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Where Were You? John Kotzuk

Where were you on September 11, 2001—that bright and clear September day

that stretched along the East coast from New York to Washington to western Pennsylvania? Do you remember the kind of day it was— the warm, crystal light, the hint of dryness, the first fadings of flowers, the pleasant nostalgic sadness, September’s song? The lush intensity of midsummer was slowly giving way as the colors changed; pinks and roses, yellows, lavenders and shades of blue were softly and delicately fading away. September was gently easing us into dark winter, and suddenly, on that day in September, a cold, cruel, methodical madness changed our world, perhaps forever. Where were you on…? That question may have been asked on other dates in history: April 19, 1775, April 2, 1861, April 6, 1917, or December 7, 1941. When momentous events happen they reverberate throughout the world, touching many lives, the high and the low, the rich and the poor. By association with the momentous, the ordinary everyday action is seared into memory: “I was cutting the grass,” “I was on my way to work,” “I was at the doctor’s office,” “I was shopping,” “I was waiting for my flight to be called.” Whatever you were doing, wherever you were, you were doing what Americans have been doing for 226 years: exercising your right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. You were living your independence in the free and independent United States of America. What now? What has changed? If you got a phone call that morning: “Turn on the television.” “Why?” “Something terrible is happening.” You turned on the TV and you sat and you watched and you were unbelieving and numb and couldn’t stop thinking—“special effects. A Hollywood blockbuster.” You had seen it many times before. Even if you were watching a giant, high-definition screen with surround sound, this wasn’t real-time, in a real world—it was just an image. There was no deafening roar and crash and screams and fire and instant oblivion. 2

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002

You could not see the evil, hear the cries, feel the agony, smell the burnt flesh or taste the acridity. You could not sense the helpless feeling of the pilot, confined to his small space, his only weapon his strong voice of authority—“Get out of here!” You could not put yourself into the shoes of the one who said, “Let’s roll,” and then took his last steps forward into eternity. It would take time before the enormous horror of the carnage and the destruction and the bottomless grief began to sink in. The whole world heard the shots fired in 1775 and the whole world heard the voice of free men declaring their independence in 1776. Then for more than 200 years the whole world watched and envied and copied and tried to pull down and destroy the struggle to create a more perfect union. Wars have been declared, fought, won or lost, peace has been restored, cities rebuilt, families reunited, reconciliations made, pledges and pacts are signed and former enemies become friends. This has been the pattern for centuries. Has this all changed? Is our world truly changed? Is the enemy hidden amongst us, indoctrinated with a sure sense of martyrdom if they sacrifice themselves while trying to destroy us? How can we find them and if we do, will our Constitution protect them? Our leaders tell us our way of life must stay the same—we must go on about our normal, daily business. It’s not easy when we frequently hear of alerts and possible terrorist attacks. They say attacks are sure to come. The suspense is when or where. The reality and the promise and the truth of America has been written in song and poetry. The Star Spangled Banner will forever wave o’er this sweet land of liberty, the home of the free and the brave. Freedom will ring forever from every mountaintop and from sea to shining sea. God has shed his grace on our spacious skies, purple mountain majesties and fruited plains. We are now, as never before, the United States, the United People of America. America, the beautiful, of thee I sing. ■


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26

Fall 2002

• Volume 8

Issue 3

Features and Around the Township 2

Where Were You? John Kotzuk thinks back to September 11, 2001.

10

Good Old School Days Clifton School was different than the schools today according to F. E. Harmon.

21

Upper St. Clair Stalwart Says So Long High School student Stephen Colelli talks with Joe DePalma, a teacher and coach for more than 30 years.

23

Edward Oelschlager—A Poet

76

A longtime resident is a nationally recognized poet!

84

Dave Batchelor—Participation is the Key Dave, a man with many hats and honors, shares some memories.

School District 24

USC Earns a Perfect Ten Fort Couch receives its third Blue Ribbon award.

26

Dr. Pope’s Graduation Speech Looking back over the past thirteen years.

32

School District Information Helpful things to know about our School District.

37

The Deer Valley Experience Dawn Yoder shares the experience.

42

The Big Ten Coach Jim Render gives us ten points to “coach” by.

Township 59

Upper St. Clair’s Boards and Commissions These residents volunteer their expertise to make our community a great place to live.

61

86

Meet Our Township People Names, photographs, phone numbers and websites are published for your information.

69

Children’s Library Sign up for a variety of fall programs.

94

INFO LINE Directory

100 Township of Upper St. Clair Map

Cover 18

Our Upper St. Clair Volunteer Firefighters are featured on the cover of this issue of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine. Photographed with the new American LaFrance truck are: Brian Reddecliff, sales executive with Heeter Printing; Chief Ray Tomnay, home builder; David Kish, chief flight nurse at the West Penn/Allegheny General Health System; Doug Denning, a volunteer escort at St. Clair Hospital; Russell Rauch, Technical Services Coordinator for the USC Police Department; Jim Smearman, Emergency Medical Technician; Jerry Kopach, an electrical construction foreman and Doug Heckman, a recent graduate of the Allegheny County Police Academy. The cover is underwritten by Black Box and the photograph was taken by M & M Photography, Inc. Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Publishers Dr. William A. Pope Superintendent of Schools Douglas A. Watkins Township Manager Editors Harla M. Brown, Editor-in-Chief Paul K. Fox, Managing Editor Linda M. Dudzinski, Associate Editor/ School District Liaison Suzanne G. Vernon, Township Associate Editor Advisory Committee Thomas A. Labanc, School District Representative Dina J. Fulmer, School Board Director Mark Mansfield, Assistant Township Manager

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Magazine Staff Nancy Barnard, photographer; Paul Fox, managing editor; Harla Brown, editor-in-chief; Dawn McQuillen, administrative assistant; Suzanne Vernon, Township associate editor; Mary Etta Nader, advertising; Susan Depe, advertising; John Kotzuk, Senior Site and volunteer writer; Cande Day, artist and volunteer writer; Jim Render, writer; Lynn Dempsey, advertising; and Linda Dudzinski, associate editor/School District liaison. Not pictured: Jim Meston, volunteer writer Inset photo: University of Pittsburgh intern Tracy Brown— 200 volunteer hours working with the magazine!

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY is a community magazine that is dedicated to promoting the Township and School District of Upper St. Clair by recognizing the gifts and contributions of the people who live and work here. The thirty-first issue of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine is made possible through the combined resources of the staff and volunteers of the Township and School District of Upper St. Clair. Thanks are extended to the staff and volunteers for their enthusiasm and efforts on this continuing project.

August Stache, Township Director of Finance School Board Directors

Township Board of Commissioners

Albert E. Ferrara, Jr., Vice President David E. Bluey Barbara L. Bolas Dina J. Fulmer Clark R. Nicklas Angela B. Petersen William M. Sulkowski, D.M.D. Mark G. Trombetta, M.D.

Frank E. Marsh, President, Ward 5 Robert W. Orchowski, Vice President, Ward 3 Edward S. Long, Ward 1 Gloria S. Smith, Ward 2 Cheryl S. Bayne, Ward 4 Bill Bates, At Large Ernest T. Harris, At Large

Vince Yevins, Accounts Staff Nancy Barnard, photographer Tracy M. Brown, intern Cande Day, artist and volunteer writer, Lynn Dempsey, advertising Susan Depe, advertising John Kotzuk, Senior Site and volunteer writer Dawn McQuillen, administrative assistant Jim Meston, volunteer writer Mary Etta Nader, advertising Jim Render, writer A special thanks to Cindy Kane for her assistance and contributions to the magazine. The thirty-first issue of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY is a joint publication of the Township and School District of Upper St. Clair. © Copyright 2002 All rights reserved.

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY 1820 McLaughlin Run Road Upper St. Clair, PA 15241 School District: 412-833-1600 Fax: 412-851-2592 Township: 412-831-9000 Fax: 412-854-0773

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY is a non-partisan Township, School District and community magazine. Political advertising and political commentary are not accepted. The publishers of this magazine reserve the right to reject advertising or articles inconsistent with the objectives, image and aesthetic standards of the magazine. UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine is published and bulk-mailed quarterly to residents and businesses in Upper St. Clair. Extra copies of the magazine are available at the Township of Upper St. Clair Municipal Building and the Township Library. If you did not receive a copy in the mail, please call 412-831-9000. The next issue of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY will be the Winter issue and will be published in November 2002. Articles that were submitted but not published in this issue are on file for consideration in upcoming issues. Articles and announcements may be sent to: Editors, UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. Subscription Information If you know someone living outside the Township who would enjoy receiving UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine, please send $12 to cover mailing and handling for the next four issues with name and address, including zip code.

Printed by Pentagon Printing Corporation 18 West Steuben Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15205 412-922-0422 • Fax: 412-922-2922 6

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002

Article Information Harla Brown 412-831-9000, extension 232 Advertising Information Dawn McQuillen • Lynn Dempsey • Susan Depe • Mary Etta Nader 412-833-1600, extension 2284 or fax 412-851-2592 Also see: twpusc.org/magazine


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Happenings Announcements on this page are for non-profit groups. Please submit updated information with a maximum of 35 words, including a phone number that will be published to: Happenings, UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Magazine, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241 or fax 412-854-0773.

USC Citizens for Land Stewardship is dedicated to the

Activities Saturday, September 21— Coffeehouse with New Morning, a contemporary folk group, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the South Hills, Mt. Lebanon, at 7:30 p.m. $5. To make the evening complete, baked goods will be available. 412-561-6277. October 5, 2002—DeMarillac Guild’s 42nd Annual Coronet Luncheon—“Angels Among Us.” Fashions by the Bridal Beginning and Cache. For reservations, call Denise at 412-835-1738. October 11—A Toast to Life Celebration at St. Clair Country Club will include an elegant dinner, silent auction and twelve-piece oldies band to benefit services provided by the Friends of Family Hospice and Palliative Care. Call 412-572-8813. October 30—The Friends of Family Hospice and Palliative Care Annual Card Party and Lunch at Westminster Church to benefit services to patients and families. For reservations, please call 412-572-8809.

conservation of natural areas and open spaces in USC. We promote environmental education and activities that create harmony between people and nature. For information, call 412-831-3289. Upper St. Clair Athletic Association, a non-profit organization, administers year-round recreational sport programs for the youth of the community. For information, call 412-835-4499. Newcomers of Upper St. Clair welcomes women to

monthly coffees and dinners. Join this wonderful social and civic organization that provides fun interest groups and activities. Call Sue Friday, President, at 412-854-5593. Woman’s Club of Upper St. Clair—Monthly luncheons,

gardening, book groups, music, bridge, special events, new friends, and more! Membership is open to all women in USC and surrounding communities. Call 412 854-4955 or 412835-9607 for more information. Laureate Epsilon Phi chapter of Beta Sigma Phi

Saturdays, August 10–September 21—South Hills Junior Orchestra rehearses 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the USCHS Band Room. Open rehearsals for new members. Call 412-341-5160.

is an international social, service and cultural women’s organization. Meetings are held in members’ homes on the first and third Thursdays of each month at 7:30 p.m. from September to May. For additional information, call 412-563-4797.

Organizations

Mt. Lebanon Jr. Women’s Club—meets at 7 p.m., third

The Brookside Women’s Club meets the second Tuesday of

the month, September through June, in members’ homes, at 11:30 a.m. All are welcome! Meetings usually include lunch and a program or a field trip. Contact Peggy Egan at 412-833-7932. Delta Zeta Sorority Alums meet once a month, September-

May in the South Hills. Call 412-833-2796 for more information. USC League for the Arts is open to all Township resi-

Tuesday of each month, Unitarian Church on Sunnyhill Drive and Washington Road. Join other women across the South Hills in civic, philanthropic and social activities. Call 412-886-1221. USC Chamber of Commerce—Serving our business community for 14 years. We invite all local businesses to become involved. Contact our Chamber office for membership information at 412-833-9111.

dents. Meetings and classes are held in the Township Building. Members exhibit in Spring Show, Sugarplum Shop, Library and Post Office. Contact Ned Garnhart at 412-835-7640.

Junior Woman’s Club of USC—A new social, cultural

USC 1830 Log House Association—Pioneer lifestyle of USC historic landmark preserved for future generations. Contact Kim Guzzi at 412-851-0570.

USC Coterie is a social club that hosts dinner, luncheons, golf, bowling, bridge and other events to form friendships. Call Elaine at 412-833-7374.

League of Women Voters is a non-partisan political organi-

Welcome Wagon of Upper St. Clair invites all women in the area to join this fun group. We offer monthly activities, community service projects, special programs and much more. For more information call Anarosa Jones at 412-257-8067.

zation that encourages citizens to take an interest in government. We work toward influencing public policy through education and advocacy. For information, call 412-831-3448. Upper St. Clair Historical Society—Collecting from Yes-

terday, Preserving for Tomorrow. Would you like to help us TODAY? Please call Jean Brown at 412-833-2323. The Upper St. Clair Lions Club supports Pittsburgh

Vision Services, Leader Dogs for the Blind, Meals on Wheels, Children’s Institute, South Hills Hospice, Upper St. Clair Library and others. Contact Wes Hurst at 724-941-8329 for more information.

and philanthropic organization affiliated with the Woman’s Club of USC. Call 412-279-0432 for more information.

Also see: Clubs and Organizations on page 56 Here’s What’s Up! page 81 Churches and Synagogues Serving Upper St. Clair page 88

open to residents residing in the Township over two years. Activities include luncheons, bridge, book club and golf. For membership information, call Ann Kravitz at 412-221-5016.

