November 2021 Polo Players' Edition

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2021

P L AY E R S’ E D I T I O N

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CONTENTS

P L AY E R S’ E D I T I O N

N OV E M B E R 2 0 21

VOL. 25,

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS

30 Smooth Sailing Photos by Tony Gibson

6

Hotels at Sea cruises to victory in U.S. Arena Handicap

NO. 3

Association News USPA Bulletin Mountain View Polo

34 Working Women Photos by Oana Moore

14 Instructors Forum

Ace and Bad Ass earn USPA arena titles

By Jared Sheldon

40 Here to Stay Photos by Larry Johnson & Alex Pacheco

16 Equine Athlete

International Townsend Cup remains in USA

Courtesy of AAEP

18 Polo Scene News, notes, trends & quotes

NOVEMBER 2021

24 Polo Development 28 Intercollegiate/Interscholastic 44 Polo in the Pampas

TION P L AY E R S’ E D I

OUR COVER

Hotels at Sea Wins Arena Handicap

by Lucas Noel

Hotels at Sea’s Marcos Bignoli closes in on Core’s John Gobin in the U.S. Arena Handicap final. Photo by Tony Gibson

58 Yesteryears 64 Calendar 48 Polo Report Sol De Agosta Sweeps 8-Goal Rincon League

$5.00 US/$5.50 Canada

OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN SIGNED COLUMNS ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHORS AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE PUBLISHERS OF THIS MAGAZINE.

2 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N



P L AY E R S’ E D I T I O N THE

OFFICIAL MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE

UNITED STATES POLO ASSOCIATION

Editor & Publisher

GWEN D. RIZZO

Contributing Editors

HEATHER SMITH THOMAS, ALICE GIPPS, LUCAS NOEL, C. MAYBE ORTIZ, SARAH EAKIN

Editorial Board

ROBIN SANCHEZ, TONY COPPOLA, TOM BIDDLE, DAWN WEBER, AMI SHINITZKY

Art Director DAVID BEVERAGE Prepress WALSWORTH Advertising & Editorial Offices USPA Member Subscription Inquiries (800) 232-8772 OR FAX (888) 341-7410 ldolan@uspolo.org

General Subscription Inquiries 9011 LAKE WORTH RD, LAKE WORTH, FL 33467 (561) 968-5208 gwen@poloplayersedition.com

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E-mail: info@poloplayersedition.com

©Copyright 2021 by United States Polo Association.. No part of this issue may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process without written permission of the publisher. Paul Brown illustrations are ©2018 and are reprinted by permission of Paul Brown Studios, Inc., P.O. Box 925, Hedgesville, WV 25427. Subscription rates: $45/one year, $78/two years. Other countries (air mail), $78 drawn on U.S. bank/one year, $144 drawn on U.S. bank/two years. (GST:134989508). Subscription problems call (561) 968-5208. VOL. 25, No.3 POLO Players’ Edition (ISSN #1096-2255) is published monthly by Rizzo Management Corp. for U.S. Polo Association, 9011 Lake Worth RD, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Periodicals postage paid at West Palm Beach, FL and additional mailing offices. (USPS: 079-770). POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Polo Players’ Edition, 9011 Lake Worth RD, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Canada Post: Publications Mail Agreement No. 40612608. Canada Returns to be sent to Imex Global, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2.

4 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N


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U S PA B U L L E T I N

PATRICK MICHAELS

Conduct Violation The USPA received a conduct violation complaint on July 11, alleging that USPA member Darrell Gaebel used offensive language when addressing a minor USPA member during a game played at the Great Meadow polo facility under the auspices of Twilight Polo Club on July 10. On July 20, the USPA Executive Committee issued charges against Mr. Gaebel for violating the USPA Code of Conduct. A hearing was held on Aug. 6, during which Mr. Gaebel, the minor USPA member, and 15 other witnesses testified. The hearing officers rejected Mr. Gaebel’s jurisdictional objections, but concluded there was not sufficient evidence to find that Mr. Gaebel used the offensive language alleged in the complaint. Accordingly, the conduct violation complaint was dismissed in a final order dated Aug. 20.

three-month suspension, a one-year probation, completion of an anger management program, and the delivery of letters of apology to affected USPA members. PDI Grant Application The 2022 Polo Development Initiative application is now available and will close Monday, Jan. 31, 2022. The Polo Development Initiative Grant Program is a reimbursable grant-based program intended to support thoughtfully presented applications for PDI funding that address specific, club-based, sustainability needs. Grant awards will be made in support of a specific purpose that addresses those needs, including, but not limited to: • Advancing the sustainability and growth of club membership, taking into consideration club capacity and the available polo facilities. • Improving the quality of the polo-playing experience. • Promoting the development of the sport of polo. Visit the Polo Development Initiative page on uspolo.org to apply today. Alumni Networking Host an alumni networking event at your club. Relive memories from your intercollegiate/ interscholastic career and reconnect with the sport! Alumni networking events aim to introduce I/I alumni in the area to local polo clubs and players. To learn more about alumni in your area or to share information on your polo club, please check out the Alumni Polo Network on LinkedIn. The Alumni Engagement Committee invites any member club interested in hosting an I/I alumni networking event to reach out to I/I Program Coordinator Ali Davidge.

Seneca Polo Club in Poolesville, Maryland, hosted an I/I alumni networking event this past summer.

The USPA received a conduct violation complaint alleging violations of the USPA Code of Conduct by Salvador Sanchez Duggan during two games in the USPA Memorial Cup at the Spokane Polo Club. The USPA Executive Committee issued charges related to subparagraphs (2), (3), (8), (9) and (10) of the association’s Code of Conduct, and subparagraphs (a) and (b) of Outdoor Rule 33. Mr. Duggan voluntarily agreed to resolve the matter in a settlement that included, among other things, a

6 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Membership Renewal It is that time of year again! Renew your USPA membership for 2022 and continue to enjoy a variety of benefits, including savings on nationally known products through NTRA advantage, discounts on clothing and more. The fastest and most efficient way to renew your membership is through the USPA website at www.uspolo.org. To ensure your membership benefits continue uninterrupted, please renew no later than Friday, Dec. 31. When renewing, please ensure your contact information, including your email and mailing address, is current. If you require a paper renewal, please send a request to membership@uspolo.org.


DAVID LOMINSKA/POLOGRAPHICS.COM

U S PA B U L L E T I N

Does your helmet have the NOCSAE logo? If not, it is not NOCSAE compliant.

Frequently Asked Questions Why can’t I pay my membership by phone? The USPA requires every member to accept the “Terms and Conditions.” This can be done quickly by logging onto the member portal on uspolo.org or by mailing in the completed membership renewal forms. Why can’t two members use the same email? Our membership database uses email addresses as a unique identifier. All information, such as handicap, member status and club affiliation, is tied to an email address and cannot be used for another member. How do I obtain a handicap? To obtain a USPA handicap, the delegate at the club with which you are affiliated must send a recommendation via email to handicaps@uspolo.org. This recommendation is then sent to the circuit handicap chairman and national handicap chairman for approval. How long does it take to obtain a handicap? A handicap takes up to two weeks to be processed. If you plan on playing in a USPA tournament, please make sure to allow sufficient time to receive a confirmed handicap. NOCSAE Helmet Variance As of May 1, members must wear NOCSAEcompliant helmets in all actual outdoor and arena polo games at member clubs, not just USPA events. The Rules Committee has learned that some members and some member clubs mistakenly believe

that NOCSAE-compliant helmets need only be worn in USPA events. That is a misconception. NOCSAEcompliant helmets must be worn in all actual outdoor and arena polo games (not including practice games) at member clubs, not just USPA events and not just games umpired by USPA professional umpires—all actual games. These rules apply to you unless you qualify for one of the existing variances and have signed the applicable USPA Waiver and Acknowledgment. USPA Outdoor Rule 4a and USPA Arena Rule 3a(2) each state that, “[n]o player may participate in any USPA Event or Club Event in anything other than a proper uniform, including a protective helmet with a chin strap, which must be worn in the appropriate manner specified by the manufacturer of the helmet. ... Effective May 1, 2021, the protective helmet required by this rule for players must be certified to meet the NOCSAE ND050 Standard Performance Specification for Newly Manufactured Polo Helmets.” The terms “USPA Event” and “Club Event” are each defined in Part I of the USPA Tournament Conditions, and these definitions make clear that every actual polo game is either a club event or a USPA event. The USPA Rules and Tournament Conditions apply to all members and at all member clubs. And both Outdoor Rule 11b and Arena Rule 1d state that “no USPA Member Club or Host Tournament Committee may adopt any variance” from the rules requiring NOCSAE-compliant helmets. Members and member clubs each agree annually to comply with all USPA rules and policies. Thus, if you are a member, you must wear a NOCSAEcompliant helmet in all actual polo games, both POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 7


U S PA B U L L E T I N

outdoor and arena. And if you run a member club, he or she has ordered is delivered. you must require your players to wear NOCSAENote that this variance can be applied when a compliant helmets in all actual polo games, both NOCSAE-compliant helmet is damaged during a outdoor and arena. game to allow the member to finish the game in a Due to delays in production and shipping, the non-compliant helmet, provided that each such Executive Committee has decided to extend USPAaffected member (1) agrees to promptly provide after approved NOCSAE helmet variances until Dec. 31. the game proof of purchase for a new NOCSAECasablanca and Charles Owen have assured the compliant helmet, and (2) executes in writing (a) a USPA that all existing orders for NOCSAE-compliant waiver of liability in favor of the USPA and its helmets will be filled by Dec. 31. For that reason, the member clubs for any claims that might arise from Executive Committee has decided to terminate all the use of a helmet that is not a NOCSAE-compliant existing variances from USPA Outdoor Rule 4.a and helmet, and (b) an acknowledgment that the variance USPA Arena Rule 3.a(2)—the NOCSAE-compliant will expire as to him or her when the NOCSAEhelmet rules, which took effect on May 1—except for compliant helmet he or she is ordering has been the three variances set out below, which are now in delivered. effect and will remain in effect: Third, any member who is age 13 years old or First, any new member who joined the USPA for younger and whose head is not large enough to use a the first time on or after May 1, or who rejoined the currently commercially available NOCSAE compliant USPA on or after that date following an absence of at helmet may nevertheless participate in a USPA event least two years, and who does not possess a NOCSAEor club event using a protective helmet that is not a compliant helmet, may nevertheless participate in a NOCSAE-compliant helmet, provided that (1) this USPA event or club event using a protective helmet proposed variance will expire when two NOCSAEthat is not a NOCSAE-compliant helmet, if he or she compliant helmets are commercially available in a provides definitive proof that on a date within 30 smaller size that fits the affected member; (2) that days of joining or re-joining the USPA but no more each such affected member’s parent or guardian first than six months previously, he or she ordered a executes in writing (a) a waiver of liability and (b) an NOCSAE-compliant helmet, which has not yet been acknowledgment that the variance for their child or delivered, provided that each such affected member ward will expire when two NOCSAE-compliant first executes in writing (a) a waiver of liability in helmets are commercially available in a size that fits favor of the USPA and its member clubs for any the affected member and the child or ward is able to claims that might arise from the use of a helmet that take delivery of one such promptly-purchased is not a NOCSAE-compliant helmet, and (b) an NOCSAE-compliant helmet; (3) the non-compliant acknowledgment that this variance will expire as to helmet is always worn with a chin strap and in the him or her when the NOCSAE-compliant helmet he appropriate manner specified by the helmet or she has ordered is delivered. manufacturer; and (4) the affected member uses Second, any member who can demonstrate that appropriate eye protection (i.e., a face mask or safety he or she does in fact possess a NOCSAE-compliant goggles). helmet that has been damaged, and who provides If you have any questions about how the NOCSAEdefinitive proof that he or she has ordered another compliant helmet rules apply to you or your club, or NOCSAE-compliant helmet no more than six about how any existing variances may apply to you, months previously, which has not yet been please contact USPA Membership and Handicap delivered, may nevertheless participate in a USPA Director Lindsay Dolan for clarification. But event or club event using a protective helmet that is remember, NOCSAE-compliant helmets must be not a NOCSAE-compliant helmet, provided that worn in all actual outdoor and arena polo games (not each such affected member first executes in writing including practice games) at member clubs, not just (a) a waiver of liability in favor of the USPA and its USPA events and not just games umpired by USPA member clubs for any claims that might arise from professional umpires—all actual games. the use of a helmet that is not a NOCSAE-compliant helmet, Published by the United States Polo Association Offices at 9011 Lake Worth Rd., Lake Worth, Florida 33467 • (800) 232-USPA and (b) an acknowledgment Chairman: Stewart Armstrong President: Tony Coppola that the variance will expire Secretary: Charles Smith Treasurer: Steven Rudolph as to him or her when the Chief Operating Officer: Chris Green NOCSAE-compliant helmet 8 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N


LARRY JOHNSON

U S PA B U L L E T I N

Deadlines for intercollegiate and interscholastic teams are approaching.

I/I Deadlines Advertising Deadline A reminder for anyone that wants to submit an ad to be included the I/I magazine must turn in the ad and payment by Dec. 1. Please contact Amy Fraser at afraser@uspolo.org with any questions. Entry Fees and Score Sheets Tournament entry fees for intercollegiate teams are due Dec. 1. In addition, a minimum of one official score sheet from a regular season qualifier game is due by Dec. 1. All eligibility paperwork and tournament entry fees for interscholastic teams are due Dec. 8. In addition, two regular season qualifying game score sheets are due on Jan. 5. Please contact Ali Davidge at adavidge@uspolo.org with any questions. Clinic Reimbursement This is the last call for I/I clinic reimbursement. The I/I Clinic Program is open for I/I teams to apply

for reimbursable funds up to $1,500 to host a clinic this fall. To learn more about the program please contact Amy Fraser at afraser@uspolo.org. PDI Program The 2022 Polo Development Initiative application is now available and will close Monday, Jan. 31, 2022. The Polo Development Initiative Grant Program is a reimbursable grant-based program intended to support thoughtfully presented applications for PDI funding that address specific, club-based, sustainability needs. Grant awards will be made in support of a specific purpose that addresses those needs, including, but not limited to: • Advancing the sustainability and growth of club membership, taking into consideration club capacity and the available polo facilities. • Improving the quality of the polo playing experience. • Promoting the development of the sport of polo. For guidelines or to apply, visit the Polo Development Initiative page on uspolo.org. POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 9


U S PA B U L L E T I N

Mountain View Polo

LAURA GODDARD

Charles Town, West Virginia

Mountain View Polo Club is hidden away in a lush forest, on a ridge overlooking the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Hidden away in a lush forest with an arena positioned on a ridge overlooking the Blue Ridge Mountains, it is clear the spectacular natural landscape inspired the naming of Mountain View Polo Club. As the only USPA member club in West Virginia, Mountain View’s primary focus is creating and developing low-goal players with affordability in mind. Utilizing intercollegiate and interscholastic teaching methods, it helps players build a solid foundation in the arena. Located just an hour outside of the nation’s capital of Washington D.C. in the Eastern corner of the state, Mountain View invites its members and students to escape bustling city life and enjoy polo in a safe and inclusive environment. Founded in 2010 and officially joining the USPA in 2012, Mountain View Polo Club was built entirely from the ground up by Dr. Laura Goddard and Hugo Pasten. The two established a new polo school and trained lesson horses with their experience from Capitol Polo Club (now known as Congressional Polo Club). “We bought and trained all the lesson horses ourselves because we couldn’t afford to buy made 10 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

polo ponies,” Goddard, an I/I alumna (1994-97), said. Learning to play at Cornell University while studying entomology, Goddard continued at the University of California, Davis, helping run and coach the existing polo club through six years of graduate school. “After graduation, I still wanted to play, but I was a postdoc at the National Institutes of Health [Bethesda, Maryland], and the only way I could afford it was to teach in exchange to play,” Goddard said. “I set up a polo school with then Fifth Chukker Polo Club [which became Capitol Polo Club] and gained a lot of students in Poolesville, Maryland, over six years.” Searching for a spacious and affordable farm to board her string, Goddard took advantage of a buyer’s market in 2010 and purchased a foreclosed property situated in a rural, residential area that would become her own Mountain View Polo Club. Featuring a house on the property built in the early 1800s, the club pays homage to the original farm’s name, Mountain View Farm, painted on the wall in the basement.


