca m pu s. It is reasonable to sup pose that if t h is game we re sta r t ed . m any st udent s and fac ult y member s wo u ld beco me wa rml y a ttached to th e g am e o f .\nd y Ca rn eg ie and Rock efelle r. Socio logy teach es u s that man is a g regar io u s a nim al, and bu s iness an d pol iti cs as"llr e u s t h at there is st re ngt h i;l organiZl ti o 'l. al l o f which is as tr u e w ithi n as wit ho ut th e co lle ge wo rld ; wit h th is ac1\' antage. that w it hin t h ere is joy and inspiration as we ll as mi g ht in o ur ullion. I [ we Illu st a -; soc ia t e. bo th fo r in st ru ction and pleasure . by all l1l ea n s let u s do it to the ad\' 8. nt age and ta st e of all. \\ ' e ha\'e l11enti o ned h e r e only s uc h fo rms of s tud e nt en terpri se as Illi g h t we ll [-louri s h in o ur sc hoo l. and we leave to ot hers th e o rgani za tion of cl ub s . nut we ass ure all cl ub s o ur h ea rti est s up po rt. a nd t o n evv o nes we exte nd a welcom in g han (1. Ou r stud ents have b ee n sharpl y c ri ticised fo r want o f re pon s ibility : h e r e is a good chance to r eb uk e o ur critic s . \ Ve have h e r e s ugges ted th e


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greJte s t opportunity fo r leader~ h ip in u ntr ie cl act l\' lt es our ~chool affords-w ho w ill be lead ers?

HUMOR. VVe knew that hum o r differed not only with indi v idu a ls, but also with countries, but until recently we never doubted that humor was funny. In a current magazine w e read all article entitled "Serious Humor," in which the writer mad e a plea for sober hu mor. For awhile we were very much upse t by that article, for it disturbed ou r very m e ntal balance . \tVe re we to think humor se riou s, so rrow fllnny , su ga r so ur, .\1 at h.4 s imp le, and the atte ndan ce co mmi ttee easy? In con s t e rnation w e ru shed to '''' ebster, and there learn ed t o o ur joy that he, too , t ho ug ht hum o r funny: and th e n w e hurri ed off to delve in to ;\[ark Twain' s choice pages, and we found that eve n h e labo red Ull c1e r o ur delu s io ll. .:vIany of o ur cher ish ed no t io ns a nd pe t theor ies hav e been bru s hed as id e by th e m o dern un Fee lin g' scho lar, but thi o ne we refuse to s urre nd e r. vVhen t o ld that Cleopatra was ug ly, that t h e Pilgrim s did not land o n Plymouth Rock, and that the cherry t ree sto ry was fal se, we bowed our h ead m ee kly; and when w e lea rn ed that S h akespeare diu not wr it e hi s plays, no r H o m e r hi s

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poe ms, and t hat Fulto n did n ot in vent th e s t eamboat, we submitted out of re spect to su perior kn ow ledge. vVhen it comes to defining hum or, howeve r, we think we are o n familiar g round, and we gently but firm ly refu se to yield; w e cast ollr lo t with the ancient foo ls who thought hu mor funny. Certain a s we are that hum o r is playfu l a nd fanta stic, not s tupid and matter-of-fact, we are perfectly willing t o await the verdict of t hose wh o may be pres umed to know. vVhat we are even mo re worried abo u t than the definiti o n of hum o r, is that some well -meaning individual s have s a id we o urse lves lack it! Just the ot h er day a man said , " Th e c hi e f tro ubl e w ith th e A. C. stu de nt bo dy is t ha t it lacks a keen sense of humor. " :\o w if humor is se ri oll s, w e ce rta inl y o ug ht to h ave o ur full share; and o n th e o ther hand , if it is funn y, w e a lso belie\'e we ought to 路ha ve a cons iclerabl e am o un t, s in ce in IJ oyt's ",:orel s, "T h ere are funn y things Ro in g o n around yo u all th e tim e if YO t! on ly have eye s to see t hem." I'e rh a ps w e need to hav e o ur eyes tested t o di s cove r why we do not see funn y things. \\' e think th e re is now here a rich er fi eld for a hum o ri st than o ur ow n A . C. So m eo ne once ad va nced th e t h eo ry that there were o nly half a dozen original jokes, a nd s et o ut to class ify all h e coul d


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find. By the tim e h e had gat he red all the jok es about o ld m ai d, bald bachelors, he n-pec ked hu sba nds and t h e ce ntiped e's feet, we und ers tand hi s fr ie nd s had to s n atc h hi s data away and rem ove him CJuietly to a padded cell. Poo r soul! h e sho ul d h ave been a li bra r y clerk or a boo kk eepe r's ass is tant where hi s eage rn ess for classincation could h ave b ee n satisned w it h les s di sa strous re sult s . The root of the matter is, we h an all the o ri g in a l jo kes and many new o n es wit h ti S yet. Long may they li ve! \Nhy not have the old bachelors 0 11 the faculty tell us why t h ey n ev er married, and the sin gle lad ies tell us w hy they chose a profe ss ion? \\' hy not h al'e Prof. Langton exp lain w hy th e Big Dipper is Il ot in the :\1 ilky \ ,vay, an d P rof. Pa rk er exp la in h ow he dared mak e hi s ch ape l talk . \lVhen Boaz ha d eate n <ln d

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drunk, the s to ry goes that hi s " h ea rt was m erry. " If that is a ll it takes to bring joy to the soul , w e fa VO l' a bread lin e an d free lem o nade for all stud e nts. Ea rl y in the yea r we were urged by o ne of our visito rs to lift our vo ice" in h appy so ng, but ho w can we sin g if our hea rt s are h eayy? \Ve call for a com mi ttee to investigate h eav in ess of h ea rt and its relati on to th e hi g h pri ce of food. It is strange that Cong ress did not think to have it s c0 111 m itt ee look into the matter. Jf we may ve nture a re m edy, what we ne ed i ~ exhil a ration. \lVe g reatly fea r we take li fe too se ri ou s ly, and h ave neither jollity at the board nor merriment on t h e neld. :\lr. La Gal li en ne says "gayety is th e esse nce of power. " a nd we joi n w ith Rob e rt Louis Ste\'e nso11 111 hi s prayer for "coura g e a nd gayety and a qui et min d." JEREi\[]:-\H JR


