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December 20, 2013 Volume: 1 Issue: 16

Supply Dept. Wins 14th Consecutive Blue “E” Award By MCSN Chase Hawley The USS Bataan (LHD 5) Supply Department recently won its 14th consecutive Blue “E” for their outstanding performance. Commander Naval Surface Forces Atlantic presented the award with Cmdr. Pamela Theorgood, Bataan’s supply officer, accepting it. “Winning the Blue ‘E’ is important because the ‘E’ represents effectiveness,” said Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Charles McNeely, Aviation Supply (S-6) leading petty officer (LPO). “Ultimately, the goal of any military is to be effective. To win another Blue ‘E’ means that the USS Bataan’s Supply has been doing everything it can to be as effective as possible for the last 14 years.” The Supply Department Blue “E” is awarded for supply excellence with a compilation of points awarded for several categories including: supply management inspection, end-of-month (EOM) readiness goals, training, supply awards, EOM service goals, and intermediate

maintenance activity support. “There are a lot of contributing factors that go into winning the Blue ‘E’ award such as teamwork and leadership, all the way up from the Supply Officer down to the junior Logistics Specialists, SH Ship’s Servicemen, or Culinary Specialists running the storeroom or space they’re responsible for, ultimately it’s Supply Department working together to achieve one common goal,” said Logistics Specialist 1st Class Chad Stumler, Stock Control (S-1) LPO. There are eight divisions within the Supply Department that all have to work as a team to achieve the necessary outstanding performance to achieve the Blue “E”. One of those, the Food Services Division is in the final round for winning the Annual Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial BLUE E story cont. on page 2

Photo by MC1 RJ Stratchko

NCIS Agent Brings Unique Experience, Skills to Bataan

By MC2 Shannon Smith When Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) Special Agent Latrice DeBruhl-Daniels arrives on the scene of an investigation, she’s got a slew of skills and years of experience to rely on. Had the crime involved, say a murder, she’s got it from all angles of experience. From her years patrolling for local law enforcement in Maryland, she could have helped prevent the crime. She could have helped disarm the situation with her training as a firearms instructor for NCIS. From her time as an Emergency Medical

Technician (EMT) she could have saved the person’s life. From her nearly complete nursing degree and her studies in forensic science, she could have helped the person get better or found clues hidden by the body. From her experience volunteering with medical examiners as a coroner, she could help perform an autopsy on the body. And with her experience as a detective sergeant, she could help collect the clues and track down the killer. However, her varied career is more a reflection of her incessant curiosity for

everything rather than indecisiveness. “I like solving puzzles,” DeBruhlDaniels said. “I’m always learning how to do something, I’m always in training. I always look for challenges. ‘I dip and dab in so much.’” Going on four years with the global agency, DeBruhl said all of her experience has culminated to this. “I’m where I’m supposed to be now,” she said. “I think all of that has helped me get where I am.” As the agent afloat for the Bataan NCIS story cont. on page 2

Look Inside! Burial At Sea, Page 3 | Synthetic Marijuana added to Drug Testing, Page 6 | Newest Frocked Sailors, Page 7


Blue E cont. from Front page

Award, known as a NEY. This is the most prestigious award for food services to win and is a small example of how Bataan Supply is standing out in the fleet and deserving of their 14th consecutive award. “We will continue to excel, we have some new faces and a motivated group

of Sailors that truly want to make this Supply Department the best in the fleet,” said Stumler. Winning the Blue “E” moves the ship as a whole one step closer to winning the Battle “E” award. The Bataan will be in competition against the other ships in the Amphibious Ready Group (ARG)

for nomination for the award. “There is a long standard of excellence to live up to by those who have led before us,” said Stumler. “We will continue to excel. We have some new faces and a motivated group of Sailors that truly want to make the Bataan Supply Department the best in the fleet.”

narcotics, and trains on topics for crime prevention like active shooter scenarios and sexual assault. “Our job doesn’t look like it’s so important during the exercises,” she said “But things can happen on a ship, even if you’re gone for two weeks, and you can’t always have an agent fly on the ship, so they attach one.” Her role requires a delicate balance between approachability and professional distance so as to not compromise her ability to perform as an impartial authority. “I do like to stay low-key, but I also like to communicate with everyone on the ship,” she said. “It’s not a big secret that

