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Volume 7 Issue 7

July 19, 2019

LCAC-36“Send it” REGINA P. MILLS LEADERSHIP AWARD

A PROUD SAILOR


VOL.7 ISSUE 7

JULY 19, 2019

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COVER: Members of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions dump ice on Chief Culinary Specialist Linda Colter after a 5k fun run

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Commanding Officer Capt. Greg Leland Executive Officer Capt. Bryan Carmichael Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Ryan Lamkin BATAAN PUBLIC AFFAIRS Public Affairs Officer

MCCS (SW/AW) Stacee McCarroll

Editor, Layout & Design

MC1 (SW/AW) Jaq Renard MC2 (SW) Zachary A. Anderson

News Team 5

MC1 (SW) Kegan Kay MC1 (AW) Kathryn Macdonald MC2 Kaitlin Rowell MC3 Leonard Weston MC3 Alan L. Robertson MCSN Levi Decker

Table of Contents 3 News From Around The Fleet 4 Hometown News: Regina P. Mills Leadership Award 6 Hometown News: A Proud Sailor 8 LCAC 36 “Send It” 10 Battling Bastard Photos

The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by Bataan’s Public Affairs Office. This newspaper is an authorized publication for members of military services at sea. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. USS BATAAN (LHD 5) USS BATAAN


FLEET NEWS

VOL. 7 ISSUE 7

BATAAN TOUGH

JULY 19, 2019

GI BILL BENEFITS TRANSFER DEADLINE EXTENDED

From Chief of Naval Personel

The deadline for Sailors who have over 16 years of service to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits to dependents has been extended to Jan. 12, 2020 based on recently revised guidance issued by the Department of Defense (DoD). NAVADMIN 020/19 announced DoD’s exception to policy for enlisted and officers who cannot obligate for four more years due to statute or service regulations expires July 11, 2019. Members who will be ineligible for the Transfer of Education Benefits (TEB) after July 11, 2019 include: - Enlisted members within four years of the high year tenure gate for their current pay grade

- Officers within four years of the statutory limit for their current rank - Members in a limited duty status or undergoing medical or physical evaluation board processing and found not fit for duty All Sailors applying or reapplying for TEB who have not previously completed the online self-service Statement of Understanding must first complete it at the MyNavy Education website at https://myeducation.netc.navy.mil/ webta/home.html#nbb. Once members complete the Statement of Understanding, they will receive a link to go to MilConnect to submit their benefits transfer request. Sailors will require a four-year service obligation in order to transfer benefits.

FIVE COMMON MYTHS ABOUT MILITARY FINANCE Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Anthony Camilli

Over the past eight years, the Bureau’s Office of Servicemember Affairs (OSA) has engaged with military families throughout the country and even the world. Each year we receive tens of thousands of complaints from servicemembers, veterans and their families about financial products and services. We have heard lots of barracks rumors and scuttlebutt and we hope to arm you with the ground truth about the following topics. Myth #1: Credit card companies are required to waive annual fees for servicemembers. Truth: Although a number of credit card companies offer to do this as a way to say “thanks for your service,” the law doesn’t specifically require them to waive annual fees for servicemembers. However, the law does require that credit card companies disclose all credit card fees to ensure that you can make a true “apples-to-apples” comparison. Have or getting a credit card? Then check out our resource on credit cards to learn more.

Myth #2: The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) only helps by lowering interest rates. Truth: The SCRA provides many important protections and benefits to active-duty servicemembers beyond just the 6 percent interest rate cap for pre-service loans. For example, the SCRA has special protections concerning foreclosure, repossession, default judgments, and more. And for good reason – troops who are deployed “downrange” shouldn’t be worried that anyone is going to take away their house or car. Download our SCRA factsheet to learn about what else the SCRA can do for you. Myth #3: The Military Lending Act (MLA) doesn’t protect my spouse or my dependent children. Truth: While you were at field training, did your spouse or child buy something on credit with outrageous rates? Fear not – as long as you were on active duty under a call or order for more than 30 days the MLA covers your spouse, your children Continued on page 11 No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 3


