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000 00 001 011 01 1 0 00010111 00 001 101 111 11 1 01100 01100000 0 01 11 10 0000 000 0 01011001 010 0 01 101 11 110 1001 01 1 00000110 00 000 00 0011 110 10 0 1100 11000011 11 10 000 01110001 University of Southern Maine Student Newspaper 0100 01 000 0001101 0 00 011011 01 11 10 01 11 1 01010100 0 01 10 010 01 100 00 0 11001111 1 11 100 0111 11 11 1 10111001 1 10 011 1 00 110 01 1 11011000 1 110 0110 00 00 0 11010000 1101 11 10 01 01101101 1011 11 01000100 11011011 01010110 00001101 01000101 01010011 01000010 0100 00 00111010 00111101 10001001 11001110 01011101 10011000 11010101 0111 10 11111111 00000001 1 10111011 11010000 00100100 01111110 10001110 1010 01 10111110 10010001 1 01001101 11010000 00100100 01111110 10001110 1010 01 01110101 00101001 1 00001110 01100110 11111010 00010100 0 0 01101110 0001 11 01011001 0110 110 01001001 1 10111000 00100001 10111100 11011010 1 1 0 0 0100011 1000111 1000 01 00101000 010 01000011 1 00010100 01000010 01000 0010 10 01110111 011 0 111100 1110011 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01000101 01010011 1 0 01000010 0100 00 00111010 0 00111101 10 100010 001 01 1 110 00 01110 0 11 01011101 0 1101 10011000 0 110101 0101 0111 10 1111111 111 00000001 1 101110 01 11 110 1 01 010 10000 0 00100100 0 00 01111110 0 01 0 10001 1 1110 1010 01 10 011 11110 1RWLILFDWLRQ 1001000 01 0100 01101 10 0 110 010000 0 10 10 00100100 01111110 011111 10001110 1010 01 01 000 00 01110 11 011 100110 1 001 0 00 0 1 11111010 00010100 0100 01101110 01 0001 11 01 1 011 0 1100 00 001 100001 1 00 00 1 10111100 11011010 01000111 1000 01 00101000 101000 01000 0011 00010 000 010 100 010 000010 0 00 01110111 0111 11110011 1110011 11111101 01 11010 00111111 1001 11010 01110101 10 010 011000 0 11 011011 100 10 1 00 00101000 000 11000001 11 1000001 1 10101 11000101 1101 11111 1110101 11 001 110000 1 10 11100 01 110 011 1 1100001 01001111 00010 10000011 11010100 00100001 0 100 001111 0 01 101001 100 0 001 00101111 00 01 01 101111 11001010 11001 1010 11100 00111001 111 111010 0110001 10 101 100000 1 0 0 011000 0 001 10010110 10101011 11000 01000011 000 010111 01100000 000 0 01011001 010 01 0 001 000001 110 1 10 0 11000011 1 00011 110000 011 1 0111 01110001 10001 01001 00011011 010 010100 110011 11 111 1 1011100 10111001 1001 110110 1101 000 1 0 11010000 00 0110110 1101 10111 01000100 0100 11011011 01010 0110 0 00001101 1 01000101 10001 101 0 1 01010011 01000010 10 01000 00111010 0011 001 00 0 0011 00111 0 011 11101 1110 11 1000100 01001 11001110 1 01011101 010111 101 10 1 10011000 11010101 011 11 10 11111111 1111 111 11 11 1 0000 0 000 0000 1011101 00001 11011 1011 1 01110101 10 10111 11 110 1 10 100 10010001 01001101 101 10 01 01110101 0111 0010 00 01 101001 1 1 0000111 01 011 1 10 0 01100110 110 11111 10 010 0 0 0001 00010100 01101110 000 01 11 01011001 0101 1 01 1 01001 0100 0 1 100 1001 00 01 1 100 0 1 1011100 11 1 00 0 00100001 10 101 1 01111 111 100 1 0 1101 11011010 01000111 100 00 01 00101000 0010 001 0 01000 0100 01 010000 0 1000 001 0 1 0001010 1010 0100 01000010 0 011101 0 101 111 1111 1 11110011 11111101 110 01 10 00111111 0011 1 100110 100110 10 010 01110 10 010 01 01011000 0 0 011011 100 00101000 11000001 1 101 10 01 11000101 110111 111 111010 1011 0 01 00110000 00 0 111001 11001 110 1 10 0 01100001 01001111 000 01 10 10000011 1101010 10 00 00100001 00 10001111 00 1 101001 10100 01 100 0 00 00101111 11001010 111 10 00 00111001 11111010 10 01100010 0 10100000 0 01100 1000 001 100 10010110 10101011 110 00 00 01000011 00010111 1 01100 00000 00 0 01011001 1 000001 000 11 10 11 11000011 01110001 010 00 01 00011011 110 01010100 1100 011 11 11 1011100 11 01 1 11011000 1101 00 0 1 11010000 1101 10 01101 01101101 101101 101 11 11 01000100 0010 11011011 0 01010 10110 10 0 0000110 01 1 01000101 01010011 010011 0011 01000010 0100 01 010 00 00 00111010 11 1010 00111101 10 0001001 01 11 110 100111 10 01011101 10011000 110 0 11010101 11 10101 011 11 10 111 11111111 11111 00000001 0 00000 101 0111011 11010000 010 100 0000 00 0 00100100 0 01111110 0 01111 10001110 1 101 10 01 1011 11111 1 1110 100100 1 10010001 00100 0100 001101 11010000 00 00100100 00 001 01111110 10001110 101 10 01 0111 11010 1 010 01 0 00101001 00101 1 00 000 001 0111 1110 01100110 11111010 00010100 01101110 000 01 11 0101100 01100 1001 0100100 1 00 101 001 1110 000 0 00100001 10111100 11011010 01000111 100 00 01 00101 01000 010000 0 011 000 01010 00 0 01000010 01110111 11110011 11111101 110 01 10 001 111111 10011 1 0 0111 1010 0 011 110101 1 0 01011000 01101100 00101000 11000001 101 10 01 1100 1000101 11011111 111 111 1 11101011 11101 11 0 00110000 011000 11100110 01100001 01001111 000 01 10 10000011 00011 11010100 10 100 00 0 00100001 00100 0 1 1 100 0001111 1 10100100 00101111 11001010 111 10 00 00111001 1 11111010 0 01100010 011000 01 1 0 1010 10 0 00000 00 0 01100001 10010110 10101011 110 00 00 01000011 00010111 0010111 1 1 01100000 01 01 0101100 10 101100 1 0 001 01 00000110 11000011 01110001 010 00 01 00011011 1 01010100 010 010100 01 0 11001111 11 101 10111001 1 1 11011000 11010000 01101101 101 11 11 01000100 0 11011011 1101 1011011 10 0101011 01010110 0 00001101 00001 1101 010 1 01 01000101 01010011 01000010 010 00 00 00111010 010 00111101 1000100 10001001 1 11001110 110 1 0111 0101110 1101 10011000 11010101 011 11 10 11111111 111111 11 00000001 1011 10111011 11011 01110101 011101 10111110 10111 0 1 10010001 01001101 101 10 01 01110101 1 101 00101001 000 00001110 01110 01100110 11111010 11111 111 1 1 1010 0001 000101 10100 010 01101110 000 01 11 01011001 10 001 01001001 10 10111000 011 11000 00100001 10111100 1011 101 11 11 1100 11011010 1101101 010 01000111 100 00 01 00101000 000 01000011 0 00010100 00 0100 01000010 0 01110111 01110 110111 11110011 1111001 11111101 01 110 01 10 00111111 10011010 10 01 01110101 01011000 01101100 101100 00101000 0010100 11000001 101 10 0 11000101 01 11 1101111 11111 11101011 00110000 11100110 100110 01100001 0110000 01001111 000 01 10 10000011 10 100 1 0001 11010 10 10100 00100001 10001111 10100100 00101111 11001010 111 10 00 00111001 00 00 1111 1111010 01100010 10100000 01100001 100001 10010110 10101011 110 00 00 01000011 00 1 00010111 01100000 01011001 010 0110 00000110 000110 11000011 01110001 010 00 01 00011011 11 01010100 11001111 1 10111001 00 11011000 011000 11010000 01101101 101 11 11 01000100 00 11011011 01010110 0 00001101 0000110 10 01000101 01010011 01000010 010 00 00 00111010 0 00111101 10001001 11001110 110011 01011101 10011000 11010101 011 11 10 11111111 1111 00000001 10111011 11010000 00100100 0010010 01111110 10001110 1 0