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

needs volunteers to assist with data entry and clerical support at the Bridgeville site. Days/evenings flexible. Also help is needed with recreational, social and cultural activities. Call 412-221-3302, ext.118. Pittsburgh Vision Services—To learn more about PVS or how you can help the blind and visually impaired, please call 412-682-5600. Young Writers Guild invites High School and Middle School students to write for UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine. IB students earn credit for community service. Adult coordinators are also needed. Contact Paul Fox at 412-833-1600, ext. 2235. Animal Friends—Volunteers can help with dog walking, cat socializing, pet therapy, humane education, and special events. Call J. Moore at 412-566-2103, ext. 229 to inquire about age requirements, volunteer orientation and registration. USC Volunteer Fire Department needs volunteers to assist in providing emergency services to the community. Volunteers are also needed to perform various administrative tasks. For more information contact Fire Chief Ray Tomnay at 412-835-0660. Court Appointed Special Advocate Program—CASA volunteers speak up for abused and neglected children in court. Help these children find safe, permanent homes where they can thrive. Call 412-594-3606 for more information. Brighten Someone’s Day—Volunteer! Asbury Heights, a long term care facility for older adults, is seeking volunteers to fill many opportunities. Store clerks, escorts are but a few of the opportunities. Call 412-571-5150.

Support Groups Movers and Shakers meet every Wednesday at

Westminster Presbyterian Church. Exercise 5-6 p.m., dinner and speakers for those with Parkinson’s or similar disabilities. Call 412-835-6630 for 6 p.m. dinner reservations. Families in Transition Classes—Are you dealing with

separation, divorce, or becoming a stepfamily? Parents can get help from a class at Parent and Child Guidance Center on Banksville Road. Call 412-343-5698. outpatient services and aftercare is open Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Fridays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Experiencing conflict in your life, depression, parent/child issues, divorce, etc.? Need to talk? Call 412-221-3302.

The Graduates of Upper St. Clair is a social organization

8

Chartiers Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center

Chartiers Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center

Visit the Bethel-St. Clair Rotary meetings every Thursday evening, 6-8 p.m. Holiday Inn, Fort Couch Road. For information, please call 412-833-4396 or 412-835-4510. agency located in Bethel Park. SHIM offers food, clothing, household items and counseling on a sliding scale and many interfaith programs. For more information, please call 412-854-9120.

escort, television, information desk, supportive visiting and Lifeline. Senior volunteers must be at least 18 years old. Junior volunteers—14 years. Call 412-344-6600, ext.1650. Family Hospice seeks volunteers to sit with patients. Training offered. Needed immediately: volunteer barbers, beauticians and office workers. Call 412-572-8806.

grams for your club, neighborhood group, and church or synagogue group. Possible topics include the philosophy of hospice care and grief and loss. Call 412-572-8809 to arrange for a speaker.

Bethel-St. Clair Rotary—Community service minded?

South Hills Interfaith Ministries (SHIM) is a non-profit

St. Clair Hospital needs volunteers for clerical, courier,

Family Hospice Speaker’s Bureau can provide pro-

USC-BP Morning Rotary meets Tuesdays from 7-8 a.m.

at the Grand Residence on McLaughlin Run Road. South Hills Business residents interested in community service should contact President Joseph Kiernan at 412-221-6772.

Volunteers

Fall 2002

The Grapevine page 89

South Hills Crisis Pregnancy Center—Call Pam Hart at 412-531-2112 for more information regarding South Hills CPC’s services. Familylinks, formerly Parent and Child Guidance Center and The Whale’s Tale, offers many valuable programs dealing with successful parenting through separation and divorce. PARENTLINE is a call-in service where callers may remain anonymous. Call 412-343-7166. NAMI Family to Family Education Course is for families

of the mentally ill. A twelve-week series of free classes is limited to twenty participants. Registration required. Call 412-366-3788. Southwestern Human Services is a non-profit outpatient mental health clinic across from South Hills Village Mall. SHS provides mental health services to adults, adolescents, and children. For information, call 412-831-1223. Family Hospice and Palliative Care offers two bereavement groups. The afternoon group meets 1-2:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month at Southminster House and the third Monday at the Unitarian-Universalist Church from 7-8:30 p.m. Call 412-572-8829. Pre-registration not required.


1820 McLaughlin Run Road • Upper St. Clair, PA 15241

Douglas A. Watkins

Dr. William A. Pope

Dear Residents, We are proud to present the Residential Guide which is published every other year with “everything you always wanted to know about Upper St. Clair.” The cover is dedicated to our community fire fighters in honor of their longstanding self-sacrifice and service to Upper St. Clair. We salute these volunteers who, every time the alarm is sounded, leave their homes or jobs and risk their lives to protect our people and property. When school opens on September 9, 2002, please be especially alert for children and school buses. Best wishes to our new neighbors and businesses. You have selected a fine community in which to live, work and raise your children. We are confident that you will find our School District and Township government services responsive to your needs. Our staff members are eager to make you feel welcome and comfortable. For your convenience, the names, phone numbers and e-mail addresses of our administrative staff and departments are listed throughout this 31st issue of the UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine. Enjoy the remainder of your summer! We hope to see you soon at a Township or School District Board meeting or sharing some time with your family at the Library, a local park, school or recreational facility. You are invited to Panther Stadium for the first two home Varsity Football games on August 30 and September 6 and the Varsity Soccer “Kick-off Classic” on August 30 and 31. Please keep in touch. Sincerely,

Dr. William A. Pope Superintendent of Schools

Douglas A. Watkins Township Manager

School District of Upper St. Clair 412-833-1600 Fax: 412-833-5535 http://www.uscsd.k12.pa.us email: info@uscsd.k12.pa.us

Township of Upper St. Clair 412-831-9000 Fax: 412-831-9882 http://www.twpusc.org email: uscadmin@twpusc.org Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

9


Good Old School Days F. E. Harmon Clifton School from 1937 to 1944 was

certainly different in every way from my grandsons’, Matthew and Christopher Salera, Upper St. Clair schools today. Each grade of 12 to 15 students was in a separate room and in my eighth grade graduation class in 1944, there were 14 students. Day after day, from a home my father, Ferl, built in 1931 and where I was born at 206 Brookside Boulevard, I, along with my cousin Dave, who lived next door at 204 Brookside in a home his father, Everett, built in 1928, would walk to Clifton School. My older sister, June, also walked to school. Dave was like a brother to me. His dad and my dad were brothers who worked together as carpenters and builders from 1927 to 1946 when each of them formed his own building company. My mother, Mildred, and Dave’s mother, Gladys, were sisters. Our parents were farm children from a beautiful farm in the Switzerland of Ohio, 18 miles northeast of Marietta. Dave and I often talk about our Grandfather and Grandmother Foraker’s working farm where we spent many a weekend and just about every Thanksgiving holiday with our relatives the Forakers, the Sloans and the Harmons. Clifton School was at the corner of McLaughlin Run Road and Old Washington Road. At recess, we played games, like

Seated left to right: Charlotte Wright and Catherine Ballentine-Nordseick. Standing: Sadie Himmeger and Sara Lesnett. 10

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Clifton School in the 1920s

marbles, near where the present High School marker is. Also, at that time we hunted small game, mostly pheasants and rabbits, on the Trotwood and Westminster properties. Brookside Farms was the largest development of homes. Across from the school was a blacksmith’s shop and the Janieros lived in the well-known log house. There were two other elementary schools at that time—Cook and McMillan—each with about the same number of students as Clifton. Mr. A. F. Baker, for whom Baker School is named, was the principal at Clifton and a mean paddle wielder although he was very fair and friendly. His secretary was Miss Irene Morton, who had a wonderful sense of humor and tempered Mr. Baker’s sternness. Ms. Sara Lesnett taught first and second grade and was a teacher there for over 50 years. Miss Sadie Himmeger taught third and fourth grade, and Mr. Anna Martin, our neighbor in Brookside, taught fifth and sixth grades. I remember all of them wearing stylish clothes, making learning fun, promoting friendly competition and being strict disciplinarians. Even though there were no computers, Miss Charlotte

Fall 2002

Wright’s mathematical mind was as sharp as today’s calculators. She taught seventh and eighth grades. Of course, they knew all the students well because there was an average of only 15 students in each class. The janitor was Mr. Klancher, father of Jack Klancher, who was the Upper St. Clair police chief and an electrical contractor. The school nurse was a beautiful young lady, Miss Too Good, on whom I had a crush. The other boys used to say, “It’s too bad she’s too good for Eddie!” Since there was no gym, we played football, baseball, “King King Alone” and dodge ball in a large field behind the log house, which was a large flat valley the size of a present day softball field. The creek you cross going up to the High School was piped and covered with fill dirt in the early 60s. Each of our teachers was fair and understanding. At recess they played all the games with us except “King King Alone” and football. They were very adept at dodge ball and softball. Dodge ball was fun for all, but one day Richard Rea clobbered Faith Medding with the ball and Miss Wright gave him detention even though he was her pet and an outstanding student. “King King Alone” was a challenge for us


because it took nine to ten of us to tackle Eddie “Pot Licker” Peyton, who weighed in at 170 pounds in eighth grade. I won a bushel basket of marbles on the cinder and red dog-surfaced school playing area at the back entrance of the school. Mike Lesnett and I were the best marble shooters during the warm months each spring from third to eighth grade. Softball and baseball were my best sports. As a fourth grader I was asked by Mel Henderson and Chuck McMillan to play with the eighth graders at the annual school picnic at the lodge in South Park. Our parents brought the food and we stayed from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on this special Friday. S. W. Koenig, the vice president of Duquesne Brewery, gave me a dollar for getting a hit in our annual game. His son Bobby and I were friends. We loved to play at his house with a pool table and swimming pool. We were in Boy Scouts together also. Mick Mall’s father organized the baseball team—the Washington Terrace Reds—consisting of seventh and eighth graders from Clifton and McMillan Schools. The Reds easily defeated teams from Bethel, Bridgeville and Mt. Lebanon. I remember Clifton as a three-story building with classrooms on the second and third levels, along with Principal Baker’s office. An auditorium and bathroom, along with a coal furnace, were on the first floor that opened onto a large play area. I particularly remember the auditorium where my father made a lot of props and projects for the school’s PTA. It was there I performed in Hansel and Gretel and Mulligan’s Magic. Clifton’s graduating class of 1944 is what I enjoy remembering today—Clifford Evans, Wanda Daughtery, Jim Greenawalt, Bob Koenig, Dale Langley, Barbara Lenfesty, Grayson Lesnett, Mike Lesnett, Eddie Peyton, Honey Lou Price, Richard Rea, Howard Schroeder, Emily Sumner and me, Ed Harmon. ■

Clifton School—First and Second Grades, 1939 Jean Emerick, Pearl Ellis, David Daughterty, Bill Roberts, Helen Warnick, Joan _____, Lucille Dixon, Emily Barkand, Bernice Janciar, Grace Carlisle, Billy Carothers, Bob Jones, Jack Cooper, Billy Lynch, Jimmy Barron, Bobby Barron, Audrey Philips, Faye Haynes, Paton Rogers, Richard Eliis, Grant Johnson, Joan Durham, Stella ________, Wanda Carson, Florine Orient, Myra Ostoff, Billy Godwin, Norman Fife, June Cameron, Barbara Lenfesty and Patsy Hilliard

Clifton School—Sixth Grade, 1941-1942 Billy Carothers, David Daugherty, Jack Cooper, Jack Martin, Bob Jones, Dwight Daugherty, Louis Minella, Emily Barkand, Grace Carlisle, Lucille Dixon, Beatrice Minella, Audrey Philips, Bernice Janciar, Kenneth Reardon, James Dean, Tommy McLean, Jimmy Barron, Bobby Barron, Myra Ostoff, Frank Montone, June Cameron, Norman Fife and Billy Godwin

Clifton School—1932 Roland Bellingham, Oliver Degleman, Russell Dublin, William Knowles, Ernest Lesnett, Lawrence McCool, Jack Northwood, Richard Schneider, Richard Staley, Clem Staley, George Yeckel, George Seifert, Alvin Deiss, Fred Coder, Elmer Dixon, Donald Host, Alexander McLean, Edward Oelschlager, Calvin Stelley, William Whittlinger, William Stevens, Charles O’Donnell, Mildred Barkand, Hilda Carlisle, Gretchen Johnson, Jacqueline Malone, Janie Marshall, Thelma Messner, Nancy Philips, Betty Jean Rittenour, Jane Warnick, Moris Meding, Catherine Nortone, Grace Sumner, Jean Sutton, Claranna Heaps, Rose LaBelle, Josephine Maneigne, Evelyn Beekert, Eleanor Carlisle, Nancy Cameron, Veronica Harkens, Mary Eleanor Henderson, Lucille Stahalman, June Von Horn, Jane Priestley and Mary Mancegne Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

11


DISCOVER WHAT REAL ESTATE SHOULD BE

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Experience of a Lifetime

Sophia Alexiades

Bonnie Byrnes

Anita Crago

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John Geisler

Edith Gidwani

Genie Gooding

Lois Goodrich

Nancy Heffernan

Sydnie Jones

Sue Kelso

Maria Lane

Julie Leslie

Joyce Lewis

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Rt. 19 South/Galleria Office 1539 Washington Rd. • Pittsburgh, PA 15228 412-344-0500 12

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


A T C OL D W E L L B A N K E R R E A L E S TAT E

Norma Bishop

Michelle Bonnar

John Butera

Linda Cobb

Diane Croup

Barbara Cusick

Amy Dias

Kathryn Gerhart

Judy Hlister

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Sandy Learish

Jean MacCumbee

Helen Moore

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Toni Petrucci

Efstratia ‘Tulla’ Rakoczy

Sara Redinger

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Jim Walsh

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They serve as your “personal advisory board” as you go through the sales process. When you have a real estate need, Surround Yourself With Good People at Coldwell Banker Real Estate.