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DRAMATICS-PAST AND PRESENT The plea s ure o f r em ini scen ce is a s kee n fo r t h e colle ge se nio r a s for t he g ra n cis ire. I-Ie has help ed m ake hi tory bo th in anci out o f t he class roo m anci, like Go ld s m it h' s sol d ie r , h e e nj oys s ho ul der ing hi s c ru tc h ane! s how ing how I·ict o ry wa s w o n in at h letics , d ram atics o r d ebate. There are ce r tain epoc h-making da tes in hi s college ca r ee r when he either ··go t int o t he ga m e" him se lf o r watc hed o t h e rs d o it. :\"ext t o hi s int e rest in at hl e ti cs is t ha t w ith w hich h e looks back to th e dra Ill<ltic e\"e nin gs of hi s college li fe. It w as th e re t h at h e go t h is fi rst ideas of the a rt of acting, o f imi tat in g real li fe, of real izing- th at the a m atel1 r st ucl e ll t ca n ofte ll p lay sO lll e pa rts as well as thc p ro fessiolla l actor. Th is initiati o n int o t he sc ie nce o f stag·c-c raft ofte n CO Ill CS ove r h im wi th re I·cali ng force . Th e pcr fo r mance o f ·'The Clim bc rs·' mark s the sel·cn th r egu la r seaso n of A . C. ci ramat ics. Th esc scve n years a rc we ll wo rt hy of bein g chro n iclcd in full. fo r t hey fo rl11 a recorcl o f plays t hat ran ge frOIll Shakespea rc to Clyde Fitch ; t hey are r epl etc wit h hu m o ro u s in cid e nts in t h em , and they furni sh a d ra m at ic h is to ry o f w hi c h allY yo un g coll eo.e mi g h t b e prouci . In 1903 t h e college fi r st in vacied the s tage o f t h e

T ha tc h e r Opera I-lo u se an d r evcal ec! to t he Cac h e V all cy world its d rama ti c tale nt. It was then t hat th e yo un g women st ud ents of the So ros is p u t 011 S hak espcare·s ·' :\lidsulllmer 0:"igh t"s D rea m. " A t that time t he co llege be li cl·c rl t h at st udents sho ul d h al·e 11 0 ci ramatic gods befo r e S hak espea r e. :\othing clsc was wort hy the dig ni ty o f an in s titu ti o n of hi g h e r learnin g . \\ ·e did not hal·e th e gooel fo rtu ne to see thi s perfo rm a nce, but we ca n easily im agi nc t he swcet I·o iccs o f the prctty maids in thc fa iry sccnes of the play, tho ug h rum o r relates th<lt so m e o f th c m fou nd th c a rm o r ~() !t eal·)" to \I·car tint w h en th ey r e po:-;cd Oil t h e mossy banks t hcy werc \Vcl l nig h un able t o ri se. The fo ll ow ill g yea r St udent Lifc , cI·c r o u t o f poc kct ill th ose cl ays , p ro du ced ·':\s You I.ike It.·, its o \\'n staff and ot he r leadin g stude nt s furnishing the a lco rs. !l cr e again we arc not pre hi sto ri c c no ug·h t o g il·c t h e repo rt o f a n eye w itn ess, bu t we kn 0w th e rc wc re so me goo d peop le ill t he cas t wh o m we applaude d ill later plays. \\' h et he r th e in tcrp retat io n was w ithin th e reac h o f the a cto rs or no t 111 t b ese S ha ke spear ia n plays, t b e stu cl en ts I11U St have lcar necl by heart so m e o f tbe m os t beaut iful pa ssages o f th e E ng li s h lan g uage and t o make


16

s=,th1Jc:nt 1Life

s u ch line s a part o f one's mental bein g is well worth the drudge ry of rehea rsal s. Th e foll o wing year, 1905, s aw the college we ll la unch ed in the dralllatic world. That was the yea r o f the fir st college opera, when the " Little Tycoo n" was g ive n. A picked cast of s tudents , coac h ed by Prof. Lp ham and Miss \1 0e nch , gave admirable performcl1lC eS of Gold s mith 's "Sh e Stoops to Conq uer" from u nl ettered Blackfoo t o n the north , where a n ew s pap er cr itic a sk ed if the studcnt s wrote th e play, to eq ual1y unl etter ed Richfi eld o n th e sou t h , where th e nati\'es were b o red and unp en etrat ed by Goldsmit h 's wit. Th e most app reciative a udi ences were found in Logan and Salt 14ake. Thi s was the first a ncl o nly time that the co ll ege h as g iven it s play in th e cap ital. Th e ne x t tw o years th e re w e re no college plays, but in s pite of consolid atio n, tUlllult and unres t, the co l1 ege co ntinu ed to s in g its o peras gay ly and gave Gilbert and Sul1i\'an's "Pirat es of Pe n zan ce" a nd 路'P inafo re. " With the y ar 1<;07 b egan a ne w dramati c reg im e. Th e rei g n of th e classica l S hak es pea re and the o ld English co m edi es was O\'e r for a t im e at leas t. Th e dram a ti c depa r tme nt beca m e fil1ed with a sp irit of mocl ern ity , we l1 befitting a n indu s trial schoo l. It was o nly a part of the e t e rnal cycl e which is cons tantly dri\' ing man fro m

roma nce to rea li s m , from the s piritu a l t o the material, from the id ea l to the practical. The fir st of the moclern play s was Gilbert's "Pyg malion and Galatea ," appare dtly a Greek elram a, but thoro ug h I y mo dern in id eas and s pi ri t. There are many s till in college who remembe r th e charm of its cleverness and the good acting of Mi ss J-layball. T h at year the operas were "The Ro se of A u\'ergne " and the "lVIarriage by Lant e rnlight," tw o a s pleas in g comi c ope ra s a s o ne would want to see both for action and mu s ic, but the ultra-m o de rn s d emanded a cho ru s and wo uld not be sa ti sfied with principal s a lo n e. Th ey got a go rgeou s cho m s th e n ext year in "'Babette" as wel l as exce llent solo work and a good mu s ical comedy. Th e play, ho we \'e r, o f la s t yea r can ha rdly count am o ng th e notabl e col1 ege pro du cti o ns. The select io n o f " Th e Am e rican Cit ize n" turn ecl o ut to be unfo rtunatc fo r it s humor fell Aat a nd its sit u ation s fa iled to int e res t. Only a comeclian with the large pe rsona l fo llow ing of l\at Goodw in 01- an ac tress w ith th e beauty of l\Jax in e E l1i o tt could h a\'e g ive n it any le ngth of life . Coac h a nd s tud e nt s s trugg led han! a nd no bly with it, but it was a n exce ll en t lesso n t o all o f a poor ly co nst ruct ed and written play. Ib se n and Sardow h ad e \"idently h ad no me ssage fo r it s author.


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t ..

T he presc nt yea r t he co ll ege has gl\'e n two plays wit h success; one, all o ld-fash io ned, conl'ention al fa rce called, "Mr. 1J0b," which I\ a s actcdw it h Illu c h sp ir it by th c h igh sc hool s tu de nt s; a nd a seco nd, "T he Climb e rs," w hi ch is s till fr cs h in o ur m in ds, As all 2.c t iilg play it is , by fa r, t he be .; t eye,' g i\'en by t h e ...\, C. st u denh and h a ~.; ta ug h t t h em t hat t he s tagc s ho u ld be a n intensi fied copy of rea l lifc, \\ ' h enel'er any actor at a r eh carsal a s ked Sa rd ow ho w a ce r tain pa ssage s h o uld b e g iven h e woul d rep ly always w it h t h c questi o n, " Il ow wo ul d you say it)" and thu s would get t h e acto r to g i,'e t h e na tura l int o nation , Rac he l. t hc g reat F re nch act rcss , lhccI to say that th e s implc st 1hings in h er play s were t he h a rd cst fo r h er t o sz,y, Th e passions an d t h e e motions II' cre easy for hcr to por tray. but su c h rell1a rks a,.; ' \\ ' h at do ] be ho ld ?' ' Ca n] b e li el'e Ill y cycs?' we re al lll os t im p oss ible for her "I kcausc," sa id .s hc. ,,] lI'ould nel'c r u se such express io ns ill real li fe. " Our best acto rs in [\m c ri ca o wc mu ch of th e ir s u ccess to th e fact t hat th ey helong- to city cl ubs w he re t h ey mi x wit h judges . bu s in css man . sc holars, Ill cn of all professions, as w ell as actors, a n d t hu s a re a hl e t o o bse r ve li vin g n~ ode l s of t h e c ha racte rs that th ey m ay at a ny 1l1ome nt be cal led upo n to enact. Th e bes t act in g, that wh ich produces t he illu sio n of real li fe.