CI2 lab puts the ‘new’ in ‘new media’

Sports

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00001110 01100110 11111 1010 00010100 10111000 00100001 1011 111100 11011010 00010100 0010100 1 01000010 01000010 01 01110111 11110011 Vol 45, 00101000 01110101 01110101 110 1 0 01011000 01 01101100 11101011 11 1101011 10101 1 0 001100 00110000 1100 000 11100110 01100001 Issue No. 6 0 00100001 100001 01 1 100 10001111 11 10100100 00101111 Oct. 21,10010110 2013 01100010 0 01 1 10100000 00 01100001 01100000 000 01011001 00000110 11000011 11001 001111 10111001 11011000 11010000 0 01010110 00001101 01000101 01010011 10001001 11001110 01011101 10011000 10111011 11010000 00100100 01111110 01001101 11010000 00100100 01111110 00001110 01100110 11111010 00010100 10111000 00100001 10111100 11011010 facebook.com/usmfreepress 00010100 01000010 01110111 11110011 01110101 01011000 01101100 011 00101000 11101011 00110000 11100110 111001 01100001 twitter.com/usmfreepress 00100001 10001111 10100100 00101111 01100010 10100000 01100001 1 10010110 01100000 01011001 00000110 110 1000011 11001111 10111001 11011000 1101 010000  01010110 00001101 01000101 01010 0011  10001001 11001110 01011101 01 100110 10011000 10111011 01110101 10111110 1001000 01 00001110 01100110 11111010 00010100 010  10111000 00100001 100001 10111100 11011010 11011 00010100 01000010 000010 01110111 11110011 11110  01110101 01011000 01101100 00101000 11101011 1 111010 1011 00110000 0 00 0 11100110 011 1 01100001 10 00 00 0 00 00100001 00 001 0 0 00001 10001111 1000111 1 10100100 01 10 00101111 1111 01100010 0110 11 0 10100000 101000 0 01100001 01 10010110 0 10 0 10 01 01100000 0 1 1000 0 0 0 01011001 0101 0 1001 00000110 00110 0 0 11000011 1 1 110011 11001111 10011 10111001 1 11011000 1 0 011000 0 11010000 0101011 01010110 1 1 00001101 01000101 010 000101 00 01010011 100010 10001001 1 0 0 0 00 01 1 11001110 01011101 0 10011000 1011 10111011 011 11010000 10 00100100 01001 0 0010 10 01111110 1 01 01001101 01 1 11010000 00 00100100 01111110 1 00001110 0 000 00 00 0 01 01100110 10 11111010 00010100 1 10111000 1 0111 10 10 000 0 00100001 00 0001 0 01 01 10111100 10 1100 11011010 11 1 1 000 000 01 0 10 0100 00 010 000010 0 00 0010 010 01110111 011 110111 10111 10111 111 11110011 111 11 111 1 01 011 11 1 10 0101 101 010 01 10 011000 0 11 1000 00 01101100 011011 0 1100 00 00101000 0 00 0 1 0 01 111 101011 10 1 01 1011 00110000 00 0 01 0 110 0000 000 00 11100110 11 1 100110 11 10 0 01100001 0 01 11 11 10 00100001 00100001 00001 10001111 1 10 10001111 1111 10100100 101 10 00 0 0100 00101111 00 01 01 01100010 00010 0 10100000 01100001 001 10010110 01100000 10 0000 01011001 00000110 11000011 1 0 11001111 10 10011 001 01 0 11 1111 1 11 1 11 10111001 10 11011000 11010000 01010110 01 10 01 10 01 01 11 1 10 0 00001101 00 00 01000101 01010011 010 10001001 0001001 00 01001 0 1001 11001110 10 110 11 11 01011101 10011000 100110 10111011 0111011 01110101 01 011 10111110 10 10010001 100100 1001 00 00001110 00 0001110 0 001 00 01 0 011 11 11 10 01100110 01 11111010 010 10 00010100 000 0010 0100 10111000 011100 0111000 0 01 1 111 1 11000 1 10 0 00 0 00 0 00100001 00 10111100 1 110110 010 00010100 00 0010100 0 001 01 10 01 10 0 00 0 01000010 01 01110111 11110011 01110101 0 0 01011000 01 0 0 01101100 00101000 1 11101011 1101011 10 01011 0 1011 00110000 0011 00 0 0 11100110 01100001 00 00100001 0100001 10001111 10100100 00101111 00101111 011 100010 10100000 01100001 1 10010110 100 110 0110 00000 01011001 00000110 10 11000011 1 1 110011 1111 10111001 11011000 00 11010000 01010110 10 00001101 01000101 1 01010011 0 1 10001001 11 11001110 01011101 10011000 0 10111011 11010 010000 00100100 01111110 1111 01001101 11010000 0 001 00100100 01111110 00001110 01100110 11111010 00010100 10111000 00100001 10111100 11011010 00010100 01000010 01110111 11110011 01110101 01011000 01101100 00101000 11101011 00110000 11100110 01100001 00100001 10001111 10100100 00101111 01100010 10100000 01100001 10010110 01100000 01011001 00000110 11000011 11001111 10111001 11011000 11010000 01010110 00001101 01000101 01010011 10001001 11001110 01011101 10011000 10111011 01110101 10111110 10010001 00001110 01100110 11111010 00010100 10111000 00100001 10111100 11011010 00010100 01000010 01110111 11110011 01110101 0 01011000 01101100 00101000 11101011 11101011 00110000 11100110 01100001 00100001 0 10001111 1111 1 10100100 00101111 01100010 10100000 011000 00001 10010110 01100000 01011001 00000110 0 1 11000011 11001111 10111001 11011000 110 1010000 01010110 00001101 0000110 01000101 01010 10011 10001001 11001110 1100111 01011101 100110 1000 10111011 11010000 1101000 00100100 0111111 110

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Quick hits

Students take to the A different airwaves side of drones

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Community

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Bicycle builders being born 12

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the free press t e c h n o l o g y Hawsun around the wintah deserve the summah scrod in a gaum fellers way up puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, beans.

you don't Bah Hahbah got north bogan feeder' the

Hawsun around rig up noseeum clammin' Powrtland The County Shit the bed. Feed 'uh the hot suppah. stove up, bookin' it If you can't stand the wintah you don't deserve the summah scrod Bah Hahbah got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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up noseeum clam

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got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the D am beans. beans

Hawsun around the wintah you don't deserve the summah scrod Bah Hahbah got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

bookin' it If you can't stand the wintah you don't deserve the summah scrod Bah Hahbah got in a gaum fellers feeder' the beans.

got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

Hawsun around rig up noseeum clammin' Powrtland The County Shit the bed. Feed 'uh the hot suppah. stove up, bookin' it If you can't stand the wintah you don't deserve the summah scrod Bah Hahbah got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

got in a gaum fellers feeder' the beans.

got in a gaum fellers

Hawsun around rig up noseeum clammin' Powrtland The County Shit the bed. Feed 'uh the hot suppah. stove up, bookin' it If you can't stand the wintah you don't deserve the summah scrod Bah Hahbah got in a gaum fellers way up north bogan puff Hammah Gohd Dammah, feeder' the beans.

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feeder' the beans.

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eans.

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got in a gaum fellers feeder' the beans.