I’m here, but I like to keep that reputation of ‘you see me, and you know I mean business.’” When the ARG deploys, DeBruhlDaniels will mostly be in the field, scoping out each port ahead of time for the ships to provide detailed information for liberty briefs, making sure security procedures at the pier align with requirements and coordinating with the local law enforcement. “This job is hard. You have to learn local law, federal law, and military law, international law, and where jurisdictions fall,” DeBruhl-Daniels said. “But I really love my job, it’s a challenge every day and it’s different every day. I get to view so many different countries, learn so much about them.” As a former Navy wife, she understands the pressure that deployment puts on family and the stress of her job, but that’s why she said a strong support structure is crucial to her effectiveness. “Family is very important,” DeBruhlDaniels said. “It’s very important with this type of lifestyle to have a supportive family at home.” NCIS is comprised of some 2,000 personnel in over 40 countries around the globe. The organization is roughly 90% civilian, and its cadre of federal agents about half its total personnel is 98% civilian.

NCIS cont. from Front page

Amphibious Readiness Group (ARG), supporting USS Bataan (LHD 5), USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19), USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44) and the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit-- DeBruhl-Daniels said the main reaction she gets to her presence is both intimidation and confusion. She can’t always help that aspect, even her shirt is intimidating with its large and bold white letters spelling out “SPECIAL AGENT” on the back with a badge on the front. The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) is the federal law enforcement agency charged with conducting investigations of felony-level offenses affecting the Navy and Marine Corps and also performs investigations and operations aimed at identifying and neutralizing foreign intelligence, international terrorist, and cyber threats to the Department of the Navy. In addition, it provides warning of threats and specialized defensive force protection support to U.S. naval forces around the world. Though the majority of DeBruhlDaniel’s tasking is counter-intelligence and counter-terrorism, she has a variety of responsibilities. She goes to nearly every brief to stay informed and provide input, she handles any crime and fraud investigations, gives briefs on illegal

Photo by MCSA Michael J. Lieberknecht

The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by Bataan’s Public Affairs Office. This newspaper is an authorized publication for members of military services at sea. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. Editor MC1(AW/SW) RJ Stratchko

Commanding Officer

Command Master Chief

CMDCM(SW/AW) Kevin M. Goodrich

Layout and Design MC1(SW/AW) Gary A Prill

Executive Officer

Public Affairs Officer

MC1(SW/AW) John Belanger MC1(AW/SW) RJ Stratchko MC1(SW/AW) Gary Prill MC3 Erik Foster

Captain George J. Vassilakis

Captain John “J.C.” Carter

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MCC(SW/SCW) Dennis Herring

News Team 5

MC3 Mark Hays MCSN Nicholas Frank Cottone MCSN Chase Hawley MCSA Michael Lieberknecht


Bataan Sailors Honor Deceased During Burial at Sea By MC3 Mark Hays Sailors aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5) conducted a burial-at-sea for 16 former service members and three spouses. The burial-at-sea began with an announcment passed over the ships announcing system, the 1-MC. “All hands bury the dead. Maintain Silence in the vicinity of the Hangar Bay. Raise the church pennant. Lower the colors to half mast.” Burials at sea are a long-standing Navy tradition, in which the cremated remains (cremains) and intact remains (casketed) of service members and their families are committed to the sea while a ship is underway. This ceremony is a sacred honor available to active duty members, retirees, honorably discharged veterans, and dependents. This Navy tradition shows the crew’s honor and commitment to service beyond a military member’s life. “It was an honor to work so closely as part of this tradition,” said Religious