t 11. f f t

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lS t h us ba se d o n obsen'at io n . Im agin atio n a nd in s tinct count [o r m u ch , but the actor w it h brain s watc h es people and copies th e ir m an ner isms . In "Th e Cl imb e rs " the st udent acto rs of t h e .:.... C. had a chancc to be s impl y, d ircctly and absol u tely n a tura l a nd t he hig h es t prai se th at was given t h cm was t hat t h ey ol'erd id not h- ' illg-. T he plays of C lyde Fitc h c harm el'en mo re by thcir lifelike d e tail than by t1'-eir plot s; and because t h ey ar e life itsclf they a rc th e be s t poss ible ma te ri a l fo r a m ate urs , The A. C. dra m atic season is not ye t OI'C r. Th e :\gricultural Cl ub is plall nin g to g iye a n el'ening o f plays. in cluding a ncw s paper play ca lled "Th e Cac hc \ ra lIcy F'a rll ler" a nd a bu rle squc of "Othel lo ." Th ey hal'e t h c fi rst near ly r cady fo r pro d uction a nd t ho ,;e lI路ho I! al'e sce n it in c mbryo fi nd it a n a mu s ing tr iAe o f a play. b uilt aro und a sc ri o us id ea. a nd con tain ing se l'c ra l exce llent pa rt s w h ich thc cl u b m en a re hand lin g with mu ch a bility . Then , too, th e re is th c opc ra to com e. Th is yea r, "T he Gcis ha" will be g ive n. a cl) mi c o pcra that h as bec n s un g all ol'e r the 路w orl el , ha s s tood t h e test o f t im e, a nd IS now gett in g int o th e regular rep e rto ry o f some of t h e E u ro p ea n o pera h o u ses. T h e re a r e al so rum o rs of an eve nin g of play s by the Soros is g irl s and it is to be h oped t h at th ey are not va in rum o rs, The re is no bet-


~_mm~~~m~ 18 s= t u 11 f n tiL. f f te l' way for a coll ege frate rnity to ge t an e n viable r eputati o n for itself than by becoming famous fo r it s yearly p lay . A ny society can give a da ncin g party, but t h e frat m en o r w o m e n w h o ca n g ive a play ha\'e to h ave brain s and, in th e lo ng run , the b es t s tudents w ill want to join the frate rni ty that s tan ds for the hi g h es t t hi ngs. Th e dramatic o ut loo k is en couragin g . So ma ny st ud ent s w a nt t h e ex peri ence that co m es fro m acting in pub li c a nd a re willing to w o rk for it. T h e day ca nn o t b e fa r off w h en t h e coll ege will have

a regular s tock co mpan y, ea ch m emb er of w hi ch can play sev eral pa rt s . The se m emb ers will be th e regul ar s tud ents in pub li c s p eakin g cl asses w ho will learn th e ir part s as regular class room w o rk and w ill get c redit fo r it. Th e s ph ere of a n indu s tri al co ll ege is large a nd sho uld e mbrac e the a r t o f act in g, fo r peop le n eed to b e a mu se d in life as t11uch a s t h ey need t o b e fed . I t will pe rh aps no t b e lo ng befo re we h ave a regular school o f acting a s a n integ ral de partm ent of th e coll ege wo rk. F . R. A .

ATHLETIC HISTORY Athl etics at thi s in s tituti o n cl a te b ack to th e fal l o f 1891, w h en the fir st foot b all t eam wa s o rg an ize d. It wa s certa inl y an ul1p" o mis in g b eginnin g, [o r the t eam t h at yea r co ns i 路teelm e rely of a few jolly p laye rs, and th e ga m es of a fe w s ki r m ish es . :\0 co n t est s we re h e lel w ith t eam s fro m t h e o ut s id e, a lth o ug h at that tim e th e L' ni ve rs ity wa s play in g th e ga m e ir~ q so rt of h ap h azard way. Th o ug h th e start was s impl e a nd un pret e nti ou s, foo tball co n stant ly g rew and fl o uri h ed. For t h e firs t ten yea rs, h ow eve r, th er e wa s no r egular way of do in g things; no sala ri ed coach wa s empl oye el , a nd ga m es and co ntests w e re arranged as occas io n arose, o r as th e true