Upper St. Clair Office 1699 Washington Rd. • Pittsburgh, PA 15228 412-833-5405 Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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SURROUND YOURSELF WITH GOOD PEOPLE

Roberta Allen

Hope Bassichis

Paul Bergman

Tade Bua-Bell

Dal Goldstein

Kris Marra

Nancy Morgan

Michael Wheeler

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South Hills Office 1695 McFarland Rd. • Pittsburgh, PA 15216 • 412-831-9500

Peters Township Office 3244 Washington Rd. • McMurray, PA 15317 • 412-831-5555

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14

Lisa Carper

Heather Collins

Cheryl Ferri

Marylu Fitzpatrick

Ginny Macaul

David Mares

Sue Robertson

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002

Mona Sutcliffe


HEARING BEST and FEELING BEST is a CHOICE Long Term Consequences of Hearing Aid Utilization The best understood result of Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is reduced communicative ability, especially in more challenging listening environments. Furthermore, hearing loss may well have significant secondary effects. For example, persons with SNHL can also experience increased feelings of isolation. Specifically, hearing impaired individuals may limit their contact with family,

friends, and /or be less willing to participate in social activities. Primarily due to this increased degree of isolation, a higher incidence of depression, loneliness, anger, fear, frustration and disappointment has been reported in the hearing impaired population. Furthermore, recent data suggests that hearing impairment may also have a detrimental effect on an individual’s degree of physical health and well- being.

Specifically, research evidence suggests that persons with hearing loss tend to exhibit a higher incidence of health related difficulties, such as hypertension, ischemic heart disease, arrhythmias, and osteoarthritis. With these considerations in mind, Dr. Carl Crandall of the University of Florida set out to examine the effects of hearing aid utilization on communicative, functional and psycho-social health

status. He wanted to determine if the provision of an advanced technology hearing instrument would significantly decrease perceived communicative difficulties, functional health difficulties and psycho-social health related difficulties.

The Results from Dr. Carl Crandall’s Investigation indicate the following: 1. A significant improvement in communicative status with the use of amplification. 2. A significant decrease in functional health-related disorders (as indicated by the Sickness Inventory Profile) with the utilization of hearing aids. 3. A trend towards reductions in psycho-social difficulties, particularly Depression, with amplification.

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Put your home

with the home

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Whether it’s Upper St. Clair’s little league team, Upper St. Clair’s high school football team or one of our very own softball teams, you’ll always find us rooting for the home team. And when it comes to homeowners insurance, we hope you’ll do the same...with Upper St. Clair’s very own Alcorn Christie Insurance Agency. After all, we’ve been serving the area’s insurance needs for over 56 years with quality insurance from companies like Travelers Insurance…the number one insurer of autos and homes among independent agents! For auto, business, or home insurance, call the home team…call us at 412-563-7828 today!

Alcorn Christie Insurance Agency 733 Washington Road, Suite 206 Pittsburgh, PA 15228 Mark D. Christie at 412-563-7828 mchristie@alcornchristie.com

16

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


Senate of Pennsylvania Senator Tim Murphy TIMOTHY F. MURPHY STATE SENATOR 37TH DISTRICT SENATE BOX 203037 ROOM 460, MAIN CAPITOL BUILDING HARRISBURG, PA 17120 (717) 787-5839 FAX (717) 772-4437 504 WASHINGTON ROAD PITTSBURGH, PA 15228 (412) 344-5583 FAX (412) 429-5092 WWW.LIBERTYNET.ORG/MURPHY TMURPHY@PASEN.GOV.

Budget Provides 4.9% Increase in Education Spending At the end of June, the Senate passed

a $20.7 billion budget that uses past savings and controlled spending to cover a $1.3 billion revenue shortfall and provide $2.45 million in additional dollars for schools in the 37th Senatorial District. The budget controls government spending, cutting the cost of operations by an additional 2%. Combined with cuts made during FY 2001-02, the state has reduced the day-to-day costs of running state government by 5%. This budget uses the savings to the Commonwealth that has accrued over the good times to help us through our current financial difficulties and move forward. It is a practical budget—one that prioritizes state spending with an emphasis on education and the future. Currently, 47 states are reporting revenue shortfalls with a cumulative total exceeding $66.26 billion. California’s $23.6 billion shortfall is nearly $3 billion larger that Pennsylvania’s total budget for FY 2002-03. Pennsylvania’s neighboring states are also facing revenue shortfalls: Delaware, $70 million (2.9% of General Fund); Maryland, $415 million (3.8%); New Jersey, $853 million (3.6%); New York, $8.2 billion (20.4%); Ohio, $2 billion (8.8%) and West Virginia, $10 million (0.3%). New Jersey is facing an overall budget shortfall of $2.4 billion. The 2002-03 budget holds the line on spending and maintains the current 2.8% personal income tax rate. This is a major accomplishment considering that the Pennsylvania economy slumped at a level unparalleled since 1991, when lawmakers were forced to enact a 48% increase on its

personal income tax—an increase of $350 for the average family of four. At the heart of the 2002-03 budget is a 4.9 increase in funding for basic education. Basic education subsidies will increase by $126.4 million to a total of more than $4 billion, providing for an average 3% increase for all school districts, except Philadelphia. The Upper St. Clair School District will receive a $3,371,239 basic education subsidy, an increase of $144,716 or 4.5%. The education budget also includes $52.9 million for charter school reimbursements and an additional $19.3 million earmarked for non-public school transportation for a total of $75.3 million. Many other states are cutting education funding. In particular, Florida reduced its spending by $639 million and Illinois cut $158 million in education funding. Almost every other major state in the nation has either cut or frozen education funds. I am pleased that we haven’t had to do that in Pennsylvania and have instead been able to provide a modest increase. The new budget package also includes a $45 million reduction in the job-killing Capital Stock and Franchise Tax and a $12.4 million expansion of the Working Family Tax Cut, meaning a family of four, earning up to $31,000, would be exempt from paying state income taxes. Additional funds for the budget will come by increasing the cigarette tax by 69 cents per pack and by increasing the tipping fee charged at state landfills by $4 per ton. The spending plan is also contingent on using $750 million from the state Rainy Day Fund, leaving $300 million in that savings account for the future. ■ Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Meet the USC Volunteer Firefighters Terry Kish They are lawyers, engineers, students, retirees and auto technicians. Some are

married; others are single. While some of them enjoy golf or reading, others go for skydiving and skiing. They are a diverse group of individuals with one thing in common—the desire and ability to serve their community as firefighters. As a group, they have over 430 years of firefighting experience. As individuals—well, here they are! William Neill, one of two senior members of the USCVFD, has been with the department for 43 years! He and his wife Sandy have four children—Bill Jr., Patty, Heidi, and A.J.—five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. A high school graduate, Bill spent six years in the Army Reserves. Bill is retired now, but enjoys auto racing, and has run a fire safety group at a local speedway for the past 30 years.

Doug Dennig is another senior member of the USCVFD. He’s been a volunteer with the department for 26 years, but a firefighter for 37 years! Prior to joining Upper St. Clair’s fire department, Doug served with South Old Bridge VFD in Old Bridge, New Jersey. Doug and his wife Anna are the parents of Mallory Walezak, Stuart Denning and Darcy Hill. They have three grandchildren. Doug attended the American Institute of Banking. He is retired from Westinghouse Electric Corporation. In addition to volunteering with the fire department, Doug is a volunteer escort at St. Clair Hospital. In his spare time he enjoys bicycling and yard work.

A 31 year member of the USCVFD and the chief of the department, Ray Tomnay and his wife Sarah have five children: Bill, Barb, Dan, Jennifer and Mike. They also have five grandchildren. A 1967 USC High School graduate, Ray earned his BS from the University of Akron. Ray’s career as a home builder keeps him busy, but he still finds time to serve as chief of the department. 18

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Russell Rauch is a 25 year veteran of the USCVFD and deputy chief of the department. He and his wife Nancy have one daughter, Andrea. Russ served for six years with the US Army Reserve and is a certified APCO Instructor. Russell has a gift for teaching and is often seen at the Upper St. Clair schools instructing kids about fire safety. He is employed as Technical Services Coordinator for the USC Police Department.

USCVFD’s assistant chief, Brian Reddecliff, has been a firefighter for ten years—five with USC, and five with Brentwood VFD. He and his wife Cheri have two daughters—Brina and Bayley. Brian is employed as a sales executive. Brian has been known to bare his legs in public—when he dons his kilt to perform on the bagpipes! In addition to bag piping, Brian enjoys flying.

USCVFD’s assistant chief, Steve Moore, has been with the department for twenty years. Steve has three children—Matt, Mike and Lauren—and is married to Sue. Steve is an USC graduate and attended Robert Morris University. He is employed by the USC School District as a mechanic. In his spare time Steve enjoys auto racing and spending time with his kids!

Children often follow in their parents’ footsteps, and Michael Tomnay has followed his father Ray into volunteer service with the fire department. Mike has been a member of the USCVFD for two years. A graduate of USC High School, Mike works as a bricklayer, and enjoys remote controlled cars, motorcycles and trucks.

Fall 2002

David Kropp has been with the USCVFD for 13 years. He and his wife Leslie are the parents of Laura and Russell. Dave earned his BS and MBA from Penn State, and his JD from Dickinson School of Law. He earned his LLM (tax) from the University of Miami Law School, and his CPA in Florida. He is a tax attorney and President of Bradford Capital Corporation. Not surprisingly, Dave is treasurer for the department. Volunteer work is one of Dave’s hobbies. In addition to serving as treasurer of the fire department, Dave is a former president of USC Friends of the Library, former president of Chartiers Center Mental Health/Mental Retardation, former elder of Westminster Presbyterian Church and former director of The Wesley Institute. He also taught Sunday school for five years. In his spare time, Dave enjoys reading and sports.


Don De Leo is a 29 year member of the USCVFD. He and his wife have two children, Christopher and Olivia. A high school graduate, Don is a welder and enjoys target shooting.

Tom Edkins has 23 years of firefighting experience: 16 years with USCVFD, five with Dormont, and two with Library. He and his wife Sally have four sons—John, Donald, Jeffery, and Thomas—and eight grandchildren. A graduate of South Hills High School, Tom served with the US Navy. He spent three years on the USS Worcester light cruiser as gunner’s mate third class, and also served as a fire fighter in Sub-Group 2 at Green Cove Springs, Florida. Tom is retired after 30 years of working as constable. He also has experience working as a stagehand at theatres and local television stations. In addition to volunteering with the fire department, Tom enjoys fishing and watching the History Channel.

Dan Barr has been a firefighter for 20 years: four years with USCVFD; four years with Edgeworth VFD; and 12 years with Mt. Pleasant Township (Hickory). He also makes his living in a related field—fire apparatus and equipment sales! Dan’s experience makes him a valuable member of the USCVFD board of directors. He and his wife Lori have two sons— Daniel and Christopher. In his free time Dan is an usher at Mt. Lebanon United Methodist Church and enjoys sports and travel. Photos by M & M Photography, Inc.

Dan Ferguson has been with the USCVFD for 24 years. He and his wife Jody have two children, Bryan and Alyssa. Dan attended Technician Training School for carpentry and Community College of Allegheny County for HVAC training. He is employed as a heating and cooling installation technician. In his spare time, Dan enjoys hunting, fishing, hiking, canoeing, camping and mountain biking.

Another firefighter following in his father’s footsteps is Bryan Ferguson. Bryan, the first junior member of the USCVFD, is the son of Dan Ferguson. A student at USC High School, Bryan enjoys hunting, fishing, camping and mountain biking.

A 19 year veteran of the USCVFD, Jerry Kopach, Jr. and his wife Anne are the parents of three children: Kaitlynn, Elizabeth and Derek. Jerry graduated from USC High School, followed by a two year tech school and four year electrical apprenticeship school. He is employed as an electrical construction foreman. While serving as president of the department takes up some of his spare time, Jerry still finds time to enjoy golf, bowling and riding motorcycles and ATV’s.

Donald J. Gerlach has been with the USCVFD for 17 years; prior to that he was a volunteer with South Baldwin VFD for five years. He has four children—Don, Greg, Jen and Drew—and three grandchildren. Two of his sons, Greg and Drew, are also members of the USCVFD. Don enjoys people, a trait that serves him well as Sales Executive and President of Allegheny Ad Services, Inc., the company he founded in 1971. In his spare time, Don’s hobbies are golf, the Steelers, and Big East basketball! Greg Gerlach has spent the last decade volunteering for the USCVFD. He and his wife Shari are the parents of Zachary and Olivia. Greg earned his BS in Management from Clarion University and works for Xerox Connect as a Solutions Architect/Project Manager. While serving the fire department as captain and spending time with his family keep him busy, when Greg gets some free time he enjoys camping, fishing, riding ATV’s and golf.