U S PA B U L L E T I N

“I/I players are typically cleaner players because they know the rules and they are great at team plays,” Goddard commented. “I think the overall quality of polo that comes out of the I/I program is better so I’m trying to pass that on to the public.” Intentionally trying to make the game of polo accessible to everyone, Goddard’s affordable prices have allowed the club to attract new players from a variety of backgrounds. “When you’re out in the arena it doesn’t matter where you came from or what you do during the day; everybody’s equal when they get on the horse,” Goddard emphasized. “We have everything from secretaries to screenwriters.” Starting off in private lessons, new students are taught the foundational skills of riding and hitting the ball, gaining proficiency before graduating to C Flight where they play slow, heavily-coached games. “We really pride ourselves on teaching the skills and enforcing the rules,” Goddard said. With an emphasis on safety and fun, Goddard and Pasten make sure each player is safe before allowing them to move on to faster flights. “Our focus is really to enjoy the game and play safely,” Goddard said. “Also, everyone is very kind and courteous and plays with great sportsmanship, which we encourage. There’s a genuine camaraderie, and we have a really great string of safe lesson horses

LAURA GODDARD

“It was a lot of work and renovations to make the farm usable, but it had two barns, and all the infrastructure was already there,” Goddard revealed. “I couldn’t see what was on the land because the grass was so overgrown, but I found out afterward there was an arena on top of the ridge which I just needed to extend. It has the best view on the property.” Having the flexibility of working from home full-time as a patent examiner, Goddard runs the polo school on nights and weekends around her schedule. At the same time, her fiancé Pasten manages the farm and keeps the horses fit. “A lot of my students from Maryland followed me out here,” Goddard said. “They’re commuting in from D.C. and Maryland to continue playing with our club.” Mountain View’s targeted mission is to introduce and generate new polo players, with a strong emphasis on teaching and producing technically correct riders. “We teach students to play polo from the very beginning, and we coach our practices,” Goddard explained. “We are able to create teaching moments through umpiring and calling fouls.” Drawing upon the skills-focused structure she was given while learning to play through the I/I program, Goddard has transferred these elements into her lesson program.

Interscholastic participants are all smiles during a summer tournament.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 11


LAURA GODDARD

U S PA B U L L E T I N

Right: Mountain View Polo Club hosts the USPA Karen Carra Memorial women’s tournament annually.

MOUNTAIN VIEW POLO CLUB

Below: Laura Goddard and Windy, the Carra Memorial Best Playing Pony.

12 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

that make it enjoyable for everyone to keep coming back.” In addition to running all aspects of the club, Goddard and Pasten also train and sell Quarter Horse polo ponies as demand for horses has increased. Featuring weekly practices and skill-specific clinics, Mountain View’s schedule runs from April through November, highlighted by two annual USPA tournaments: the 2- to 4-goal Karen Carra Memorial women’s arena tournament in September and 0- to 2goal Paigahs Seahorse Cup in October. Aside from flight practices held Thursdays and weekends, Mountain View members also have the opportunity to travel for inter-club mixer tournaments at nearby clubs such as Seneca and Congressional Polo Clubs, both in Poolesville, Maryland. “We go to Seneca quite often and play A-, B- and C-Flight tournaments so any of our students can compete against different people no matter what level,” Goddard said. Maintaining a steady stream of players with 25 current members, Mountain View was among the clubs that benefited from an influx of new students due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “2020 was one of our best years ever for lessons


MOUNTAIN VIEW POLO CLUB

U S PA B U L L E T I N

The club hosts A, B and C flights, offering something for everyone regardless of skill level.

because everyone was looking for an activity to do outdoors, and our business really exploded,” Goddard explained. “At first we contemplated shutting down because we were limited on group activities, but I’m really glad the USPA stepped up to help with the USPA COVID-19 Relief Package.” Integral to Mountain View Polo Club’s philosophy on instruction, two types of clinics are held throughout the season for beginners and more advanced students. “In the beginner clinic, students learn the rules and how to hit the ball, then we scrimmage at a walk,” Goddard explained. “In the Polo Pro clinics, we do drills and focus on improving one area at a time. So, for example, in the Effective Riding for Polo clinic, we just worked on stopping, how to use your seat to ride, rollbacks, and how to ride off an opponent.” Focusing on one specific skill at a time, such as the Offside Swing clinic held at the end of June, the Polo Pro clinics allow players to hone and perfect skills individually. Another essential component is slow-motion video recordings of students, allowing them to watch themselves and receive feedback. “I take videos of everybody so they can see how they look when riding and hitting,” she said. “At the

end we do an analysis of every video and watch it on a big-screen TV.” Goddard often draws from helpful activities she participated in during Cornell practices by integrating drill team warm-ups into her riding clinics. Mountain View Polo Club’s effective methods and supportive atmosphere have successfully grown its polo community over the last decade, leading it to expand. Plans are for it to become both an arena and outdoor club in 2022. “We’re putting in a field as we speak,” Goddard announced. “The Polo Development Initiative paid for us to clear the field last year, and they are helping us renovate our arena this winter with all new boards.” Starting a polo club from nothing, Goddard and Pasten’s hard work has paid off as they get to share the sport they love. “Everything here was built by Hugo and I, so it’s really special for us to have this club because we really worked for it,” Goddard remarked. Nestled high in the mountains just above the Shenandoah River, Mountain View Polo Club beckons players of any age or stage to come to experience the exhilaration of polo. • POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 13


INSTRUCTORS FORUM

Arena Penalty 4s Strategies for offensive and defensive setup options By Jared Sheldon

After 7-goal arena star Jared Sheldon, a two-time winner and MVP of the U.S. Open Arena Polo Championships, was asked to work with an interscholastic team prior to a national tournament, he drew up some plays and ideas for them to use. This gave him the idea to write a series of arena polo strategy playbooks. The following is adapted from a chapter in his first book, “Arena Polo Strategies: Penalties & Throw-Ins,” covering offensive and defensive setup options for Penalty 4s. He reminds us that no matter what penalty is called, the most important factor for success is for players to set up quickly—as soon as the umpire calls the penalty—regardless if your team is taking or defending the penalty. The sooner players set up, the sooner they can anticipate and choose their actions based on the way the other team sets up.

this play, depending on the shot. If the shot is on target and will clearly be a live ball once touched or swung at by the defending player in goal, then O1 is responsible for attacking player X3 in the goal. It is preferable for O1 to attack here and not O2 because O1 is able to come from a wider angle and attack the defender easier on the offside. O2 Communication with O1 is extremely important. As mentioned earlier, it is preferred that O2 play more reservedly while positioned in the center of the field so if the rebound comes back past the 25-yard line, O2 is able to make a play on it. If the rebound goes off to O2’s right-hand side, then the X player on that side becomes their defensive responsibility. If the rebound goes to O2’s left-hand side of goal, then he or she must mark the player on that side as O1 moves in to go to the defender in the goal.

Hitting O3 This player must think the most defensively because the hitting team cannot attack a rebound off the wall. It is best for O3 to set up just outside the 5yard arc on the offside of the hitter. O3 is there to shut the back door. If O2 goes to X2, then O3 must go back toward the defensive goal in order to cut off X1 from receiving a counterattack pass. If O2 goes to X1, then O3 goes to X2. Anticipating the rebound will make for quicker decision-making. Defense

In the image above, notice the O2 player is not following the shot, but instead allowing O1 to apply pressure. The reason for this is with a Penalty 4, there is usually a more unpredictable rebound. When O1 takes the pressure role, it allows that pressure to be applied on the offside of X3, no matter where the rebound ends up. Here is how the offensive players line up: O1 With a defending player in the goal mouth for a Penalty 4, O1 is free to think very offensively on 14 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N


INSTRUCTORS FORUM

Defensive players line up as follows: X1 What changes here from a Penalty 2 or 3 is that the ball may become live if the shot is on goal and X3 makes a play on or at it. Because of this, X1 must set up on the offside of player O1. This prevents O1 from meeting X3 head-tohead for a live ball. If the shot is not on goal and/or is not played on by X3, then reaction for X1 remains the same as if it were a Penalty 2 or 3. If it is a miss to the right-hand side of goal, then X1 gets the offside free and goes for a pass. If it is a miss to the other side, then X1 must decide if X3 has the space to clear comfortably and whether to go for the intermediate pass or to follow. X2 This player lines up 5 yards to the right of the hitter. If the shot is on target and will be a live ball, then X2 goes to O2 in order to allow X3 time to clear the ball. If the shot is not on goal or will be an automatic live ball, then the reaction for X2 remains the same as for a Penalty 2 or a Penalty 3. X3 This player takes a position in goal with the horse’s tail at the back post. It is easier to move forward to block a shot than it is to move backwards! Do not touch a shot that is going wide. Allow the ball to stop for a spot hit if it is going to fall short of the wall or allow it to hit the wall and set up for a play on the rebound. Approach it the same way with a Penalty 2 or 3 if it is not a live rebound. Make sure the team crosses midfield and knows where they are going to be. Other chapters in the book cover both offensive and defensive setups for a Penalty 2, 3 and 5, as well as center and spot hits and throw-ins. To purchase Sheldon’s first book, “Arena Polo Strategies: Penalties & Throw-ins” contact him directly at Jared.T.Sheldon@gmail.com or call him at 858-735-9795. Polo teams can purchase four books for the price of three. Readers of Polo Players’ Edition receive a special 15% discount off the cover price. •

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E Q U I N E AT H L E T E

Internal Parasites Strategies for effective parasite control Courtesy of American Association of Equine Practitioners

Internal parasites, or worms, can be silent thieves and killers. They can cause extensive internal damage without you even realizing your animals are heavily infected. The effects of internal parasites on a horse range from a dull hair coat and unthriftiness to colic and death. Internal parasites lower the horse’s resistance to infection, rob the horse of valuable nutrients, and in some cases, cause permanent damage to the internal organs. In terms of management priorities, establishing an effective parasite control program is probably second only to supplying the horse with clean, plentiful water and high-quality feed. It’s that important! Types of Internal Parasites There are more than 150 species of internal parasites that can infect horses. The most common and troublesome are the following: • Small strongyles (cyathostomins) • Roundworms (ascarids) • Tapeworms • Large strongyles (bloodworms or redworms) • Pinworms • Bots • Threadworms Probably the most important, in terms of health risk, are the first three: small strongyles, roundworms and tapeworms. The life cycle of most internal parasites involves eggs, larvae (immature worms), and adults (mature worms). Eggs or larvae are deposited onto the ground in the manure of an infected horse. They are swallowed while the horse is grazing and the larvae mature into adults within the horse’s digestive tract (stomach or intestines). With some species of parasite, the larvae migrate out of the intestine, into other tissues or organs, before returning to the intestine and maturing into egg-laying adults. Small strongyles Small strongyles are of major importance. Small strongyle larvae do not penetrate the intestinal wall or migrate through the tissues. Instead, they burrow into the lining of the intestine and remain dormant, 16 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

or “encysted” (enclosed in a cyst-like structure), for several months before completing their life cycle. During this time, the larvae are resistant to most dewormers. Roundworms Roundworms, or ascarids, are most often a problem in young horses (especially foals, weanlings and yearlings). Adult roundworms are several inches long and almost the width of a pencil; in large numbers they can cause blockage (or impaction) of the intestine. In addition, roundworm larvae migrate through the internal organs until they reach the lungs. They are then coughed up and swallowed back into the digestive tract to complete their life cycle. Virtually all foals become infected with roundworms, and very few of them ever develop symptoms of disease. However, large infections can lead to blockage of the small intestine of foals and young horses, leading to a painful and lifethreatening colic. Roundworm infection in you horses can cause coughing, poor body condition and growth, rough coat, pot belly and colic. Colic is most likely in older foals (over 3 months of age) that are heavily parasitized with roundworms when dewormed for the first time. By this stage, the roundworms can have matured into adults that could cause an impaction. In this situation, it is a good idea to have your veterinarian deworm the foal or recommend a deworming plan for the foal. Resistance to many of the dewormers has become a big problem in controlling ascarid infections in foals. Tapeworms Like with other parasites mentioned here, the large majority of horses harbor tapeworm infections without showing any signs of disease or discomfort. However, tapeworms can cause colic, ranging from mild cramping to severe colic that requires surgical treatment. The tapeworm life cycle involves a tiny pasture mite as an intermediate host, and horses are at a risk of developing tapeworm infection when they eat this mite in the grass. Praziquantel has been demonstrated to be highly effective against tapeworms and is available in


E Q U I N E AT H L E T E

several dewormer products. Pyrantel pamoate given in a double dose is effective as well. Most horses should be dewormed for tapeworms annually. Consult your veterinarian for advice on the best product to use for your situation. Other Internal Parasites Large strongyles (bloodworms) have become extremely rare in managed horses because they are effectively controlled by most available dewormers. Infection with these parasites can cause unthriftiness, weight loss, poor growth in young horses, anemia (low numbers of red blood cells) and colic. In most cases, colic caused by these parasites is relatively mild but severe infections can result in loss of blood supply to a portion of the intestine, leading to severe and potentially fatal colic. Pinworms lay their eggs on the skin around the horse’s anus. The irritation they cause makes the horse repeatedly rub its tail. Threadworms are mostly a problem in young foals, in which they can cause diarrhea. Bots don’t usually cause major health problems, although they can damage the lining of the stomach where they attach. They may also cause small areas of ulceration in the mouth where the larvae burrow into the tissues for a time after the eggs are taken into the mouth. Lungworms cause chronic coughing in horses, ponies, and mules. Donkeys are the natural host of this parasite, so typically they don’t show any obvious signs of infection. Signs of Parasitism Contrary to popular belief, horses can have large numbers of internal parasites while still appearing to be relatively healthy. But in some individuals, especially young horses, parasites can take a visible toll. Common signs of parasitism include the following: • Dull, rough hair coat • Lethargy (decreased energy) or depression • Decreased stamina • Unthriftiness or loss of condition • Slowed growth in young horses • Pot belly (especially in young horses) • Colic • Diarrhea Fecal Egg Counts One of the most useful tools in a parasite control program is the fecal egg count—microscopic examination of fresh manure for parasite eggs. This

simple test allows the veterinarian to determine which parasites are present and whether the infection is light, moderate or heavy. This information is important in developing a deworming program for your horse or farm. Furthermore, egg counts are very important in monitoring the effectiveness of the program, where samples are analyzed both before and after deworming a group of horses. Fecal egg counts involve collecting two or three fresh manure balls from the horse to be tested and sending the manure sample to a veterinary laboratory. Results are expressed as eggs per grams (epg) of manure. A fecal egg count of less than 200 epg suggests a light parasite load. Horses with high fecal egg counts of 500-1000 epg suggest the interval between deworming is too long. It is important to note that a negative fecal examination does not mean the horse is free of internal parasites. Some types of parasites produce eggs only intermittently. Larvae do not produce eggs at all, and may be present in large numbers in a horse with a fecal egg count of zero. And tapeworm eggs may be missed with routine fecal egg count techniques. The results are most useful when several horses on a farm are tested on the same day. This information gives the veterinarian and farm manager a good idea of the level of parasitism on the property.

Fecal egg count tests are useful tools to determine which parasites are present and how heavy the infection is. Kits can be purchased online and mailed in to be examined by a vet.

Dewormers There are several different dewormers, or anthelmintics, currently available. No deworming product is 100 percent effective in ridding every horse of all internal parasites. However, it is not (continued on page 63) POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 17


POLO SCENE

N E W S • NO T E S • T R E N D S • Q U O T E S

CHUKKERSHEAD FOR CHARITY Event supports children, youths Subhead and adults with disabilities

THE 25TH ANNUAL Chukkers for Charity polo match on Sept. 11

The new private cabana set-up gave everyone a front row seat to the action.

Dancers perform during halftime.

18 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

at Riverview Farm in Franklin, Tennessee, raised over $200,000 to benefit Rochelle Center’s services to adults with disabilities, allowing them to be as independent as possible in the community, and to Saddle Up!’s equine-based activities offered to children and young adults with disabilities. Chukkers for Charity brings attention to these two important charities and the tireless work they do everyday to better the lives of those they serve. “This year’s event was incredible,” said Debbie Chadwick, president of Rochelle Center. “From our generous sponsors, selfless volunteers, supportive media partners, tailgaters and so much more, I am proud of this event and Country star Layla Tucker so grateful for sang the National Anthem. the continued support of our programs and the programs at Saddle Up!” Executive Director of Saddle Up! Audrey Kidd added, “Orrin Ingram’s 25 years of support of Chukkers for Charity couldn’t have been more aptly celebrated than with this glorious day at Riverview Farm. The weather, the setting, and the exceptional play created an event to remember. Our guests loved the new private cabana set-up where everyone got a front row seat for the action. Of course, no event is possible without creative co-chairs, a hard-working committee, generous sponsors and a devoted army of volunteers. Everyone impacted by the work of Saddle Up! and Rochelle Center is so grateful.” Guests were treated to country star Layla Tucker singing the National Anthem followed by Saddle Up! riders mounted on their therapy horses that participated in the opening ceremony. Rochelle Center participants also attended the match and mingled with guests throughout the afternoon. The competing teams included Ironhorse Farms (Armando Huerta, Orrin Ingram, Lexie Armstrong, Wes Finlayson) and Lo Key Ranch (Bayard Erb, Cesar Rangel, Zulu Scott-Barnes, Stevie Orthwein). The players have a plethora of wins and achievements, making this match a competitive one. In the end, Ironhorse Farms was the winner. Armando Huerta’s chestnut mare Selma was Best Playing Pony and Stevie Orthwein took MVP honors.