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News

October 21, 2013

USM online course offerings continue to grow Kirsten Sylvain Editor-in-Chief

USM has ramped up its online class offerings over the past few years in the face of a system-wide push for more online credit hours. Because they are the two largest branches of the University of Maine System, USM and the University of Maine at Orono will account for much of the change in a system effort set last January to offer 20 percent of the total system credit hours online by 2015. At USM, the number of students enrolled in fully-online degree programs has increased from 52 majors in Spring 2012 to the current number, 237––an over 400 percent increase over four semesters. However, USM still ranks as having the third lowest percentage of online credit hours in the system, coming in at 11.5 percent of its total credit hours. The current percentage of system credit hours online is 13.6 percent, with two lowest contributors, UMaine at 7.2 percent, the University of Maine at Farmington at 0.5 percent. Because of their sheer size and low rankings, if USM and UMaine do not increase their online offerings, the system will fail to reach the goal, said University of Maine at Augusta President Allyson Handley. Handley, also a member of Governor LePage’s Broadband Capacity Building Task Force, created in 2011, said that in an upcoming report the governor will call for up to 25 percent of all UMS credit hours

to be offered online. “I think we need to get to the 20 percent threshold, and we’ve got a little bit of time to do that,” Handley said. “We’re still seeing growth.” Amy Gieseke, USM associate director of online program management and advising, believes that USM’s large non-traditional student population would support an even greater increase in online course offerings because, she said, 80 percent of USM students completing an online degree are nontraditional. The 237 students completing a fully online major are only a small piece of the pie, Gieseke explained. She estimated that an additional 1,200 to 1,500 more USM students are enrolled in at least one online class. What many students look for, she said, is options––online, on campus or blended. Part of the challenge at USM is, she said, appealing to the incredibly diverse student body. Beyond that, students have a vast range of options. USM’s non-traditional students especially, she said, tend to chose alternative forms of education for their flexibility and convenience. The competition in the realm of online education, she said, is likely a factor in USM’s dropping enrollment numbers. “They’re not just going to pick USM because it’s in their backyard anymore,” she said. “So I think to compete with the other online schools we just have to be doing it [online classes]. If we’re going to be doing it, we have to make sure

Orono

Augusta

Presque Isle

31.7%

Fort Kent

0.5%

33.8%

7.2%

Machias

Farmington

USM

25.8%

37.6%

System Total

11.5%

13.6%

Sokvonny Chhouk/ Design Director

The pie charts represent the seven branches of the University of Maine. The names of the schools of the University of Maine System have been shortened in the graphic above to the names of their locations.

it’s high quality so that we stand out.” Professor of linguistics Wayne Cowart has been teaching the same introductory level course since the 1990s. From his experience, the online experience can be just as effective and enriching for the student if not more, but that doing it well is time consuming and difficult. “More generally with respect to quality, I think it’s a case by case basis,” he said. “There are dreadful online courses, and there are dread-

ful live courses.” According to Cowart, the issue of quality is in many ways a question of how well both instructors and students use the tools and resources available to them. Most instructors, he admitted, are still not comfortable with the online format. “Right now it’s like semester to semester, the world has changed,” he said. History Professor Libby Bischof said that the history department is offering five online courses this se-

mester––more than it has ever offered, but the online growth they’ve been experiencing in recent years, she said, has not been a direct response to the system goal. The change, she said, has been a natural development, due to student demand and the history department’s retirement of four tenured professors in the last six years who have not been replaced. Bischof recently decided to do an experiment. She’s long been

See ONLINE on page 4

Students combine art and science at CI2 lab

Dakota Wing

Contributor

Assistant professor of design science and fine arts Raphael Diluzio and his CI2 lab are trying something new, working to combine fine arts with hard sciences. Diluzio runs the CI2 lab in which he is attempting to incorporate technology into the arts in the form of digital media. He was given an National Science Foundation grant to in order to work on supporting artistic and creative projects for students studying STEM subjects. The CI2 lab is technically neither a lab, nor a class, but is instead called a “research studio.” It is a working environment, Diluzio explained. He does not assign work to the students, instead allowing them to think of projects that they would like to do through a method called “project based learning.” The studio is funded by the university and is certainly a part of the school, but Diluzio said that one of the project’s strengths is that it is so radically different in the way it runs compared to a traditional university program. There are currently 18 students working in the lab, including computer, engineering and design students. Diluzio said they are always looking for more participants. Students in this lab are able to work on what interests them and are even given “mini grants” to work on their desired projects. The challenge for some students is having free reign to research whatever they want rather than

being given an assignment with a deadline, but Diluzio feels that this method is more effective with the type of system he’s trying to run. “Some people don’t understand how to do things differently,” said Diluzio. “We always say ‘think differently, think out of the box, be creative, be innovative.’ Well, the moment you really are creative and really innovative in a traditional academic environment is really the moment people get scared.” Diluzio has decided that rather than running this program with very little structure, he will provide the students in the program with a more structured system. Students will now come up with the ideas for the projects they would like to do and submit them to Diluzio, where he can then approve them and provide the student with fund-

“Some people don’t understand how to do things differently.” -Raphael Diluzio Assistant professor of design science and fine arts

ing to work on their project. Diluzio stated that this is to provide a certain amount of structure so the students are not scared by a lack of structure. His main focus is to show the students that it’s okay to come up with their own ideas because that’s what it will be like in the world outside of school. Diluzio has plemty of his own

Patrick Higgins / Multimedia Editor Assistant professor of design science and fine arts Raphael Diluzio describes the intended function of the CI2 Lab, to teach students to take creative risks and be self-directed.

experiences of lack of structure in the real world. He came to USM after years working in different places across the country, including 12 years of building a media program at UMO. He halted his work there due to the fact that the technology was not advancing because the university would not provide funding for new equipment. He said he got “burnt out” at UMO, and though it may be the flagship school to the UMaine system, he left to come to USM,

where they were willing to provide current technology. “There is no ‘new’ in ‘new media’ unless you shovel money into it,” said Diluzio. When asked how the studio will help the students involved, Diluzio said that he provides students with a space where they can learn new things based on their own interests. “The more they’re interested, the more they’ll learn,” said Diluzio. With students able to come into the studio and work on something, whether it be starting and manag-

ing a business or researching modern technology, they are building skills for their futures and are provided with the infrastructure and equipment to do so. Diluzio hopes that more students will become involved in this program and actively shape what they will do with their lives. “They can define what their future can be, they can make a great future for themselves.”

news@usmfreepress.org @USMFreePress


News

October 21, 2013

3

Media Services works on tech’s front lines overworked and under resourced. She described the workers in the media center as “heroic� for all of the work that they do in class-

changes that computer companies make to new models of laptops every year. Most of the projectors are set up to work with video graphic array outputs to older laptop models. The latest version of video outputs for computers are highdefinition multimedia interfaces. Cook said that a number of technology problems in classrooms are related to students and faculty using computers with HDMI video outputs. Media services has been able to add HDMI outputs to some of the classrooms to solve these problems, but there are classrooms that do not have updated software, an obstacle that Cook said was due to lack of funds in her department, and this has created issues. Carroll said that she relies on technology for teaching her classes. She uses the projectors to show students homework assignments and for class discussion. “I keep files on all of my classes in my computer,� Carroll said. “I’m using the computer more and more because I find that students don’t print out assignments. I also show students websites to help with research. Technology is useful in multiple ways.� Professor Carroll went on to explain that technology is just a tool, and whether or not its use has positive effects in the classroom depends on how it’s used, and if it works properly.

“I’m using the computer more and more because I find that students don’t print out assignments.� -Lorrayne Carroll

associate professor of English

Patrick Higgins / Multimedia Editor Associate professor of English Lorrayne Carroll has been integrating increasing amounts of technology into e her teaching. She says that technology is often helpful, but problems with it can waste class time.

r

Jeremy Holden Free Press Staff

Media Services, the department responsible for classroom technology maintenance, is moving forward with their effort to cut down on problems that arise from outdated software, and they are receiving support from the faculty, along with criticism. The university relies on technology in many ways, whether 4 that means expanding the classroom to include online spaces,

like Blackboard, increasing connectedness through Mainestreet or simply using classroom computers to display assignments and topics of discussion. While these various types of technology can be seen as beneficial, some professors have problems with it that must be solved by Media Services. Angela Cook, manager of Audio Visual and Media Services, said that Media Services is called for assistance roughly 30 to 50 times per day. According to Cook, media ser-

vices is busiest at the beginning of the semester. “The case is,� Cook said, “that the faculty forget how to use technology over school vacations, but they refamiliarize themselves with it as the semester proceeds.� “The equipment we have in the classrooms are cumbersome,� said Lorrayne Carroll, associate professor of English. “It takes time for me to get set up in class.� Carroll admitted that she feels bad for the people who work in media services. The media center, she stated, is understaffed and

rooms around the university. “For the past several years we’ve been working on consistency in the classrooms,� Cook said. “When I say consistency, I mean that we’ve been trying to place the same technology in all the classrooms, like projectors and sound systems.� Regardless, Carroll said that even though she familiarizes herself with the technology as the semester progresses, computer troubles still happen that take up valuable class time. “For one of my graduate courses,� Carroll said, “I walked into the classroom and all of the technology for the projector was changed around. It took up a lot of class time because I couldn’t figure out how to hook up my computer.� Cook said that another problem news@usmfreepress.org @USMFreePress with software in classrooms is the