Another Gerlach serving the USCVFD is Drew Gerlach. Drew, a lieutenant for the department, has been a member for four years. Drew received his BA from Allegheny College and makes his career in sales. Drew is married to Abby. His interests include golf, camping and hiking.

Fall 2002

Continued on page 96 UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Upper St. Clair Stalwart Says So Long Stephen Colelli, a junior at USCHS Joe DePalma has been a part of the Upper St. Clair School District for more than 30 years, serving as both the head soccer coach and as a teacher of twelfth grade AP English. He retired this summer as both a teacher and a coach. This soccer season will be the first ever in Upper St. Clair history not to be coached by DePalma. Upper St. Clair has lost another renowned teacher and coach to retirement. Joe DePalma initially had no real aspirations of becoming a teacher. He had been inspired by a few of his teachers in high school, and he had looked up to them, but he had not planned on pursuing a teaching career. After attending college at Slippery Rock University, where he played soccer, DePalma volunteered for the army and went on to serve in Vietnam for four years. After completing his time in the service, he applied to USC High School for an open teaching position. “It was the only job I applied for because I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do in the future,” said DePalma. “I taught for about a year and was really motivated by the students. I enjoyed the job and decided to continue.” Early on in his teaching career at USC DePalma also sought to begin a soccer program at the high school level. Soccer, an emerging sport in the area, had been one of DePalma’s interests. He took it upon himself to found the Upper St. Clair boys’ soccer team. “Soccer and the program have come a long way in the thirty years since I started coaching,” said DePalma. At first, he had to really educate the community and the players about the game. Over the years, as the sport grew in recognition around the town and southwest Pennsylvania, the interest in the team began to increase dramatically. Said DePalma, “We’ve had tremendous support from the parents, the students, and even the faculty over the years. The soccer program is something I’m especially proud of.” Teaching and coaching went hand-inhand for DePalma. His students and players were similar in many aspects. Both groups were talented and wished to learn. The challenge of being a teacher and coach was motivating his students and players to learn.

“It was tough to inspire kids on a daily basis to learn,” explained DePalma. “The most daunting aspect of both jobs was trying to connect with my students or players every day. That is what teaching is, though—bringing out the best of your students’ abilities—that goes for coaching, too. A good coach and a good teacher work to help a kid utilize his or her talents, whether it be in English or soccer. That’s the reward of the job—helping a kid to succeed.” Success came often for DePalma and the soccer team. They won their section seven times and won the WPIAL title three times under his guidance. DePalma was also recognized as the 2002 Coach of the Year by the Post-Gazette. He appreciated the recognition, but it wasn’t the real reward of the job. The real rewards and memories for DePalma are of the relationships with his students and players that he has formed over the years. He said that he would always remember the championship years in soccer and big games that his teams played. The feeling of being a team facing a challenge together, as a group, was something he will always remember. Another reward came from teaching. Seeing his students that he taught graduate and go off to college always gave him a feeling of accomplishment. DePalma’s favorite memories occurred while his children attended the High School. He taught his daughter in his AP English course, and he coached his son on varsity soccer. DePalma said that being able to teach and coach his children was something very special to him and something he felt very fortunate to have been able to do. Over the years much has changed in the school, in the students, and in the game. DePalma said he felt that over the years he saw more of a change in teachers than students. “Sure, the students change physically. What is popular varies from year to year and the students’ appearances change, but all of the students still want to be motivated and helped,” he said. “They want to be led and instructed. Teachers have evolved more in the past thirty years in that they now have more techniques and ways that they use to teach students. The teachers have changed over the years more so than the students.” Teaching has also taught DePalma new things. He said that he never stopped learning from both jobs. “One thing I realized from

Joe DePalma

teaching and coaching was that you never stop learning. There is always more to learn.” Coach DePalma will be missed this soccer season, the first ever that he won’t be patrolling the sidelines on game nights. When asked if he would continue to attend Upper St. Clair soccer games, he responded, “Absolutely!” He continues to love the sport and expects continued success from the program. He won’t exactly pine for those endless fall days which could last for seventeen hours at times, but he will never forget them and all of the things he accomplished in the time he devoted to his jobs. He doesn’t see any teaching in his future, but he won’t rule anything out, either. He hopes to find something to throw himself into, a hobby or activity. DePalma’s absence from the English department also will be felt. Kathy Kirsch, English Curriculum leader at the High School was especially sad to see DePalma go. She knew what DePalma meant to the English department and to the students he taught. “What Joe DePalma has done at this High School has been incredible. I have a lot of respect for him,” said Kirsch. “He was the last High School English teacher for the seniors going to college, and he prepared them extraordinarily well for what they would experience in college. The students enjoyed going to his class every day. I think he did a tremendous job in his time here.” Joe DePalma treasured the years he spent working at Upper St. Clair High School. For his contributions and the presence he had in the school and on the field, he will be sorely missed this coming school year. ■

Fall 2002

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002

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Edward Oelschlager— A Poet

Betty Marshall and Edward Oelschlager

The International Society of Poets nominated Edward Oelschlager, a resi-

dent of Upper St. Clair, to be the 2001 World Champion Amateur Poet. He was inducted as an International Poet of Merit and an Honored Member. He also received an “International Poet of Merit” Award Medallion and a beautiful championship silver trophy. Editor’s note: Ed and Betty are graduates of USC’s Clifton School—see page 10. The Oelschlager family has lived in Upper St. Clair since 1916.

The Beauty of Fall

When We Were Kids

It’s too nice a day to stay inside the house The sun shines brightly, there’s a soft warm breeze It’s a day to enjoy, be out and about A day to have fun, do as we please

We’d play tag up in the trees Diving from limb to limb Swinging from vines like Tarzan did It was great to be a kid The vines on which we’d swing Sometimes they would break We would limp away After making that mistake We rode our bikes down a hill Right into a lake The water felt like cement Another big mistake Our bikes we carried home that day Front wheel, like a pretzel, twisted Thanking God all the way No broken bones we had listed To express all the things we did Would take many days and pages The memories we made back then Will last us through the ages

Too soon, cold, the weather will be To enjoy in comfort, as today we can Snow will be falling, there’ll be a cold breeze Heavy clothes we’ll be wearing, it’s part of nature’s plan So while it is pleasant, let’s all enjoy This lovely day, given us by God Spend our time in the great outdoors It will soon have passed, winter awaits the given nod The time is now, let’s go riding through the country The multi-colored leaves on the trees to see Could be our last chance to view the beauty Of these lovely changing leaves

Poems by Edward Oelschlager. Fall 2002

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Upper St. Clair School District Board of School Directors

Albert E. Ferrara, Jr. Vice President 412-835-2709

USC Earns A Perfect Ten

David E. Bluey 412-835-6145

Upper St. Clair School District now proudly displays

Barbara L. Bolas 412-833-9841

Dina J. Fulmer 412-831-8664

Clark R. Nicklas 412-831-1027

Angela B. Petersen 412-831-7182

William M. Sulkowski, DMD 412-221-9516

Mark G. Trombetta, MD 412-831-8543

ten National Blue Ribbon School awards with the recent recognition of Fort Couch Middle School as a third time Blue Ribbon award winner. Fort Couch, with a student body of 679 children in the seventh and eighth grades, was one of 172 schools nationwide to receive this honored distinction in May 2002. The school was previously recognized with this award in 1987 and 1993, making this their triple crown. The process of candidate consideration and selection began with a lengthy 40-page written application that was submitted to the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) and led by Fort Couch teachers David Kuzmovich and Dee Fazio. After review of the application by the USDE, a representative conducted a two-day site visit in March 2002, confirming the application data and getting hands-on information by observing and communicating with students, staff and parents. According to Dr. Timothy Steinhauer, a five-year principal at Fort Couch, the extensive self-evaluation of all aspects of operations and curriculum by school personnel was the most important outcome of the demanding process. “As we face a time of accountability in public education, it is rewarding to know that our program and staff commitment has been endorsed by the USDE with the Blue Ribbon recognition,” said Dr. John Bornyas, Director of Education/Instructional Principal. “So often we take for granted what our students achieve through this successful District-developed program. This is

Guidelines for Dress in Schools Beginning September 9, 2002 • • • • •

No hats Undergarments should not be visible No bare midriffs Shorts and skirts of reasonable length T-shirts should not display inappropriate messages

Failure to comply with the guidelines will be viewed as a violation of the School District’s discipline policy. Left to right: Dr. Timothy Steinhauer, Dee Fazio, David Kuzmovich, Dr. William Pope and Dr. John Bornyas. 24

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


definitely a time to celebrate our upper middle school program as a successful link in the education of our young people,” he continued. A special award ceremony is scheduled in Washington, D.C., this October when representatives from the school will be honored. Then it’s back home to share the award with students, staff, families and the community. “This award validates the strong foundation the middle school program affords our students before they enter the High School. We are fortunate to have full support from members of the School Board, community, staff and parents for this program,” said Dr. Bornyas.

Blue drinks for everyone, as students celebrate ‘hearing the word.’

The USDE’s Blue Ribbon national award program was initiated in 1982 in response to a report critical of public education in the United States. To date, 4418 schools across America have been recognized with this award. Fort Couch has given the District a perfect ten when it comes to the number of Blue Ribbon awards the District has earned. It may also be one of the last such awards to be given out, as the USDE is changing the title of the award to “No Child Left Behind” beginning in the 2002-03 school year. ■

School District Central Office Administration

Dr. William A. Pope Superintendent of Schools

M. Jane Sierzega Director of Finance and Business

Robert Obrosky Director of Technology

Jean Toner Director of Human Resources

Eloise Stoehr Supervisor of Pupil Services

Dr. Sharon Suritsky Director of Special Education

Dr. John Bornyas Director of Education/ Instructional Principal (7-12)

Dr. Patricia Dunkis Director of Education/ Instructional Principal (K-6)

Charles Samek Director of Transportation

To reach personnel call 412-833-1600, press 1, enter extension number followed by the # sign. Administrator

Secretary/Email Address

Extension

Dr. William A. Pope ................................................... Mary Ann Stabile ......................... 2201 Superintendent of Schools mstabile@uscsd.k12.pa.us M. Jane Sierzega ......................................................... Bonny Thomas ............................. 2266 Director of Finance and Business bthomas@uscsd.k12.pa.us Robert Obrosky .......................................................... Doreen Leech ................................ 2211 Director of Technology dleech@uscsd.k12.pa.us Jean Toner .................................................................. Debi Bakowski ............................. 2286 Director of Human Resources dbakowski@uscsd.k12.pa.us Eloise Stoehr .............................................................. Phyllis Feller ................................ 2283 Supervisor of Pupil Services pfeller@uscsd.k12.pa.us Dr. Sharon Suritsky ................................................... Phyllis Feller ................................... 2283 Director of Special Education pfeller@uscsd.k12.pa.us Dr. John Bornyas ........................................................ Cheryl Ellison .............................. 2202 Director of Education/Instructional Principal (7-12) cellison@uscsd.k12.pa.us Dr. Patricia Dunkis .................................................... Cheryl Ellison .............................. 2202 Director of Education/Instructional Principal (K-6) cellison@uscsd.k12.pa.us Charles Samek ........................................................... Karen Powers ............................... 3450 Director of Transportation kpowers@uscsd.k12.pa.us

Congratulations Congratulations to Dr. William A. Pope, Superintendent of Schools, for receiving the University Council for Educational Administration Excellence in Educational Leadership Award. This national award is given to individuals to recognize the generous and varied professional contributions of practicing school administrators to the improvement and support of school administration preparations programs.

School District Building Administration

Dr. Terrence Kushner ................................... Principal of the High School Joe DeMar ..................................................... High School Assistant Principal/Dean of Students Dr. Mike Ghilani ........................................... High School Assistant Principal/Dean of Students Dr. William Rullo ......................................... Director of High School Guidance Dr. Timothy Steinhauer ............................... Principal of Fort Couch Middle School Kevin Deitrick ............................................... Administrative Intern at Fort Couch Karen Brown ................................................. Acting Principal of Boyce Middle School Dr. Ruth Ann Matyuf ................................... Principal of Baker Elementary School Mark Miller ................................................... Principal of Eisenhower Elementary School Beverly Krill .................................................. Principal of Streams Elementary School

General USC School District website is www.uscsd.k12.pa.us Fall 2002

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Dr. Pope’s Graduation Speech to the Class of 2002 June 9, 2002 This speech is particularly special to me, because it may be the last

commencement speech I will have the honor to give at Upper St. Clair. Thirteen years ago I gave my first graduation speech to the Class of 1990. You, the members of the Class of 2002, were kindergarten students that year, and here you are today thirteen years later, graduates. In some ways we started together, you as students, and I as superintendent. We are now getting ready to go out together. You as students moving on to the next step in your life and career, and I, on the other hand, just moving on. I thought that it might be interesting to look back over the 13 years that you have been in school. What has happened that may be responsible for shaping the future that lies ahead for you and me? To acquire some concrete examples of incidents that may have affected our lives since 1989, I requested resources from our

26

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High School library such as issues of the “Year in Review” from Time magazine and “America’s Century 1900-2000.” A host of columns and articles on the subject of commencement speeches collected by Mr. Paul Fox served as a reservoir of candid thoughts that allowed me to compose parts of my graduation speech to you today. Frankly, it was a useful experience because we often get so absorbed in our own self interests that we fail to see this journey, albeit valuable, as one brief episode in a longer, creative adventure. Despite all of the aforementioned resources, one of the most useful was the senior issue of the St. Clarion. Isn’t that typical? The most meaningful facts for us adults came from the minds and mouths of teenagers. Thank goodness that we occupy the same planet. Parents, on the other hand, occasionally wish that we didn’t necessarily occupy the same homes. But that’s a different story.