Programs Specialist 2nd Class Gardiel Martinez. “Being a part of the ceremony made me feel like I was part something bigger than myself.” USS Bataan chaplains, Lt. Cmdr. William Dermott and Lt. j.g. Hardy Owens, shared the honor of offering prayers for those committed to sea. “It was a huge privilege to serve others who have served us,” said Owens. “We honored 19, starting with a Rear Adm. and ending with three military spouses.” Following a prayer, each was piped over the side as Capt. George J. Vassilakis, commanding officer aboard the USS Bataan, saluted each one to the sea. “Today we commit the cremains of these service members to the sea and entrust them to almighty God who has promised to receive us into his peace,” Vassilakis said. Upholding Navy customs and traditions with ceremonies like this remind Sailors of the service of those who came before

them. “We honor the legacy of service, commitment and honor that these service members provided for their country and we thank God for the courage and integrity they demonstrated,” Vassilakis said during the ceremony. The ceremony concluded with the announcement, “Honor guard fire the volley.” Three volleys were fired by a rifle squad, and the sound of TAPS played over the speakers. The national ensign was then hoisted up from half-mast, and Bataan carried on with her mission. Active duty members of the uniformed services, retirees and veterans who were honorably discharged are eligible for a burial at sea. Their dependent family members are also eligible for burial. Because the ceremony is performed while the ships are deployed, family members are not allowed to attend. For information on the program, contact the U.S. Navy Mortuary Affairs office.

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Photos by MC1 Gary A. Prill


DoD Adds Synthetic Marijuana to Random Drug Testing

By Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. The Defense Department has expanded its zero tolerance for the use of illicit drugs to include synthetic marijuana, also known as “spice,” the director of DoD’s drug testing and program policy said Dec. 13. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Army Lt. Col. Tom Martin said that in addition to the broad range of drugs for which the military already randomly tests service members, synthetic marijuana will also be included. “The message we’re getting out now is that when you participate in our random urinalysis program, synthetic marijuana products or synthetic marijuana will now be tested along with our other drugs,” he said. “It’s been known in the general population, both in the medical community and various media reports, that synthetic marijuana drug use is a serious health concern.” Martin noted that while the military typically has a much lower level of drug use than in society at large, synthetic marijuana “still poses a significant risk to both the safety and readiness of our force.” “Prior to synthetic marijuana being banned,” he said, “the department went out and did a random study looking at a sampling of military urine specimens from all the different services to see if synthetic marijuana was being used by our members. At that time, the positive rate, or the number of service members who tested positive, was about 2.5 percent.” To put that in perspective, he said, in 2012 the overall positive rate for all the drugs tested for in the urinalysis program was 0.9 percent. “In 2012, synthetic marijuana products were banned through legislation,” Martin said. “So we went back and did a similar study, and what we found is that the actual numbers went down.” However, he added, a high number of service members are using synthetic marijuana. In addition to testing for synthetic marijuana, Martin said, the military also randomly tests all service members for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines

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and other drugs in the amphetamine class, including methamphetamines and the drug known as “ecstasy.” The test also looks for codeine and morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, Vicodin, and different diazepines, such as Valium and Xanax. Martin said even deployed troops are subject to random drug testing. “They are still mandated to be tested under the military’s random urinalysis program; however, the frequency is determined by the operational tempo,” he said. If a random drug testing detects the presence of illegal drugs, Martin said, troops are subject to punishment under military law guidelines.

“Any service member who tests positive for either an illicit drug or misuse of a prescription drug falls under any actions deemed appropriate under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), as well actions that are appropriate as deemed by their commander,” he said. With the addition of synthetic marijuana to an already stringent drug testing policy, Martin reiterated the department’s commitment to zero tolerance for the abuse of illicit drugs. “All service members participating in our urinalysis program will be tested for cannabinoids,” he said. “And if they do test positive, they will be dealt with according to the UCMJ.”


Navy Trivia Hands off: As punishment for pulling a knife during a fight with a shipmate, old Admiralty laws decreed that the offender should have his hand cut off. Peacoat: The heavy topcoat worn in the cold, miserable weather by seafaring men was once tailored from pilot cloth, a heavy, course, stout twilled blue cloth with the nap on one side. The cloth was sometimes called P-cloth for the first letter of “pilot” and the garment made from it was called a P-jacket, and later a peacoat. The term has been used since 1723 to denote coats made from that cloth. Long Shot: Today it’s a gambling term for an event that takes a great amount of luck. It’s origins are nautical. Ships’ guns in early days were very inaccurate except at close quarters, it was an extremely lucky shot that would find its target from any great distance.