s po rt sm e n in th e in stituti o n felt so di s pose d. During th ese preca n o u s yea rs o f o ur hi st o ry no record s w e re ke pt , a ncl no o n e wa s h eld res po ns ib le fo r athl e ti cs . hence it is a ha rd matt e r t o ge t acc urate in fo rm ation conce rnin g t hi s in te res t in g subj ec t. Th e re was \'e ry li ttle int e res t in at hl eti cs at la rge , fo r a sea rch throu g h th e m usty fi les of t h e local papers fail s t o re\'ea l mu ch rega rdin g th e ea rly ga m es and p laye rs. Fo r t hese r ea so n s it will be imposs ibl e t o g ive a n ad equate record of th e ea rl y ga m es a nd a comp lete sto r y o f t h e playe rs . :'10st of the info rmati o n h e re give n was o btain ed t hro u g h int e r-


~~~m~~~~EI~~~ Stu lJ

f If

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v iews with loca l vet e ran spo rt s- Wd,; no o ne in t h e ins tituti on w ho m en, a nd much has bee n o mitt ed had th e s li g h te st info rm a ti o n rebecau se it was rath e r vag u e ancl ga rding th e ga me . an d th e boys untru stw o rth y . si mpl y p layed acco rdin g t o t h e Most of t h e s to ri es o f ear ly kn o wl edge t h ey could p ick up clays have t o do wit h foo tball , fo r fro m read in g th e rul e boo ks. In t hat has bee n th e m os t p ers is t e nt tho se earl y days Li e utena nt Dun and bes t-lik ed fo rm of at hl et ics . ni ng. Pro f. Mayo a nd P ro f. L a ngancl has ex is t ed, wit h th e exce p- ton did most o f th e coac hin g. t io n of 18S' 3, do w n to t he prese nt . S tra nge as it m ay appea r t o u s, Baseball ha s bee n playe d mu c h th e re were no res t ri ct io ns aga in s t h e re . but has h ad an up-and -do wn fac ulty m e mb e rs play in g o n t h e h is t o ry, a s th e re ha\'e bee n pe- team s, and it was no t u nt il 190 1 ri ods w hen the late ness o f s prin g that thi s was pro hi bited. Sin ce a nd ot h e r co nditi o ns ha \'e la rge ly th e n o nly legitimat e st ud e nts have re tard ed t hi s s port, a nd in so m e bee n per mitt ed o n th e tea m s. cases have a lt oget h e r preve n ted .-\m o ng t h e ea r ly play e rs s pec ial me ntion s ho uld be mad e o f "Big" th e o rga ni zatio n of team s. Swe nd so n, 11 u g h): ea ly, Sa nb o rn. T h e fa ll of 1892 fo und footba ll Ed . , \ 路h eat ley. a ll la rge m e n a nd . Ho uri s hin g. Ha rr y Sa nb or n, so n o f th e pres id e n t , wa s ca ptaill o f acco rdi ng t o t ra diti o n. m igh ty th e tea m . Th e fir s t ga m e wit h pl a ye rs. Li eute nant Dunni ng left the th e uni ve rs ity wa s played th a t yea r a nd resu lted in a \路icto ry fo r sc hoo l in 18S'8 and La ng t o n did mos t of th e coac hin g u p to 190 1. li S . In '9-+ \\ '. :\rc La ug hl in wa s cap- ll a rry Parker was ca pt a in In tai n, an d seve ra l g am es wit h t h e 1900 ; Ed. Crawfo rd in 1901 ; Acuniv e rs ity a nd di ffe re nt hi g h qu il a ): ebekar in 1902. a nd W ill sc hoo ls of t h e s tat e we re played . J a rd ine in 1903 . Th e D. Y. C. T h e n ex t year t h e n. Y. c. put a q uit th e ga m e in 1900, a nd th e n team in the fi e ld fo r t h e fi r st tim e . o ur main g am e,; we re w it h th e l- . an d fo r fi ve s u ccess i\'e yea rs t h e o f L' ., the N ati o na l Gua rd a nd t h e ga m es wit h th e loca ls we re o ur y. :\If. C. A. o f Sa lt Lak e, w hi c h c hi e f co nc rn. Fo r th e most part was mad e up o f man y o ld ea stern t h e c rim so n wa s s uccess ful In co ll ege g rads. a nd so m e hard w inllin g th e \路icto ri es. Once , ga m es w e re p layed. h o we\路e r. w h e n La ngton retu rn ed O u r firs t sa la ri ed coac h was from C h icago, wher e h e had t he lam e nted Dick Ri c hard s. t ra in ed und er Stagg, w e were t h e who came fo r a s ho r t tim e in 190 1. w inn e rs, d u e to Lan gto n's coac h- A far as w hi pp in g tea m s in t o Ill g . P rev io u s t o thi s t im e th e re s hape is co ncerned, h e was prob-


~~~~~~~~~~~ 20 oS f u ..,. e n: f 11. f f f ably t h e g reatest coac h that U tah h a s eve r known. Campbell came as coach in 1902 and staye d fi ve years. Th e n came vVa lke r for two se ason s, who durin g hi s bri ef s tay made a w o nd erful im pre ss io n on athleti cs. M r . Teetze l ha s coach ed two seaso ns in baseball and ba sketba ll and one y ear in foo tba ll. The uni ve rs ity h as beaten us in football fo r seve ral yea rs, with t h e exception of 1903, when Coach Holme s came up for th e fam ous "P ra ctice Game" and got it 17-0! T h e two prev ious year s the "U" beat us 17-0, so that b ecam e a kind of hoodoo. Durin g t hi s period we h ad seve ra l as fine playe rs as eve r do nn ed a suit ; am o ng t he best known b ein g Allred, Te nn , K irk, Jardin e, Smart, Tutt le, Madse n, prob ab ly t h e g reat est tackl e eve l- in t he stat e, and C rawfo rd , w h o Dave Campbe ll said co uld mak e H arva rd e nd hi s fir s t yea r. T h e li st of capta in s to date is : Madse n, '04, (Rob erts-Egbert); Hansen, '05: Nelso n, '06; Han se n, '07; Brossard, '08, and Paddoc k, '09. ~Iuc h could b e sa id regardin g our l-ece nt ga m es, but t h a t is so mu ch a m atte r of curr ent in fo rma tio n that , thro ug h lac k of s pace, t h ey may b e ove rl ook ed h e re. A. s fo r ba se ball , mentio n s hould be made o f Ban kh ead, Pond , Packe r, Cook, Dou g le, Se r m o n, Taylor, the \ I\' est b oys and ot h e rs 'l-v ho appea red a t diffe rent tim es .

Ba. eball has b ee n do rm ant of rece n t yea rs, b u t was r evived by \1\1a l ker two years ago, a nd O ll r tea m s have made a creditab le show in g fo r two seasons . The team bids fair to do well thi s year. Basketball was first pl ayed h ere by g irl s. It wa s not unti l 1906 t hat w e were represe nted in the state league . Sinc e th e n we h ave ha d a fai r team each year. We bega n track w o rk in 1905, w h en we se n t a team t o t h e s tate m eet. Prev iou s to t hat tim e our t rack wo rk h ad be en co nfin ed to class a nd fi eld-day meets. Many s tar s have appea red, chi ef o f w h om a re A llred, P hillip s, Ha nse n, Stewa rt. Fa rn swo rt h, D ixo n, Conge r . Fre w, Brossard a nd Pl an t and m a ny ot he rs, se\'e ral o f who m arc sti ll w it h us a nd hope to m ak e a place fo r th em se lves in th e nea r fut ure. "M ent io n sh ould b e ma de of te nni s. ~o thi n g has eve r b ee n done in t he way of co ntes t s w it h t h e outsid e, yet it ha s long be e n an impo rta nt fo rm of a thl eti c ' for t hose see kin g exe rcise onl y . Th e re is now a s trong fee lin g in th e sc h ool. and a des ire o n th e pa rt o f som e to do som e rea l ac ti \Ie wo rk a lo ng t hi s lin e. Th e courts ha\'e bee n pu t in fir s t-class shape , a n d now dai ly many co ntestant s can be see n out pract icing. It is to be hoped th a t thi s s pirit will grow a nd t h at m or e in terest w ill be tak en in thi !' mo st fa scin a tin g ga m e. E. P . H., '09.


~~m~~m~~~~~m~mm ji

t u 1J e .. t 11. f f

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DEBATING '1' ei1 yea r s ago int e rco ll e~' 'ate cl ebates were no t com mon In L.:tah. In o ur ow n sc hoo l t l 're we re oc cas io n a l co nt ests betwt en memb e rs of the va ri o u s li terary soc iet ies. but we se ldom ve ntured ou r ow n walls in thi s pha se o f stu clent activ ity. St ra nge it is that li te ra ry and fore ns ic contests sh ou ld not be am Oi tg th e first e ndeavo r s of m e n w ho a r e asse m b led fo r inte llect ual deve lop m ent, bu t at hl et ic co nt es ts ilwa ri ab ly come fir st. Th e d ebate is a tru e r m easure of th e int e ll ect ual life o f st ucl en ts tl111l physica l COlI tests ca ll poss ibl y be. :\Ith o ug h 110t eye ry so ulld t hink e r can ex presoi hi s t houghts ( u e ntl ), . a large pro port io n o f goo d thinkers ca n make clea r state tll cnts of t heir id eas a :]( I, t herefo re. if cl eba t ors a re se lec t ed from t h e sc hoo l at large. after co mp et iti\'e tryo u ts h ave bee n h e ld . it is fa ir to assume that t h e 111 en 011 t he tea m s represent at least th e al'erage in telIige nce of the st udent bo dy. I t fo ll ows from w h at has b een sa id t hat it is g r eat ly to ou r in t e rest to make a goo d recorcl in thi s fie ld o f actiyity . L.: p to t h e prese nt tim e we hal' e been fairly s uccessful in o ur int e rcoll eg iate debates, hav in g bee n defeate d on ly t hree t imes o ut of n ine co n-