POLO SCENE

POLOHEAD CLASSIC

THE TRIANGLE NSLM POLOAREA CLASSIC POLOwas CLUB held text Sept. 12 at

SAS EQUINE PHOTOGRAPHY

Match benefits National Subhead Sporting Library & Museum

NetJets’ Daymar Rosser, Nacho Figueras and Hilario Figueras greet fans.

Coco Chanel, with owner Ineke Kreeger, won Best Dressed Dog.

ERIN GILMORE PHOTOGRAPHY

IMAGINE PHOTOGRAPHY

Great textMeadow Polo Club in The Plains, Virginia. Spectators were treated to two matches, The Founders Cup and The Mars Cup. Presented by Mars Equestrian, the NSLM Polo Classic raised funds to preserve, promote and share the literature, art and culture of equestrian, angling and field sports, as well as to advocate for the conservation of open space necessary for these pursuits. A portion of the proceeds will also be donated to local food banks in support of community members who have suffered loss and hardship the past year-and-a-half, and Work to Ride. The Founders Cup between TTR|Sotheby’s International Realty (Annalise Phillips, Laura Farrell, Tano Vial, Doug Barnes) and NSLM (Debbie Nash, Bill Ballhaus, Tolito Fernández Ocampo, Jonas Larguia), kicked off with a ceremonial ball toss by NSLM Executive Director Elizabeth von Hassell. After four chukkers, teams were locked in a 5-5 tie, but a handicap goal for TTR|Sotheby’s put the team ahead. Phillips was MVP, while Barne’s Valentino was Best Playing Pony. After the first Dog Divot Stomp, the Orange County Hounds, led by Huntsman Reg Spreadborough took to the field in NSLM Polo Classic tradition. Afterward, the six-chukker Mars Cup began with a ceremonial ball toss by Ikdeep Singh, president of Mars Petcare North America. The match saw father-andson duos on both teams—Nacho and Hilario Figueras for NetJets and Bill and Wil Ballhaus on Holman Hill. Joining the Figuerases were Andy Hertneky and Daymar Rosser. For Holman Hall, brothers Tolito and Lucio Fernández Ocampo joined the Ballhauses. Holman Hall took the 9-8 edge. Wil Ballhaus was MVP and Andy Hertneky’s Taruha was Best Playing Pony. The National Sporting Library & Museum is located in Middleburg, Virginia, the heart of beautiful horse country. Founded in 1954, the renowned research library and fine art museum highlight the rich heritage and tradition of country pursuits. Angling, horsemanship, shooting, steeplechasing, foxhunting, flat racing, polo, coaching and wildlife are among the subjects you can explore in the general stacks, rare book holdings, archives and art collections. The NSLM offers a wide variety of educational programs, exhibitions and family activities throughout Nacho Figueras, Wil Ballhaus, the year, and is open Andy Hertneky and Bill Ballhaus to researchers and the competed for the Mars Cup. public.

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POLO SCENE

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DOG DAYS Ohio match benefits Leukemia & Lymphoma Society event

THE CINCINNATI POLO CLUB in Loveland, Ohio, held a charity match to benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Light the Night national fundraiser. Club social member Gwlenys Reid connected the club to Debra Ruelman, whose husband Peter is battling a condition associated with blood cancers. The Reulmans and their team walked in the Light the Night fundraiser in October, holding lanterns as they crossed the bridges of the Ohio River. The polo event assisted in their fundraising efforts. The dog-themed match was organized in just a few short weeks, with a bake sale, including homemade “pupcakes” watermelon “pupscicles”, hotdogs and homemade dog treats. There was also a special doggy photo booth and someone dressed as a dog mascot to sell 5050 raffle tickets. The weather was ideal for the match, attracting a large crowd. Eight members of the Hickory Hall Polo Club joined 14 members of the Cincinnati Polo Club for a spirited eightchukker match. The teams paraded on the field prior to the match as Cincinnati Polo Club president Rev. Torie Front trumpeted the National Anthem. A 7-year-old cancer patient, Brennan, rolled out the ball to start the match. Hickory Hall prevailed but the real winner was the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, that benefited from the $1,800 raised. The Cincinnati Polo Club, owned by Tom and Dianne Wygle, partners will local charities for all its home matches. The charities provide volunteers to work the gate, and help with things like timing, scorekeeping and flagging, and keep proceeds from the matches. Players from Hickory Hall and Cincinnati Polo Clubs played in the match.

The Cincinnati Polo Club partners with local charities for all its home games.

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POLO SCENE

FUN IN FRANCE GPL event held in St. Tropez

IN

MID-SEPTEMBER, members of the Gay Polo League traveled to St. Tropez, France, to participate in the first GPL tournament hosted by the St. Tropez Polo Club, Sept. 17-19. The tournament included players from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Spain and the U.S. The event was organized by Argentine pro Mariano Darritchon and club manager Julio Zavaleta. Four teams competed in the event, each anchored by a professional player, and all donning U.S. Polo Assn. jerseys. Teams included Cherry Knoll Farm (Scott Hartzel, Gus Larrosa, Chip McKenney, Darritchon), Gordon W. Ross ReMax Real Estate (Rafik Boughadou, Rachel Spencer, Gordon Ross, Tomas Joaquim), Passport Magazine (Peter Secor, Saïd Ait-Ouaraz, Alexandre Rata, Julio Zavaleta), Alpilles Polo Club (Eva Marquard, David Bouclier, Aurelian Crochon, William Prestise). After a day of stick-and-ball practice, a draw was held along with an Argentine dinner and dance party with one of St. Tropez’s top DJs. The games began the following day where Cherry Knoll advanced to the final over Passport, while Alpilles Polo Club advanced over Ross ReMax. In the final, Cherry Knoll edged Alpilles, 5-4. Cherry Knoll gained the early lead, but Alpilles tied it up 4-4. With just 30 seconds left, Larrosa scored a penalty to clinch the Cherry Knoll victory. In the consolation, Secor led Passport to a 3-1 victory over Ross ReMax. After the matches, players gathered for the trophy ceremony. Dr. Eva Marquard took MVP honors. GPL President Chip McKenny said, “I want to express our collective gratitude to Mariano and Julio for creating such an exceptional experience for GPL and our players and guests. Everything about Polo Club St. Tropez was top notch; the polo club, the ponies, the pros, the parties, the endless wine, the energy, and most of all, the hospitality extended to our group.” Later, the club hosted an Argentine asado that lasted well into the evening. —Rebecca Baldridge

Four teams competed in the GPL event.

Cherry Knoll’s Gus Larrosa races to catch ReMax’s Rafik Boughadou.

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SAND POLO Action on and off the field at beach arena polo

BOLD MEDIA AGENCY @BOLDMEDIAUK

THE 14TH ANNUAL British Beach Polo Championships were held Sept. 17-18 at Sandbanks Beach in

Chris Gregory, Hazel Jackson, Adolfo Casabal, Garrie Renucci, Ollie Cork and Nick Van Open

BOLD MEDIA AGENCY @BOLDMEDIAUK

The teams played in front of a capacity crowd of 3,000.

22 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Poole, England. Blessed with an Indian Summer, the Blue Flag Beach’s golden sand was drenched in its usual sunshine. A capacity crowd of 3,000 people each day enjoyed a dynamic display of fastpaced beach stadium polo. U.S. Polo Assn. was the apparel partner for the event, in collaboration with U.K. licensing partner Brand Machine Group. President and CEO of USPA Global Licensing explained, “With the U.K. being one of U.S. Polo Assn.’s most loyal and fastest growing markets, we were proud to be part of the glamorous and exciting British Beach Polo Championships. We love that there are opportunities to expose new polo fans and global consumers to the sport in such a unique and fun way as Sandpolo.” The gripping match was a reflection of the equal strengths of both teams but it was strong teamwork from Whispering Angel (Chris Gregory, Hazel Jackson, Adolfo Casabal) that led to a 19-14 victory over Lightening Commercial Finance (Garrie Renucci, Ollie Cork, Nick Van Open). It was Jackson’s first year playing on the Sandbanks Beach and she said she hopes to be back in action there next year. Jackson is ranked second in the world in women’s polo. Most Valuable Player went to Adolfo Casabal, who also won the spectacular charity race with a polo pony racing across the sand against a 4 x 4. Reggae, a mare playing for the Lightening team, was Best Playing Pony. Her groom Gussie Thompson was also recognized. Andrew Spate served as umpire over the two days while Simon Ledger kept spectators captivated with the amazing horseplay thanks to his commentary over both days. The after parties, always a big highlight at the event, did not disappoint and the celebratory mood was heightened after a year away. Partygoers enjoyed the beach backdrop at Friday’s Boogie on the Beach and there was an electric atmosphere at Saturday’s Gold Closing Party. Sandpolo director, Johnny Wheeler said, “It is nothing short of a miracle that all of the infrastructure, supplies, event staff, security and players delivered this perfect event given the initial uncertainty we always had. We never quite knew we could pull it off until the last minute but it all came together. A perfect finale to the summer season.”


POLO SCENE

DUAL PURPOSE Benefit supports trauma center and celebrates war hero

AFTER A YEAR HIATUS due to COVID-19, the 23rd Ronny Maher Memorial polo match returned to the Maryland Polo Club in Jarrettsville, Maryland, Aug. 6. Over 500 attendees were treated to an evening of fine food, great polo and music all to benefit R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The event honors Ronny Maher, an avid foxhunter who fell in love with polo at age 60. A member of the Maryland Polo Club, Maher fell while out foxhunting on Thanksgiving Day in 1996, leaving him a quadriplegic. The Trauma center did all it could for him after the fall. He died of respiratory failure eight months later at 72 years old. Maher’s son Ron Maher organizes the event each year. The evening began with a 100th birthday tribute to a hero of the Greatest Generation, Col. Orville Hughes, and what a 100 years it has been. U.S. Army Command Sgt. Major Lyon gave a stirring speech in honor of Hughes, telling the incredible story of the combat veteran of World War II, Korea and Vietnam. This true hero and family man still drives and lives on his farm on his own. Before the matches, the Montgomery County mounted park police presented the flag for the playing of both the U.S. and Jamaican National Anthems. Then, Hughes threw in the ceremonial first ball as USA (Trevor Reeves, Roberto Carreras, Parker Pearce, Zoey Bivalacqua, Luke Merrick) took on Jamaica (Nate Berube, Charlie Chambers, Zach Byles, Shane Chin, Sophie Grant). Jamaica led the first three chukkers. USA rallied after the champagne divot stomp, closing the gap to within two goals, but Jamaica hung on for the 8-6½ victory. The party continued well after the trophies were presented. The success of the event is due in large part to Ron Maher, club manager Nate Berube and club president Olivia Stringer Berube. —Rob Slade

Above: Col. Orville Hughes celebrated his 100th birthday. Left: Jessica Cook and Ron Maher Below, left: Mounted park police present the flag. Below, right: guests and players mingle after the match.

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P O L O D E V E L O P M E N T, L L C

NYTS Champions Eastern region overcomes Wild Card team By United States Polo Association • Photos by Kaile Roos

Blue’s Taylor Olcott rides in stride with Yellow’s Sophia DeAngelis.

Las Brisas, Morgan Creek, Oak Brook and Due West Polo Clubs, along with the Chicago Polo Association welcomed 32 youth players from across the United States and Canada to compete in the headline NYTS National Championship event. Since the program’s inception in 2013, the NYTS National Championship doubled in size. This year, for the first time, four open teams and four girls’ teams participated. The competitors hailed from 22 USPA clubs, representing many regions, riding backgrounds and polo experiences. Each team from the Open division was paired with a Girls’ division team, encouraging new friendships and a broader learning experience. Team coaches included former 7-goal player Tiger Kneece, and three current 4-goal American players (Marcos Alberdi, Patrick Uretz, Ulysses Escapite) that regularly compete at the highest levels of professional polo in the United States. Kneece coached his teams to victory in both the Cecil Smith Cup and the Girls’ Championship. The Chicago polo community provided fantastic venues throughout the week for the numerous scheduled games and events. Cecil Smith Cup Semifinal matches began with the Eastern Region (Sophie Grant, Aiden Meeker, Winston Painter, Landen Eckbo Daniels) earning a decisive victory over the Central Region team (Grace Mudra, Lily Lequerica, Will Mudra, Lance Stefanakis), 172½, to advance to the final. Stefanakis was unable to attend the event so his position was covered by Summer Kneece and twins Reagan and Robyn Leitner. The next match was much closer with the Wild Card team (Daniel Miranda, Josh Escapite, Taylor Palacios, Vlad Tarashansky), narrowly defeating the Western Region team (Quinn Kyle, Riley Jordan, Piers Bossom, Will Schneider), 4½-4. In the final, the Wild Card team doubled down on defense to control Eastern’s notorious offense.

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P O L O D E V E L O P M E N T, L L C

Carlucho Arellano presents the Best Playing Pony award to Reagan Leitner’s Sagebrush.

Competing with friends and guided by her former intercollegiate/interscholastic coach, Eastern’s Sophie Grant was confident the strength of those relationships would benefit the team on the field. “I believe that the well-rounded ability of all four players on our team led to our success and dominance,” she said. “The chemistry between the four of us and our coach, Tiger Kneece, was great. We’re all close friends off the field so it was easy to gel together on the field.” Ultimately, Eastern’s team chemistry proved successful as the final bell rang with the team ahead, 8-6. Soda, Mariano Obregon’s 7-year-old Argentine mare played by Winston Painter in the first chukker, was named Best Playing Pony. Painter’s horsemanship skills were recognized when he received the Horsemanship Award. Leading Wild Card with four goals, Josh Escapite was named Matthew Cohen Most Valuable Player. Additionally,

Wild Card’s Taylor Palacios, MVP Josh Escapite and Vlad Tarashansky

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P O L O D E V E L O P M E N T, L L C

Both the Open and Girls’ divisions had four teams competing.

Chrys Beal, Nino Obregon, Winston Painter, Marco Tulio Esquivel and Best Playing Pony Soda

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P O L O D E V E L O P M E N T, L L C

Western Region’s Quinn Kyle received the Sportsmanship Award. In the consolation final, Western defeated Central, 5-4½. Girls’ Championship After introducing the Invitational East vs. West Challenge in 2017, the second division of NYTS became the invitational NYTS Girls’ Championship the following year to better represent the growing demographic of female players. NYTS Committee Chair Chrys Beal set her sights on expanding the girls’ division to four teams, reaching her objective this year when the NYTS program invited 16 female players to the national championship event. The semifinal round began with Pink (Reagan Leitner, Madison Jordan, Kelsey Bray, Grace Fleishmann) overcoming Yellow (Gracie Brown, Sunny Diller, Sophia DeAngelis, Brianna Jordan), 5-3. Later in the day, Purple (Summer Kneece, Caroline Mathews, Saralyn Painter, Elise Pardue) got the best of Blue (Robyn Leitner, Taylor Olcott, Maya Miller, Caroline Mooney), 6½-1. Purple met Pink in the final. Led by MVP Summer Kneece, the Purple teammates knew they had to keep their heads down and focus the entire four chukkers to beat a strong Pink team. After winning its first match with a strategy focused on offensive strength, the Pink team changed gears against Purple, maintaining a strong defensively-minded strategy. Leading by only a half goal at the beginning of the fourth chukker, the Purple team managed to find the goal twice to pull ahead 6½-5. Coaching in the NYTS Girls’ Championship for the third time, Kneece had the honor of coaching his daughter Summer to the win. “Girls’ Pink had some really good offensive players and we knew we were going to have to contain them to stay in the game. It can be challenging and fun at the same time to coach my daughter,” he explained. “She does well with it and she responds well.” Best Playing Pony honors went to Sagebrush, an 8-year-old chestnut mare in Reagan Leitner’s string.

Western Region’s Riley Jordan takes a knock-in.