NEWS

Hometown

Regina P. M LEADERSHIP AWA “Regina was always such a caring person,” said Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuel) Hawa Riley, Zamora’s Leading Chief Petty Officer. hen walking down the passageways of the “So after her death, the Aviation Boatswain’s amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD community thought it would be fitting to create 5), you pass many faces, but there is one face you can always count on to be wearing a smile, Aviation this leadership award in her honor. She was a great Boatswain’s Mate (Fuel) 2nd Class Gillian Zamora, leader, a great handler, a great air boss; pretty much everything about Regina Mills was great. This this year’s recipient of the Aviation Boatswain’s honor doesn’t even touch an inch of what she really Mate Association and Commander, Naval Air was, however this is the best we could do to honor Force Atlantic Fleet’s Lt. Cmdr. Regina P. Mills her by recognizing Sailors who are great leaders Leadership Award. like she always was.” Every year the Aviation Boatswain’s Mate For Zamora, this award is a lot more than just Association recognizes two Sailors from the a piece of paper and a pat on the back. “I feel Aviation Boatswain’s Mate community who they honored and humbled,” shared Zamora. “I’m feel best embody the spirit of Lt. Cmdr. Regina P. honored because it means that someone took the Mills. Mills enlisted in the Navy as an Aviation time out to recognize that I’m doing what I’m Boatswain’s Mate and later earned a commission supposed to do, and I’m humbled because the as an aircraft handling officer. She served as the award is in honor of such an influential person in USS Abraham Lincoln’s (CVN 72) first female the [Aviation Boatswain’s Mate] community.” aircraft handling officer successfully leading one of the largest departments onboard. Mills was According to Riley, Zamora has taken on difficult killed in 2012, after being struck by a vehicle when duties throughout her career and built a reputation she stopped to assist others involved in a traffic of excellence that follows her wherever she goes. collision in Gig Harbor, Wash. Story and Photo by MC2 Zachary Amderson

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Mills ARD Riley who nominated Zamora for the award worked with her at Recruit Training Command, “I saw her work ethic there,” said Riley. “So when I saw her onboard the Bataan, I already knew I had a strong second class to lead the division, and she has set the standard since day one.”

work ethic, dedication to duty and contributed to improving the ABF community. Which Zamora has demonstrated all throughout her Navy career and especially since 2017 while aboard the Bataan. Zamora says she has learned to lead by watching other strong females in the Navy.

Zamora attributes her success to always trying to remember her “why,” which is her fundamental desire to always continue bettering herself. “On my bad days I remember that my Sailors need me,” said Zamora. “They are my reason to keep going. Because if I stop doing what I have to do, what is going to drive them to do better?”

“When I joined the Navy, I guess I was lucky, I always seemed to have good leadership from the start,” said Zamora. “At my first command, I met my first female Master Chief and I told myself that I would like to be like her or at least copy some of her characteristics.”

For Zamora, bad days are vital to growth. “It’s not as easy as it seems,” said Zamora. “There are struggles; it’s all about how you overcome them. There are going to be good days and bad days, but it’s important that you use those struggles as stepping stones to self-improvement.” A Regina P. Mills Leadership recipient must have demonstrated exceptional leadership skills, a strong

Zamora’s attitude, leadership, and experiences have all culminated in a second class more than worthy of the Regina P. Mills Leadership Award, according to Riley. “Winning the award really reaffirmed everything we already knew about her as a great leader,” said Riley. “So when she won this award, it wasn’t a surprise; it was a confirmation that everyone else in the Aviation Boatswain’s Mate community saw that this girl deserved some recognition.”

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A PROU Story by MC1 Jaq Renard & Photos by MC2 Zachery Anderson

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ay Pride. For so many Americans serving in the United States Armed Forces today, it means much more than just identifying as a member of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community. For service members, it means to serve openly and proud, without the fearful silence of having to decide whether being with their beloved openly or their call to duty.