tests in which we have taken part. Gut no t eno ugh int er est is yet taken. E I'e ry st u dent ca ll con tr ibu te to o ur s uccess in seve ra l ways . In t h e first place, m ore o f us sh o ul d enter t h e t ryo ut s. The keene r t h e com petiti o n b eco m es . the g r eate r will b e th e effo r t p u t fo rth by every man w ho hopes to m ake t he t ea m an d the bette r w ill be th e qua lity of t h e team final ly chose n. In t h e seco nd place, el'e ry st ud en t w ho indul ges in a n occas iona l perusal of newspa pe r s o r magaz in es can brin g to th e attentio n of th e team t im e ly articles Oil th e qu estio n to be di scusse d. Th e te:l 1ll wil l find all cur rent art icle s wit hout assist,,(nc e if n eces~ary . but we 111a." lig ht e n their labo r s mat e r ially by work ing with them. It is a va lu ab le asset to a deba to r t o know that hi s fell o w stude n ts a r e in tereste d In hi s wo rk. EI'e ry o ne k nows t hat a littl e c h ee r ing h c lps a n at hl ete: a sy mpathet ic inte rest is eq ually I'a luab le to the m an w ho is p r epa rin g fo r a forensic battle. Th e o ld er m e n among u s say that Prof. E. \ \'. Rob i nSOll is th e nla n to w ho111 credit 111u st be g i\' e n for o rga n iz in g d ebati ng in th is in st it u t io n, and the prese n t ge n eration o f s tud e nt s have Dr. T ho m as to thank fo r t h e co mpl ete c1el' e lopme nt o f t he syste m.


~~~rmm~~~~ 22 s= f U 11 f 1J t 1L' f f Th er e are man y de tail s to b e a t te nd ed to in selectin g a t eam , prov idin g li te ra ture fo r th em , selec tin g judges, arran o'in g co nt es t s, fix in g da t es a n d pl aces, a nd sec urin g necessary fund s. Th ese q u es ti o ns use d to be ve ry troubl eso m e ind eed ; bu t th ey a re ta ke n ca re o f in th e prese n t syst em of m a nage m e nt w ith ou t so mu ch d iffi cu lt y . Now, in al l prob a bility we shall de bate a nnu a ll y w ith at least two sc h ools; and in t he inter es t of eco nom y of t im e a nd e ne rgy, it mi g h t b e a good pl a n fo r us to co-o pe rat e w it h th em o n th e pla n a dopted som e t im e ago by 1-la rva rd , P rin ce to ll a nd Yale. Th e three sc hoo ls m e nti o n ed m ee t

ea ch ye a r in debate. Th e qu esti o n is agree d u po n ea rl y in th e yea r a nd th e three de bates are on th e sa m e q uest ion. Th e deb a tes a re a ll h eld th e sa m e eve nin gs , on e a t each school. Th e v isitin g team in each case d efend s th e n egat ive s ide of th e qu esti on. By thi s a rran ge m en t each sch ool train s two t ea m s a t th e sam e tim e, o ne o n th e nega ti ve and th e oth e r o n t h e affirm ati ve. Th e advan tage of s uch a syste m can Thi ~ read il y be a pp rec ia ted. sch em e ca n be ca rri ed out h ere a d mira bl y, if a ll co n ce rn ed a rc pre pa red to e nt er int o a n a g reem e nt fo r a t e rm o f yea rs. Le t t1 ~ t ry it . R. O . P.


T H E BAND Someo ne o ll ce ach -anced th e theory that 110 Ise in c r ea se d w ith ci vilizati o n . a nd a v is it to a big metropo li s verifies th e t h eo ry _ A ncient :-\th e ns and R o m e mu s t hav e bee_1 painfully quiet. O n th e o ther h anel . ce rtain wr it e rs m a in ta in Illu s ic is m o r e wide s pread to day tha n el-e r , \\"h et h er it is this 100'e of I)an's pl e a sa nt pasti m e o r di slike o f drill that win s r ec ruit s fo r t h e ban d. we kn ow no t , bu t ce rtain it is that jo ll y fe ll o ws fro m far a nd near ye arl y beco m e pa tient stud en t s of so m e wood o r bras" in s trllm e nt. \\'ithin th e wa ll s o f th e ,-\ , C. il lus t ri o us artists h;1\'e sojo urned for a season , J os , :\, S mith. Jr.. l he cornet soloist: \fc Clo ud, G u)' Sill it h an d Rud o lph. o f c lari o net faille: \\ ' Ilit m o re. Lee and \\"ri g ht , 100' ers of the saxop ho ne; Jacob :;on. th e fife I' : Line! a nd \\ ' o rk s, t ro lllb one a r tist::;: .\1 cKil ln o n . w ho pun is hed t he drum s . a nd J o nes, I\' h o d IT I\, co m fo rt fr o m the so usap ho l1 e , There are ma n)' s till w ith ti s. a nd t h e r e a re man )' w ho wo ul d r e turn to us we re it pos s ibl e to do so , The se t un e ful h e roes hal'e bee n of g reat se n ' ice to the '\Iilitar)' \) epartm c n t, furni s hin g t he mu s ic fo r t he G r a nd Ball and In s pecti o n Day, A nd no w the ban el is to march w it h th e cadets t hree tim es a wee k I Th e band h as led many

process ions at ho m e and abroad, and ha s g iven well-p rai sed co nce rt s , n est o f all, it ha s a ro u sed tremendous e nthu s ias m, a !l(1 Ins in s pired nlany st ud ents with loy a lt y for th e sc hoo l of t h ei r cho ice, lts tuneful mu s ic ha s o ft e n d r il-e n ho m es ickne ss and petty ca res far away . leal' in g their l'iCtilll S lig ht heart ed and stro ng, The m e rry mu s icians practic e eac h day du rin g drill ho ur . al1<1 no twit h st andi llg the e nc roac hm e nt s o n the ir time mad e by lo ng-winded cha pel s pea ke rs . make trul y wonderf ul a dvanc e ment , Students are forced to leave sc hoo l un ex pectedl y at time s a ncl thi s oc casionally il1jur es th e ba n c\. but t he ba n dllla ste r ho pes some d ay to hal'e a rese n 'e fro m whi c h 10 draw, Eac h yea r sees th e d eparlure o f act il'e membe rs by g radu ati o n o r o th e r causes. and raw materi a l has to be tra in ed , I n ,; pite o f all th ese h a ndica ps , hOII'e\'e r. th e band is better eac h year, Th e wr ite r is a warm friend o f th e bane!. a 11(1 a rde n t ly wi s hes it wo uld de li g h t u s o ft e ner w ith it s exce ll ent mu s ic , St ud e n t 11 0c1 y exerc ises would be sel'e ral ti l11 es as interesting if the band led t h e s in g ing; a nd e n t hu s ia s m fo r ath le ti cs wo uld be mu ch g rea t e r if th e ban d we r e pr ese nt in unifo r11l at el'e r)' co nte st , Ot h er sc hoo ls hal'e had the ir band at ba s ket ball


~~~~~~mmmmm~m 24 S t .. 11 (' n t a i f (' ga m es-bu t w h er e was o urs? Befo r e a n im po r ta nt baseball, basket ba ll , foot ba ll. o r eve n debat in g contest, wh y not h ave t h e ba ncl o u t? I t h as by no m ea n s ex h a u st-

eel a ll poss ib il itie s . Co m pete n t ju dge s ha\'e sa id we have t h e b est st ucl e n t b a n d in t h e state. May its r ep u tat io n n eve r d iminish !