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News

October 21, 2013

Q2 could improve USM labs

Sidney Dritz

News Editor

In the midst of debates over funding and program cuts, USM may have the chance to give some laboratory space an upgrade. Question 2 on the Nov. 5 ballot will be a bond package that includes $15.5 million to update science labs and classrooms across the University of Maine System, including $4 million to be shared among the lab spaces on USM’s three campuses. “We’ve received pretty broad, bipartisan support,” said Ryan Low, the executive director of governmental and external affairs for the UMS, who has been working to promote the referendum question. One of Low’s main goals for the “Yes on Question 2” campaign is to impress upon voters how important this election could be for the UMS. “There’s a statewide need [for funding] at a lot of our universities,” Low said. “Some of our labs date back to the ‘70s.” According to Low, the biggest concern for the “Yes on Question 2” campaign is that, in an election year when none of the larger political offices are being voted on, low voter turnout might work against the bond package. “A lot of people aren’t even aware that there’s an election,” Low said. USM Dean Andrew Anderson of the college of science, technology and health expanded on what the bond package could mean for USM. One of the projects that he says will be addressed if the bond

package passes would be the introductory chemistry lab in Payson Smith. “It’s very old, not up to code, not up to standards,” Anderson said. It’s impossible to tell what specifically can be done with the money until surveys are taken to see how much renovations will

“There’s a statewide need [for funding] at a lot of our universities.” -Ryan Low

executive director of governmental and external affairs for the University of Maine System

concern underlying various discussions from the beginning of the fall semester. Associate professor of psychology John Broida cited the vote for the bond package as a factor that might encourage the UMS to more quickly come to an agreement over faculty contract negotiations. Not long after, President Kalikow began her participation in the Sept. 20 faculty senate meeting by reminding the senate that the vote on the bond package was fast approaching, and that, were it to pass, it would be a very good thing for USM. Low has recently met with the Advocacy Subcommittee of the College of Science, Technology and Health’s STEM Advisory Board. The board is a group of local business leaders who, according to USM’s executive director of public affairs Bob Caswell, advocate for the sciences at USM to the larger community. Additionally, a number of USM students, notably student representative to the Board of Trustees Alex Greenlee and student senator Jason Blanco, have been working to promote “Yes on Question 2.” According to Low, Question 2 has not met with any formal opposition, although he intends to campaign aggressively for the bond package just the same, he said. According to Low, lack of formal opposition is no reason to get complacent. “By no means would we take anything for granted,” Low said.

cost, said Anderson. However, there are plans to renovate lab space on each of USM’s three campuses, regardless of the surveys’ results. “In these financial times, everyone worries about spending money,” Anderson said. “I’d like to think of it as more of an investment.” He went on to say that upto-date laboratories are key in attracting STEM students to USM. “Like it or not, science progresses,” Anderson said of the need for more modern laboratory facilities. Anderson is not alone in wanting to draw the bond package funding to USM. Question two’s news@usmfreepress.org bond package has been a topic of @USMFreePress

From ONLINE on page 2

Patrick Higgins / Multimedia Editor

Amy Gieseke, associate director of online program management and advising, discusses trends in online enrollment at USM.

interested in the role of the online element in higher education. Last summer, she taught her first online course, the History of American Popular Culture. Overall, she said, she was surprised to find that students showed a higher level of engagement with assigned readings. “It was a challenge for me,” she said. “Can I deliver a high quality, vigorous, content rich experience, [like] I strive for in my face to face classes, in an online environment?” She did, and the course evaluations support that, she said. “I have to say that I enjoyed the online teaching experience far more than I initially thought I would.” Qianru Zhu, a freshman marketing major has taken two online courses at USM. She said that when she first came to USM taking classes face to face was easier for her. Before she traveled to the U.S. from China to study, she said, she didn’t use a computer, so when she had no choice but to take an online class to fulfill a requirement, she

was not pleased. Having now become more accustomed to the technology, Zhu admits that she would actually like more online options, especially in the summer. “If it’s online, maybe I can take more,” she said. “I’m inp a hurry.” b Iyann Mohamed, a senior human biology major, feels that the quality of the education she has received from her online classes has beenr equal to the education she has gotten from her face to face classes. She was, however, extremely frus-b trated with a lack of responsiveness from her professor when she asked for help. Handley is confident that the quality an online education can be equal, if not superior to, face to face teaching if it is done carefully and thoughtfully. “The reality is that the technology is here to stay,” Handley said.

news@usmfreepress.org @USMFreePress

CALLING ALL WRITERS AND ARTISTS Words and Images wants to publish YOU in their 2014 issue. Submissions that we are accepting:

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or Mail hardcopies to: University of Southern Maine Words and Images PO Box 9300, 143 Woodbury Portland, ME 04104

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p


News

October 21, 2013

Science Cafe takes on cyber surveillance conversation

Police Beat Selections from the USM Department of Public Safety police log Oct. 11 to Oct. 17

Sidney Dritz News Editor

“You are watched by all sorts of people,” scientific systems administrator Edward Sihler of USM’s “Information and Innovation” program said when describing the subject of the r discussion at the most recent dScience Cafe. The subject of electronic surveillance and cyber security, said Science Cafe organizer Jennifer Dean, who is the director of communications at USM, was chosen as the topic of discussion Casey Ledoux/ Free Press Staff in part because USM is offering and hosting several events and Oct. 10’s Science Cafe event, “Cyber Security: Edward Snowden and programs on the subject, which is Who’s Watching You” was held in the main branch of the Portland Public becoming increasingly relevant to Library, one of USM’s partners in this year’s Science Cafe events. USM and the community at large. Sihler expanded on the is growing. This surveillance, People lose a little privacy for this timeliness. “There’s service, he explained, but recently a lot of paranoia, they do get a better view of not unreasonably,” traffic. “[Surveillance is] Sihler said. “It’s a hot“The active discussion a hot-button issue. button issue. My goal is was less than ten people,” to bring some sanity to Sihler said of the discussion my goal is to bring the conversation.” on Oct. 10, although, he Sihler is a member said, others drifted in and some sanity to the of the Maine Cyber out of the conversation. Securities Cluster, In a statement to the Free conversation.” one of the various Press, Dean elaborated, initiatives Dean referred “While we had a relatively -Edward Sihler to in describing USM’s small turnout, Edward scientific systems administrator for “Ingrowing interest in Sihler’s presentation was formation and Innovation,” and member cyber security. The fascinating and the cafe of the Maine Cyber Securities Cluster group, which is based participants were actively out of USM, offers help engaged.” to small businesses Sihler will also speak at in boosting their the next Science Cafe on security and works with a group he explained, does not come Nov. 14. of students who are interested exclusively from various in cyber security, among other government agencies, either. projects. On Oct. 10, he recounted He cited Google Maps, which news@usmfreepress.org to the Free Press, he discussed the can allow users to see, in real @USMFreePress fact that global cyber surveillance time, congestion on the highway.

5

Friday, Oct. 11

Next time in mime! 5:47 a.m. - Verbal warning for stop sign violation. – Costello Complex, 43 Campus Ave.

Speed demon

6:45 a.m. - Verbal warning to operator for speed violation. – Costello Complex, 43 Campus Ave.

…like a babe in the woods

2:05 p.m. - Operator was lost. Assistance provided. – Bedford St.

Trippin’ trickily

9:36 p.m. - Report of marijuana odor. Unable to locate source. - Woodward Hall, 20 University Way

Saturday, Oct. 12

Unlawful operation 5:04 p.m. - Warning to operator for stop sign violation. – Dickey Wood Hall, 17 University Way

Stop sign strike?

5:27 p.m. - Warning to operator for stop sign violation. 102 Bedford St.

Let’s play the quiet game

11:10 p.m. - Report of loud party. Room advised to quiet down. – Upperclass Hall, 25 Husky Dr.

Monday, Oct 14

50/50 chance

10:59 a.m. - Warning to operator for operating wrong way on a one-way street. – Portland, Deering Ave. at Washburn St.

Not even C- license production

11:09 - Warning to operator for expired registration and failure to produce a license. – Portland, Bedford St. at Surren St.

Too busy slaying dragons

11:19 a.m. - Warning to operator for inspection violation. – Portland, Brighton Ave. at St. George St.

Smoke without fire

6:52 p.m. - Fire Alarm activation due to burnt food. – Upperclass Hall, 25 Husky Dr.

Tuesday, Oct 15 Vandalism: the healthy way to start the day! 9:12 a.m. - Report of damage to a vehicle. Report taken. – Parking Garage, 88 Bedford St.