1ST CLASS ABH1 EDUARDO I. ACEVES AC1 ADRIANA AYALABARCELLOS EM1 RANDALL K. BARRETT CTR1 JOSHUA D. CHANEY HM1 RONALD D. CRAWFORD IT1 ABRAM J. MERRITT LS1 JOSH I. PILGRIM NC1 BILLIE R. PRICE MC1 GARY A. PRILL ABF1 RODNEY T. RANDALL CTR1 CORY M. RICHTBERG ABH1 TROY T. WASHINGTON

2ND CLASS IS2 JOSHUA C. ADAMS IT2 JAMES W. BIZZELL FC2 KORA L. BUNCH OS2 DAVID J. CARTAGENA LS2 DONTAY L. FEATHERSON DC2 KENBERNARD B. GARCERA MM2 DUSTIN R. GLOOR EM2 ROBERT B. HESS EM2 BRANDON A. HOLDER EM2 ADAM R. KRAMER MM2 JOSHUA D. KRAUTH EN2 MICHAEL A. LEPPERT JR. MM2 CAMERON C. LINTON MM2 KEIANA S. LIVINGSTON MM2 PATRICK G. LIVINGSTON II CTR2 CHARLES B. LONGS ABH2 LESNER LOUIDOR

IT2 CINDY L. MCCANDIES FC2 SEAN A. MCFARLIN OS2 SEAN R. MCGAFFEY OS2 ALEX M. MOORE IS2 AMY C. NOVAK AS2 MARCGGLENN L. ORCULLO ABH2 GERRICK J. PARKS EM2 NICOLE N. PINNOCK MM2 DEREK R. READ AO2 GLYNDALE C. RIVERA YN2 BRITTANY B. RUSSELL MM2 SAMUEL S. SANTAYANA JR AZ2 MARQUISE A. SARGENT IS2 GARRETT W. SCHOONOVER HT2 CHARLES V. STAINER AZ2 ERIC L. TOMLINSON EM2 JOHN M. UTLEY II SH2 TAKADO D. WATIE

3RD CLASS CS3 BABATUNDE S. ATAPA HM3 JACQUELINE V. BARTHOLOMEW BM3 JIMMY R. BATAN JR. IT3 PRESTON C. BIXLER ABH3 ELIZABETH BLASCO BM3 MICHAEL S. BOUSSON DC3 JACOB A. BUSHMAN AZ3 VICTORIA J. CAGLE MM3 MEGAN M. DIBENEDETTI MM3 HARRISON L. DORTON IT3 GUNTHER S. FITCH YN3 INDIA J. GREENE MM3 BRYAN T. GREENMAN

OS3 JOHN P. HAMMOND JR. MC3 MARK A. HAYS AG3 JENNACA L. HEINECK CS3 ISAIAH L. HUBBARD AS3 THOMAS J. KENNARD LS3 REGINA M. MAKAU BM3 MICHAEL F. MARTIN CS3 MICHAEL L. MARTIN OS3 LOUIS R. MERCEDES JR. MR3 GLEN A. MORAN EN3 GEORGE C. NASH AG3 BENJAMIN C. NUNEMAKER CS3 MARCUS D. OLIVER IT3 KYLE A. OSGOOD MM3 NICHOLAS J. RAMSDELL EN3 BENJAMIN G. RICHTER EN3 GIANCARLO P. RIGNEY IT3 RAYMOND A. RIOS JR. BM3 DAVID D. ROGERS LS3 EVANS K. SANG ABH3 JABRIEL V. SANGABRIEL AT3 SARAH E. SCHENK ABF3 DALTON T. SCHMIDT AZ3 HEATHER L. SEEBACH MM3 TYLER P. SMITH EM3 WILLIAM D. SPIECKER OS3 KELLY M. SULLIVAN ABF3 JAMES P. TRAVIS MM3 MICHAEL L. WALKER JR. ABF3 FELISHA L. WATKINS QM3 DEMARIO A. WELCH AO3 KYLE G. WHITE CS3 TAMARA U. MURPHY

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Gator Growl Vol. 1 Issue 16