Sagebrush had previously been awarded Best Playing Pony at NYTS qualifiers in Aiken and Bluewater Creek. Competing for Blue, Robyn Leitner was given the Sportsmanship Award for her positive attitude, fairness and support for her peers on and off the field. Pink’s Madison Jordan received the Horsemanship Award. In the consolation final, Blue defeated Yellow in a shootout. • POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 27


I N T E R C O L L E G I AT E I N T E R S C H O L A S T I C

Splitting up Teams to be placed in one of two divisions

CATHY WALLACE

By Emily Dewey

For as long as it has existed, college coaches and supporters of the Intercollegiate/Interscholastic Program have debated ways to grow collegiate polo. Ideas have been proposed, tried, and cast aside, but one theory that emerged in the last decade continued to rise to the top of conversations: what if the intercollegiate teams were split into two divisions? During the summer of 2020, the question was posed again and a sub-committee of coaches from all levels of college polo was formed to discuss the possibility. The concept that developed out of that group was to focus on increasing the number of emerging teams competing in the spring tournaments and the number of competitive games at every level. After putting a pause on intercollegiate polo for a calendar year, the USPA and I/I leadership agreed the up-coming season would be as good a time as any to give two divisions a try. While not an unfamiliar concept to college sports enthusiasts, divisions in college polo will have nothing to do with scholarship availability and school or budget size. Division assignments will be based on the strength of teams, and determined by rosters, a team’s regular season scores and strength 28 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

of its schedule. Opinions will also be pulled from committee members, coaches, umpires, managers, and staff to make the most accurate placement of teams. In addition, women’s and men’s teams from the same school will not be required to play in the same division, allowing teams to participate at an appropriate level. Perhaps the most important detail is teams will be able to move back and forth between the divisions from year to year to accommodate for student matriculation and annual roster changes. All teams will begin the year competing in regular season games both in and outside their assigned region starting Sept. 1. These games can come from one-off competitions, weekend trips, or longer tournaments, but all games must use the I/I tournament conditions. By Oct. 6, teams must declare their intentions to compete in the spring tournaments by filling out a simple form and including a list of possible rostered players for the year. Games and tournaments continue through the fall, including the notable Fall Fandango, Field Tournament, Mustang Madness, and Virginia Invitational, all of which have served as training grounds for players, coaches, managers, and


I N T E R C O L L E G I AT E I N T E R S C H O L A S T I C

encouraged to follow their favorite teams on social media and track their season records on the I/I pages of uspolo.org. • JULIE CORDERO PHOTOGRAPHY

umpires for many years. By Dec. 1, all college teams must submit at least one qualified game score sheet to the I/I staff. These score sheets, along with available game video, a coaches’ poll, and input from staff and volunteers, will be used by the I/I’s National Host Tournament Committee to determine which division each team will be placed in. After the assignments are made public, teams will have two weeks to request a change to their division assignment. Teams are encouraged to continue playing games up until the spring tournaments begin, but each team must have a minimum of two score sheets turned into the I/I staff by Feb. 1 to aid in all tournaments being seeded appropriately. Teams selected for Division I will play in either an east or west regional depending on their location. Teams in the Northeastern and Southeastern regions will play in the east tournament, while Central and Western teams will play in the west tournament. Winners will move on to the DI national tournament and wildcards will be chosen by the NHTC to fill out the line-ups. Teams selected for Division II will play in their region’s preliminary or regional tournament (Central, Northeastern, Southeastern, Western). Winners will move on to the DII national and wildcards may be chosen to fill out the tournament. The USPA Division II National Intercollegiate Championship will be hosted by the Central Coast Polo Club in Los Osos, California, from Mar. 22-27. The Division I National Intercollegiate Championship will take place at Virginia Polo Inc. in Charlottesville, Virginia, from April 4-10. Fans are

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 29


Smooth Sailing Hotels at Sea cruises to victory in Arena Handicap Photos by Tony Gibson

Tolito Fernandez Ocampo sends the ball past Wyatt Harlow in the final.

30 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N


Appearing in its second consecutive national final, Hotels at Sea made the most of it, capturing the title in the United States Arena Handicap at Twilight Polo Club in The Plains, Virginia on Oct. 2. Fueled from its recent National Arena Chairman’s Cup victory, Hotels At Sea’s unified teamwork and familiarity propelled it in the United States Arena Handicap. After advancing in a narrow victory in the semifinals, Hotels At Sea was challenged by a determined Core Real Estate for the opportunity to claim the championship title and $20,000 grand prize. Held at the brand-new arena outside downtown Middleburg, Virginia, Hotels At Sea (Tareq Salahi, Jorge “Tolito” Fernandez Ocampo Jr, Marcos Bignoli) and Core Real Estate (Andrew Baldwin, Wyatt Harlow, Connor Deal, John Gobin) delivered a captivating final of high-stakes fall polo. A whopping $40,000 in total prize money was awarded; $10,000 for second place, followed by $7,000 for third and $3,000 for the fourth-place team as part of the USPA Prize Money Match Program. Starting with two goals on handicap, Gobin extended the scoring to three in the beginning of the first for Core Real Estate, followed by a quick response from Ocampo. As each team tried to establish their early strategies, Baldwin slammed in a two-point goal for Core Real Estate. An arena newcomer playing his first arena

Tolito Fernandez Ocampo was named MVP after scoring nine goals in the final.

tournament, Baldwin, who has a background in lacrosse and extreme sports, relished the challenge of arena polo. “[There’s] faster transitions than in the grass, the strategy [is] way different, working the angles and the boards,” he said. Continuing the momentum from the beginning of

Joe Muldoon, far right, presents prize money to Tareq Salahi, Marcos Bignoli and Tolito Fernandez Ocampo.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 31


Tareq Salahi gets free and takes the ball to the goal.

the chukker, Gobin added another goal, giving Core Real Estate a 7-4 lead at the end of the first. Despite trailing early, Hotels At Sea teammates were confident in their team chemistry and ability to communicate. Competing together as a team for three years, Salahi shared, “We know how to switch strategy and sometimes we do it in the middle of a chukker.” It was this familiarity that led to Salahi’s successful two-goal second chukker. Ocampo said, “The idea was to find a position for [Tareq], where to be when Marcos and I hit the ball.” Playing unified was important for Ocampo. “[As] the highest handicap on your team, your job is not to play more than your handicap, it’s making your teammates play higher than their handicap,” he said. The ability to adjust mid-chukker and utilize quick passing allowed Bignoli, with his own twopointer, and Ocampo to join Salahi on the scoreboard in the third chukker as Hotels At Sea moved full steam ahead, leading 12-9 at halftime. Not to be deterred by their three-goal deficit, Core Real Estate’s Harlow, substituting in the final for Deal, posted two goals in the third chukker,

32 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

including a successful penalty conversion. Ultimately, the chukker would belong to Hotels At Sea as Bignoli and Ocampo continued their offensive onslaught and accurate shooting, adding a combined four goals to take their team into the final chukker with a five-goal lead. With the fourth chukker underway, Core Real Estate began the push for a final comeback opportunity. Gobin hitting the goal mouth first was a good reminder for Hotels at Sea that there was no space to relax. Having played with Gobin previously, Salahi was cautiously aware and appreciative of his talents. “He knows my strengths and weaknesses, where I’m not going to be strong and ready. He comes to those areas, so we had to switch it up,” he explained. Hotels At Sea’s strategic execution and healthy respect for its opponents allowed it to hold Core Real Estate to just two goals from Harlow and Baldwin. Bignoli and Ocampo capped-off their tournament with an additional goal each as Hotels At Sea sailed to the 18-14 victory. Ocampo was named MVP, finishing the day with an impressive nine goals and five assists, despite


competing in only his fifth lifetime arena match. He reflected on his new journey into arena polo as differing from his experiences in Argentina. “We arrive here [in the United States] and I’m a 6goal [handicap] and I’m going against someone who is a 1-goaler, but he’s smart because he knows indoor polo. I don’t know this sport and it’s hard to play, but it’s good because every [type of] polo you play, makes you think and teaches you a lot,” Ocampo said. Still learning and growing in his polo career and the American arena polo system in particular, he is thoroughly enjoying the opportunity to challenge himself in prestigious tournaments such as the United States Arena Handicap. “I want to be open; I want to play any polo,” he said. Best Playing Pony honors were presented to Chrome, a fiery 15-year-old American Thoroughbred chestnut mare played and owned by Gobin in the second and fourth chukkers. “I bought her from Justin Pimsner seven years ago,” Gobin said. “She is very athletic and fast, so she makes for a perfect polo pony. She has a little crazy chestnut in her though because you can only

get on her if you are in the arena or on the field, otherwise she rears and brings you back to the trailer! Her craziness is worth putting up with once you start playing though because you feel like you can get to any ball or outrun anyone on the field.” Overjoyed by the victory, Salahi took the time to recognize the fans in attendance contributing to an electric atmosphere. “It’s great to see [them] here. It really drives us to play stronger and more aggressive polo,” he said. In addition to claiming the title of United States Arena Handicap champions, Hotels At Sea also received the $20,000 grand prize check. When Bignoli was asked what he was going to do with his share, his answer was practical yet poignant. “Build more fences on my farm,” he said. Hotels At Sea will now set their sights on fielding a team for the U.S. Open Arena Polo Championship to be held at Twilight Polo Club next year. The challenge to assemble a competitive team is one that Bignoli embraces. “[Tareq] says next year he wants to do the U.S. Arena Open, so we’ll see,” he said. •

Marcos Bignoli turns the ball with Wyatt Harlow covering him closely.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 33


Working Women Ace and Bad Ass earn USPA arena titles Photos by Oana Moore

La Jefa’s Katie Mitcham races to catch Bad Ass Polo’s Posey Obrecht, who is riding Rosalita.

Virginia Polo, Inc. in Charlottesville, Virginia, held a competitive weekend of elite women’s arena polo, Sept. 22-26. In the end, Demitra Hajimihalis came away with a pair of titles after competing in both the USPA Women’s Arena Handicap and Women’s Arena Open. The action began with the USPA Women’s Arena Handicap. Played at the 10- to 14-goal level, four teams vied for the title. A competitive semifinal double-header saw La

34 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Jefa (Katie Mitcham, Emmie Golkosky, Jessica Schmitt) narrowly advance over Summerhill Farm (Victoria McGraw, Alana Benz, Marissa Wells), 1413; and Garrison Forest (Lindsey Morris, Zoey Bivalacqua, Anna Winslow-Palacios) fall to Bad Ass Polo (Josie Dorsey, Posey Obrecht, Demitra Hajimihalis), 18-14. Two days later, on Saturday, Sept. 25, Bad Ass Polo and La Jefa met in the final, each laser-focused on winning the prestigious national title. Gaining a


narrow lead in the first and holding it throughout the match, Bad Ass Polo fended off La Jefa’s advances with a strong fourth-chukker drive to seal the victory, 13-6. Kicking off the final with a fast, open first chukker, both teams made strong offensive plays as they worked hard to establish an early lead. “It took us a minute to figure each other out because we haven’t practiced prior to this,” Obrecht said. “After our first chukker, it was smooth sailing. The game was very open, and there was a lot of communication between us.” Breaking free from a pack of defenders along the boards, Dorsey, on palomino Cash, quickly fired on goal to pick up Bad Ass Polo’s opening two-pointer, adding to its one-goal advantage on handicap. Working effectively as a team, La Jefa answered back with two consecutive field goals. Schmitt briefly leveled the scoreboard in the second to four goals apiece, but Bad Ass Polo responded with a burst of offensive power. Scoring three consecutive goals with each teammate contributing to the scoreboard, Bad Ass Polo rapidly regained the lead and ended the half up, 7-4. Riding the offensive momentum of the second

chukker into the second half, Bad Ass Polo struck first with a tail shot from Obrecht to double up La Jefa early in the third. “We all complemented each other well. Josie is a great forward player offensively, Demitra is

Above: Lou Lopez presents Zoey Bivalacqua the Sportsmanship Award. Below: Jessica Schmitt played Best Playing Pony Timone.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 35


Josie Dorsey receives the MVP award from Lou Lopez.

Bad Ass Polo’s Demitra Hajimihalis, Josie Dorsey and Posey Obrecht

amazing at defense, and I’m a good floater,” said Obrecht. “All three of our playing abilities really complimented each other and made us a very good match. Working to chip away at Bad Ass Polo’s growing lead, La Jefa’s Mitcham made a nearside neck shot, which passed underneath a horse’s legs and into the goal. Golkosky followed up to narrow the gap to two. Wanting to end the tournament on a solid note, Bad Ass Polo delivered its most offensive chukker

36 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

yet, and silenced La Jefa for the remainder of the game. Hitting a perfectly placed back shot, Hajimihalis set up Obrecht to tap the ball in as she picked up her second consecutive score. Dorsey also contributed a pair of goals, and Hajimihalis claimed the final goal of the chukker to win the title by a dominant 13-6. As part of the USPA’s Tournament Stimulus Package, Bad Ass Polo received $1,500 in prize money while the runnersup took home $1,000. Reaching the tournament final several times, Obrecht was proud to count her first win. “I’m thrilled to finally win this tournament!” Obrecht said. “It’s especially great because I coached Josie, and I’ve known Demitra her entire life. It’s really special to all come together and earn the win with friends.” Previously winning in 2019 with UVA, Hajimihalis knew she had a solid team in Bad Ass Polo with a strong chance of winning the trophy. “I think we all have similar styles, so we know what to expect from each other,” she said. “We tried to stay simple and use each other; plus, we communicated a lot. Teamwork, communication, and using the team are key because you can’t do it alone. Also, being wired similarly in the arena with two really solid arena players was helpful.” Competing in the event for the first time, Dorsey was named MVP. “This is my first MVP award in a women’s tournament!” Dorsey said. “I’m a little surprised but very thankful and glad we had a lot of fun in both games.” Ironically receiving a bridle as a prize, Dorsey is looking forward to purchasing her first horse in the future. “Hopefully, I can buy a horse to put in the bridle, but that is a process,” she said with a laugh. This November, Dorsey will also be competing in the upcoming U.S. Open Women’s Handicap (the outdoor equivalent of this tournament) at Houston Polo Club in Houston, Texas. Garrison Forest’s Zoey Bivalacqua received the Sportsmanship Award. “This was my first nonintercollegiate/interscholastic tournament, so it was a really good experience for me, and I had a lot of fun,” she said. “I’m typically more on the quiet side, so it was really exciting when I came out of my shell and was able to earn the Sportsmanship Award.” Playing against other women who also attended Garrison Forest on opposing teams, Bivalacqua learned a lot by participating in the tournament. “In the semifinal, I played against people who I


normally play with, so it was a really fun, intense game,” Bivalacqua shared. “My second game was more of a learning experience, and I got to see some new plays and get out of my comfort zone a little bit more.” Best Playing Pony honors went to Timone, owned by Virginia Polo, and played by Jessica Schmitt in the first chukker. A part of the men’s intercollegiate string since 2016, Timone was donated to the program by Russ McCall. “I like playing Timone in the first because he’s super steady and nice to hit off of when warming up,” Schmitt said. “He has a huge bump, so he wins most plays which gives me a lot of confidence. I can always count on him to get my head in the game.” After graduating from UVA in 2020, Hajimihalis loves the opportunity to work and still enjoys playing the sport she loves. “This is my second year in the professional working world, and for me winning this tournament means I can work and continue playing polo,” she said. “It’s really important to have a balance, and polo keeps me motivated. ... I want to give a huge shout out to my boss, Andrew Baldwin, because he let me use all his horses, and UVA let me use one of their men’s string horses. I wouldn’t be able to do this without him because he also plays and understands the balance of work and polo.” All three teammates shared a connection to Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills, Maryland, and the tournament was an excellent opportunity to compete together for a national title. “Demitra and I both went to Garrison Forest, and Josie plays there now,” Obrecht said. “There was also a complete Garrison Forest team, so it’s really special that we can all get together and compete in a tournament of this level.”

made a spirited comeback on a two-point goal from Halle, however, Winslow-Palacios was the hero, scoring the game-winning goal with one minute remaining to lead Ace Sportswear to a tight 11-10 victory. “We knew it was going to be a defensive battle. We’re all really seasoned arena players, so we all mark-up really effectively. We knew that we all had

MVP Anna WinslowPalacios and Virginia Polo’s Lou Lopez

Sportsmanship Award winner Ingrid Donnan and Lou Lopez

USPA Women’s Arena Open The same weekend, four teams battled it out in the USPA Women’s Arena Open. Some of the players in the Women’s Arena Handicap were also on teams in the Open division. The semifinal round saw Boothwyn Pharmacy (Katie Mitcham, Jessica Schmitt, Cindy Halle) top UVA (Maddie Grant, Grace Burgert, Elizabeth Owens), 14-11, and Ace Sportswear (Demitra Hajimihalis, Anna Winslow-Palacios, Ingrid Donnan) edge Granville Farm (Posey Obrecht, Isabella Wolf, Katie Define), 9-7. Concluding the competitive weekend, Ace Sportswear and Boothwyn Pharmacy met in the final on Sunday, Sept. 26. Boothwyn Pharmacy POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 37


Boothwyn Pharmacy’s Jessica Schmitt leans on Ace Sportswear’s Anna WinslowPalacios.