J.

G.


~~~~~~m~~~~~~mm~m ÂŁi t u 11 e n t 1L f f e

25

FRATS AND CLUBS Th e g ro wth of o ur fra t e rniti es was reo rgani ze d a s th e Phi D elta and club s h as b ee n s lo w, but lik e :\T u. Finall y, in 1904, it became that of st urdy oa k s, it is ch a r- th e S ig ma A lph a, th e fir s t Gre ek ac t eri ze d b y e n d urin g s tability . lette r "frat " in th e co ll ege. Its V e ry few o f o ur soc ieti es, o nc e c hart e r m e mb ers w ere : O. W . laun ched, h ave eve r di s band ed . A dam s, J. E . Barrack, R. C. HillTh e o th ers h a v e by degrees a t- ma n, L. M. H ow ell , N. A. J e nta in ed s uch stre ngt h t hat th ey are s en, F. R. J e nse n, B . F. Ri te r, J r. , 110W o ut o f all da nge r of di sso lu - a nd R. E . Rud olph . S in ce that t ion . t im e man y prominent s tud ents Th e So ros is so ci ety is th e rig ht- have beco m e m emb ers. Th e fra iu l cl a imant t o th e ho no r of b e- te rni ty numb ers a mong its m eming th e o ld es t soc iety in th e be rs e ig ht alumni , an d two sc hoo l. It was s t a rted in 1899 and se ni o rs. Th e prese nt act ive m em s in ce th en has e nj oyed a prospe r- be rs hip is e leve n . Th e o bj ect of o u s life. So ros is s t a nd s fo r three t he o rg ani zat io n is t o p ro m o t e inthin gs in o ur co ll ege, nam e ly, lit- te ll ec tu a l and social advanc em ent e ra ry trai n i ng . s oc ia l cuI ture and a nd t o h Oll o r its Alma M a t er. co ll ege loya lty . Th e g irl s a re Th e P i Ze t a ]' i w as o rga lli zed s uc ce ss fu l in a ll o f t h em . E ac h ill D ece mbe r, 1905, by fi ve F reshye ar So ros is g ives a da ncin g par- me n m e mb e rs of th e class of '09. ty, whi ch is o ne of t he sw e ll a f- B efo r e t h e e nd o f that y ea r fOLir fa irs o f th e se a so n. Th eir part in new m e mb e rs w e re tak e n in , and st ud e nt a c ti viti es is we ll kn o wn t he n ext yea r a no th e r nl e mb e r ,. "-''to e v eryo ne ~I a I1 Y o f u s re nl e nlwa s a d de d, ma kin g a tota l of te n . h e r th eir re m a rka bl y good min - S in ce 1907 m e mbe rs h ave bee n st1-cl s how two yea rs ago . and ta ke n at large fr o m co ll ege no w it is whi s pe red a bo ut that classes . Fo r th e fir s t three y ears t hey a re co nt e mplatin g som e thin g of its ex is t e nce, th e frat occ upi ed o f a s im ilar nature. Th ro ug h a roo m in th e co ll ege, bu t eve nt ut hi c k and thin , th e So ros is g irls a ll y it w as dec id ed to m o v e t o a re always in th e fro nt ra nk o f tow n, as it w o uld be m o re co nfri e nd s o f th e C . A . C. \'e ni e nt for m ee tin g purp oses . The The S ig ma Alpha frat e rnity, (o ta l m embers hip at p rese nt is o ne of th e old -tim e rs, had its in - t w e nty-fiv e, as foll o w s : F o urte e n ce pti o n in a s mall law club, o rg an - a t th e A . c., two of who m are o n ize d whil e P ro f. E. \i\T. R o bin so n th e fa culty,. o ne, a s eni o r at th e w a s in s tructo r in law. La t er it L-. o f U ., three g radu a t e t hi s year


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at 1J t tf f

from th e L a w Sc h ool a t C hi cago. two a re e ngage d in minin g a t Il i Ilg h a m , t wo in comm ercia l wo rk in Utah, o ne pr ac tic a l agri cul t urist in Id ah o. a nd two in th e t 路. S . Dep art m ent o f .-\ g ri culture. V路l e h ave on ly one na ti ona l frate rnit y r epresent ed , th e D elta Th eta Si g ma . Thi s frat ernity was foun de d in O hio , hav in g fo r

it s a im th e a d van cem ent o f scientifi c ag ri culture. It was th e in te n tion o f th e foun de rs to rai se ag ri culture to a hi g h e r pos iti on in t he ag ri cultura l sch ools of th e L'ni ted Sta t es. Thi s it has accom pli sh ed to a ve ry en couragin g deg ree . A g reat p art of its su ccess is due to th e hi g h sch olarship which it demand s o f studen ts who

11. t f

t

b ecom e m emb e rs. In Ollr sch oo l t he De lt a Th eta S ig ma has b eg u 1 th e wo rk o f unitin g st ud ents of th e large r sc hools o f th e U nited St a t es with th ose o f OLlr o wn. T he chapte r est abli sh ecl h er e is th e E ps il o n ; oth er chapt e rs are located in Io w a Mi ssouri . Colo ra do. O regon, \ l\T ashin g to n and Ca li fo rnia. Th e acti ve chart er m em -

be rs o f our ch a pt e r a re: A . E Aldo us. Ceo . ~/l.. Turpin, E ra s tu s Pe te rson, P . V . Card on, Ea rl Be nni on, V . A . Sadl er, Ern es t Ca rroll , Al ex McOmi e, H . P. Barro w s, A. B. Ball a ntyn e. O. G . Lloyd, D ean P et er so n and R . J. Ev an s, a nd as ho no rary m e mber s: Dr. J. A . \N idt soe, Dr. E .D . B all , E. A. Ivl e rrill , R obert S. Nort hrop, Dr. H. J.


~1l~~IlIl~~~llm~ Stu lJ e n t Frederick. J o hn T. Caine III. C hri s tian Hogen so n, J. E. G reans, T. E . vVoodward , E. G. Titu s, \"'.T. L. vValker a nd F. D. Farrell. During thi s yea r th e fo llo win g ha ve bee n added as active members: A . C. Coo ley; L. M. vVinsor, A. E. -Bowman, E . T. Ralph , E. F. Burton, VV. B. Oldham and F. A. \"'ya tt , and a s ho nora ry m e mb ers : Dr. Robert S t ewart, E . P. Hoff, E. 1-1 . \i\' alt e rs a nd J os . Taylor. Cntil quite recent ly t h e P hi [(a ppa I o ta frate rnit y wa s un known t o th e large r part o f o ur st udent body. No twith sta ndin g th e fact t hat this li ve o rga nizatio n h as bee n in ex is tence mo re than two years. th e ann o u nceme n t o f it s adve n t into th e w o rld of recogni zed coll ege frat e rni ties ca m e as a s urp ri se t o most of u s. Befo re t he e nd of t h is sc hoo l yea r we ho pe to kn o w m o re a bo ut its STC DE N T -S IXTEE N m emb e rs hip a ne! its wo rk. A t prese nt it is kn ow n t hat it has w ithi n it s fo le! seve ral grad ua t es and man y fr0 111 the rank s of the 11 pp er c1assl11 en. Th e Beta Ka ppa P hi is t h e o nl y Greek let te r so ro rit y in t he co llege . I t is composed m a inl y of g irl s in th e hi g h sc hoo l depart m e nt and has as it s aim th e soc ial