Fall 2002

The journey began for both of us in 1989. Just as you were finding your way to kindergarten, the super tanker, Exxon Valdez, dumped 11 million gallons of oil on the wildlife rich coastline of Alaska, and the Berlin Wall, the world’s most visible symbol of oppression, crumbled, and I became your District’s fourth superintendent. There may have been a message there. The world took a turn for the better for all of us in the early 1990s when Nelson Mandela was elected president of South Africa, the Soviet Union collapsed and the Americans and their allies in Operation Desert Storm freed Kuwait. Our country was not without tragedy however, when rioters ravaged Los Angeles after the Rodney King verdict, and the headquarters of David Koresh and the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas, was engulfed in flames. In 1994, the students who are graduating today left our elementary schools and continued the journey. In that year,


Honoring Cathy Luke

while we were watching O. J. driving his white Bronco on TV, the District was completing the addition at Boyce Middle School just in time for the Class of 2002 to take up residence. In two short years, the graduates of today traveled to the north side of the Township and became teenagers together at the then recently renovated Fort Couch Middle School. And continuing on the progression of years in school and renovations, your entry to high school was marked by the beginning of the construction for the beautifully renovated, remodeled, new High School, which is our legacy to every student and every class who follow. We both learned to develop resiliency during the construction transition, and we have enjoyed the new facility for the past two years. Symbolically, perhaps this represents the challenges and accomplishments we both faced during these years. But the building alone is secondary to the people and practices that occur within it. Back to the national scene. During your high school years, the tobacco companies made a $368.5 billion deal to settle claims against them, and the school tragedy at Columbine made us stop, pause, and say thanks for being safe here. In many ways your senior year will be marked by our collective reaction to the tragedy at the World Trade Centers, the Pentagon and Somerset last September. It is likely that Americans will remember terrorists bringing down the Twin Towers more than anything else that happened last year. We have all said many prayers since that day. Much has been written about the day, the savage attack and the thousands who were killed on September 11. This class has obviously had to change the way it plans, lives and travels. The world will never be the same again, and we now need to focus

on our own mortality more than ever. But let’s keep today for our graduating seniors. On a table in my home office is painted, “In your heart, keep one still, secret spot where dreams may go.” Well, today is one of those days filled with all of the dreams we have for the future and ourselves. Don’t be afraid to dream. Teenagers and adults see the future differently. I love working where I see and talk to students every day. That way my youth never ends. Looks and health may change but being with you young folks never gets old and boring. This is in part because you are at the early stages of your life story. Speaking of stories, I am reminded of the novel Jane Eyre, which is about a governess whose life with its moments of joy, happiness and sorrow shows us that we all create our own personal story through the challenges we address and overcome. Supreme Court Justice Breyer in a commencement address to Stanford graduates tells us, “Most important, our stories include our own justifications for our actions and our motives in light of our own values. We cannot escape the negative meaning that a failure of integrity—a failure to live up to our own basic standards of right and wrong—will give to the story that throughout our lives we tell ourselves. I agree with the philosopher who said that money can vanish overnight, power disappear, even that bubble reputation can evaporate; but character—personal integrity—is a rock that is secure and that no one can take from you.” As I began, we have traveled these past 13 years together meeting new challenges. Anna Quindlen, a writer for Newsweek said in a speech to the graduating class of Villanova, “You walk out of here with only one thing that no one else has. There will

Left to right: Dr. Robert Christiana, former School District Superintendent, Dr. Catherine Luke, former Deputy Superintendent and Superintendent Dr. William Pope.

Dr. Catherine (Cathy) Luke

retired from the School District this past June, completing her thirty-second year of dedicated service to our school system and community. Cathy began her Upper St. Clair teaching career as a reading specialist at the High School in 1970. She went on to become the K-12 curriculum leader and reading specialist for grades K-5. In 1982 she assumed the role of K-12 Supervisor of Reading/ Languages, progressing to Supervisor of Curriculum and Instruction for the District. She served the District from 1995 to 2002 as Deputy Superintendent. Cathy received her bachelor’s degree from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Paul, Minnesota, and her master’s degree from Mankato State College in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She completed her academic endeavors by earning her doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh. School District administration and staff and community residents honored Cathy at a retirement party held at St. Clair Country Club this past spring. Thank you, Dr. Luke, for your wisdom, guidance and creativity as you helped lead our students to academic achievement and staff to excellence in education. We’ll see Cathy around Central Office and our schools this fall as the District was fortunate to retain her as a consultant for the 2002-03 school year. ■

Continued on page 98 Fall 2002

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2002 Graduation School Board Response Delivered by Jim Murdy, former School Board President There have been many important things said this afternoon by the

valedictorians, by Dr. Kushner and especially just now by Dr. Pope. Speaking for the School Board I’d like to congratulate each graduating senior and your parents. Dr. Pope set the historic context of this class. It is unique. You have already seen so much at such a young age. I will stay with his theme. You are historic not for what you have seen, but for what you can accomplish for yourselves and for all of us. You are the second high school class of a new century—a new millennium—the next one thousand years. But think of this. There are 319 of you graduating—three hundred nineteen Upper St. Clair 18-year-olds. In the entire world, there are roughly 100 million 18-year-olds. That means you are only a small fraction (three one thousands of one percent) of the worldwide 18-year-olds who are privileged to be from the graduating class of 2002. In math class, did you ever solve such a tiny number? So, in an arithmetical sense, this class is inconsequential. But this School District doesn’t believe you’re inconsequential. And you can’t believe you’re inconsequential, either.

Your class and graduating classes like yours across America and across the rest of the civilized world will carry a tremendous burden. It is sad and sobering to realize that tens of millions of today’s 18-year-olds won’t contribute to our world. You, Upper St. Clair graduates, may be the tiniest fraction of the shear world numbers. But you are a crucial fraction of the world’s hope. Is there a graduating class anywhere today that’s expected to accomplish more than your parents, your teachers and this community expect you to accomplish? There isn’t. Continued on page 98

Class of 2002 High School Academic Achievers Valedictorians Shoshana Hetta Ballew, Matthew Thomas Birris, Michael Harris Iskoe, Brent Aaron Jackson, Holly Beth Law, Amy Rose Lorincy, Ashime Mathur, Aditya Sankaranarayan, Amisha Mukesh Shah, Stephen Robert Singerman, Kevin Michael Slowey, Jenna Lee Young, Karl Edward Zelik and Sarah Shuohua Zhang. Superintendent’s Academic Achievement Award Sarah Christine Cameron, Jessica Leigh Jones, Elizabeth Ann Luley, Kara Irene Mikula, Elizabeth Louise Miller, Pamela Ann Swaney and Claire Cecilia Yeargers. International Baccalaureate Diploma Award Troy W. Baily, Emily Marie Lovell, Christina Catherine Luke, Mark Peter O’Connor, Stephen Robert Singerman and Sarah Shuohua Zhang. ■

Fall 2002

Steve Singerman lives up to his surname and sings his graduation speech to fellow classmates.


The Annual Baccalaureate To honor our High School graduates, the annual

Baccalaureate is a secular ceremony featuring one or two songs performed by the High School choirs, a motivational speaker, and “reflections”—four short speeches made by the senior class officers about memories, anecdotes and personal experiences of the graduating class through their years in the elementary schools, Boyce, Fort Couch and High School. It is voluntary and held free of charge for High School seniors, their family members and friends in the High School theatre on commencement day at 2 p.m. Also optional is a sacred Baccalaureate Service (not sponsored by the School District is held on an earlier date for those interested) in one of the Christian churches in our community. The District was pleased to have Harvey H. Alston as the baccalaureate speaker for the graduating class of 2002. As a remarkable communicator and one of the most in-demand speakers, Harvey’s career has spanned diverse positions—from head football coach of Ohio’s Columbus East High School to assistant director of student financial aid at the university level. As an educator, he taught English, biology, health, life sciences and mathematics. He also served in business management and in supervisory positions for the food and restaurant industry. Mr. Alston authored four books, including Be the Best and Black Males. Over the years, he has received numerous awards as well as national recognition. He is a member of the National Speakers Association and the Ohio Speakers Forum and serves as advisor to many civic boards, panels, and commissions. ■

Harvey motivated the audience, involving them throughout his speech.

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Temporary Inconvenience— Permanent Improvement The B.E.S.T. Express is on Track Remember that the 2002-03 school year begins Monday, September 9. To accommodate requirements of the construction projects and concern for student and personnel safety, the School Board approved the late start date this past May.

The Baker Eisenhower Streams Team (B.E.S.T.) is on track with the

construction project at each elementary school. Safety of the students and staff remains top priority. No one, other than construction personnel, have been at any of the elementary sites since the beginning of summer. To accommodate the construction, the three elementary school administrative offices were relocated to Room 146 at the High School on a temporary basis on June 13. To contact these offices by phone, use the general School District number, 412-833-1600, with the extension 4000 for Baker, 8000 for Eisenhower and 6000 for Streams. The only elementary voice mailboxes that will be operative are the elementary principals’ and curriculum leaders’ extensions. The remaining individual voice mailboxes will not be operational until school resumes in the fall.

A temporary walkway fenced in for safety at Streams.

Parking Reminder at Our Schools When parking at any school property throughout the District, drivers are reminded to follow the posted traffic/parking signs (both temporary and permanent). Automobile parking is permitted only where designated by posted signs or markers. Parking on grass areas or roadways not designated as such is dangerous for emergency situations and considered illegal. Please obey all temporary parking restrictions at the three elementary schools during the construction period. ■

Baker, up to its elbows in construction.

412-833-7700

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The integrity of the classroom will be maintained by providing for total separation between construction and instructional areas when students and staff return this fall. Since approval of the renovations, ongoing information has been provided to all families of elementary students, keeping them abreast of the progress and facility restrictions. Fall 2002

Preserving nature among demolition at Eisenhower.


DARE Tracy Brown Daring to “say no” is a familiar phrase to past third

graders. The Upper St. Clair Police Department along with the School District created a four week program where a policeman teaches our youngsters Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE). The curriculum emphasizes recognition and resistance of influences that lead to experimentation with drugs. A packet is given to each child to increase his or her knowledge. One part of the workbook stresses safety in a variety of ways: street signs, personal situations with strangers, and the people they can trust. Officer Jon Wharton speaks with a third grade class at Streams Elementary.

A second section teaches about the different types of drugs and the variation between harmful and helpful drugs. The last part of the program highlights the children’s individuality. Each third grader has the opportunity to get to know themselves and their interests a little better. The course encourages parental and family involvement to make the child feel safe and confident to avoid and resist uncomfortable situations. ■

Also see page 54: Teenage Drinking—You Can’t Afford It! Sheriff’s DARE car in our Community Day parade.

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School District Information School Board Local school districts and their governing boards were established by the Pennsylvania General Assembly over 150 years ago. Public education is the only public service mandated by the Pennsylvania Constitution. Although elected locally, as agents of the General Assembly, school directors are state officials. Such local control of education is one of the unique strengths of our public education system. The Upper St. Clair School Board consists of nine elected directors: Albert Ferrara, Jr. (Vice President), David Bluey, Barbara Bolas, Dina Fulmer, Clark Nicklas, Angela Petersen, William Sulkowski and Mark Trombetta. One position is currently vacant. The regular meeting of the School Board generally takes place on the fourth Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in the High School LGI Room. There is no scheduled meeting in July. Copies of school board minutes are available at School District Central Office and on the School District website at www.uscsd.k12.pa.us. For further information regarding meetings call 412-833-1600, extension 2202.

Central Office staff, left to right, front row: Cheryl Ellison, Phyllis Feller and Diane Mariano-Rodi. Back row: Nancy Klein, Mary Ann Stabile, Mary Bonczek, Donna Faccenda, Bonnie Thomas, Debi Bakowski and Karol Kommer.

Chris Hack Becky Berquist

Central Office The School District’s Central Office is located in the Municipal Building at 1820 McLaughlin Run Road—412-833-1600. As you enter the building, the School District offices are straight ahead.