Ace Sportswear’s Ingrid Donnan, Anna Winslow-Palacios and Demitra Hajimihalis

to be disciplined on the man, disciplined on the wall, which is tough against this team because I know they have the same strategy,” explained Winslow-Palacios. Withstanding an opening run from Boothwyn Pharmacy, Winslow-Palacios picked up the ball at

38 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

midfield with a burst of speed to open the scoring for Ace Sportswear. Fighting her way along the wall on consecutive plays, back-to-back goals from Hajimihalis gave Ace Sportswear the early 3-2 lead in the first chukker. A resilient Boothwyn Pharmacy pulled even in the opening stages of the second chukker until a booming penalty from the centerline for WinslowPalacios found the goal for a two-point conversion, pushing Ace Sportswear’s lead to two. After exchanging goals, Ace Sportswear resorted to its long-distance shooting again, this time with Donnan scoring the two-pointer to send her team into halftime with an 8-5 advantage. Determined to extend its lead further, Ace Sportswear raced out of the gate in the second half, leaving Boothwyn Pharmacy pinned in front of its own goal. After three missed attempts from Ace Sportswear, Hajimihalis found the goal for her third score of the day. Regrouping, Boothwyn Pharmacy found its footing in open play, finishing the third chukker with goals from Mitcham and Schmitt to decrease the gap to just two. With the game just out of reach the majority of the time, Boothwyn Pharmacy made the most of the final chukker. Trailing by two, Halle jumped on the loose ball and sent a two-point shot into the goal, tying the score and leaving spectators on the edge of their seats entering the final minutes. Blocking a clearing attempt, Winslow-Palacios turned the corner and hit the ball in, giving Ace Sportswear


Cindy Halle with Best Playing Pony Estrella

the one-goal lead with one minute remaining. Despite the best efforts of Boothwyn Pharmacy, Ace Sportswear held on to claim the prestigious title with an 11-10 victory. Ace Sportswear inscribed its name on the trophy for the second time after winning in 2017. Members of that winning team, Winslow-Palacios and Hajimihalis reunited, while adding newcomer Donnan to emerge victoriously. “I’ve lucked out in playing a few times with Anna, and we’ve gained a lot of great chemistry. It was really fun, competitive polo, and it translates onto the field really well,” shared Donnan. As part of the USPA’s Tournament Stimulus Package, Ace Sportswear received $1,500 in prize money while Boothwyn Pharmacy took home $1,000. Capturing her second title in as many days after winning the Arena Handicap on Saturday, Hajimihalis reflected on the memorable weekend. “It feels incredible. I really have to thank my teammates in both flights. They made it really fun, and I think it’s just the attitude of no matter what, we knew we were going to have fun.” Hajimihalis deployed five horses that rotated over four days of play to capture the two titles. “I’m very exhausted and so are the horses today. They all played amazing,” she said. Winslow-Palacios said, “We feed off each other’s energy, which is awesome. I would play for this team over and over again.”

The MVP award went to Winslow-Palacios, whose six-goal performance, including the game-winning goal, helped lead Ace Sportswear to the win. “I actually switched my horse order around quite a bit from the semifinals,” Winslow-Palacios explained. “I put my second-half horses in the first half today, which I think helped a lot. I started really strong with my big run-and-gun horses and ended on my steady horse.” Counted on in the first and fourth chukkers, Cindy Halle’s Estrella, a 15-year-old Argentine roan mare, was awarded Best Playing Pony. “She got hurt before the season started, but I’m so happy to have her back” explained Halle. “She’s got a huge bump and moved over a lot of big horses. Anyone could play her, but I really love playing her. She worked really hard out there.” Building on the chemistry from the team’s 2017 title, Ace Sportswear gained valuable experience on the grass this past summer, by competing in a women’s tournament together in a lead-up to the Arena Open. Donnan drew on her experience from playing with the heralded Cornell program. “I learned to play at Cornell, started freshman year, and worked my way up to starting on varsity,” Donnan explained. “In my senior year, I was starting for the National Intercollegiate Championship, but it was canceled. I never got my opportunity to shine. This is a pseudo-nationals for me to finally show all the years of hard work.” • POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 39


LARRY JOHNSON

USA’s Geronimo Obregon swipes at a bouncing ball on the fly.

Here to Stay International Townsend Cup remains in USA

Pelon Escapite led USA to victory over England in the Townsend Cup, held at New Bridge Polo and Country Club in Aiken, South Carolina, Oct. 10. It was part of an International Arena Showcase, which included a match between the USPA Armed Forces and the British Armed Forces. Originally scheduled for Oct. 1, rain postponed the match 24 hours, but by game time the arena was in top shape, allowing for a fast, exciting match. The 8-goal Escapite was joined by 7-goal Geromino Obregon and 2-goal Winston Painter. Both Escapite and Obregon, whose families are from Argentina, have played a lot of arena polo, particularly in the Gladiator Polo series in Florida several years ago. The 17-year-old Painter began playing polo in middle school at the Gardnertown Polo Club in Newburgh, New York. He went on to play in interscholastic polo, NYTS events and other 40 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

USPA- and PTF-sponsored events, including playing in England and Argentina. Playing for England was 6-goal Julian Daniels, who has lived and played in the U.S. for decades, although much of his polo time has been in outdoor play. He saddled up alongside experienced arena players—brothers Robin and Eden Ormerod. The Ormerod’s own Druids Lodge Polo Club in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Established by their parents in 1994, the club is home to some 50 members and includes an all-weather lighted arena, four grass polo fields, a club house, guest accommodations and stabling for up to 80 horses. Though the brothers play together quite a bit, they admitted its been awhile since they’ve played in the arena. “We have a really nice arena surface at home. In England, we play in the winter when the grounds are too soft,” explained Eden Ormerod.


ALEX PACHECO

Circuit Governor Billy Raab presents trophies to USA’s Pelon Escapite, Geronimo Obregon and Winston Painter.

Obregon hit the target with a two-pointer but Daniels found the mark and Robin Ormerod shot through a two-pointer of his own to give England a 5-4 advantage. The England lead proved to be short-lived as Obregon tallied again and a Penalty 1 on Daniels put USA ahead, 6-5, after the first chukker. Early in the second, Eden Ormerod leveled the score. Escapite gave USA the lead after easily sinking a Penalty 2. USA kept up the pressure as it benefited

HPA Steward Tae Ormerod presents the MVP trophy to Pelon Escapite.

ALEX PACHECO

New Bridge’s lighted arena allowed for an evening match. After National Anthems from both countries were played, umpire Bradley Biddle threw in the ball to get the game started. Umpire Robert Lynn-KeeChow was positioned outside the arena—to allow for more room in the enclosed playing field—as was a third man and umpires positioned at the 25-yard lines to verify two-point goals. There were no throw-ins after each goal, instead it was continuous play with the defender taking the ball immediately after each goal. With nonstop action, players changed horses at around the 3:30 mark of each chukker. Both teams were outfitted with jerseys and saddle pads from U.S. Polo Assn. While the Ormerod brothers had the disadvantage of riding borrowed mounts, that just added to the pressure on the U.S. to win on their home turf. “It’s big pressure. We can’t lose in-house,” explained Escapite. “It’s always more pressure to play [at home] than away.” Obregon was ready for a battle. “Man, they’re rough! England is always rough. My experience playing against them is always intense. It’s tough to go around them and you’ve got to go through them. It’s hard; they’re competitive,” he said. With that pressure in mind, Escapite started off the match with a two-pointer but the Ormerod brothers each countered with goals of their own. Escapite was whistled on a play, giving England a Penalty 2 but they were unable to convert it. Later,

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 41


LARRY JOHNSON

Pelon Escapite, center, gets by Robin Ormerod, while Winston Painter covers Julian Daniels.

ALEX PACHECO

Tae Ormerod with Britain’s Eden Ormerod, Julian Daniels and Robin Ormerod

from a Penalty 1, Escapite found the mark again, and Obregon tallied, giving USA a four-goal advantage, 10-6. England was unable to connect on a Penalty 2 and 3 but battled its way back with Eden Ormerod converting another Penalty 2 opportunity and Robin

42 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Ormerod knocking one in from the field. The half ended with USA ahead 10-8. USA coach Tiger Kneece spoke to the players and with such a tight game, decided to change the strategy so the players rotated positions more often.


LARRY JOHNSON

Eden Ormerod pilots Best Playing Pony Samurai, Liv Berube’s 13-year-old Mexican Thoroughbred.

“[I] would switch a lot with Pelon, and Winston pushed forward. We rotated a lot and ... when Pelon would push forward, I would stay back. When I would push, he would stay back. We changed the momentum a few times,” said Obregon. Meanwhile, the arena was dragged at the half, keeping the surface in tip-top shape and allowing for the fast play to continue. Tommy Biddle, currently the highest-rated arena player at 9 goals, served as a guest commentator on the live stream. He remarked that with the continuous play, players’ heads practically have to be on a swivel to keep up with the action. With the ball back in play, Escapite quickly slammed in a two-pointer. Soon after, England was awarded a Penalty 1 and Eden Ormerod shot in his first two-pointer to bring the team within one, 12-11. The game briefly stopped when Painter was accidentally hit with a mallet, but he toughed it out. Painter’s second goal increased the difference, but a Penalty 1 and goals by Robin Ormerod and Daniels gave the advantage back to England, 14-13. That was short-lived, however, when Escapite connected with another two-pointer later in the chukker to give USA the 15-14 edge heading into the last period. The last seven minutes kept fans on the edge of their seats. Obregon bulled his way with two in a row, to give USA a three-goal advantage. England missed a third Penalty 2, but Eden Ormerod was able to score through traffic to come within two,

17-15, as time was ticking away. Three minutes into the chukker, Escapite, willing to give his all, leaned too far out in the goal mouth and fell hard. He was initially caught up in his stirrups, but Julian Daniels jumped off to help free his leg. It took Escapite just a few minutes to shake out the cobwebs before remounting. Always tough as a bull, it didn’t seem to slow him down one bit. Still, one two-pointer from England would force overtime, and they had the talent to do it, but it wasn’t to be. Painter added one more goal and England was shut down as time ran out. Of the nine contests held in the past 98 years (eight in the past 17 years), England has only been successful once, in 2013. Tommy Biddle has won four times, more than any other player. This is the second victory for Escapite, his first as captain. “Pelon did a great job captaining the team and controlling the bulk of the game,” Biddle remarked. Escapite was named MVP after scoring eight goals. Samurai, a 13-year-old Mexican Thoroughbred owned by Liv Berube and played by Eden Ormerod, was Best Playing Pony. “We got lucky today,” said Escapite. I scored a few two-pointers, and two is better than one.” In the 2nd Churchhill-Roosevelt Cup match between the Armed Forces, USPA’s Cindy Stephenson, Rob Dirado and Alex Jenkins prevailed over Britain’s James Cochrane-Dyet, Peter R.L. Hunter and Albany Mulholland, 11-8. • POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 43


P O L O I N T H E PA M PA S

The Sheriff’s Horse Past and present AAP leaders take arena win By Lucas Noel

Martindale’s Julián Martínez Youens carries the ball along the wall while trying to get by Argentine Polo’s Juan Lalor in a preliminary match.

44 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Some matches were played under the lights at night.

COURTESY OF AAP

COURTESY OF AAP

In Argentina there is a phrase of popular wisdom that perfectly describes when a person has help to obtain positive results in some matter: “He is running with the sheriff’s horse.” And the truth is that appearing in a tournament with the current and former presidents of the Argentine Polo Association as part of the team may help to collaborate a lot with the cause. Joking aside, the Arena Polo Grand Prix once again enjoyed a very fun and attractive competition, just as had happened in 2019. This season, La Carona Polo Club was the venue for this very entertaining second edition of the competition, which had La Aguada as the big winner with Delfín Uranga (president of the AAP) and Eduardo Novillo Astrada Jr. (former president of the AAP) in the line-up. Both were accompanied


P O L O I N T H E PA M PA S

International Formula Polo The arena competition involving national teams of this attractive 3 vs. 3 contest will be held in Buenos Aires in December as a prelude to the Argentine Open (see details next page) final match. This global initiative will include teams from the countries where the league has acquired a presence. Argentina, USA, France, Germany, Spain, Colombia, Brazil and Mexico will face each other in a blitz tournament to be played on Dec. 7-8. The matches will be broadcast live on the PoloHUB+ platform and will be enriched with the use of technologies such as GPS on the horses, high-speed drones and live music.

COURTESY OF AAP

by Carlos Menéndez Behety to complete the trio that won the Gold Cup. This year, the tournament featured the participation of six teams with handicaps between 11 and 19 goals. In the contest, each player plays with a handicap two goals higher than his official handicap. On the opening day, two round robins were played with the winners advancing. In the final, La Aguada beat Ascochinga, 11-7, to win the main title. Meanwhile, Capilla Polo got the Silver Cup among the runners-up. The team of Juan Banchero, Felipe and Francisco Bargalló won, 7-2, over Argentina Polo Day. Earlier in the day, Equestria defeated Martindale, 6½-2, to win the Bronze Cup. The AAP continues to increase La Aguada’s Carlos Menéndez its support for the different Behety, Delfín variants in which this sport is Uranga and played. This type of polo, known as Eduardo Novillo indoor in the United States or Astrada won. England, is called ‘picadero’ in Argentina. The modality consists of the same sport that we already know, but starring three players per team. The matches are played on a reduced field of approximately 110 x 55 yards, and with a sand floor instead of grass. This mode of the game has enormous dynamics since it is played between walls, and since the ball almost never leaves the field, the fluidity is much greater. It is much more exciting, easier to understand for the spectator that is not familiar with the rules of polo, and is shorter in duration, because it is played in four chukkers of 5 minutes each.

GOLD CUP

SILVER CUP

BRONZE CUP

La Aguada 11, Ascoshinga 7

Capilla Polo 7, Argentina Polo Day 2

Equestria 6½, Martindale 2

La Aguada Carlos Menéndez Behety Delfín Uranga Eduardo Novillo Astrada Jr.

19 4 6 9

Capilla Polo Juan Banchero Felipe Bargalló Francisco Bargalló

13 3 5 5

Equestria Benjamín Soto Patricio Poggi Nicolás Llambías

Ascochinga Marcos Aldao Juan Lagos Mármol Gonzalo Azumendi

13 3 5 5

Argentina Polo Day Santiago Tito Juan Lalor Santos Perkins

16 2 7 7

Martindale Nicolás Pisarenko Julián Martínez Youens Ignacio Martin

7 2 2 3 11 3 3 5

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 45


P O L O I N T H E PA M PA S

Though arena is a fun version of the sport, everyone looks forward to the outdoor high-goal season, which is now underway. Two new rules changes have gone into effect. In the final match of the 2020 Palermo Open, as the warning horn sounded in the seventh chukker, Ellerstina was leading La Dolfina, 8-7. By regulation, the action continues for another 30 seconds. Facundo Pieres stole the ball from Pablo Mac Donough and quickly took a shot at the goal. The second bell, the one that irrefutably signals the end of the chukker, rang an instant before the ball crossed the goal line, but clearly after it left Facundo’s mallet. Ellerstina, the team from General Rodríguez, protested. In the eighth and final chukker, La Dolfina scored three goals and won the most important title of all for the eighth consecutive year. Facundo’s actions seemingly ended up setting a precedent. And the Regulatory Commission of the Argentine Polo Association apparently took note of it. Basketball, perhaps the sport that best understands the relationship between the rules and the show, has a very clear norm regarding this situation: if the buzzer sounds when the ball is in the air, but after it has left the shooter’s hands, the play is valid. And this rule has certainly given basketball some of the most wonderful moments any sport has ever seen. This season, polo in Argentina will imitate this determination. The new rule states that when a goal

QUALIFYING TOURNAMENT

shot is taken in the seconds before the end of any chukker (including the last one) and the second bell rings, the ball will remain in play until the end of its run. There are four ways the next chukker may start: 1. If a goal was scored, a throw-in from the middle of the field. 2. If the goal shot was wide, a knock-in. 3. Throw-in from where the ball finished its run if it was inside the field. 4. Throw-in from where the ball touched a mallet, player or horse. In case the ball hits one of the posts, a determination will be made if it was a goal. Once this decision of the AAP was taken and communicated, Polo Players’ Edition consulted Facundo himself to know his opinion. “It will add adrenaline and excitement to the match. I don’t know if the decision was taken specifically because of the play in last year’s final. The truth is that it has happened many times in all these years. But I like it, it’s good. Any measure that adds appeal to the show is fine. We players can adapt to almost anything,” said Ellerstina’s goal scorer. The second change is aimed at fair play. Play may only be restarted for Fair Play if no foul has been called and the umpires have had to stop the game before it becomes neutral with one team in clear possession of the ball and free of any opposing player. The umpires shall drop the ball where it was when the whistle was blown and, when

Group B Alegría Fish Creek Clemente Zavaleta Juan Ruiz Guiñazu Joaquín Pittaluga Bautista Bayugar

30 7 7 7 8

Group A Chapaleufú Julián de Lusarreta Juan Martín Zavaleta Rufino Bensadon Felipe Dabas

29 7 8 7 7

La Esquina Pascual Sainz de Vicuña Cristian Laprida Jr. Lucas James Iñaki Laprida

29 6 8 7 6

La Irenita II Facundo Fernández Llorente Min Podestá Juan Agustín García Grossi Tomás Fernández Llorente

28 7 7 7 7

La Aguada Peke Gonzalez Manuel Elizalde Miguel Novillo Astrada Tomás Beresford

29 7 7 8 7

Los Machitos Torito Ruiz Lucas Díaz Alberdi Mariano Aguerre Martín Aguerre Jr.