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a nd in tel lectual bettermcnt of its mem bers. A not h er g irl s' soc iety is call ed the B'lue '1', co ns istin g al so of hi g h sc hool g irl s, which s tri ves to pro mot e soc iability and college spirit a mo n g the g irl s of the sc hoo l. Th e; date of the birt h of the Agri cultural Club is Jan . 25, 1902. Its fir s t pres id e n t wa s J o hn T. Caine III. Since it s beginning it h as had as members many m e n w ho have b eco m e fam o u s in o ur college . At pr ese n t it has a n active m e mb e rs hip o f fifty ent hu s ias ts . T he club has many purposes, some of w hi ch are : T o act as a co mmitt ee t hro ug h whi c h agricu lt ura l st ucl en t may sp eak a n d t o encourage int eres t in st ud cnt act l\路 lt les. Ve ry s ho rtly th ey w ill plunge into t he dra mat ic wor ld with a presentat io n of t h e "Cach e Vall ey Farme r," a del ig htful thr ee-ac t co m edy. Thi s comp let cs th e s ho r t li st of active co ll ege club s, frats and soror iti es that we haye at p rese nt . \ \ ' e hope t hat t he s uggest ion co ntained in an ot h er rart of t his pape r w ill b e acted up o n, so t h at by the en d o f the yea r we may h ave se\'c ra l mo re active s tud ent o rganizatio ns .


28

~th" 路 f

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iLife

AN ODE TO PRO FESSORS.

EXAMINATION ECHOES.

T eac h 0 11 , O h Pro fs o. t eac h 0 11 I Thro u g h sc ie ntifi c lo r e T eac h 0 11 I \\ Oh at th o u g h t h e st uel e nt s think yo u bore? \\ Ohat th o u g h th ey lau g h a nd ca ll yo u qu ee r ? \\O h at t ho ug h t h e t im e is a lo n g. lo n g yea r ? \\ Ohat t ho ug h it brin gs yo u littl e c h ee r ? "<,ver yo u mind! 'reach o n!

In th is conAi ct Beowolf was fata ll y wou nd e d , fr o m th e effec t s of w hi c h h e di edo

T eac h 0 110 O h Pro fso o t eac h Oil I Thro ug h pat ie ll ce-t ryi n g d ays T eac h 0 11 I St udent s m ay s it with vacant gaze o S tu de nt s Illa y ca ll your lectures st u ff. S tud e nts ma y play t h e 掳game o f bluffo Yo ur h a nel m ay ac h e cu ff, '\e\Oe r yo u mind! T eac h o n!

,\1 ilto ll was one of thc m os t s tud io u s m e ll th a t eve r li\Occl. li e ke p t hi s h ead a nd min d w ra pped u p in a b ook- so mu c h so th at his eycs b ec am e ve ry weako li e we n t to t h e docto r o w ho t o ld hi m if h e d id no t s to p h e wo uld go blind in a s h o r t t im e, but h e t ook n o h ee d! Soon h e wa s a blind m a n o

,0T r eas ure I s la nd " I S a ta il o f go lel. w ith o ut th c lea s t m o ra l s u ggoest io n o Th e c lim ax of ooTh e '\ec kl ace" is w h e r e ~J a cl a lll e L o ise l c1i :icove rs that t h e diam o nd s wer e m ade o i do u g h o

Th e Got hi c nove l is wh e r e c h a ract e r s m yste ri o u sly di sapp ca r an d re-a ppea r.


~~m~~~~~~~~~~~~m~m~~ ~

t .. 1r

f If

Th e fift ee nth ce ntury contains som e o f o ur bes t poet ry, c haracterized by a high deg ree of arti s ti c s t e rility. Mi ss Kyle (afte r exp lainin g th e use of saw ancl seen ) - "~ow, M r. J- - , will yo u pl ease t e ll u s whel1 to u se t h ese w o r cl s?" :'I1 r. ].-"Youu se saw when t he o bj ec t is n ea t路 and seen wh e n it is fa r off."

In Faculty Prof. Ste wart- " For tw o yea rs have ta ught a 7 :50 class, a nd hal'e e nj oye d it. " I' resici ent \\ ' .- " Bu t 1 wa nt t he fac ul ty to und e rs ta nd D r. Stewa r t nel' e r a rri ve d befo re 9 w he n h e was tIl y ass ista nt. " I' rof. S .- " \\ ' ell, you kn ow o nl y aimed t o be the fir st o ne I he re. " -0-

Sessions (to t h e fe ll ows 'w h o a re debate t h e L'. )-":\o\<v if YO ll want to wi n t hat deba te, tak e a good ene rget ic rest th e la st week . (0

-0-

First I'rep .- "v\ 路h at did Pro f. ./ e nse n 11l ea n w h en h e s poke of t h e "" illd o ll's of t h e soul ?" Secol](1 l'rep. -"J guess he was rek rrin g t o yaw nin g. " -0-

C ru e-" Say, P ro f. , what ki nd of a bu g is t h e woggle bug?" i'rof. Ti tu s-" It's a hum b ug."

t 1.t f f

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:\f iss S tewa rt (to ne w st ud e nt ) - "Yo u In ve s ig ned yo ur name Josep h R. \ " h at cloes t he R. sta nd fo r ?" :\ e w Student-"Reube11." :\1 iss S.-"l Iow cl o yo u s p ell it , pl ease : " :\ew St ud ent ( h es itatin g)-" T d U11n o-R- u-b-i-n, I g u ess ." A lady employing a co lo red 11l a n , as ked him h is name. " :\Iy na m e is Poe , ma'am." " Poe) Pe rh aps so me of your fa mil y wo rk ed fo r Edga r Al lan Poe." Th e dark ey's eyes o p ened wide with g reat s urpri se . " \~ T hy , h e gaspe d, po intin g a du s ky fo refin ge r t o him se lf, "why, A h a m E d ga r .-\ ll a n r oe !"-Ex. D id h e finally s u ccee d in getLi ng a nyo ne to m ake a bet w it h him ? Yes , th e e le l'a to r boy took hi1ll up.-Ya le R eco rd. Stu de nt- :\ re no ( the mOI'em enU; of t he hea rt ca u sed by electri city) P ro f. - l do n't kn ow , J g u ess a goo d d ea l of act io n of t h e h ea rt is ca u sed by s pa rkin g.- Retor t. "J s yo ur mi st ress in )" " Yes : bu t s h e ca n't be dis turb ed . S he's pl ay ing w hi st." "A lI , I und e rs t and. \\ ' ell , an ot h e r t im e w ill do . T o nl y ca m e to te ll h er that h e r li tt le boy fe ll int o the ril路e r ."-Ex .


~m~~~~~~~ 30 ~ t If 1J ( If t i1. i f e Lady-"Very h ealthy place, is it ? aave you any idea what the death rate is here?" Caretaker-"VVell, mum , I can't zactly sa y; but it's about one apIece all around." - London Punch.