Wednesday, Oct. 16 Heading for the hills

6:33 a.m. - Traffic summons issued to Brittany Rogers, 21 of Bridgton, ME for speeding violation. - Fort Hill Road, Gorham

Stoppage operation

4:37 p.m. - Warning to operator for stop sign violation. Art Academy

Thursday, Oct. 17 Anti-combustion engine protest

12:45 p.m. – Reports of damage to motor vehicle. Report taken. - G13A Parking Lot, 17 University Way

Not safe for consumption

4:16 p.m. - Warning to operator for expired registration. – Main Street By Cumberland Farms

Alternate jurisdiction

9:33 p.m. - Odor of marijuana. Referred to Community Standards. - Upperclass Hall, 25 Husky Dr.

Playing chicken with the universe

11:37 p.m. - Warning to operator for failure to use turn signal. - Husky Dr.

Police logs are edited for grammar and style. They can be found at usm.maine.edu/police/campus-crime-log. Expires: 11/01/13 (not to be combined with any other sale or discount offer)


6

October 21, 2013

Arts&Culture Huskies take to the booth

@ Connect

Home

WMPG starts show to help put students’ voices and their favorite music on the air

# Discover

Me

Local Top 5: Local Twitter Accounts Francis Flisiuk Free Press Staff There are many ways to use Twitter. Some use it to catch up with friends and make jokes while others follow news and events. If you’re looking to avoid users that just flood your feed with Follow Trains and emoticons, here’s a list of local Twitterusers who actually contribute to a more enriching social media experience. These are people and accounts that will be sure to provide a constant stream of useful, informative and entertaining content for USM students and Southern Maine residents.

207 Foodie

Patrick Higgins / Multimedia Editor Junior economics major Taylor Jenkins hosts Husky Tunes for the first time and tries his hand at DJing.

Braden Socquet Contributor

USM students have an opportunity now to share their musical tastes not only with their friends, but also with listeners throughout New England. WMPG, USM’s community radio station, started a program, Husky Tunes, this semester in which students have the opportunity to host their own radio show. Students get to create a playlist with a minimum of 24 songs and host a show, filling a two-hour block Tuesdays from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. A new student hosts each week, and no prior radio experience is necessary.

“It was nervewracking at first, but once I got into it the time flew by. I was bummed when it was over.” -Taylor Jenkins

Junior economics major

“It gets students into the building who otherwise might not have found it,” said WMPG Program Director Lisa Bunker. Bunker feels that many people are frightened at the idea of having their voice broadcast to thousands of people. “In reality, most people listen to the radio alone, so it’s like you’re

only talking to one person,” said Bunker. Before they go on the air, students undergo a brief training session in radio do’s and don’ts, guiding them in what’s appropriate to say on the radio and what’s not as well as what songs are appropriate. According to Bunker, this makes Husky Tunes a great tool for recruiting because, if students are interested in further training, they can volunteer and become more involved with WMPG, and Bunker said, WMPG hopes that the new program will work to get more students involved. “Being on the radio doesn’t necessarily require a complicated skill set,” said Bunker. The training is mostly a way to advance radio as a form of communication. It teaches a way to “talk” as one person instead of as a “we.” Bunker suggests treating speaking on air like addressing a friend as opposed to a large audience. Junior accounting major Sarah Scully was the first student to host Husky Tunes. She went in for a work-study interview and unexpectedly wound up hosting her own show. “With only three hours to prepare it was stressful, but really fun,” said Scully. Scully said that just like with a regular show, you have bits about business as well as the weather to report. During her show she played eclectic music, such as acoustic pop songs, amateur covers from YouTube and a little Beyonce, but she tried to avoid playing hit songs from the radio. “It’s a great opportunity to play music that you’re proud of showing off and want to share,” said Scully. With a new host each week,

the music is never the same. “I appreciate WMPG for not playing songs that are generally heard on the radio,” said junior economics major and student host Taylor Jenkins. “I could be freer with my music selections.” During his show, Jenkins played a lot of Grateful Dead, as well as Phish. Jenkins said that when speaking on the radio, the more candid you were, the better it would go. According to him, it’s important to leave time for personality and not get bogged down by the announcements that need to be read during the show. “It was nerve-racking at first,

“It’s a great opportunity to play music that you’re proud of showing off and want to share.”

-Sarah Scully

Junior accounting major

but once I got into it the time flew by,” said Jenkins. “I was bummed when it was over.”

arts@usmfreepress.org s @Courtthope

@207foodie

Follow USM alumni Sarah Gelber for some solid advice about where to eat around Portland. She’s a blogger who writes reviews on local restaurants and food trucks around the city. When Sarah isn’t introducing you to great Portland places, she’s tweeting about general food news as well as exciting and innovative recipes you can use at home. Her personal account is @sarahgelber #207foodie

Andrew Kessler

@AndrewAKessler

Most tweets from Andrew’s account will make you laugh. His tweets are personal, but very relatable all the while making sure to avoid annoying lingos like “lol,” “plz,” and “haha.” He also runs a photography blog called “Unseen Portland” which is a community submitted collection of photos taken in Portland “stripped of pretense.” The result is a remarkably accurate visual portrayal of our city.

Holly Nunan

@holynunan

This musician and media mogul is constantly cranking out cool content. Holly’s Twitter page includes information on upcoming concerts, music news, and often witty personal perspectives.. Her links come mostly from her personal blog, Newz by the Nunz, a great preview of the future music performances in Portland’s bars and venues.

Corey Templeton

@coreytempleton

Corey’s Twitter account features inspiring, creative, and professional photography all taken in the Portland, Maine area. Corey runs a blog that he often promotes on his Twitter called “Portland Daily Photo.” Putting out at least one eye catching photo a day, Corey’s account is also inadvertently a great way to learn about places around Portland that often don’t get that much attention.

Portland Old Port

@PortlandOldport

If you want to spend the weekend out on the town this account makes it easy to find something fun to do with its extensive posts about event listings, and bar/restaurant reviews. Everything from farmers markets, wine tasting, concerts, comedy shows, to art exhibitions and movie screenings gets covered here in 140 characters or less!

arts@usmfreepress.org @francisFlisiuk


Arts & Culture

October 21, 2013

A&C Always connected Listings Social media popping up in the Tuesday, October 22 Community Event: Annual Indie Biz Awards SPACE Gallery 538 Congress St. Doors: 5:30 p.m. / Show: 6:00 p.m. Brian Dolzani Blue 650 Congress St. Doors: 7:30 p.m. / Show: 8:00 p.m.

Wednesday, October 23 Artist Talk: NSFW Closing Party SPACE Gallery 538 Congress St. Doors: 5:30 p.m. / Show: 6:00 p.m. Bruce Childress Blue 650 Congress St. Doors: 7:00 p.m. / Show: 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, October 24 Artist Talk: Pecha Kucha SPACE Gallery 538 Congress St. Doors: 7:00 p.m. / Show: 7:20 p.m. B.B. King / Arum Rae Port City Music Hall 504 Congress St. Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Show: 9:00 p.m. Brett Eldredge Asylum 121 Center St. Doors: 8:30 p.m. / Show: 9:00 p.m.

Friday, October 25 Film: 2013 Sundance Short Films Tour SPACE Gallery 538 Congress St. Doors: 7:00 p.m. / Show: 7:30 p.m. Lincoln Allen Jazz Blue 650 Congress St. Doors: 7:30 p.m. / Show: 8:00 p.m. The Coloradas and Girls, Guns and Glory One Longfellow Square 181 State St. Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Show: 8:00 p.m. Lazerdisk Party Sex / Of the Trees Port City Music Hall 504 Congress St. Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Show: 9:00 p.m.

Saturday, October 26 Hardy Brothers Trio Blue 650 Congress St. Doors: 7:30 p.m. / Show: 8:00 p.m. Aztec Two Step One Longfellow Square 181 State St. Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Show: 8:00 p.m. Fitz & The Tantrums / Beat Club State Theatre 609 Congress St. Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Show: 9:00 p.m.