History recognizes the 1969 Stonewall Inn riots in New York as the beginning of the LGBTQ movement. However, for over 2 centuries military service members, government officials and employees have long fought an arduous battle, from the hearts and minds of men up through the highest court in our democracy, to obtain fair and equal rights and the freedom to love whomever they please. Yet, so many LBGTQ Americans remained quiet and distant themselves from their friends and colleagues for fear of unjust treatments. In 1919, The U.S. Navy, ordered by Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, launched an undercover sting operation “Vice and Depravity” aimed at seducing Sailors suspected of being homosexual. At least 17 Sailors were jailed and court-martialed before public outcry prompted the Senate to condemn the operation. Lt. Gotthold Frederick Enslin was the first documented Solider in 1778, serving in the Continental Army to have been relieved and discharge from service due to his homosexual proclivity. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Leonard P. Matlovich a decorated Vietnam Veteran was discharge from service in 1975 after declaring his sexuality on the cover of Time magazine and Air Force Staff Sgt. Anthony Loverde was one of many 13,000 members of the armed services to be discharged under President Bill Clinton’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) policy. Before the DADT policy was repealed, some young Americans held a secret for hope and chance to one day join the U. S. Armed Forces. For Ensign Matthew Derden, amphibious assault ship USS Bataan’s (LHD 5), electronics maintenance officer, his personal discloser was retracted and remained tightlipped until he was ready to share that information about his life. “I came out of the closet when I was 14 years-old. I went back into it in 2008 when I was 22 years-old [to enlist in the Navy],” said Derden. “Don’t tell anyone who you are, really means don’t let anyone find out,” Derden exclaimed. “I witnessed a Sailor get discharged after being outed for the first time while I was in ‘A’ School at Great Lakes. He left a flier from some gay club in his trash and his roommates turned him in. That’s when I realized that discrimination wasn’t only tolerated against gays, it was a requirement.” Despite the DADT policy, Derden loved the opportunities the Navy provided. He worked really hard at his craft and excelled up through the ranks. Like

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UD SAILOR every other junior enlisted personnel, Derden complained about his daily duties and challenges of being a young Sailor. For him, the worst part of the Navy was the best part and he quickly developed strong bonds of friendship among his peers, but how long could he maintain his secret? “It became increasingly hard to keep up the lies, and to live a double life while becoming so close to such awesome people,” explain Derden. “I didn’t want to put them in a position where they had to keep a secret that I considered my burden to bear.” Derden was careful not to disclose anything about his lifestyle away from work. He created excuses of why he wouldn’t meet up at gatherings, functions or events with friends, and he dull downed his weekend exploits during the Monday morning conversations with his colleagues so not to build up interest in joining him the following weekend. “I hated lying, so I tried to keep things vague and tried to avoid sharing anything about me personally,” explained Derden. “Eventually, my Navy friends just stopped inviting me out. We were all still good friends at work, but it was understood that is where it ended.” After the DADT policy was repealed and the U.S. Supreme Court stroke down the portion of the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which restricted federal employees in same sex marriages, including military families, from receiving federal benefits. “Everyone in the military came to work and

did their jobs like professionals, and the world continued to spin,” said Derden. Derden recalled how emotional he felt during an all hands call when his chain of command addressed the crew on the repeal of the DADT policy. Some of his fellow shipmates asked concerning questions about how the changes were going to affect them. “What if someone is gay and lives in my berthing,” one Sailor asked. “Will they have to move out?” His commanding officer (CO) replied to the Sailor “no.” Another Sailor asked, do we have to share the same bathroom with them and his CO’s response was, “yes, you already do.” Derden’s second coming out was not a big to-do. “That’s not my style,” Derden explained. “The shipmates, who I was terrified of finding out that I was gay, immediately embraced me as I told them one by one… and their only gripe was I didn’t tell them earlier.”

“I’m proud to be gay, it’s who I am. I’m also proud to be a Sailor and to be a part of an organization that stood up and did the right thing, when the right thing still wasn’t that popular in America,” said Derden. “I’m proud to be an LDO [Limited Duty Officer] Mustang, and to have the chance to lead and mentor Sailors regardless of their sexual orientation every day… and finally, I’m proud that when people see my wedding ring and ask “What does your wife do?” My response is “He’s a Chief.”