Rah! Rah! The h e n stood on th e ri ve r 's brink And gave h e r college cry, C ntil a frog in pain ed surpri se Politely asked h e r why . Sh e said , "K ind s ir, you see that duck O u t th e re u pOll th e water? We ll , that' s a winning co ll ege crew , And I'm its A lma Mate r! " -Th e Corne ll 'vVidow.

House Party Time , "Do you beli eve in fate? " h e as ked, as h e s llu ggled clo se r . "\IVe ll ," answered the g irl. " T belie\'e th at what 's goin g to happen will happe n. " - Cornel l VV idow.

Prof.-"A foo l call as k questions that a wi se man can ' t an swe r. " Boy-"I s uppose that is why so man y o f us fail o n exa m s."-Ex. P ro fesso r-"You s hould a lways write so that your mos t ignorant reader m ay understand. " Student-" \ I\f hat part of my theme didn 't you understa nd, professor ?" Litt le Bobby's Ma -"J os iah , Bobby has been u sing s lan g again today." Little Bobby's Pa-" Now see he re kid! You've got to cut it out! I won't s tand fo r it! See ?"-Ex. The jud ge says : "vV hat' s th e t roubl e ?" The man says: " Jud ge, this ma n is a fri e nd Of min e a nd hi s nam e is Gun. Now, Ju dge, Gun is loaded. I kn ow it' s against t h e law to carry a loaded g un on the s treets, so I brought him in h e re." T h e jud ge says : "G un , you ' re disc ha rged ." (A nd th e repo rt was in th e pap e r nex t day. )-Ex .


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you are at a Musical, or have a fondness Ifor Music, you must surely be in needofsomething in the Musical line.

Ed. Seligmann's SHOE ESTABLISHMENT D on't fail to visit us. You can be fitted with the best Shoes at the lowest prices.

~

tlrbatcbtr jiMU!iic <teO. LOG A N,

U TA H

Ed. Seligmann THE COZY CO RNER WHI!: RE THE CARS STO P

J-c<h e French Dry Cleaning makes old clothing look almost \....) like new. Ladi es, please let us have some of your old dresses, waists, ball and evening gowns, or an ything in this line and see what we can do. Also Gent's Suits, Neckties, Overcoats, etc. etc. Suits pressed for 75C. Firstclass laundry work guaranteed . .N o charges for call or delivery .

AMERICAN STEAM LAUNDRY 46 East Center Street , Logan, Utah Both Phones.

Call us up


Wtau 1!\ental 芦ompanp DR.

s.

E. G REENE , M:m"ger

4 7 MA IN STREET LOGAN, UTAH

HI GHEST CLASS OF WORK

WHEN people wan t to see a Football Game, they hie themselves to th e A. C. Campus. And when people want good reliable Furniture, prices, and quality to please, they hie themselves off to the

Wm. Edwards Furniture and Carpet House MA IN STRE E T , LOGAN

HENRY G. HAYBALL'S SPECIAL GROCERY ORDER 20 P ou nd s S uga r 3 o ne路 poun d pac kages l3 est Ra isins . 4 pound s l3e st Ri ce .. 路1路 pounds Tapi oca a nd Sago ..................... .. . 3 ra ns ' I'o ma t oes :) ca ns Peas or COrtl.. ... .. ............... ........... ... 1 ca n 2:) 07. . K . C. Bak ing Powd er .... ...... ... ... . 1 pac kage Jf:, pou nd Best .1 a pa n T en 3 on e-pon nc1 ca ns Cockta il Sa lm o n 3 ca ns L ye. 3 pac k ages bes t Co rn Sta rc h .. 3 p ackages b est Lau ndry Sta rch .. 1 po und Schillin gs Best Co ff ee . ] 2 ba rs D i a mond C Lau nd ry Soa p ... . ._... .. ... .. 'L'otaL

.... $1.00 25c

25 c 25 c 25c 50c 25c 25c 50c 25c 25c 25c ........ .... .... ............ 25c .... .... .......... ......... 50c ....... _$5.00

The Above List Will Be Delivered to Any Part of the City for only $5.00. Cash on Delivery. Figure this out and see what we are saving you. R emember the place~ at H. G. HA YBALL MERCANTILE CO.


- - - --- - -------------- ----- --

The Agricultural College OF UTAH Offers an efficient combination of practical and theoretical instructions by trained experts of long and varied expenence in the following industrial and technical subjects. Agriculture.-Farm

Crops,

Arid

Farming,

Forestry, Horticulture. Irrigation and Drain a ge, Ro ad Building, V eteri nary Science, etc.

D omestic Science and Arts.-Cooking, Servo ing, Home Construction and Sanitation, Laund oriag, }-Ianc1 and l\1achine Sewing, Dros smakill g, Embroidery, Hous ehold, Economics, lIomo Nursing, e tc.

Commerce.-Accounting, Money and Banking, Business Administration, Stenograpy, P enmanship, Typewriting, Commercial Law, etc.

Mechanic

Arts.-Carpentry,

Forging,

chanical Drawing, :M:achin 6 Work,

Building, Pattern Mnking, Sloyu, etc.

Wood

Me路

Carriage

Carving,

General Science.-English, Mathematics, His路 tory, Modern Langunges, Naturnl and Physi路 cal Science, etc. Engineering.-Irrigation Engineering jointly with the University of Utah. Courses are also offered in Music, both vocal and instrumental, Art, Physical Culture, Li路 brary Work, etc.

SUMMER SCHOOL Summer School will open June 6th and close July 16th 1910. Courses will be offered in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geology, History, Economics, English, French and German. Many of the regular courses in Agriculture, Domestic Science, Commerce and Mechanic Arts will be repeated during the Summer Session. Write for summer school circular.

Address: THE REGISTRAR U. A. C., Logan, Utah


Our Clothinli Your Satisfaction Our Suits and Overcoats will please you because they are made to do so. Their style, their fabric, and the long wear that is moulded into every one of them, will delight you. Their moderate price will be a revelation.

Knox, Stetson and Imperial Hats Nettleton, Florshein and Walk-ovtr Shoes . ~1909. '"

........ s.-. c.... ~. No Y.

F. W. THATCHER COMPANY

Profile for USU Libraries

Student Life, November 1907, Vol. 6, No. 2  

Student Life, November 1907, Vol. 6, No. 2  

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