28 7 7 7 7

La Fija Gringo Colombres Ezequiel Martinez Ferrario Ignacio Negri Jr Felipe Vercellino

28 7 7 7 7

46 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

UPCOMING SCHEDULES O C T O B E R 16 - N O V E M B E R 6 128th Hurlingham Open Hurlingham N O V E M B E R 8 - D E C E M B E R 11 5th Women’s Argentine Polo Open Pilar NOV E M B E R 8 Cámara De Diputados Cup Pilar N O V E M B E R 1 0 - D E C E M B E R 11 128th Argentine Open Palermo D E C E M B E R 1 3 - 16 Nations Cup Palermo


the teams are ready, give the ‘play’ signal. The player who was in possession of the ball shall play within 5 seconds; his team members may be in any position they wish. If the team does not play the ball within 5 seconds, a throw-in will be awarded. If the ball is within 60 yards (attacking), it shall be placed on the 60-yard line in a straight line to where it was when the whistle was blown. The shot must be taken as if it were a [safety]. The players of the opposing team must not be within 30 yards of the ball or behind it. If one of them is within 30 yards when the [shot] is taken, he may not play until the player in possession of the ball passes it to another player or has been marked by another opponent. If he enters the play, a penalty shall be awarded, always approaching the goal. If the opposing player, for any reason, is behind the ball, he will be offside.

128TH ARGENTINE OPEN

Looking Ahead The season began on Sept. 4 with the San Jorge Open. Ten days later, the Jockey Club Open began, followed by the Tortugas Open. Both were completed as we were going to press, and the Hurlingham Open had just begun. The Hurlingham Open final is scheduled for Nov. 6. The qualifying tournament for the Argentine Open was also just kicking off with seven teams in two groups. The winner of each group plays in the Argentine Open. The 5th edition of the Women’s Argentine Polo

SERGIO LLAMERA

P O L O I N T H E PA M PA S

Who will claim this year’s Argentine Open trophy?

Open begins Nov. 8 and runs through Dec. 11. Played at the association’s fields in Pilar, teams must be at least 16 goals, and it is open to players 4 goals and above. The tournament is limited to eight teams. If more than eight teams enter, the seven highest-rated teams qualify and the remaining teams will play a qualifier, with the winner taking the eighth spot. The Cámara De Diputados Cup kicks off on Nov. 8. It will also be played in Pilar and is for teams 24 goals and up. Five teams will come from the qualifier tournament, joining the 11 best teams from the Municipalidad de Pilar Cup. The Argentine Open is set to begin Nov. 10 with the final scheduled for Dec. 11. Two days after the final, teams representing Argentina, England and the United States will play for the Nations Cup. •

Group A Ellerstina Facundo Pieres Hilario Ulloa Gonzalo Pieres Jr. Nicolás Pieres

39 10 10 9 10

Group B Murus Sanctus Facundo Sola Guillermo Caset Jr. Pablo Mac Donough Juan Martin Nero

39 9 10 10 10

La Dolfina Adolfo Cambiaso Francisco Elizalde David Stiring Jr. Diego Cavanagh

38 10 9 10 9

La Natividad Camilo Castagnola Polito Pieres Bartolomé Castagnola Jr. Ignatius du Plessis

36 9 9 9 9

La Ensenada Juan Britos Jr. Alfredo Bigatti Juan M. Zubía Jerónimo del Carril

33 9 8 8 8

La Dolfina Brava Poroto Cambiaso Guillermo Terrera Jr. Rodrigo Ribiero de Andrade Alejo Taranco

33 8 9 8 8

La Irenita Santiago Loza Segundo Bocchino Ignacio Toccalino Isidro Strada

31 8 7 8 8

Alegría Agustín Merlos Pedro Zacharías Tomás García del Río Frederick Mannix Jr.

28 7 7 7 7

Winner Qualifier Group B

Winner Qualifier Group A

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 47


POLO REPORT DISPATCHES FROM THE WORLD OF POLO

PAC I F I C C OA S T

KERRI KERLEY

SOL DE AGOSTA SWEEPS 8-GOAL RINCON LEAGUE

Pacquito de Narvaez tries to stay ahead of Jason Crowder in the final of the Carpinteria Cup at Santa Barbara Polo. Ryan Kerley and Torrey Ripinski follow close behind.

O

VER two months this summer, five teams rounded out the 8-goal Rincon League at Santa Barbara Polo and Racquet Club in Carpinteria, California. Despite the strong team lineups, Sol de Agosto came away the winner in all four tournaments that make up the league. In the James Colt Classic, Sol de Agosto (Juan De Narvaez, Pacquito De Narvaez, Paco De Narvaez, Ryan Kerley) edged Del Padre /Lucchese (Matt Yonally, Maco Llambias, Agus-

48 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

tine Molinas, John Muse). Father and son, Paco and Pacquito De Narvaez combined for three goals in the first period, countered by strikes from Llambias and Molinas. Pacquito traded goals with Molinas in the second to keep it close, 4-3. The De Narvaezes increased the difference to three, 6-3, with goals in the third. Lucchese/Del Padre rallied in the second half, holding back all Sol’s drives in the fourth, while Llambias hammered in a Penalty 4 and Molinas

scored from the field. Sol benefited from a Penalty 1 in the fifth, and Pacquito sunk a Penalty 2, while Paco scored from the field. Llambias found the target to stay close, 9-6, going into the sixth period. Yonally put one in for Lucchese early in the chukker, and Muse followed with one of his own. Sol was kept off the board while Llambias tied things up, 9-9, as time expired, forcing overtime. Pacquito was the hero in sudden death, finding the mark to win the match.


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P O L O

R E P O R T

KERRI KERLEY

KERRI KERLEY

Kerley was MVP, and Paco De Narvaez’s Nieta was Best Playing Pony. The same teams met again in the Malibu Cup. Luke Klentner took over for Juan De Narvaez on Sol de Agosto so Rancho began with a handicap goal. Pacquito got the scoring Sol de Agosta’s young guns: MVP Ryan Kerley, Pacquito de Narrolling and wouldvaez and Juan de Narvaez after winning the Summerland Cup. n’t stop. He hamPacquito De Narvaez was MVP, mered in a pair of Penalty 3s, then a and Juan De Narvaez’s Tordilla was Penalty 2 before scoring twice from Best Playing Pony. the field while Rancho could not Next up was the Summerland Cup. reach the goal. Crowder scored for This time, Sol de Agosto met Rancho Rancho early in the second, while Sol Polo/Zahedi Chogan (Sy Zahedi, Sierwas silenced. Pacquito and Paco each ra Dunbar, Joaquin Avendano, Jason found the goal early in the third. Crowder) in the final. Kerley struck Crowder answered back, but Pacquito first with back-to-back goals. Those scored again. Avendano put one on were followed by goals from Paco and the board to end the half with Rancho Pacquito De Narvaez. Rancho got on trailing, 8-4. the board with a pair of Penalty 3s by Rancho was kept away from the Crowder in the second chukker, and goal for the next 14 minutes, while Avendano scored to bring the team goals from Kerley, Paco and Pacquito within one, 4-3. Pacquito found the pushed the difference to nine, 13-4. In mark for Sol to increase the difference to 5-3. Crowder sunk a pair of Ryan Kerley and Sy Zahedi Penalty 4s in the third, but the Narbattle in the Malibu Cup. vaezes combined for three goals to keep Sol ahead, 8-5, at the half. Crowder kept working in the second half, nailing another Penalty 4 and scoring from the field, but Kerley scored twice and Pacquito once to increase the difference to four, 11-7. Sol shined brighter in the fifth when, Pacquito, ably assisted by his teammates, scored twice on runs from the field and once from the Penalty 3 line. The team also received a Penalty 1, and Paco scored from the field to make the difference nine, 16-7. Crowder put through a Penalty 4 in the last chukker, but it was countered by an unstoppable Pacquito to end the game, 17-8.

50 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

the last chukker, the teams traded Penalty 2s, and Avendano scored one more, but it wasn’t nearly enough, and Sol came away with the 14-6 win. Pacquito de Narvaez was MVP, and his mare Coneja was Best Playing Pony. Both teams made it to the final of the last tournament, the Carpinteria Cup. Klentner was replaced by Meghan Gracida on Sol de Agosto, while Torrey Ripinsky and Patrick Uretz took over for Sierra Dunbar and Joaquin Avendano on Rancho Polo/Zahedi Chogan. Rancho was hoping the third time was a charm and started out strong. Uretz struck twice, countering a handicap goal given to Sol de Agosto. Crowder sunk a Penalty 3, and the first chukker ended with Rancho ahead 3-1. Crowder traded goals with Kerley and Paco in the second to maintain the two-goal advantage. But a scoreless third chukker for Rancho allowed Sol de Agosto to catch up, thanks to repeat goals by Kerley and Paco, ending the half tied, 5-5. Kerley had back-to-back goals in the fourth, but Crowder converted a Penalty 2 to stay close. Pacquito hit


Coming Early 2022 “The Polo Style of Riding”

s dwig’ u L e Reg book

One of the main factors in playing to the best of your ability is helping your polo-playing partner—the horse—play its best for you. To accomplish that, I compare the human body on a horse as being a joystick. Additionally, I imagine a bolt passing through the knees. That imaginary bolt affects the horse by direction you lean your “joystick” upper body. For instance, if you want your horse to accelerate, lean your joystick upper body forward and down, consistent with the rate you want your horse to accelerate. At the same time, your upper legs are pushing forward and down into your horse’s shoulders to effectively be pushing the horse forward by way of the bolt. Because your lower legs are a counterbalancing mechanism to your upper body; your lower legs should move back and up to the degree that your joystick upper body leaned forward and down. Using your body in this fashion sends a clear message to your horse, “Accelerate.” If you want your horse to decelerate, lean your “joystick” upper body up and back, which will effectively be lifting the horse’s front end up and back. At the same time, your lower legs should move down and forward from the accelerate position, but only to the point to where they are still in contact with the horse’s sides for the purpose of energizing the hind quarters to drive the hind legs forward and under the horse’s body, which is critical to the decelerating process. If you want your horse to change direction, lean your joystick upper body in the new direction, which will have you pushing down on the bolt on the side to which you are leaning, while lifting the other side. Because your joystick upper body has a tendency to follow your head, your head should be the first part of your joystick body to lean.

Look for more critical tips like these in “The Polo Style of Riding,” coming soon!


R E P O R T

JDKIZZPHOTOGRAPHY

JDKIZZPHOTOGRAPHY

P O L O

Cereal Killers took on Holy Moly in the first game of the Pacific Coast Arena League held at Orange County Polo Club.

the target late in the chukker, then scored three in the fifth, including two open goal penalties, while Rancho was kept away from the goal. Trailing by five, Rancho knew it had to strike hard and fast, but a pair of goals, including a Penalty 3, from Pacquito took the wind out of its sails. Paco and Crowder traded goals in the closing minutes, but the damage was done, and Sol had the 14-7 win. Ryan Kerley was MVP, and Paco De Narvaez’s Justa was Best Playing Pony. Voted on by fellow competitors, Pacquito de Narvaez was named Season MVP, while Paco de Narvaez won Best String. Sy Zahedi won the Season’s Best Sportsman award.

PC ARENA LEAGUE HELD AT ORANGE COUNTY The Pacific Coast Arena League, held at clubs throughout California, played its first of three legs at Orange County Polo Club in Silverado, Sept. 18-19. The event attracted 28 participants from Lakeside, OC, and Poway Polo Clubs. With A-Flight and B-Flight matches, the first game had Cereal Killers (Spencer Hurtt, Jim Tuohy, Nicole Bankhead) topping Holy Moly (Ethan

52 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

The Assassins strike again in the match against Barbarians. The Assassins finished with a 17-4 victory.

Bankhead, Kelli Newton, Bekan Segien, Shelley Geiler), 12-10, in 6goal A-Flight action. Newton had the announcer saying, “Holy Moly” after opening the chukker by shooting through a hat trick in a matter of minutes. Cereal Killers took revenge, with Hurtt scoring back-to-back goals added to a handicap goal. The team was awarded a Penalty 1, and Nicole Bankhead followed up with another goal to take a 53 lead. In the second, Geiler and Hurtt traded goals to keep Cereal Killers’ advantage two, 6-4, at the half. The game heated up in the third. as Holy Moly came within one, 9-8, going into the last chukker. A pony goal leveled the score early in the fourth, and Segien put Holy Moly ahead, 10-9. Touhy snuck back for Cereal Killers, shooting in three in a row to take the 12-10 lead before time expired. Nicole Bankhead was MVP, and Ethan Bankhead’s Chloe was Best Playing Pony. Hurtt took the Sportsmanship award. In the first B-Flight match, Assassins (Maia Schnoebelen, Allie Bushong, Lauren Helpern) killed Barbarians (Danielle Slutzky, Andy Schnoebelen, Jo Faulkner, Tom Rath), 174. Barbarians began with a one-goal handicap. Assassins wasted no time in

the first period, amassing a 6-1 lead. Barbarians slowed the bleeding in the second, keeping Assassins to single goals from Bushong and Helpern while Slutzky tallied one, and the team was awarded a Penalty 1, ending the half with Assassins ahead, 8-3. Assassins kept firing at the lifeless Barbarians in the second half, with the team combining for six more goals to win. Bushong was MVP, while Slutzky’s Rafiki was Best Playing Pony. Faulkner took the Sportsmanship Award. In the next match, Destroyers (Shira Engel, Haley Schneider, Dave Myrick) exterminated Black Widows (Derek Wall, Colleen Newton, Fawn Rinalduzzi, Marc Schnoebelen), 14-8. The teams kept the game level, 3-3, at the end of the first. Wall tallied three times to give Destroyers the 6-4 advantage at the half. Black Widows had another strong chukker with Schneider scoring twice and Myrick once, but Rinalduzzi and Schnoebelen had two each to increase the difference to three, 10-7. The last chukker belonged to Destroyers after Newton tallied three times and Wall once while holding Schneider to one. Destroyers had the win. Rinalduzzi was MVP, and Schnoebelen’s Koda was Best Playing Pony. Engel earned the Sportsmanship Award.


R E P O R T

JDKIZZPHOTOGRAPHY

JDKIZZPHOTOGRAPHY

P O L O

Danielle Slutzky won the Sportsmanship Award in the game between Whirlwinds and Bullfighters.