HMC Davrao Warren, Ensign Matthew Derden, IT3 Klayton Boggs, LS2 Ketsia Jean-Paul, Capt. Greg Leland, Capt. Bryan Carmichael and CMC Rayan Lamkin pose for photo at the pride celebration cake cutting.

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LCAC-36 Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Joshua Wilborne and Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 2nd Class Alex Burgos troubleshoot the fuel system of Landing Craft, Air Cushion 36.

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Story and Photos by MC2 Zachery Amderson

The water gate of amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) is lowered as Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) 36 lines up their approach. If you are standing in the upper vehicle stowage aboard Bataan as LCAC 36 breaks the threshold of the water gate, the violent thrashing of the air and roaring sounds will make you suddenly aware of the massive power of the twin rotors that propel that vessel though the water.

Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Rio Ray secures a vehicle to the deck of Landing Craft, Air Cushion 36.

The Crew of Landing Craft, Air Cushion 36 Poses for a photo.

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Inside the cockpit a different scene plays out, the five man, all enlisted crew are connected to each other through headsets that dull the screaming engines and allow clear communication with one another. The navigator, Operations Specialist 1st Class Michael Morgan receives direction from well deck control and relays that information to Master Chief Gas Turbine Engineer Scott Weifert, the craft master, who is piloting the 92-foot-long LCAC safely into Bataan’s well deck. Once LCAC 36 is in position and the ramp marshal gives the signal, the engines shut down and the craft lowers itself. Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Rio Ray, the loadmaster, then gets out and begins to unload the craft. Once unloaded, the crew heads back to the beach to get the next load. This scene will play out over and over throughout the


” day as all three LCACs embarked with Bataan fulfill their ready and making the minor repairs needed to get the crafts mission as the primary means of ship-to-shore transportation out on the water in a full mission capable status.” for Marines and their equipment. Though there is a maintenance team, when something The craft accomplishes its mission in an interesting way, happens while operating, the small crew has to fix the issues “The LCAC hovers,” said Ray. “We like to say it flies, but it on their own. “If we’re sending a load and we have to stop hovers over sea and land.” The ability to hover gives Marines in the water and come off cushion we have to handle that access to beaches that would be unreachable otherwise. right there, just us,” said Ray. “I never would have thought that as a Boatswain’s Mate I’d be out fixing engineering The hovering nature of an LCAC requires both aviation and casualties.” surface expertise to operate. “This is one of the most unique places in the Navy,” said LCAC 36 engineer, Aviation LCAC 36 along with the other two LCACs onboard are a Structural Mechanic 1st Class Joshua Wilborne. “I’m part part of Assault Craft Unit Four based out of Little Creek, of a five man enlisted team of different ratings from all over Virginia, and provide fast, over the horizon movement from the Navy. It’s really great to get to interact with all those ship-to-shore of combat troops. different ways of thinking and bring that all together on the All three crafts are always competing with each other and LCAC to find better ways of doing things.” use that competitive spirit to motivate the crew. “We all The LCAC was first deployed in 1987 and is nearing the end work really hard and put in a lot of time and effort,” said of its lifecycle. Just like with any vehicle, they require a large Wilborne. “We want to show off all that work, so if we can amount of maintenance to keep going and each LCAC has carry a few more loads than the other crews, we’re happy to a team of twenty to thirty maintainers. “The man hours for secure those bragging rights.” maintenance verses the flight hours are much higher,” said Wilborne. “We had an operation this morning and another While working with the LCAC crews you can feel the early tomorrow morning. I’d be willing to bet that if you excitement the crews have to have to be doing their work go into the well deck around nine or ten o’clock tonight all and Ray sums up the attitude of LCAC 36 in a few simple three crews would still be in their crafts getting everything words. “As long as 36 is running, 36 is ready to send it!” No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 9