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Fall 2002

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Elementary Schools (Grades K-4) All three elementary schools are undergoing renovation construction, scheduled for completion by September 2003. Albert Baker Morton Road—412-833-1600, ext. 4000 Erected: 1968 • Current enrollment: 495 Carl R. Streams Ashlawn Drive—412-833-1600, ext. 6000 Erected: 1966 • Current enrollment: 464 Dwight D. Eisenhower Warwick Drive—412-833-1600, ext. 8000 Erected: 1960 • Current enrollment: 508 Middle Schools (Grades 5-8) Middle level education was introduced to American public education by Upper St. Clair in the 1960s through the work of Dr. Donald Eichhorn, who was then assistant superintendent in the District. He is internationally remembered as the founder of the middle school in America. Boyce (Grades 5-6) Boyce Road—412-833-1600, ext. 5000 Erected: 1968 • Current enrollment: 614 Fort Couch (Grades 7-8) Fort Couch Road—412-833-1600, ext. 3000 Erected: 1951 • Current enrollment: 679 High School Upper St. Clair High School (Grades 9-12) Washington and McLaughlin Run Roads—412-833-1600, ext. 2202 Erected: 1960 • Current enrollment: 1391 Major renovations were completed in the 1999-2000 academic year to this state-ofthe-art facility. The school’s three archways of entrance showcase the academic, arts and athletic wings of the school. The theatre, inside the arts wing, is host to numerous student and community activities with seating capacity of 860. Buses/Transportation The Upper St. Clair School District’s Department of Transportation enjoys an impeccable safety record. Charles (Chuck) Samek, Director of Transportation since 1983, puts a high premium on safe operating procedures. He says, “Our primary responsibility is to provide safe, efficient transportation for our 4400 public, private and special needs students who attend approximately 30 schools within a ten mile radius of Upper St. Clair.” All Upper St. Clair school bus drivers are required to carry a Pennsylvania class

B commercial driver’s license with a passenger endorsement and no air brake restriction. They must possess a Pennsylvania school bus driver certification, pass an annual physical and recertify every four years. Chuck is a certified instructor examiner and provides the required ten hours (seven in the classroom, three behind the wheel) of training for recertification. A typical day for an Upper St. Clair bus driver includes about sixty miles and four-and-ahalf hours behind the wheel. All new employees are required to have Act 33 and Act 34 clearances and must be pre-employment drug tested as required by the Federal Highway Administration. Additionally, 50% of all Commercial Drivers Licensed bus drivers must be randomly drug tested on an annual basis under FHA regulations. The bus garage, where the District’s 52 school buses and vans are stored is located on Fort Couch Road next to Fort Couch Middle School. For more information, contact Chuck Samek at 412-833-1600 ext. 3450. Food Services To best digest the sweet food of knowledge offered every day by their teachers, Upper St. Clair students first need food. The District’s six nutrition centers serve thousands of healthy meals each day— meals that play an important role in the education of our children. Under the supervision of Russ Phillips, Director of Food Service for Upper St. Clair Schools, the nutrition center managers and their dedicated staffs happily provide a break from the classroom, allowing the children to return nourished and ready to learn. For information, contact Russ Phillips at 412-833-1600 ext. 2287. Technology The role of the Technology Department in the Upper St. Clair School District is to provide and support the use of resources which enhance the teaching and learning processes, strengthen communication, and improve efficiency of operations. Robert (Bob) Obrosky has served as Director of Technology since August 1988. With the help of staff members D o re e n L e e c h , R a y B e r ro t t , B u d Marlett, Erin Walker, and Carol Seibert, the department plans for and manages the acquisition and implementation of technology to ensure that it supports Continued on page 34 Fall 2002

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School District Information

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Continued from page 33

the curriculum and the needs of students, teachers, and administrators. Each member of the District’s teaching staff has a laptop computer that is used to plan and present instruction, to gather information, and to communicate with colleagues and parents. One hundred percent of the classrooms have access to the District’s high-speed, wide area network and to the Internet, so that both staff and students can extend learning and communication opportunities beyond the walls of the classroom—virtually to the entire world. An instructional technology aide supports technology in each school building. This aide is onsite and works with the teachers and staff to optimize implementation and utilization of a wide variety of

Tech Support staff, left to right: Doreen Leech, Bob Obrosky, Erin Walker, Carol Seibert, Bud Marlett and Ray Berrott.

available technical resources. The District offers training so that all staff members may enhance their skills to apply technology to their job responsibilities. The District’s vision for integrating technology into daily activities in our schools includes incorporating the use of appropriate hardware and software throughout every area of the curriculum. Instead of studying computer science as an end in itself, computers are used as teaching and learning tools in each subject. In addition to computers, the Technology Department manages the telephone, email, and voice mail systems, satellite and television systems, audiovisual resources, and photocopiers and printers. For more information, contact the Technology Department at 412-833-1600, ext. 2211.

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Fall 2002

2002-03 PTA Council Executive Board, left to right: Joanne Prorok, Board Advisor; Cheryl Delany, Treasurer; Beth Hornak, President; Amy Billerbeck, Secretary and Dr. William Pope, Second Vice President. Missing from the photo is First Vice President, Lori Feldman.

PTA Council The Upper St. Clair PTA Council is an umbrella organization comprising representatives from each USC school, USC PTA unit presidents, the Superintendent of Schools, other School District representatives and School Board members. As the core of PTA activities in the District, PTA Council heads up many committees. PTA Council meets the first Wednesday of each month at 9:30 a.m. Refer to your PTA Council calendar or your school directory for meeting location. Visitors are welcomed and encouraged to attend. PTSO (Grades 9-12) The Parent Teacher Student Organization is an organization of parents, teachers, and high school students that provides an opportunity to work on additional programs and educational and social activities at the High School. For more information, call 412-833-1600. PTA (Grades K-8) The Parent Teacher Association (PTA) is an organization of parents of school age children together with their teachers that allows parents to work within the schools to provide extra help, additional programs, and educational and social activities for the children. The PTA has branches at each school in the District. For information, call your building’s school principal or PTA representative. A list of some PTA sponsored or affiliated activities follows: Odyssey of the Mind Available in Upper St. Clair since 1997, Odyssey of the Mind is an after school program designed to develop creative thinking in children. Students work in teams under voluntary coaches to solve problems that


are proposed by the national Odyssey of the Mind organization. For more information, contact your PTA representative or District coordinator Kelly Hanna at 412-831-7733. Partners in Education (PIE) PIE is a group of parents, administrators and staff formed as a branch of the PTA to foster the best educational environment for all exceptional children and to educate and assist parents of exceptional children. Over the years PIE has provided programs, workshops and opportunities to network for staff, parents and students. The guidance department runs a spring orientation for parents of special education students making the transition into middle school and high school. For more information, contact Nancy Douglass at 412-833-6583 or Jennifer Peterson at 412-831-3166. Together in Education (TIE) TIE is a new branch of the PTA formed to foster and address general education issues for all school aged children. TIE plans to meet twice annually. Guest speakers will address the audience, with discussion to follow. For more information contact Marcia Rojcewicz at 412-833-4773.

Together in Parenting (TIP) TIP is a branch of the PTA Council. Its objective is to offer support and education on difficult parenting issues. TIP is open to all Upper St. Clair residents. Meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month. For more information, call Valerie Valdiserri at 412-221-1006 or Sarah Mittelman at 412-220-1122. USC Guild for the Gifted Child Upper St. Clair Guild for the Gifted Child is a chapter affiliate of the Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education (PAGE). This program is offered for children in nursery school through grade twelve. For more information, contact Central Office at 412-833-1600 or your building’s school principal. International Baccalaureate (Grades 1-12) The Upper St. Clair School District piloted the International Baccalaureate Program in 1998 and is offering this program for grades one through twelve. The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), a nonprofit educational foundation based in Switzerland, offers the Diploma Continued on page 36

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School District Information Continued from page 35

Program for students in the final two years of secondary schools, the Middle Years Program for students in the 11-16 age range and the Primary Years Program for grades one, two and three. Requirements for the IB Diploma are structured to meet the entrance requirements of the best universities throughout the world, while striving to meet the ideal of a liberal arts education. The general objectives of the IB Program are to provide students with a balanced education, to facilitate geographic and cultural mobility, and to promote international understanding through academic experience. IB is now a significant educational force in some 720 schools in 94 countries worldwide. The School District is accepting tuition students for its Diploma Program. Students from local schools who are entering eleventh grade this fall can apply and will be expected to complete the two-year program and graduate in the year 2004 with International Baccalaureate and Upper St. Clair diplomas. Those interested or for more information, please call Central Office at 412-833-1600.

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School-Wide Enrichment Program—SWEP (Grades 1-4) Many opportunities are available for elementary level students to explore topics that interest them through SWEP. Miniassemblies, mentorships and independent study projects are all part of SWEP. This program is a three-pronged approach that consists of Type I, Type II and Type III activities based on Renzulli’s “Talents Unlimited” model. Type I activities are exploratory activities for all students. Type II activities consist of process training skills for students who are identified as academically gifted. Type III activities are investigative enrichment projects and are for all students. Enrichment specialists in each school direct these activities, with the major responsibility of execution and completion lying with the student. For more information, contact Central Office at 412-833-1600 or your building’s school principal. Volunteers in Our Schools (Grades K-12) There are well over a thousand volunteers who share their time and talents with

Fall 2002

the children in our schools. They take on a thousand different roles. They listen, read, type and file. They tutor, bake, compute and encourage. They raise money and they raise awareness. Our volunteers help tutor math and reading, and they help in the library and in the classrooms. They are Great Book discussion leaders, foreign language tutors, and computer resource volunteers. Surely our schools could survive without volunteers, but the loss would be immeasurable. They affirm that our schools are not just another consumer service but are an integral and vital part of our community. Upper St. Clair’s Volunteer Program started in 1976 by Dr. Catherine Luke, former Deputy Superintendent, with only a handful of volunteers. Since then and because of the tremendous volunteer support, dozens of learning and extracurricular activities have been added at our schools. Any resident who is interested in volunteering in any of our schools is encouraged to call 412-833-1600 ext. 2202 or contact your building’s principal. Continued on page 48


The Deer Valley Experience Dawn Yoder, Deer Valley Program Director

Deer Valley, located next to Mt. Davis, the highest natural point in Pennsylvania.

Deer Valley Committee, left to right: Dawn Yoder, Kevin Clark, Bernice Andrews, Jim Smoyer, Kathy Hoedeman and Mark Goelz. Ahhhhh… to get away from it all!

Sometimes a few days away from everyday life can do wonders for the soul. Envision this: Miles and miles of virgin forests, a crystal clear lake, and fields of beautiful bluets that resemble little puffs of turquoise cotton balls spreading from field to water. Is this, perhaps, a new vacation spot for your family? Maybe, but residents of Upper St. Clair know it’s the place where sixth level students go to learn about the environment—Deer Valley. It is located six miles from the border of Maryland, and is about two hours from Pittsburgh. This annual trip, known as the Earthwarden Program, has been in existence for over 15 years. Every sixth level team experiences two and one half days away from home at Deer Valley. Boyce students sell wrapping paper in fifth and sixth grades to pay for this excursion. If some students are unable to sell the allotted amount for this fundraiser, work contracts are distributed to enable those students the same opportunity to “earn” their way to Deer Valley. Teachers on the Deer Valley Committee begin to plan and budget in July for trips that are scheduled ten months later in May. The committee meets often to discuss the needs of the program—one that has been recognized statewide and nationally. There are two meetings to inform and train parent volunteers for academic lessons conducted at Deer Valley.

Students collect fossils from a farmer’s field about one mile from camp.

The parents, of which 90% attend, teach and assist with the lessons. It is truly a partnership between school and community. The teachers get to know the parents better and the parents get the opportunity to watch their child learn firsthand, observe the excellent teachers at Boyce in action, and meet other adults from the community. But, most of all, they get to spend quality time with their child. “It builds relationships with parents, students, and teachers,” said Bruce Shea, a parent who attended Deer Valley last year. Parent Kimberly Cantees offered another comment, “It was a great experience, a chance to know my

Students “grokking”—exploring nature using senses other than sight.

child’s teachers and their teaching philosophy, but most importantly, to spend one-on-one time with my child.” Jill Dodin commented, “You all did a wonderful job. My son Mike and I will always remember it.” The students made similar remarks. Jordan Perry, who is currently an eighth-grader at Fort Couch, stated, “If I could do anything I did in sixth grade over again, it would be Deer Valley.” Kiersten Luther, another Fort Couch student, commented, “I really thought it was going to be boring and hard work, but it turned out to be a really great experience.” If you ever have the opportunity to accompany your child to Deer Valley, we encourage you to do so. In spite of the sore feet, wet clothes, and exhausted bodies, we think it’s a worthwhile experience and so does your child. You’ll both have treasured memories forever. ■ Fall 2002

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Ted Barnett Scholarship Fund Faculty, staff and families of Baker Elementary School are pleased to announce the development of a scholarship program in honor of retired principal Mr. Ted Barnett. The scholarship will be awarded annually to a High School senior who is an alumnus of Baker and meets the requirements as set forth by the USC High School counselors. This annual award will continue at least through the year 2014, the graduation year of the 2002-03 kindergarten class. “I am proud and humbled to be associated with this fine award. It is fitting that I’m remembered in this way, for it’s the students who have made the District what it is today and they who have made my job easier,” remarked Ted when asked about the origination of the scholarship fund. Ted has worked for 35 years in education. During Ted’s career in Upper St. Clair he served the School District in various capacities as a member of the faculty and administration for 30 years. Prior to his appointment as principal of Baker he worked as an elementary counselor and elementary and middle school principal in other District buildings. He is a big basketball fan and coached the Upper St. Clair Junior Varsity basketball team. He and his wife, Barbara, have two married children—Amy and her husband Brian Berklich and Tom and his wife Christine—and granddaughter Lauren Elizabeth. Ted enjoys music and played the clarinet and tenor saxophone in high school. The first scholarship was awarded to graduating senior Lauren Conn this past May at the High School awards banquet. Lauren was a member of the 1993-94 fourth level class at Baker the year Ted became principal. In addition to graduating with honors and being a Presidential Academic Fitness graduate, Lauren’s

Scholarship winner Lauren Conn with Ted Barnett at the High School awards banquet. Lauren will attend Davidson College this fall.

involvement in school activities included student council, choir and Chanteclairs, Natural Helpers, German Club and soccer, as well as many other activities. She is very involved with her church and has volunteered her time on various committees including Pediatric Aids Awareness. “Lauren embodies all we think of when selecting a candidate for this award. She is an excellent role model and has, beyond a doubt, successfully balanced academics, the arts and athletics during her years as a student in the District,” said Ted while congratulating Lauren. On the last days of school, this past June, Baker staff and students held an assembly and “clap out” to honor Ted. He will surely be missed in the District but look for him around our township as he’s remaining in the area. So it’s—so long—not goodbye! ■ If you would like to donate to the Ted Barnett Scholarship Fund, please make checks payable to the Community Foundation of Upper St. Clair, including on the memo line, “Ted Barnett Scholarship Fund.” Checks should be sent to Community Foundation of USC, 2585 Washington Rd., USC, PA 15241.