Ghost Riders (Matt Corodimas, Luca Abboud, Remy Glasgow) finished the day with a 16-2 win over Overachievers (Ava Abboud, Mila Slutzky, Serdar Celik). Overachievers began with a one-goal head-start, but Ghost Riders grabbed an early, 4-1, lead. Ghost Riders continued to haunt Overachievers in the second, while making the difference 10-1. Overachievers made Ghost Riders all but disappeared in the third when Celik answered a lone goal from Luca Abboud. But Ghost Riders sent the ball into goal with a thump five more times to take the win. Luca Abboud led Ghost Riders with 11 points and was named MVP. Celik was Sportsmanship Award winner, and a pony named Freddie took Best Playing Pony. Teams were shuffled the next day. Rockstars (Andy Schnoebelen, Ava Abboud, Derek Wall) got the action going with a 14-7 win over Savages (Mila Slutzky, Maia Schnoebelen, Haley Schneider) in the first game. Rockstars jumped ahead, 5-2 in the first. Wall and Slutzky traded goals in the second to end the half with Rockstars strumming, 6-3. Slutzky and Schneider knotted the score, 6-6 in the third. Abboud put Rockstars back on top, but Schneider leveled it again. Andy Sch-

The first leg of the Pacific Coast Arena League had 28 participants playing at the Orange County Polo Club in Silverado, California.

noebelen took back the lead to end the chukker with Rockstars ahead, 87. Savages were silenced in the final seven minutes while Rockstars rocked in six more goals before the final horn. Andy Schnoebelen was MVP, Maia was Sportsmanship Award winner, and that pony named Freddie won Best Playing Pony for the second day. Hellraisers (Kellie Newton, Nicole Bankhead, Ethan Bankhead) took on Revolutionaries (Spencer Hurtt, Jim Tuohy, Shelley Geiler, Bekan Segien) in the next game. Revolutionaries took a 7-5 lead into the half before Hellraisers raised hell in the third to double up Revolutionaries, 14-7. Newton and Ethan Bankhead combined for five more goals in the fourth while holding Revolutionaries to two goals from Hurtt for the win. Ethan Bankhead was MVP, Newton’s Dublin was Best Playing Pony, and Hurtt was Best Sportsman. The next game saw Spider Monkeys (Allie Bushong, Remy Glasgow, Matt Corodimas) squash Vipers (Lauren Helpern, Mila Herrera, Shira Engel, Bekan Segien), 13-5. All three Spider Monkeys got on the board, adding to the team’s one-goal handicap, in the first while Vipers struck just once. Bushong scurried about in the second, tallying four times while

Glasgow tallied once. Segien struck for Vipers, but Spider Monkeys went into the half ahead, 11-2. Vipers held Spider Monkeys to single goals in the third and fourth, while tallying three times. Despite Vipers’ late rally, the team could not swallow the first-half deficit, and Spider Monkeys had the victory. Glasgow was MVP, Herrera was Best Sportsman, and Bushong’s Lebron was Best Playing Pony. The weekend games finished up with Whirlwinds (Danielle Slultzky, Luca Abboud, Colleen Newton, Fawn Rinalduzzi) taking down the Bullfighters (Serdar Celik, Marc Schnoebelen, Jo Faulkner, Tom Rath). Thanks to goals from Abboud, Slutzky and Rinalduzzi, Whirlwinds ended the half with a 7-3 advantage. Finding their rhythm in the second half, all three Bullfighters tallied in the third, putting five points on the board. Fans responded with, “Olé!” Goals by Slutzky and Newton kept Whirlwinds narrowly ahead, 9-8, going into the final seven minutes. Rinalduzzi and Abboud sandwiched goals around one from Schnoebelen to stop the Bullfighters attack and ensure the Whirlwinds’ victory, 11-9. Rinalduzzi was MVP, Slutzky was Best Sportsman, and Newton’s Zenyatta was Best Playing Pony.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 53


P O L O

R E P O R T

Wild Horses’ Julian Steinberg, Jaime Bourdieu, Juanse Olivera, and Milo Dorignac won the Northeastern Masters Cup.

NORTHEAST

WILD HORSES WIN NE MASTERS CUP Wild Horses may not have dragged CVC Stones away, but it did edge it in the final of the 4-goal USPA Northeastern Masters Cup, held at Mashomack Polo Club in Pine Plains, New York, Aug. 1. Four teams competed in the event. After CRG/Buena Vista (Mitch Adelstein, Alex Langlois, Don Langlois, Gaston Lisioli) and Justin Farms (Jeff Marlaugh, Adam Justin, Bauti Crotto, Pato Farias) were eliminated in preliminary rounds, CVC Stones (Julian Steinberg, Agustin Zavaleta, Felipe Niveyro, Mario Dino) faced Wild Horses (Victoria Gray, Milo Dorignac, Juanse Olivera, Jaime Bourdieu) in the final. The final started with both of the teams flexing their muscles. Niveyro struck first, but Bourdieu responded. Gray followed with a goal, and Bourdieu added another. A Penalty 4 conversion by Zavaleta stopped the Wild Horses’ momentum. Niveyro ended the chukker with another goal, leaving the teams knotted, 3-3. Dorignac gave Wild Horses an early lead in the second, but Niveyro leveled the score

54 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Savanna’s Nicolas Miro, MVP Milo Dorignac, Juanse Olivera, and Nick Beinstock won the Constitution Cup.

with a Penalty 3 conversion. Olivera gave Wild Horses back the lead to end the half ahead, 5-4. Dorignac and Olivera traded goals with Niveyro and Dino in the third, allowing Wild Horses to maintain the narrow lead. In the final seven minutes, Olivera sunk a Penalty 2, but Niveyro scored in response. While the teams traded goals throughout the game, Bourdieu got in the last word to ensure the Wild Horses’ victory, 9-7. Juanse Olivera was MVP, and his chestnut mare Frutilla was Best Playing Pony. CRG/Buena Vista got the best of Justin’s Farm in the consolation, 7-4. A month later, on Sept. 5, Savanna took the trophies in the 4-goal USPA Constitution Cup. Six teams in two brackets began the tournament. After a week of playoffs and some rain delays, Savanna (Nick Bienstock, Milo Dorignac, Juanse Olivera, Nicolas Miro) met Smithfield (Craig Callen, John Klopp, Santiago Llavallol, Gonzalo Urrutibeheity) in the final. Callen got the scoring started in the first chukker with a lone goal. Savanna was slow to start but made up for it in the second chukker when Dorignac struck three times, interrupted only by a goal from teammate Olivera, while the team shut out Smith

field. The half ended with Savanna on top, 4-1. Olivera, Dorignac, and Miro each scored in the third, but this time Smithfield fought back with Llavallol and Urrutibeheity connecting with the goal to stay in the game. Trailing by four, 7-3, going into the final seven minutes, Smithfield had its work cut out for it. Dorignac increased the difference early in the chukker. Smithfield received a Penalty 1, but it wasn’t enough, and Savanna took the 8-4 win. Dorignac was MVP, and Llavallol’s Rita was Best Playing Pony. In 8-goal action, Hawk Hill (Ian Mactaggart, Santiago Llavallol, Dylan Rossiter, Philip Mactaggart, Finn Secunda) defeated Savanna (Nick Beinstock, Milo Dorignac, Juanse Olivera, Gaston Lisioli), 12-11, in overtime to win the USPA Eddie Moore Memorial, Aug. 1. Lisioli was MVP, and Rossiter’s Fiesta was Best Playing Pony. Nine teams, divided into two brackets, battled it out. To get to the final, Hawk Hill ousted Shekomeko (Guy Merison, Maxi Chenaut, Sebastian Borgui, Oli Merison), 13-9, and Savanna slipped Windswept (Davis Colley, Valentino Echezarreta, Michel Dorignac, Bruce Colley), 9-8. The tables turned in the 8-goal USPA Tracey Mactaggart Memorial.


P O L O

Savanna’s Nick Beinstock, Milo Dorignac, Gaston Lisioli, and Juanse Olivera won the Mactaggart Memorial.

PATTY SHARKEY

Hawk Hill’s Ian Mactaggart, Dylan Rossiter, Santiago Llavallol and Finn Secunda won the Eddie Moore Memorial.

Eight teams were divided into two brackets, and once again, Savanna faced Hawk Hill. This time Savanna prevailed. Gaston Lisioli was MVP, and Juanse Olivera’s Pastise was Best Playing Pony.

IGEA TRIUMPHS IN NAPP MEMORIAL For the third year in a row, IGEA won the Jerry Napp Memorial, hosted by Meadowbrook Polo Club in Westbury, New York. The match was held at Bethpage State Park on Sept. 11. IGEA (Mrinal Dansingani, Adam Lipson, Juan Redlich, Gaston Lisioli) faced Meadowbrook (Glenn Sam Lostritto, Glen Lostritto, Tavi Usandizaga, Agustin Bottaro). Wellmatched teams kept spectators on the edge of their seats. A shootout was needed to determine a winner in a close game with everyone playing on top of their game. In the end, IGEA prevailed. Glen Lostritto was MVP and received a polo picture hand etched by Kim Doran, while Gaston Lisioli’s Margarita earned the Best Playing Pony blanket. The trophies were sponsored by The Tackeria and presented by Debra Napp.

R E P O R T

Debra Napp, center, presents trophies to IGEA’s Gaston Lisioli, Juan Redlich, Adam Lipson and Mrinal Dansingani.

CENTRAL

G-SQUARED PREVAILS IN BUTLER INTERNATIONAL Oak Brook Polo Club in Oak Brook, Illinois, closed out its summer season with the USPA Butler International Cup, Sept. 17-26. Five teams competed in the event, including two teams representing the United States. Games began with G-Squared-U.S. (Larry Aschebrook, Juan Martin Gutierrez, Juan Martin Obregon, Matias Obregon) downing Oak Brook (Mariano Gutierrez, Tomas Obregon, Horacio Onetto, Jim Drury). Two days

later, G-Squared earned its second victory over the German Flying Changes team (Jennifer Leffingwell, Chris Vangel, Anthony Garcia, Mariano Obregon) in a close, 1110 battle. Later in the day, Oak Brook fell to Kingston Jamaica (Charlie Chambers, Freddie Farquharson, Jason Wates, Santi Torres), 8-7. Kingston narrowly prevailed in its second match over Liechtenstein (Richard Harris, Pedro Manion, Lindor Novillo Corvalan, Alfredo Guerreno), 8-7½. Flying Changes picked up its first win, beating Oak Brook, 13-11. The last preliminary matches saw Liechtenstein top Flying Changes, 14½-12, and G-Squared defeat Kingston, 9-6. Oak Brook picked up its first win in the consolation round-robin, edging Flying Changes and Liechtenstein. The championship match had GSquared facing Jamaica. The match got off to a rapid start with G-Squared jumping ahead, 3-0, after goals from Gutierrez, Matias Obregon and Aschebrook. Torres put Jamaica on the board late in the chukker, but GSquared shot back in the second with Matias Obregon converting a pair of Penalty 3s and Juan Martin Obregon scoring one from the field for a 6-1

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 55


R E P O R T

ANDREW MEIER

P O L O

G-Squared’s Larry Aschebrook, Juan Martin Gutierrez, Juan Martin Obregon, and Matias Obregon won the Butler International Cup.

lead. The Jamaican defense came alive in the third, shutting G-Squared down while Torres added a goal. The half ended with G-Square ahead, 6-2. The Jamaican defense held steady in the second half, keeping G-Squared off the board. But, Jamaica struggled to get through the G-Squared defense and could only connect with the goal once. Unable to make up for the firsthalf deficit, G-Squared held on for the 6-3 victory. Flying Changes’ Mariano Obregon received the MVP honors, and Juan Martin Obregon’s Lady Bug was Best Playing Pony. The participating teams received gifts and prizes before the Butler International Cup Trophy presentation to the winning team. Additionally, Roger Cummings, Kenneth Weidman, Kim Palermo, Quinn Palermo, and Larry Misiukevicius, all graduations from Oak Brook Polo Academy, received certificates of completion from academy director Jenna Davis and instructor Turner Wheaton. Announcer Rob Wilkinson was also honored for his dedication and services to the club and the great Chicagoland polo community. Originally from Zimbabwe, where he was introduced to polo, Wilkinson reached a 2-goal handicap and won two National Interscholastic Championships

56 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Money Pit Manor’s Erica Tergenson, Akemi Tinder, and Liz Calvey won the Karen Carra Memorial.

(1997-98) at Colorado State University. He moved to Philadelphia earlier this year to work for Advisors Asset Management.

EAST

MONEY PIT MANOR ACES KAREN CARRA MEMORIAL Mountain View Polo Club in Charles Town, West Virginia, held its 6th annual USPA Karen Carra Memorial Women’s Tournament, Sept. 11. The event is sponsored annually by Karen’s widower, Matthew Graham, a member of the club. Players and horses wore pink to honor Karen with her favorite color. This 2- to 4-goal tournament allows newer and lower-rated players to compete in a USPA tournament in a fun, low-stress environment. Four teams were originally slated to play; however, Mountain View had to forfeit due to illness. That left the three remaining teams to battle it out in a round-robin. In the first round, Old Farm Vet (Christina Connelly-Kanmaz, Kija Wilson, Laura Russman, Sierra Goff) took on Money Pit Manor (Liz Calvey, Erica

Tergenson, Akemi Tinder). Money Pit Manor pounded Old Farm Vet, 4-1, in the first chukker and continued sinking goals to win, 9-1. In the second round, Old Farm Vet stayed up to meet Rebellis (Susan Roberts, Kasey Morris, Harleigh Humphries). Old Farm Vet struggled to find the goal in the first chukker while Rebellis pulled ahead with three goals. Goff, a 17-year-old interscholastic graduate, finally found the goal with a twopointer and followed with a goal to close the gap. Rebellis managed to hold the narrow lead to win, 5-4. Rebellis and Money Pit Manor played the third round to a 7-7 tie. With the highest net goals, Money Pit Manor earned the $1,500 tournament stimulus prize money provided by the USPA. Tinder was named MVP, Goff was Sportsmanship Award winner, and Morris’ Pandora was Best Playing Pony. No one went home empty-handed as Rebellis received $600 in prize money as runner-up, and Old Farm Vet won $400. In addition, all participants received commemorative tournament shirts and wine glasses from Graham. A month earlier, five teams battled for $2,500 in prize money in the 0- to 3-goal Paigahs Seahorse Cup. The semifinals began with a round-robin


P O L O

R E P O R T

Participants in the Paigah’s Seahorse Cup, including the winning Aviators’ MVP Rohail Khan, Monica Soucy, and Damian Di Claudio (in grey jerseys).

between Triangle Area Polo Club (Maud Eno, Tammy Havener, David Brooks), Rebellis (Gabriel Boie, Kasey Morris, Luis Echezarreta), and Aviators (Rohail Khan, Monica Soucy, Damian Di Claudio). Aviators topped the round-robin with wins over both Triangle and Rebeliss for a spot in the final. DI Polo (Kelly Xiao, Ava Nunes, Juan Carlos Gonzalez) kept spectators on the edge of their seats in the second semifinal, eventually advancing over Paigahs Seahorse (Akemi Tinder, Shamsiya Shervani, Sierra Goff, Hugo Pasten) in a spirited match. DI Polo and Aviators met in an intense final dominated by Gonzalez Di Claudio, backed by young players. “It was a tough battle between the two pros, and Rohail and I worked hard to play good defense and give Damian as many chances to score as possible,” Soucy said. “It was my first time playing with my teammates, but they were great, and I learned a lot from both of them.” Aviators flew ahead in the first chukker, 6-1, and widened the gap as Di Claudio single-handedly claimed 12 goals, including three two-pointers. The team went on to a 19-8 victory. MVP honors went to 11-year-old Rohail Khan. “Rohail was a machine. His consistent plays and good attitude made him a great choice for MVP,” Soucy said. Gonzalez’s Nera was Best Playing Pony, and Echezarreta received the Sportsmanship Award. After the match, everyone enjoyed home-cooked Indian food provided by Shervani and Paigahs Equestrian Gear. Shervani gave a touching speech to remember her grandfather, for whom the tournament is named. •

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 57


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Leading the way Townsend kickstarts international arena competition

John R. Townsend was a big supporter of arena polo. He died on Sept. 29, 1923 at 62, just months after the first Townsend Cup was played.