In Heavy Rotation What caught the eyes and ears of our staff this week.

classroom and across campus Courtney Aldrich Free Press Staff

Addicted to social media? It’s okay, so is everybody else. Whether it be an occasional tweet or a Facebook birthday greeting, everyone, from your grandmother to your 10 yearold neighbor, is popping up online. In the Myspace days, it all seemed so new and exciting. Now, social media is just another part of our daily lives. For the brothers of Phi Mu Delta, an active fraternity here at USM, getting too creative with their Facebook just means more budgeting. “You need to pay [Facebook] in order to reach more people,” said Phi Mu Delta member and USM senior linguistics major Christian Evans. “And there’s still the sheer fact that most people either ignore or ‘like’ and ignore both your page and your posts.” But, overall, it has been a worthwhile endeavor for them. For the brothers of Phi Mu Delta, access to Facebook through postings, recruitment and marketing has also been a way to stay connected. After about two decades of being absent from any USM affiliation, the fraternity is back in its second year with 16 members. “It’s fascinating to see how many people you reach––and being able to be a hub to which people can reach out, even if they’ve been out of the loop for a while,” said Evans. “For example, we have a lot of alumni brothers who like our Facebook page, and it allows them to have access to information about us and what we’re doing.”But Facebook isn’t the only means to satisfying some sort of deep social need. USM senior psychology major, Mary Moran, said that she’s had enough of being constantly connected. “People are spending time with each other, and they are on their phones the whole time,” said Moran. Moran, who is the senior captain and number one singles player for the USM Women’s Tennis Team, refrains from signing up for Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter and most social networking sites and apps most students buzz about. She simply doesn’t feel the need to and would rather spend time focusing on other interests, she said. Interestingly enough, she admits that she’s still logging some Facebook hours–– just not on an account of her own. As a transfer student from Bates College and a 2010 graduate of Portland High School, Moran likes to stay connected with her friends at other schools. She wants to see the pictures from events that they post on their pages. She explained, one friend from school gave Moran her username and password, so she can look through their albums without using her own name. Although Moran does have a Snapchat account she uses it strictly to send pictures to close friends. Moran said that she avoids

Fake Record Label

El Ten Eleven/ El Ten Eleven El Ten Eleven creates some of the best atmospheric music out there. The first song I heard was “My Only Swerving” in a relaxed coffee shop. After investigating a little bit, I found they’re making instrumental music for any mood. Download this album and listen to it all. -Sam Hill Arts & Culture Editor

Sokvonny Chhouk / Design Director

popular networking sites as a way to save time and focus on real life things, like her position on the tennis team and her schoolwork. “I’ve considered making a Twitter account,” said Moran, “but it just seems like a lot of work.” And Twitter, it turns out, has made its way into the classroom context at USM, in an introductory international relations course. The class, taught by USM professor and alumni, Julia Edwards, requires students to operate a Twitter account as part of their end of the semester final project. “I chose Twitter because it is a fast-paced tool that forces brevity,” said Edwards. “I strongly suggest that students in all my courses follow news sources on twitter. It’s how I get my news, and I have found that in today’s fast-paced over-stimulated media and entertainment world, being able to quickly and succinctly see and digest events around the world is invaluable.” The project entails that each group takes on the role of a country fighting for power and authority within the global scene, and Edwards encourages students to use Twitter as a means for propaganda and public relations to give their country a specific image. “Most governments in the world today have Twitter feeds––it’s a great way to engage in public diplomacy, and I want my students to get that experience of choosing their words carefully and harnessing the power of technology for a bigger purpose,” said Edwards. arts@usmfreepress.org @Courtthope

Come join the crew! See a typo anywhere? Lend us a hand with your sleuthing skills and come copy-edit for us.

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7

Steel Wool Media

Watsky / Cardboard Castles Ever wonder how great a rapper with an English degree from a major college like Emerson would sound like? I can tell you. It’s pretty amazing. That’s the case with San Francisco based rapper Watsky. If you’re a fan of good hip-hop and brilliant lyrics, then this guy is definitely worth a listen. -Adam Kennedy Sports Editor

Elefant Spain

The Gothic Archies / The Tragic Treasury This soundtrack to the Series of Unfortunate Events books really gets me singing along, all “Run! Run, run, run or die! Die, die, die, die, die.” “Die, die, die” scans the same as “doo, doo, doo” or “la, la, la” but with its own very special tonal difference. -Sidney Dritz News Editor


8

October 21, 2013

Perspectives Our opinion: Online

Sustainability and ME

classes a positive force The Babson Research group found that nationally there was a 10.1 percent increase in online class enrollment from 2010 to 2011, despite an unparalleled 0.2 percent drop in total college enrollment. This means that online enrollment has grown a massive 10.3 percent ahead of national enrollment rates, with no sign of slowing. When things change rapidly, there’s bound to be some anxiety about that change and at least healthy amount of skepticism. Naturally, then, many people are concerned with how higher education as a whole will change. Anyone who has ever taken an online course could tell you how different the experience is from the face to face classroom experience–– that’s hardly debated. If you ask students if they liked the online course, if it was as productive on campus courses, you’re likely to get a wide variety of answers. Online courses can be good and they can also go terribly wrong, but it’s not inherent to the medium of internet learning. Online courses have not been around for very long, and with anything, there is a learning curve. This learning curve applies to several players in the process, including the administration

of a school, programmers involved in course portals, professors, and students. All of these players have unique challenges in acclimating to and improving the online class structure. As online education grows and expands, there will be a compounding increase of quality and ease of access in online education. Aside from that, online courses will provide an opportunity for many more people to continue their educations. Maine is largely a rural state, and for adults with careers, moving to the nearest city to complete a degree can be out of the question, while an online course, or hybrid course involving both in-class and online elements, can be accessed by thousands throughout the state. The University of Maine System has addressed that issue with a goal laid out in its 2012 Board of Trustees Goals and Actions. Directive IIIb. states that online and hybrid credit hours should reach 20 percent of all UMS credits by 2015 in order to help more working adults gain access to degree programs. A modern economy requires an educated workforce, and online courses will help Maine get the workforce it needs, and Maine workers the jobs they deserve.

p

USM works hard to reach carbon neutrality Tyler Kidder Contributor Here at USM, we signed on to the President’s Climate Commitment in 2007, which is an agreement to actively reduce the carbon emissions of our campus and operations, signed by college and university presidents around the country. USM has committed to being carbon neutral, or having no net greenhouse gas emissions, by 2040. Five years in, where are we? In 2009 the President’s Council on Climate Neutrality was created and wrote a Climate Action Plan to help move USM in the right direction. The plan, called “USM’s Guide to a Climate-Neutral Education,” includes many recommendations for reducing

the carbon footprint of all three of our campuses. As the Assistant Director for Sustainable Programs in Facilities Management, part of my job is to research, implement, and update these recommendations in order to help USM meet its 2040 target. Some of the recommendations focus on energy conservation and alternative energies, some on waste reduction and others on transportation and travel. Anytime staff, faculty or students utilize a fossil fuel through electricity for their computers, hot water to wash hands, heat in offices and classrooms, transporting waste off campus or utilizing a vehicle to come to campus, we tally up and record all these cumulative emissions in our yearly greenhouse gas inventory. How do we come up with the numbers? We have really good utility data

The Pickle Jar

Off the battlefield, drone technology helps out

92 BEDFORD STREET, PORTLAND, MAINE 04101 (207) 780-4084 • editor@usmfreepress.org EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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C

See CARBON on page 9

the free press

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EC008

p that tells us how much electricity and natural gas we are using each year, and we have detailed information about our waste streamr as well. What we did not really know was how our students and employees were getting to campus. Were you coming from near or far? How many times a week? Do you carpool? In the past, thep Office of Sustainability had used a survey but found that the par-p ticipation was low resulting in statically insignificant results. Therefore, we formed a partnership with the USM GIS Office to help us understand where our community members are travelling to and from in order to calculate the mileage, and therefore carbon emissions, associated with transportation here at USM. We made a few assumptions

STAFF WRITERS Courtney Aldrich, Dan Kelly, Francis Flisiuk, Skyla Gordon, Jeremy Holden, Emma James, Dylan Lajoie STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

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INTERNS

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Patrick Higgins DESIGN STAFF John Wilson FACULTY ADVISER Shelton Waldrep

Sloane Ewell, Jen Smith ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES __ EDITORIAL BOARD: Kirsten Sylvain, Sidney Dritz Alexander R. van Dintel

Editorial & Advertising Policies

Ellen Spahn / Design Assistant

Dylan Lajoie Staff Writer

Unarmed Aerial Vehicles, more commonly known as unmanned drones, have become an integral part of the U.S. military. Their use dates back to U.S involvement in Bos-

nia and Kosovo, where they were strictly used as a surveillance tool for gathering important intelligence about what was happening on the ground. While drone technology is rapidly evolving, the new expanded use of combat drones that can launch hellfire missiles and decimate targets

has drawn much criticism from the media and politicians alike. What drones bring to the table in industries other than war, however, has largely been ignored. UAV critics are certainly not See DRONES on page 9

The Free Press is a weekly student–run newspaper paid for in part with the Student Activity Fee. • We reserve the right to edit or refuse all materials submitted or solicited for publication. • Columns do not reflect the opinions of The Free Press or its staff. • Guest commentaries are sometimes solicited or accepted from members of the USM community; they may not exceed 700 words. • We have a genderneutral language policy. • One copy of The Free Press is available free of charge. Up to 10 additional copies are available for 25 cents each at the office of The Free Press, 92 Bedford St., Portland, Maine. • To advertise, contact our Advertising Manager at 207.780.4084 x8. • We reserve the right to reject advertising. We will not accept discriminatory ads. • We welcome letters to the editor. They must be submitted electronically, include the author’s full name, school year or relationship to USM, and may not exceed 350 words without prior approval from the Editor-inChief. • The deadline for all submissions is Wednesday at 5 p.m. preceding the week of publication. Send submissions to editor@usmfreepress.org.