Staff and students together enjoy the last day with Ted. 38

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First Graders Visit the Fort Sue Fleckenstein, Fort Couch math teacher

The problem-solving book is a hit with the students.

“When are the first graders coming? When are the first graders coming?” the seventh graders on Team

One at Fort Couch kept asking. First level students from Eisenhower made the short trip down Fort Couch Road on May 28 for a morning full of math and physical education activities personally designed for them by the seventh graders. The day began with a greeting in the gym, where the seventh graders got to meet their first grade buddies. The students were then escorted to the Probability Candy Carnival set up in the Multi-Purpose Room.

Each first grader was given a bag of candy to use as tokens to play the games. The seventh graders designed the games of chance as a culminating project after finishing their Data Analysis and Probability Unit. After playing the carnival games the first graders enjoyed their packed lunches, while the seventh graders delivered cold drinks to their new first grade friends. The older students were surprised and very impressed with how well behaved the first graders were! In preparation for the Eisenhower arrival, the seventh grade students read through various first level books. They used the first grade reader Little Duck Dance as a guide. They then designed their own problem solving books for the first graders to try. After lunch the students sat together on blankets in the gym, answering the problem solving books created by the seventh graders. Lisa Cain, a physical education teacher at Fort Couch, created four activity stations for the students to enjoy. The seventh

Groups work together asking and answering questions.

graders conducted the games as the first graders rotated through the stations of the Parachute Game, Squirrels in the Trees, Musical Hula Hoops, and Long Jump Roping. It looked like the older students enjoyed the activities just as much as the younger ones! As the day came to an end, and goodbyes were said, the seventh graders now asked; “When will we get to see the first graders again?” ■

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Bayer Mentorship Program and Cultural Communications Alliance

Left to right: Deanna Baird, Michelle Ross, Monica Appelbe, Katie Baratz and Barbara Andrews. Holding the trophy is Claire Graff.

The Mission The Mentorship Program is an outgrowth of the Cultural Communications Alliance (CCA). The CCA is a business-to-education community outreach program. Its mission is to prepare tomorrow’s workforce to meet the requirements of an expanding global marketplace through programs that simulate international business and promote the acquisition of world language skills and cultural understanding. The Participants The participants of the Alliance include a manager from Bayer Corporation; professors from the University of Pittsburgh, Robert Morris University and Pittsburgh Technical Institute; fifteen to twenty teachers who represent high schools in the Pittsburgh area and various Bayer Corporation personnel. The Opportunities Each year a mentor from Bayer Corporation meets with freshman and sophomore foreign language students to illustrate through oral and video presentations the connection between mastering language, understanding cultures and working in the global workplace. Junior and senior language students are then given the opportunity to participate in a marketing competition both in their schools and finally against students from other schools. Twenty-two students from Upper St Clair participated in the initial competition. The Skills To compete successfully, students must master research and presentation skills, learn the importance of teamwork and gain knowledge of marketing principles. Our students had the privilege of working with four Russian graduate students from the University of Pittsburgh, a marketing professor from the Katz Graduate School of Business, and a marketing consultant from Robert Morris University. A panel of professional judges from business and academia judged the students. The Future This three-year-old alliance is expanding to include additional corporations, to obtain 501c3 non-profit status and to develop additional programs to benefit students. First place winners in the 2002 Bayer competition were USCHS students Monica Appelbe, Katie Baratz, Claire Graff and Michelle Ross. The Upper St Clair participants in the CCA are High School foreign language teachers Barbara Andrews and Deanna Baird. ■

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Welcome Ted Petersen, Our New Athletic Director

Left to right: Joe DePalma, Cindy Storer, Ted Petersen and Mike Sheleheda. Ted Petersen, former Pittsburgh Steelers lineman from 1977 to 1984, accepted the position of Athletic Director at the High School. Ted’s professional career also includes teaching at Trinity High School, being head football coach for Trinity and assistant football coach at Mt. Lebanon. In addition to his duties as athletic director he will also teach physical education and health classes at the High School. While Ted is a welcomed addition to the school, everyone will miss retired Athletic Director Mike Sheleheda. Mike, who held this title since 1984, began his career with USCHS as a driver’s education teacher. During his service as director, he was complimented by Assistant Athletic Director Joe DePalma, who also retired this past year. Under Mike’s reign as AD, the High School won four PIAA state titles in AAAA division and dozens of WPIAL championships. While this in itself is a fine accomplishment, it’s even more outstanding when you consider that USC is one of the smallest schools in quad A classification, the highest-ranking division. One face that will stay the same, helping to maintain peek performance, is that of Cindy Storer, secretary for the Athletic Department. ■

Christie Parkinson Excels in the Reflections Program The PTA-sponsored Reflections Program challenges students to create

art that supports a specific theme. This past year’s theme was “I Hold in My Hand…” Each year young artists participate in the Reflections Program during October and November through their local PTA by expressing themselves through various art forms that complete the theme. Students submit their entries in one of the following four art areas: literature, music composition, photography or visual arts. The works of art are critiqued against Christie, shown here with her others in the same grade division, which awards, is a student at Baker allows for recognition and judging to take Elementary School. place by appropriate developmental age and skill level. The grade divisions are Primary (preschool to grade two), Intermediate (grades three to five), Middle/Junior (grades six to eight), and Senior (grades nine to twelve). Entries are first judged at the local school district level, then regionally, statewide and finally nationally. Christie Parkinson, daughter of Ron and Kathy Parkinson of Upper St. Clair, placed first this past year in the primary division at the local school district level, as well as, first regionally, with her musical composition written for the piano titled, “I Hold in My Hand a Little Butterfly.” Her entry then went on to place second in the Pennsylvania competition. Congratulations Christie! ■

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The Big Ten The Top Ten Things I Have Learned About Coaching Jim Render I have just completed my thirtieth

year of being a head coach in Pennsylvania high school football, including seven years at Uniontown and twenty-three years at Upper St. Clair. In addition, I coached six years in various Ohio high schools and was a graduate assistant coach at West Virginia University for another two. The 38 years have gone by very quickly—far too fast, actually. Pennsylvania football has been very good to me. I have coached many great kids and some marvelous athletes. Some have become doctors and lawyers, while others have made their mark in the business world and on Wall Street. My best player in Ohio, an outstanding fullback and linebacker, now makes his living doing an impersonation of the late Elvis Presley. The performance is worthy of Las Vegas! Another player was the first AfroAmerican to be captain of a Southeastern Conference football team while at the University of Georgia. Two others were captains

at Yale. In the 1986 Yale vs. Dartmouth game, six of the starters were former USC players, three playing for Yale and three for Left to right: Bob Palko, West Allegheny High School head football coach; Dartmouth. A seventh Jim Render, USCHS head football coach; Brigadier General Pete Dawkins, retired U.S. Army, 1958 Heisman trophy winner,1959 West Point class USC player was a president and Cadet First Captain; Jack McCurry, North Hills High School principal and head football coach. Dartmouth freshman. In their hometown of The General and the coaches were photographed at the U.S. Army All Pittsburgh, three brothers American High School All Star game in San Antonio, Texas, January 2002. helped design and man- Coaches McCurry, Palko and Render have won a combined eleven WPIAL championships and each has won a state championship. age the construction of Heinz Field built by their father’s company, Mascaro Construction. Penn State vs. Miami in 1986 and Virginia And still, another former USC player comes Tech vs. Florida State in 1999. to work at that stadium as the coordinator I’ve also had a great group of assistant of personnel for the Pittsburgh Steelers. One coaches during my career and together young man was a starter at the University we’ve managed to win conference chamof Delaware for 51 consecutive games—a pionships in each of the four decades that school record. Three former USC athletes I have been head coach. My fondest played in the national championship game memory is of coaching my two sons to five for their respective universities in three dif- WPIAL championship games at Three ferent decades—Georgia vs. Pitt in 1976, Rivers Stadium. I have truly been blessed.

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I have coached hundreds of boys who are now marvelous men. Like so many other successful coaches, I have learned from my players as I’ve progressed through the years. Having said this, I would like to share with you my “big ten list.” The majority of you are most likely younger than me and maybe I can provide an idea or concept that will be beneficial to you in your coaching experience. At least that is my intent. 1. Give the players your time Think of them as your sons and daughters. They are not impressed by how much you know—they just want your time. Nothing is more important than the players. It is your job to help them become bigger, faster, stronger, quicker and more agile. Don’t turn this responsibility over to somebody else. Always be there for them. 2. Teach them the game of football You need to know the game and you must be able to teach the game. What you know is less important than what you are able to teach and instruct. My mentor used to tell me never to blame the players. He would say that, “If they don’t know it, you haven’t taught it to them.” I was always encouraged to find ways to be a better

coach. Evaluation must begin with the coaches before the players. 3. Communicate with each player Players respond positively to personal attention. We all like to hear something good from our “boss” on a one-to-one level. As head coach, you cannot just talk to the quarterback or address the entire team only at the end of practice. Without being their buddy, you must find a way to let them know you care about their personal development and improvement—each of them. 4. Coaching football means solving problems The late Woody Hayes of Ohio State used to lecture young coaches that you should prepare for when problems arise not if they occur. Parental interference and injuries are two situations that all coaches must expect to encounter. You must discuss this with your assistant coaches and school administration and have a plan in place. Just as you need a back up quarterback and an adequate punter and long snapper, so too must you be prepared for the unexpected. Chance favors the prepared. 5. Evaluation must be fair and consistent A simple rule to follow—the team comes first. If you always do what will serve the

staff and players in the best way possible, you’ll gain respect for consistency. The players will not complain at home or in the locker room if they’ve received fair opportunity. As a head coach, you must create an atmosphere of fair and open competition. If the opposite happens there will be total chaos, which usually leads to dissention. 6. Discipline is a must My late high school football coach, Dick Haines, who won 320 games and is in both the Ohio and the Southern California Halls of Fame, use to say, “Young people will do what you expect them to do.” I still believe that today. They need and want some guidance in their life. In their hearts, they want to be corrected and they want to be told “no” to some of their want and desires. All successful teams, families and organizations alike, have a sense of structure, leadership and order. Discipline must be practiced both on and off the field before a team can achieve victory. 7. Coach and prepare your team Prepare your team to advance the football, defend your goal line, and be able to do both in kicking situations. That’s a big job! You don’t have time to worry about the coach on the opposite side of the field. Put all

Fall 2002

Continued on page 98

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USC Soccer—Kick-Off Classic Friday, August 30 & Saturday, August 31, 2002 Schedule of Games (All preliminary rounds will be played at Morton Soccer Complex.)

Friday, August 30 Boys

Thomas Jefferson vs. Penn Trafford - 3 p.m. Sewickley Academy vs. USC - 3 p.m.

Girls

USC vs. Mt Pleasant - 3 p.m. Bethel Park vs. Central Mountain - 3 p.m.

Saturday, August 31 Boys

Consolation Game at Morton Field—10 a.m. Championship Game at USCHS Panther Stadium—3 p.m.

Girls

Consolation Game at Morton Field—10 a.m. Championship Game at USCHS Panther Stadium—noon

2002 Varsity Football Schedule Friday Night Kick-offs at 7:30 p.m. August 30 September 6 September 13 September 20 September 27 October 4 October 11 October 18 October 25

Erie McDowell ......................................................... Home North Allegheny ................................ Home (Youth Night) Albert Gallatin .......................................................... Away Ringgold ......... Home (Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony) Plum ........................................................................ Away Trinity ....................................................................... Away Fox Chapel ...................................... Home (Homecoming) Canon McMillan ....................................................... Away McKeesport ............................................................. Home (Football, Cheerleader and Band Recognition Night)

Fall 2002

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School District Notices Annual Notices to Parents of Children Who Reside in the Upper St. Clair School District School Records Pupil records are an inherent part of a student’s formal education in the public school setting. They are used to collect, maintain and disseminate pertinent information. The Upper St. Clair School District (District) has adopted a policy and administrative regulations in accordance with both the regulations of the State Board of Education on Pupil Records, adopted July 12, 1974, amended July 15, 1977, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Parents and eligible students are accorded the following rights: 1. To inspect, review and be given a copy of the records. 2. To obtain a copy of the District’s policy and regulations upon written request to: Supervisor of School Guidance Counseling, Upper St. Clair High School, 1825 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. 3. To file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 330 Independence Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20201. 4. To be informed of the transfer of records to officials of another school or school system upon notification of the child’s enrollment. 5. To challenge the contents of the records. 6. To refuse individual consent where it is required for release of information from the record. 7. To be informed of data collected and maintained by representational consent. The planned program of standardized testing is collected and maintained by representational consent and is shown below. The results of these tests, as well as the results of aptitude and achievement tests taken by the individual student on a voluntary basis and required for admission into post-secondary education institutions, are maintained and made a part of the record. Should you wish to examine the record, you may arrange to do so by making an appointment with your child's principal or counselor. For specific information regarding matters pertaining to school records, parents or eligible students may contact the principal of the school in which the student is enrolled.