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1 | MCSN Decker

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BATAAN’S BATTLING BASTARDS PHOTOS 1 | MC3 Lenny Weston

2 | MCSN Levi Decker

3 | MC3 Alan L. Robertson

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| MC3 Alan L. Robertason

8 | MC1 Jaq Renard

4 | MC1 Kegan Kay

1) Mustang officers serve ice cream to the crew during an ice cream social on the mess decks. 2) ABH3 Taiwo Adegbamigbe directs an MH-60S Sea Hawk, assigned to the Dragon Whales, of HSC 28, as it takes off from the flight deck. 3) SN Cole Schaffer, acts as ramp marshal during well deck operations. 4) PR3 Alan Almonte troubleshoots a Portable Oxygen Regulator Tester. 5) MM3 Hector Perauna secures a low pressure air hose in the aft main machinery room. 6) Members of the 2nd Recon Maritime Raid Force train members of the 26th MEU to repel from the flight deck to the hanger bay. 7) BM2 Joshua Erickson gives Sailors a safety brief before a replenishment-at-sea. 8) ABHCS Frank Gardner discusses repositioning aircraft on the flightdeck with ABH2 Dominick Pointdexter using a diagram wigi board in flight deck control.

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5 | MC3 Lenny Weston 6 | MCSN Levi Decker


FIVE COMMON MYTHS ABOUT MILITARY FINANCE Continued from Page 3

(if under 21 or under certain other circumstances), and certain other kinds of dependents. Reservists or members of the National Guard on active duty also have the same protections. Remember, while the MLA limits most loans to a 36 percent interest rate and provides other important protections, it does not apply to all loans. Myth #4: You need to pay someone to help you with your financial issues. Truth: The old saying that you “get what you pay for” is true in many ways, but it doesn’t apply all the time. In personal finance matters,

Uncle Sam provides the troops and their families with a free Personal Financial Counselor to help out. Any troops who are in true financial stress—such as in need of essentials like rent, food, or other basic items—can get help, including zero-percent loans from the military relief societies. In addition, both servicemembers and veterans can get free or low cost financial help through non-profit credit counseling services. Myth #5: Financial issues are too complicated for the average person. Truth: Managing your financial life may seem like rocket science to some people, but we have many free tools

Bataan Bustle Family Deployment Briefs Join fleet and family support center along with Bataan Ombudsmen and the family readiness group in preparing Sailors and thier family for deployment. Building C9 9475 Bacon Ave. Norfolk, VA 23511 August 13 & 15, 2019 from 5:00pm to 7:30pm

to help you make sense of it all. Whether you’re creating a budget, reducing your debt, or planning for your retirement, you don’t have to go-it-alone. Our research shows that it’s not what you know about financial products and services that matters, but it’s what you do when faced with a financial decision that matters. This means knowing when to seek more information, knowing where to find trusted information, and knowing how to act on your decision. Get started with our money goals worksheet today.

Remember, while underway all cellphones must be put into airplane mode and all bluetooth devices must be turned off.

Single Sailor Briefs

Will be held on the Bataan Mess Decks August 13 - 15 from 9:00am to 11:00am

No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 11


Pre-DePloyment Brief 2019 Join Fleet & Family Support Center along with Bataan’s Ombudsmen & Family Readiness Group in preparing Sailors & their families for deployment

Family BrieF

Building C9 9475 Bacon Ave. Norfolk, Va 23511

August 13 & 15, 2019 ~ 1700-1930 Single Sailor BrieF

USS Bataan (LHD 5)

Mess Decks ~ August 13 -15 2019 ~ 0900-1100

Profile for USS  Bataan

Gator Growl - July 2019  

USS Bataan (LHD 5) celebrates PRIDE month, Bataan Sailor earns the Regina P. Mills Leadership Award, and LCAC-36 leads the way in this editi...

Gator Growl - July 2019  

USS Bataan (LHD 5) celebrates PRIDE month, Bataan Sailor earns the Regina P. Mills Leadership Award, and LCAC-36 leads the way in this editi...

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