October 21, 2013

From CARBON on page 8 ber of single occupancy vehicles that come to campus. Minimizing driving to and from campus would and a lot of very educated guesses also reduce air pollution, congesusing information from the regtion, the need for new parking on istrar’s office which provided campus, and save students money home addresses (not associated by lessening their expenditure with any names, of course!), the on gas and car repairs. Our next campus to which people were step is to find a creative way to traveling and how many times per measure how many students, facweek the trips were taking place. ulty, and staff are utilizing transit, Using GIS, we were able to figure riding bicycles, or walking and that for the 2012 fiscal year (June which we can subtract from the 2011-July 2012) students and emnumbers above. Maybe GIS or ployees likely commuted about another technology can help us 38,832,365 miles to and from our figure that out! campuses, equaling 8810 metric To learn more, see our ghg intons of CO2e in emissions. 38 ventories, or read the plan, visit million miles is a lot of miles! usm.maine.edu/sustainability or That is double previous estimates search for ‘Climate Action Plan’ of 4,276 metric tons of CO2e in on the USM website search bar. 2011. Without the accuracy and detailed nature of the GIS model, Tyler Kidder is the Assistant we would have continued to comDirector for Sustainable Propletely underestimate the impact grams in the department of Faof commuting here at USM. cilities Management. She can be The 2012 numbers assume that contacted at tkidder@usm.maine. most people are taking a direct edu. Thanks to Thea Youngs and route and that they are traveling Vinton Valentine at USM GIS for alone in a personal vehicle and their work on developing the comnot biking, walking, carpooling, muter mileage GIS model. or taking the bus. Although hopefully some people are commuting using alternative means of transportation and that information has not been captured, the model provides a baseline by which we editor@usmfreepress.org can understand what our oppor@USMFreePress tunities are for reducing the numFrom DRONES on page 8 wrong in their judgement of the ways in which drones are now used in war. Their use as bombers has been expanded drastically since President Barack Obama took office, and his administration remains tight-lipped on the drone program, providing no clear account of the policy that surrounds drone strikes. What we do know about drone strikes doesn’t sound too great. According to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, Pakistan has been the target of 325 drone strikes since Obama took office. Nearly 1,000 civilians have been killed in these operations. Those aren’t the numbers you want to see if you’re a champion for global human rights and state sovereignty. The truth is, drones have become an effective tool if you want to kill some people by pressing a button from half way around the world. Say what you will about the use of drones in achieving U.S foreign policy goals, but the technology will definitely be used for the greater good in other ways. Farmers are now using various unmanned drones to monitor crops in a much quicker and efficient way than ever before. Search and rescue missions will be aided by the use of drones and the high tech cameras they’re equipped with, saving countless lives, just as they take them abroad. With the

right equipment on board, UAVs can even monitor pollutants in the air and oceans, providing a powerful tool in the fight against climate change. For these positive aspects of drone use to be realized, though, government regulators will need to step up and update policies surrounding the use of drones domestically. The FAA has strict laws surrounding their use even in agriculture, and congress must make an effort to pass new legislation to prevent drone technology from falling into the dirty hands of the NSA as a tool for spying on American citizens and to ensure that the technology isn’t abused by local law enforcement agencies. No matter what could be argued about the current military uses of drones, the positive technological advances shouldn’t be overshadowed by paranoia. The truth is, whether you like it or not, drone technology is here to stay. The sooner the drone issue is addressed by public policy officials and politicians, rather than being hidden as a covert weapon, the sooner drones can be safely harnessed as a powerful tool for the best. Dylan Lajoie, aka “Pickles,” is a senior political science major with a concentration in international studies.

Perspectives

9

The Sporting Life

NFL needs more than rules to fix concussion epidemic David Sanok Contributor For years, the NFL has downplayed the issue of the concussions its players suffer by merely adding stricter penalties. These penalties apply to acts such as tackling other players by their heads, deliberate helmet to helmet contact and late hits on players after the play has well ended, but NFL fans across the U.S. are vocally opposing the rules because they significantly decrease the violence that makes it so popular. But what really annoys NFL fans the most about the rules is that they favor offensive players. Defensive are even fined up to a hundred thousand dollars if they make any contact with the head. Defensive players are just as vulnerable to concussions as offensive players. Former defensive end Junior Seau who played fifteen years in the NFL committed suicide

last year. Seau was diagnosed with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a brain disease that resulted from a series of devastating concussions he accumulated over his long career. It’s not the first time the NFL has ignored CTE. The disease first came to light when Mike Webster, a former offensive lineman for the Steelers who played 17 years in the NFL died in 2002. Neurologist Bennet Omalu examined tissue from Webster’s brain and discovered that showed signs of degeneration similar to what occurs during Alzheimer's or dementia. Unfortunately, the NFL ignored the discovery. It was not until 2009 when the Cincinnati Bengals’ wide receiver Chris Henry was diagnosed with CTE after he died at 26 that the NFL finally began to take CTE more seriously. The reality of the concussion crisis may have come up in the last five to ten years, but the NFL is still mishandling the situation by adding more rules that end up hurting the

game’s popularity more than actually protecting the players. Proper steps that should be taken with regard to players’ safety, such as improving equipment. More efforts need to be made to find new structures for helmets. New technologies should also be looked into getting developed for the sake of catching players who are potentially on performance enhancing drugs, as well as harsher punishments for those caught. These drugs give players extra durability and strength that can cause greater physical damage when on the field. That’s not to say that all of the rules should be thrown out. It’s the double standards against defensive players that need to change, but improvement in equipment and better PED testing would be a far more progressive step in solving the concussion crisis. David Sanok is a senior communication major.


10

Puzzles

October 21, 2013 Sudoku

Crossword

A sudoku puzzle consists of a 9 × 9–square grid subdivided into nine 3 × 3 boxes. Some of the squares contain numbers. The object is to fill in the remaining squares so that every row, every column, and every 3 × 3 box contains each of the numbers from 1 to 9 exactly once.

Weekly Horoscope

great good average alright difficult

Aries March 21-April 19 Your zeal leads you into new territory. You break new ground at home or at work and it’s exciting.

Taurus April 20-May 20 A quick trigger could lead you to jump all over a family member. Your first impulse may be off: check it out!

Gemini May 21-June 20 A friend requires more assistance and support. Don’t let your “need to be needed” go overboard.

Cancer June 21-July 22

Compromise will be necessary, even though you’d rather do things your way at work. Practical goals lead to much achievement.

Leo July 23-August 22

Cryptogram Word Search Theme: Pies

Search for the list of words in the grid of letters. Grab a pen and circle each word as you find them.

Every letter in a cryptogram stands for another letter. Use the hint to crack the code.

BRY ZQQJ AXJPYOYJ EYDXHY GQ CJIGBJXBYP GRY PYDMPYP BQ BRJQT MO BRY BJQTYN. And here is your hint: Y=E

CUKCHB WXZLEQ CMXFEI, C KCSZH LEBFMCESO BCUOBPCE STCEQOI TLB ECPO AX WFBALE SCBO. And here is your hint: S=C

The solution to last issue’s crossword

Getting some exercise is a good idea today. Keeping active supports your spirit and builds energy.

Virgo August 23-September 22

Others take advantage of your compassion. Don’t be a soft touch for a sob story!

Libra September 23-October 22 You need a bit of space in your relationships. Share ideas, communicate, and be tolerant.

Scorpio October 23-November21 You need freedom today and may feel like leaving if you think you are being held back. Don’t burn essential bridges!

Sagittarius November 22-December 21 You’ll feel guilty if you go for pure fun before finishing up your tasks. Work a bit and then have a good time!

Capricorn December 22-January 19 Beauty is accented for you-whether you go shopping for clothes, get a haircut, pretty up the house or do something else.

Aquarius January 20-February 18 Chores are the first order of business today. Getting things done is important, and clears the decks for fun later.