John R. Townsend was an established social figure in New York City and consummate horseman. He served as a director of the National Horse Show Association, vice chair of Meadow Brook Polo Club and Master of Foxhounds in England and Ireland, and premier hunts in Goshen, New York, and The Plains, Virginia. His eclectic equestrian interests were broad, however, it was promoting indoor polo at the

58 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

national and international level that he left a unique and lasting mark. Well-known for his exploits in the hunt field, Townsend, and his friend, E.H. Harriman, founded New York’s Orange County Hunt Club where he became Master of Foxhounds in 1900. He became president of the hunt club in 1918, with polo player W. Averill Harriman as vice president. Townsend made the Virginia Piedmont his second home and maintained a farm in The Plains. According to author Vicky Moon in her book “The Middleburg Mystique,” the name for Virginia’s famous Orange County Hunt came from Townsend and Harriman who brought their New York friends to The Plains where Harriman would bring his private pullman rail cars and park on the tracks. As one of the country’s leading foxhunters, portraits of him by nationally famous artists, such as Lynwood Palmer and Richard Newton, have left a lasting legacy in equine art. An all-around horseman, in 1913, Townsend won a driving competition with horses Muskateer and Belle Gratton, making headlines in the N.Y. Times sport’s section. When World War I broke out, Townsend supervised a cavalry division of 300 horsemen, trained in Central Park as an adjunct posse and was committed as part of the Home Defense League of the New York Police Department. Trophies donated by Townsend recognized everything from the highest-quality Foxhounds with custom silverplate to providing unique trophies for hunters and institutionalizing one of his Challenge Cups at the National Horse Show. Moreover, he was an innovator and leader in what today we call crossmarketing. As early as 1897, the high-society magazine “Outing” described an equestrian event promoted and judged by him: “… a potpourri, made up of a glittering array of richly-caparisoned horses, snatches of four-in-hand, tandem and country-club meets, with a little trotting, steeple-chasing, cavalry-parading and polo-playing thrown in to give zest to the collation and render it palatable.” A supporter of arena polo, he was considered a


Y E S T E RY E A R S

credible commentator and good for insightful press quotes. In 1920, Townsend arranged for two-chukker exhibition polo games held at the National Horse Show in Madison Square Garden, which proved to be one of the most attractive features of the show, according to a report in the New York Times. That popularity sparked an idea to produce a significant polo championship at the 36th National Horse Show in 1921. The show moved to Squadron A Armory, which regularly held high-goal matches. Townsend had to ensure the games met the national level competition requisite for the show and needed a way of both attracting top teams and organizing their selection. The games were held under the auspices of the Indoor Polo Association, which selected six teams: The Riding Club; New York Riding and Driving Club; West Point Polo Club; Squadron A; Brooklyn Riding and Driving Club; and Durland’s Polo Club. The competition was popular among indoor players and drew press coverage and a positive reaction

from other equestrians. The Townsend Challenge was expanded the following year to five levels (Class A Seniors, Class B Juniors, Classes C and D and Intercollegiate). Townsend donated the trophy for the Intercollegiate Championships. The New York Times reported 40 tons of tanbark footing was brought in for the tournaments. The event drew 24 teams representing clubs, military organizations, and colleges. The highgoal matches were four chukkers of 7½ minutes, while the other games were two 10-minute periods each. The event’s success led to an interest in an international competition. Charles Lang, secretary of the Indoor Polo Association, traveled to London in 1922 empowered to negotiate with foreign teams. According to the New York Times, the English players initially proved receptive but later decided it would be impossible to get together three players with sufficient experience to make it worthwhile to cross the Atlantic. The French cavalry had shown some interest in competing, having played arena polo for training and

USA’s R.A. Granniss, H.B. Blackwell and A.W. Kinny were the first to defend the Townsend International Cup.

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Capt. K. McMullen, F.W. Egan, Capt. L.W. Walford and Capt. W.F. Holman played for Britain.

public presentations, however, it later invited the U.S. to compete in France rather than traveling to the U.S. Townsend’s British friend, F.W. Egan, an arena

A very scarce program from the first Townsend International Cup, from the collections of Dennis Amato.

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polo enthusiast managing the Deauville Polo Club, helped influence a British team to make the trip. A series of cables were sent from England, the last declaring a team was ready to set sail. The Indoor Polo Association set up a committee, chaired by Townsend, including W. Averell Harriman, George C. Sherman, Robert Granniss and other leading figures of New York polo to iron out the event’s details, including funding the visitor’s traveling expenses. The event reportedly cost about $17,000 to stage. Townsend offered a challenge trophy, which was said to cost several thousand dollars to make. According to the deed of gift, the tournament’s formal name was the John R. Townsend International Indoor Polo Challenge Cup, played in conjunction with national and intercollegiate championships. Overall, the action included 46 games in 11 days, attracting more press coverage and spotlighting the arena game. With Townsend’s encouragement, in 1923, Thomas L. Leeming donated a cup for the 7- to 12goal Class C Championship, while Wilson M. Powell Jr. donated a cup for the 2- to 7-goal Class D Championship. The following year saw almost a 100% increase in Indoor Polo Association membership. In its coverage of the Challenge Cup, the New


Y E S T E RY E A R S .

York Times wrote about a new form of the arena game tried in France. The article said, “Still another form of the game has now been introduced which seems destined to achieve great popularity. Some distinctive name will have to be found for this game, which really is only indoor polo out of doors. It has been developed in France, where it has jumped into instant favor, and the coming summer will witness an extensive trial in the United States.” When the organizers of the Concours Hippique at Le Touquet introduced outdoor polo as a regular feature but didn’t have time to build a regulation field, it constructed a 200 x 100-yard wooden enclosure with 4-foot high walls. Using American indoor rules provided by the Indoor Polo Association, teams had three players each and a larger ball was used. Every detail of the play was able to be seen by the 5,000 spectators that watched the match. And the game offered other advantages—it is easier to learn, does not require as much time to play and the expense of ponies and grounds is far less than outdoor polo. It was a perfect way to train players and ponies and was ideal for army officers’ development in the sport. The references to the Army were not idle comments. With many officers in the cavalry and field horse artillery registered as players with the Indoor Polo Association, military units represented more than a third of the member clubs and, with its large armory halls, provided some of the best arena venues in the country. Moreover, a West Point cadet team won a national championship in 1922. The military coach of the West Point team was none other than Maj. George S. Patton. The 1923 Polo

Association Year Book included an editorial about army polo, writing, “The War Department then in encouraging polo is doing a very economical thing; the civilian polo player by helping and supporting the army in the same line is not only doing a very sporty thing but is also of vast assistance in rendering more efficient a body of men on whom, should war recur, the honor of his country will depend.” The Indoor Polo Association also used the stature of the international championship and interest in the visiting British team to propagate the potential of arena polo outside of New York with a series of demonstration matches. Not insignificantly, the first two demonstration games were against military teams at West Point. Matches in Detroit, Chicago, Cincinnati and Philadelphia followed. These matches also served as practices for the British team. The Brits, arriving on the Olympic, sent seven ponies on the Mississippi. Bad weather delayed the arrival of the players and the ponies came two weeks later. They were stabled at Squadron A and did not travel with the players to the Midwest. In their first match, the visitors trounced a 101st Cavalry team in Brooklyn, 21-3, riding borrowed ponies. In the first game on their own ponies, the Brits routed an American trio captained by W. Averill Harriman, 10-4. For the defense of the international trophy, the Indoor Polo Association selected top arena players, including two of the highest-rated indoor players in the country: • 9-goal Archer W. Kinny, star of the 1921 Townsend Class A Championship, playing No. 1 • 9-goal Dr. Hugh B. Blackwell, a member of the 1922

Official score sheets from the first Townsend International Cup series.

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The original International Indoor Polo Challenge Cup trophy. Its whereabouts remain unknown.

Townsend Class A Championship, playing No. 2 • 4-goal Robert A. Granniss, winner of the 1922 and 1923 Townsend Class A Championships, playing No. 3. Indoor Polo Association President George C. Sherman and R.K. Cooke, a member of the association’s executive committee, were alternates. The British team included: • 5-goal Capt. F.L. Walford playing No. 1 • 5-goal Capt. W.F. Holman playing No. 2 • 6-goal Capt. F.W. Egan playing No. 3 • 4-goal Capt. K. McMullen filled in for the ailing Holman and was the star of the British team, doing brilliant work, according to reports. Despite its cosmopolitan identity, the International Challenge Cup—by daring other countries to come to take it away—also brought out native nationalism. Even the New York Times described the English team as invaders coming to seize the Townsend. This, as much as the rhetoric about Olympian sportsmanship, seemed to fuel the intense local interest in New York. Thanks to continued coverage for a month leading up to the game and daily coverage during the matches, the event drew a capacity crowd. The first evening began with a Class C game between The Riding Club and First Philadelphia City Troop. After, the Seventh Regiment Band led the British and American teams into the arena. The 62 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Americans prevailed 4½-1. Kinny scored three goals; Blackwell made several accurate passes; while Grannis contributed several deep drives, scoring twice. Egan scored the only goal for England, a lone goal in the third. Two days later, the second game before the largest and most enthusiastic audience saw the Americans ahead 7½-1 at the half before winning 11-2. An interesting note is 12 goals were scored, however fouls were deducted from the total. The English saddles were held up in transit, so they played on borrowed American saddles. Half of their string developed sore backs and were not able to play in the last match. Instead, they had to borrow some American mounts. A New York Times headline read, “Visitors Poorly Mounted.” The third match was do-or-die for the Brits, but the Americans proved too experienced, winning 10-4 to ensure the trophy remained in the U.S. The last two games in the five-game series were played as exhibition matches. After the competition, the British team remained in the U.S., playing several indoor and outdoor matches. Their horses remained in the U.S. indefinitely after being purchased by the Cincinnati Polo Club. The Townsend International Challenge Cup raised the overall visibility of the sport both domestically and internationally for arena and grass polo. One of the most immediate impacts of the Townsend competitions was a significant expansion of the U.S. Army’s interest in indoor polo and its support with ponies and outdoor fields. Townsend had become a leading advocate of indoor polo. He was not only instrumental in bringing the English team to the U.S. but helped popularize a new version of a century-old sport. Sadly, he passed away after a brief illness just six months after the Challenge Cup at the age of 62. That might account for why, despite its success, the Townsend Challenge Cup was shelved for 71 years before being played in 1994 in Somers, Connecticut. The whereabouts of the original Townsend International Challenge Cup trophy is unknown. Some trophies were lent or given to country clubs around New York for safe keeping, but if records were kept they have not been located. The trophy currently being used for the Townsend Cup was also donated by Townsend, originally for the Class A Championships. He also donated the Intercollegiate Trophy, which is played for to this day. • Phil Karber and Dennis Amato contributed to this article.


E Q U I N E AT H L E T E

(continued from page 17)

of time and money will be well worth it.

necessary for a product to kill every worm in order to improve the horse’s health, minimize the risk of serious disease, improve feed efficiency, and reduce pasture contamination with parasite eggs and larvae. As mentioned above, resistance has developed against several of these dewormers in both small strongyle and roundworm parasites. It is therefore of utmost importance to routinely test the effectiveness of a given dewormer on every horse establishment.

A Complete Management Program Chemical control using dewormers is just one part of a complete parasite control plan. As parasites are primarily transferred through manure, good management is essential. Some of the procedures listed below can be helpful in reducing parasite burdens: • Keep the number of horses per acre to a minimum to prevent overgrazing and reduce pasture contamination with parasite eggs and larvae. • Pick up and dispose of manure regularly (at least twice a week during the warmer seasons, even in dirt or sand yards). • Do not spread manure on fields to be grazed by horses; instead, compost it in a pile away from the pasture before spreading it out.

Methods of Administration There are three main ways of administering dewormers: • Oral paste syringe • Feed additive (powder, liquid or pellets) • Nasogastric (stomach) tube All three methods are effective, providing the proper dose is given at the right time, the horse receives the full dose, and resistance has not been developed in the parasites being targeted. The dose must be calculated based on the horse’s body weight. Weight tapes are an accurate enough way of estimating a horse’s body weight for this purpose. Deworming pastes and feed additives are convenient and easy to administer. However, some horses find them unpalatable and spit them out or refuse to eat them. So be sure that all of the dose you’ve given is actually consumed by the horse. Tube deworming is a highly effective means of ensuring the horse receives the proper dose because the dewormer is delivered directly into the horse’s stomach. However, with the range of dewormers now available, it is seldom necessary for a veterinarian to deworm a horse by this method. Designing a Deworming Program There is no single deworming program that suits all horses and situations. The ideal program for your horses depends on number and ages of the horses on your farm, pasture management and your geographic location. It is best to have your regular veterinarian help you devise an appropriate deworming program for your horse or farm. Monitoring Having a veterinarian perform fecal egg counts to determine the amount of egg shedding that your horses have is important. This information will help ensure the dewormers being used are effective and also help determine the frequency of deworming necessary to keep your horses healthy. The outlay

• Mow and harrow pastures periodically to break up manure piles and expose parasite larvae to the elements (larvae can survive freezing, but they cannot tolerate extreme heat and drying for very long). • Consider rotating pastures by allowing sheep or cattle to graze them, thereby interrupting the life cycles of equine parasites. • Use a feeder for hay and grain rather than feeding on the ground. • Remove bot eggs regularly from the horse’s hair coat (flea combs work well in some instances). • Consult your veterinarian to set up an effective deworming program for your horses and monitor its effectiveness. For more information, contact your veterinarian.

Because horses drop manure in the same areas they eat, it is easy for parasites to exist. Following a complete management program is important for your horses’ health.

POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N 63


CALENDAR

November/December O C T O B E R 2 4 - NOV E M B E R 7 USPA Players Cup (4) Aiken, Aiken, SC

N O V E M B E R 1 0 - 14 USPA North American Cup Grand Champions, Wellington, FL

NOV E M B E R 2 6 - 2 8 Turkey Goal Boston, Georgetown, MA

O C T O B E R 2 5 - N O V E M B E R 14 Continental Cup (12-16) Grand Champions, Wellington, FL

N O V E M B E R 11 - 14 Fall Fandango Arena Events Legends, Kaufman, TX

NOV E M B E R 27 - 2 8 Thanksgiving Matches New Orleans, Folsom, LA

O C T O B E R 27 - NOV E M B E R 7 USPA Association Cup (8) New Bridge, Aiken, SC NOV E M B E R 1 - 3 0 National Twenty Goal (20) North American Cup (20) Grand Champions, Wellington, FL NOV E M B E R 3 - 7 Fall Plates Grand Champions, Wellington, FL Texas College Arena Championship Prestonwood, Oak Point, TX NOV E M B E R 4 - 7 National Arena Amateur Cup (3) Adm. Chester W. Nimitz (3) Legends, Kaufman, TX N O V E M B E R 4 - 11 Adm. Chester W. Nimitz (-1-0) Liberty Hall, Rixeyville, VA

Arena Constitution Cup (0-3) Texas Tech, Lubbock, TX N O V E M B E R 1 2 - 14 Arena Challenge Cup (2-8) Yale, Bethany, CT N OV E M B E R 12 - 15 Arena Challenge Cup (0-6) Texas Tech, Lubbock, TX N OV E M B E R 13 UT Polo Cup & Chili Cook-off (3) Dallas, Red Oak, TX N O V E M B E R 1 3 - 14 Congressional Cup (0-4) River Bend, Wellborn, TX USPA Players Cup (0-4) New Orleans, Folsom, LA Arena Women’s Challenge (3-6) Westchester, Portsmouth, RI

NOV E M B E R 6 Augusta Polo Cup Aiken, Aiken, SC

N O V E M B E R 17 - 21 USPA National Twenty Goal Grand Champions, Wellington, FL

NOV E M B E R 6 - 7 Club Fall Tournament & BBQ Mountain View, Charles Town, WV

N O V E M B E R 2 0 - 21 Teddy Roosevelt (4) CTPA, Texas Military, Poteet, TX

Western Region Central Coast, Los Osos, CA

Fleeter Cup Arena Tournament Greater Niagra, Wainfleet, Ontario

Challenge Cup New Orleans, Folsom, LA

Arena Sportsmanship Cup Rancho Naranjo, Santa Teresa, NM

USPA Hering Cup Circuit Arena Sportsmanship Cup Lakeside, Lakeside, CA

Southeastern Regional Liberty Hall, Rixeyville, VA

USPA Masters Cup Arizona, Casa Grande, AZ N O V E M B E R 9 - 14 Texas Women’s Open (16-20) U.S. Open Women’s Handicap (12-16) Houston, Houston, TX

64 POLO P L A Y E R S E D I T I O N

Intra Club Matches New Orleans, Folsom, LA N O V E M B E R 21 Jared Sheldon Polo Clinic Lakeside, Lakeside, CA NOV E M B E R 2 4 The Banyan Final Grand Champions, Wellington, FL

NOV E M B E R 27 Legends of Polo Carlos Gracida Memorial International Cup Grand Champions, Wellington, FL DECEMBER 3-5 U.S. Open Arena Championships (20) California, Los Angeles, CA DECEMBER 4 Christmas Polo Cup (3) Dallas, Red Oak, TX DECEMBER 4-5 Intra Club Matches New Orleans, Folsom, LA USPA Women’s Arena Challenge (12) Lakeside, Lakeside, CA USPA Sportsmanship Cup (2-4) Arizona, Casa Grande, AZ D E C E M B E R 11 Champions Tournament (2) Arizona, Casa Grande, AZ D E C E M B E R 11 - 1 2 Western Regionals Orange County, Silverado, CA Arena Sportsmanship Cup (6) Rancho Naranjo, Santa Teresa, NM D E C E M B E R 1 8 - 19 Christmas Arena Challenge Greater Niagra, Wainfleet, Ontario D E C E M B E R 2 8 - JA N UA RY 2 Congressional Cup (8) Costa Careyes, Jalisco, Mexico D E C E M B E R 3 0 - JA N UA RY 2 USPA Women’s Challenge (10-12) Eldorado, Indio, CA Note: All dates are subject to change. “USPA” refers to tournaments sponsored or sanctioned by the United States Polo Association. Signifies prize money available.



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