Pisces February 19-March 20 Cuddling is important. Get some hugs today and share some physical contact with those you love. Nurture your body.


Home Games Monday Men’s Soccer vs. UNE 4 p.m.

October 21, 2013

Wednesday

Thursday

Women’s Soccer vs. UMaine Farmington 4 p.m.

Field Hockey vs. Husson 7 p.m.

Sports

Quick Hits: The Huskies’ week in review

Upcoming

October 7

Women’s Soccer USM @ Colby College 3 p.m.

Golf USM Fall Classic 4th out of 10

Women’s Volleyball USM @ Anna Maria College 7 p.m.

October 24

Men’s Soccer

USM dominated by Bates 9-0

The Huskies team was beaten rather handily by Bates College 9-0 last Wednesday to fall to 0-14-1 on the year. The scoring was pretty evenly divided for Bates, who got four in the first half and five in the second. The Huskies will next play against Rhode Island College on Saturday.

Women’s Soccer

USM downed 3-1 by UNE

The women’s soccer team lost 3-1 to University of New England last Tuesday to bring their record to 4-9-1 for the season. The team scored their first goal late in the second half, but could not manage to score any more for a comeback. The teams next game is at Colby College on Tuesday.

Field Hockey

Huskies fall to UMass Dartmouth 2-1 The USM field hockey team fell to UMass Dartmouth 2-1 Oct. 12 to move to 5-10 for the year. The team went into the second half with a 1-1 tie, but gave up a late goal to Eleanor Taylor that sealed the win for UMass. The team is next playing Tuesday against Worchester State.

Men’s Cross Counry

USM finishes 34th among 41 teams The Huskies cross country team came in 34th place among 41 teams at the NEICAAA cross country championships in Franklin Park on Oct. 12 Briar Beede had the teams best finish, coming in 95th place out of 279 participants. The men’s cross country team will next participate in the LEC championships Nov. 2 in Gorham.

Women’s Volleyball

Plymouth state beats USM 3-1 After losing the first set, the Huskies came back to win the second one, but dropped the third and fourth in a close match. The team did get good performances from Kristina Rubico and Amanda Keppel. The loss drops the team to an impressive 17-6 on the season. Their next match is on Tuesday against Anna Maria College.

Women’s Tennis

Huskies beat by Bridgewater 9-0 The women’s tennis team was beaten 9-0 by Bridgewater State back on Oct. 12. The Huskies were beaten in all of their singles and doubles matches. The loss is the teams third in a row and second straight 9-0 shutout and drops their record to 7-6. adam.kennedy1@maine.edu @AdamKennedy15

2 1

October 8 Women’s Volleyball UMass Boston USM

3 0

October 9 0 9

Field Hockey USM Plymouth St.

6 8

Women’s Soccer Rhode Island College @ USM 1 p.m.

Women’s Soccer USM UMaine Farmington

2 2

Women’s Volleyball Rhode Island College @ USM 12 p.m.

October 10

October 26

Molly Gallagher returns a serve during last Saturday’s match against Worchester State in the team’s final game.

Men’s Soccer UNE USM

Women’s Tennis USM Colby-Sawyer

Women’s Volleyball Saint Joseph’s College @ USM 7 p.m.

Justicia Barreiros / Free Press Staff

Scoreboard

October 22

Field Hockey Worchester State @ USM 4 p.m.

Adam Kennedy Sports Editor

11

Field Hockey USM @ Western Conn. St. 12p.m. Men’s Soccer USM @ Rhode Island College 1 p.m. Women’s Volleyball UMaine Presque Isle @ USM 4 p.m.

October 27-28 Golf NEIGA Championships @ Brewster Mass. TBA

October 29 Field Hockey USM @ NEC 4 p.m. Women’s Volleyball USM @ Keene State 7 p.m. Men’s Soccer USM @ Salem State 6 p.m.

Women’s Soccer USM Husson

3 1

October 12 Men’s Soccer Eastern Conn. St. USM

4 1

Women’s Soccer Eastern Conn. St. USM

1 0

Women’s Tennis Bridgewater St. USM

9 0

Field Hockey UMass Dartmouth USM

2 1

Men’s Cross Country NEICAAA 913 points; 34th of 41 Women’s Cross Country NEICAAA 915 points; 33rd of 43

October 15 Women’s Soccer UNE USM

3 1

Women’s Volleyball USM Plymouth St.

1 3

Like writing? Like sports? Email editor@usmfreepress.org if you’re interested in sports writing


12

October 21, 2013

USM COMMUNITY PAGE Community Spotlight:

Bikers gear up for cycling series

Campus Events Monday, October 21

Jordyn Cram Contributor Starting this Wednesday, Portland cyclists can pedal over to a Bicycle Mechanic Workshop to learn about everything from bike maintenance and basic bike safety to bicycles and sustainability. The event was organized as part of a four-part series by Tyler Kidder, USM assistant director for sustainable programs. She explained that the event first started with a workshop on Earth Day in 2011. Since then, she has been trying to maintain two events per year, one in the fall and one in the spring. While each event is focused on bicycle mechanics and repair, there is always a more specific focus for each workshop, on a different part of the bike. This Wednesday the workshop will focus on “Tire tubes and wheels.” In the series, attendees can also learn about gear systems and how to do Winter biking. Participants who attend all four parts of the series, Kidder said, can learn a lot new information. The event, Kidder said, while also being a great one for experienced bicyclists will likely be a good one for newer cyclists as well. “[It will likely be] more fine tuned to the needs of the new bicycling community,” she said, than previous events because the organizers are learning what all cyclists, new or experienced, need and want to learn about bike. Helping new bicyclists, she said, is large part of why she is excited for the events to begin. This event will teach people not only how to take care of their bikes, but also about the positive role of bicycling in community sustainability efforts. As part of her work at USM, Kidder encourages people to travel by alternate means to reduce traf-

Portland GIS Clinic 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. 128 Wishcamper, Portland Muslim Student Association Meeting 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Woodburry Campus Center/Multi Cultural Center, Portland Portland Events Board Meeting 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Conference Room, Woodbury Campus Center, Portland Circle K International Weekly Meeting 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 113 Upperclass Hall, Gorham

Tuesday, October 22 Photo courtesy of Tyler Kidder Attendees at the Bicycle Mechanics Workshops learn about everything from basic bike maintenance to bike safety and winter riding.

fic and, at the same time, reduce the environmental impact of the daily commute to campus. Kidder and the sustainability group are also working with the USM Cycle Club, which organizes group rides around the local area. “The overall mission of the event is to empower people to bicycle more,” Kidder said, “[and to] reduce the barriers for people biking.” This event is not just meant to help another individual biker. The goal of the event series, Kidder said, is also to serve the greater community by showing them how to take care of their own bikes and how to bike safely in all types of weather in Maine. Sustainability at USM co-sponsored the

event with the Bike Coalition of Maine. The Coalition will help with hosting the events, ensuring that there are certified instructors present to teach attendees. The event, Kidder said, will also benefit the local YMCA, where it is held in the basement. The event is scheduled to take place at the Portland Gear Hub at 70 Forest Ave. in Portland on Wednesdays between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. More information on the event series is available on the USM website.

news@usmfreepress.org @USMFreePress

Featured Photo:

Grabbing Life by the Horns: One Couple’s Journey Toward a Satisfying, Sustainable Life 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 AM 102 Wishcamper Center, Portland Tabling to Raise Awareness about Domestic Violence 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Woodbury Campus Center Cafeteria, Portland Husky Tunes on WMPG 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. WMPG Studio, 92 Bedford Street, Portland; or listen at 90.9 FM

Wednesday, October 23 Students for Environmental Awareness and Sustainability (SEAS) Meeting 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Payson Smith Room 43, Portland Using Research About Online Learning to Inform Online Teaching Practice 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. 301 Bailey Hall, Gorham

Thursday, October 24 Engineering Student Committee Student Lecture Series 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. 217 John Mitchell Center, Gorham

Friday, October 25 Board of Student Organizations Meeting 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 1 Payson Smith Hall, Portland Building Community to Prevent Suicide 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Wishcamper Center, USM Portland 12th Annual Halloween Party 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Southworth Planetarium, Portland Anderson Woodward Halloween Fest 8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Anderson and Woodward Halls, Gorham

For more events: www.usm.maine.edu/events Alex Greenlee / Free Press Staff Senator Angus King speaking Thursday as part of the Politics Then and Now series. King spoke on the shutdown, saying that it was an attempt on the part of a particular group to take the government hostage.


October 21, 2013