Grade

Date of Administration

Pre-school

Prior to Entrance

Terra Nova CTBS Battery/ Otis-Lennon School Ability

Grade 1

Spring

Terra Nova CTBS Battery/ Test of Cognitive Skills

Grade 2

Spring

Terra Nova CTBS Battery/ Test of Cognitive Skills

Grade 4

Spring

California Achievement Test/ Test of Cognitive Skills

Grade 6

Spring

California Achievement Test/ Test of Cognitive Skills

Grade 8

December

Academic and Career Assessment Inventory (Plan)

Grade 10

October

Test Pre-school Screening

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Programs for Eligible or Protected Handicapped or Gifted Students In compliance with the state and federal law, notice is hereby given by the District that it conducts ongoing identification activities as a part of its school program for the purpose of identifying disabled students who may be in need of special education and related services (eligible students). Individualized services and programs are available for children who are determined to need specially designed instruction due to the following conditions: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Autism/pervasive developmental disorder Blindness or visual impairment Deafness or hearing impairment Developmental delay Mental retardation Multi-handicapped Neurological impairment Other health impairments Physical disability Serious emotional disturbance Specific learning disability Speech and language impairment

If you believe that your school-age child may be in need of special education services and related programs, or young child (age three to school-age) may be in need of early intervention, screening and evaluation processes designed to assess the needs of the child and his/her eligibility are available to you at no cost, upon written request. You may request screening and evaluation at any time, whether or not your child is enrolled in the District’s public school program. Requests for evaluation and screening are to be made in writing to your child’s principal or Eloise Stoehr, Supervisor of Pupil Services, Upper St. Clair School District, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. In compliance with state and federal law, the District will provide to each protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to the student or family, those related aides, services, or accommodations which are needed to provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and extracurricular activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities. In order to qualify as a protected handicapped student, the child must be school age with a physical or mental disability, which substantially limits or prohibits participation in or access to an aspect of the school program. These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” are distinct from those applicable to all eligible students enrolled (or seeking enrollment) in special education programs. In compliance with state law, the District provides services designed to meet the unique needs of gifted students. The District identifies “gifted” students on a case-by-case basis based on state law and District procedures. Such students may possess superior IQ scores and meet multiple criteria indicating gifted ability. If your child is suspected to be in need of such services, you will be notified of evaluation procedures. If you believe your school-age child may qualify for gifted education services, you may contact in writing your child’s principal or Eloise Stoehr (see address listed above) at any time to request determination of eligibility. Please note that entitlement to gifted services includes only those rights provided for by Pennsylvania law. For further information on the rights of parents and children, provision of services, evaluation and screening (including purpose, time, and location), and rights to due process procedures, contact in writing your child’s principal, Eloise Stoehr, Supervisor of Pupil Services, or Dr. Sharon Suritsky, Supervisor of Special Education. (See bolded address above.)


Confidentiality: All information gathered about your child is subject to the confidentiality provisions contained in federal and state law. The District has policies and procedures in effect governing the collection, maintenance, destruction, and disclosure to third parties of this information. For information about these policies and procedures as well as rights of confidentiality and access to educational records, you may contact in writing the persons named above or any building principal.

Directory Information Categories: • • • • • •

Student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth Awards won and offices held Major areas of study Participation in officially recognized activities and sports Post-high school endeavors Recognition of achievements in academic and non-academic areas of endeavors • Recognition of graduating seniors • Weights and heights of athletes The parent or eligible student may refuse to permit the designation of any or all of these categories, with respect to that student, by notifying the principal within thirty days of the publication and distribution of this notice.

Child Identification Activities The District provides a free appropriate public education to exceptional students. To be eligible, the student must be of school age, in need of specially designed instruction and meet eligibility criteria for mentally gifted and/or one or more of the following physical or mental disabilities as defined by Pennsylvania state standards: autism/pervasive developmental disorder, blindness/visual impairment, deafness/ hearing impairment, physical disability, serious emotional disturbance, mental retardation, multi-handicap, specific learning disability, speech/ language impairment, neurological impairment, and other health impairment. The District makes use of the following procedures for locating, identifying and evaluating needs of school-aged students requiring special programs or services. These procedures, as required by state regulations, are identified in the Disclosure of Personal Information section, which follows.

Disclosure of Personal Information The policy and administrative regulations for the collection, maintenance and dissemination of student records provide that the District may disclose personally identifiable information designated by the District as directory information. As prescribed by Section 1402 of the School Code, the District routinely conducts screenings of a child’s hearing acuity, visual acuity, and speech and language. Gross motor and fine motor skills, academic skills and social/emotional skills are assessed by classroom teachers on an ongoing basis. Specified needs from all of these screening sources are noted in the student’s personal record. Such school records are open and available to parents. Information from the records is released to other persons or agencies only with appropriate authorization, which involves written signed permission by parents. Parents with concerns regarding their child may contact the school principals at any time to request a screening or evaluation of their child. Communication with parents and exceptional students shall be in English or the native language of the parents. Screening information will be used by the pupil support team within the student’s school to meet his/her specific needs or to document the need for further evaluation. If it is determined that a child needs additional services, the pupil support team will make adjustments relative to such things as the child’s learning style, behavior, physical inabilities and speech problems to assist the student in reaching appropriate academic gains based on his or her rate of learning. Multidisciplinary evaluations of students thought to be exceptional can be initiated by parents/guardians or school personnel. Parents/guard-

ians are part of a multidisciplinary team (MDT). Permission of the parent/guardian is needed to conduct a multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of a multidisciplinary evaluation is to develop conclusions and recommendations regarding eligibility and programming appropriate for the student. Multidisciplinary evaluations use multiple sources of information in assessing a student such as District-wide testing results, input from school personnel, team interventions, classroom observation, parent input and formal psychological and educational testing. After the evaluations are completed, an Evaluation Report is compiled and includes specific recommendations for the types of intervention necessary to deal with the child’s needs. Parents are then invited to participate in a meeting where the results of the evaluation are discussed. If the child is determined to be exceptional and in need of specially designed instruction, an Individualized Education Program (IEP) is developed. The extent of special education services and the location of the delivery of these services are determined by the IEP team and are based on the student’s identified needs and abilities, chronological age, and level of intensity of the specified intervention. The District also provides related services that are necessary for an exceptional student to benefit from special education. Parents are then presented a Notice of Recommended Assignment (NORA) with which they may agree or disagree. If parents disagree with the program being recommended, the issue may be taken to mediation or a due process hearing. The District provides a continuum of options ranging from supportive intervention in the regular classroom to supplemental intervention in the regular class or in a resource room to a part time or full time special education class in or outside of the regular school. Students receive services in the least restrictive environment as determined by the IEP team. The District provides Learning Support for students whose primary identified need is in academic learning. Life Skills Support is provided for students whose focus should be on independent living skills. Additionally, the District provides Hearing Support, Speech/Language Support, Vision Support and Physical Support to meet students’ individual needs. Students who are mentally gifted receive Gifted Support. Based upon students’ individual needs, the District provides extended school year services, adaptive physical education for students who cannot benefit from regular physical education with modifications, behavior management programs for students whose behavior interferes with learning, vocational assessment, assistive devices and enrichment/ advancement. Information about parental rights, mediation or due process procedures, specific special education services and programs offered by the District and the District’s Educational Records policy is available upon request from the child’s school principal.

Hatch Amendment Notice— Protection of Pupil Rights Pursuant to provisions of Federal Law (20 U.S.C. § 1232 h), parents and students have the following rights in connection with any “applicable program” (a program over which the Federal Secretary of Education has administrative responsibility, i.e. programs funded by the Department of Education): (a) Parental right to have access to certain surveys, analyses or evaluations and the instructional materials used in connection with these surveys of a student. (b) Parental or student right to consent before the student is required to submit to certain surveys. (c) Parental or student right to file a complaint for alleged violations of the rights in paragraphs (a), (b) and (d) of this section. (d) Parental or student right to receive effective notice of the rights under paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) of this section. To see a copy of the statute and proposed federal regulations, contact your school principal’s office. ■ Fall 2002

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School District Information

School Health Immunization Regulations

Continued from page 36

Boosters (Parent Support Groups) Athletic Athletic Boosters are parent groups formed to support various sports teams. For information, call the High School Athletic Office at 412833-1600 ext. 2260. Fine and Performing Arts The Upper St. Clair Band Parents Association is a parent group formed to support the band and orchestra. The Upper St. Clair Choral Boosters is a parent group formed to support the choral groups. For information, call the High School Fine and Performing Arts Department at 412-833-1600 ext. 2353.

The Allegheny County Health Department’s (ACHD) Board of Health has enacted a revision to the School Health

Immunization Regulations for children in Allegheny County. For the 2002-03 school year all students entering school for the first time at kindergarten or first grade and students entering seventh grade must have the following immunizations completed prior to entering any public, private or parochial school: • At least four doses of diphtheria/tetanus vaccine (One dose must be on or after the fourth birthday.) • Three doses of polio vaccine • Three doses of hepatitis B vaccine • Two doses of measles vaccine, preferably as MMR vaccine • One dose each of mumps and rubella vaccine, preferably as MMR vaccine • Age appropriate dose(s) of varicella (chickenpox) vaccine or history of disease

Boyce Wrapping Paper Sale This sale, sponsored by the Boyce PTA, is conducted each September to support the sixth level Deer Valley Program and other educational activities at Boyce. See the Deer Valley article on page 37. MESH “Multicultural Education for Social Harmony” (MESH) brings students and their families of different cultures together for educational and social growth. Cultural events are scheduled at each school throughout the academic year. For more information, call your building’s school principal. Open Mikes Open Mikes are informal meetings between building principals, teachers, administrators and parents where current issues are discussed and concerns are voiced. They are held in parents’ homes, at schools or at the Township’s Municipal Building. They serve as an additional avenue of communication between the School District and the parents. Call your building’s school principal or PTA president for more information. Continued on page 95

Since 1983, Allegheny County Regulations have allowed provisional status only for students who transfer from another state. Students transferring from out of state may be enrolled provisionally provided there is evidence of having received at least one dose of each antigen and provided there is a plan to complete the required immunizations within eight months. Families are encouraged to obtain the needed immunizations from their physicians. However, the ACHD does offer the required vaccines free of charge. To obtain information about clinic location and times, interested persons should contact the ACHD Infectious Diseases Program at 412-578-8060. Provisions for this regulation do not apply in cases where extenuating medical or religious factors are involved. If there is any reason why a child should not be fully immunized, parents must submit a physician’s certificate explaining the circumstances. Parents are also required to provide written documentation if they disapprove of immunizations for religious reasons. These documents will be accepted in lieu of a certificate of immunization. ■

Upper pp St. Clair School District

•P PANTHER P PASS ASS REGISTRA ATION • ATION

Department of Athletics NAME ADDRESS

QUANTITY / AMT. ADULT L LT PASS

$50

PHONE

Good for all paid sporting events in the 2002-2003 school year

ADULT LT PPASS: L ASS: $50 one-time fee Add $5 for Reserved Football Seats STUDENT P PASS: $20 Contact the USC High School Athletic Office fffice at 412-833-1600, ext. 2260, for details.

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE YABLE TO: Y Upper St. Clair High School RETURN TO: Upper St. Clair High School Athletic Department 1825 McLaughlin Run Road Upper St. Clair, PA 15241

RESER S RVED RVED SEATS A ATS

$5

STUDENT PASS

$20

TOTAL T TAL

$


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What is the USC Dance Team?

A List of USC High School Activities

Terry Kish

American Industrial Arts

Library Aides

American Field Service

Majorettes

Art Club

Mathematics League

3-D Art Club

Montage (Literary Publication)

Audio Visual Aides Marching Band Bookstore Basketball

Music (Choral and Instrumental)

Bowling Club

National Honor Society

Broadcasting Club

Natural Helpers

Campus News Video Club

Newcomers Club

Cheerleading Chess Club Choral Groups

Clairvoyant (yearbook) Color Guard Computer Programming Club Council for Exceptional Children Crew Team Cross Country

Is it part of the cheerleading squad or

Pantherettes? If you’re not sure of the answer, you are not alone! The USC Dance Team is an independent group of fourteen extremely talented, dedicated dancers who work hard to compete at the national level. The group was originally part of the cheerleading program, but in the fall of 2000 it became a separate entity. Now the team has their sights set on becoming the best of the best. The USC Dance Team has developed a reputation for excellence in their field. Every year they have earned the right to compete at the National’s Dance Team Championships held annually at Disney World in Orlando against teams from across the country. Most years USC’s team has made the finals (top 10-14 teams). In the Pittsburgh area the team has been a pioneer in developing a high school dance team, and other schools look to the USC team as an example. In addition to competing in regional and national competitions, the USC Dance Team performs at the High School home basketball games in December and January. Tryouts for this competitive squad are intense. Each spring potential members perform before a panel of judges evaluating

their technique, sharpness of movements, motion placement, performance in two tryout dances, jumps, flexibility, and ability to pick up material quickly. Most of the dancers on the team have trained for many years at private studios in order to reach the level of expertise required. The members of the team are a well rounded group of individuals, active in student council, soccer, track, music, National Honor Society, cheerleading, service organizations and outside employment. As a team, they perform community service for World Vision and Make a Wish Foundation. The team also sponsors an annual Dance Team Clinic for children in grades K-8. USC’s Dance Team and their parents also work hard at fundraising! School funding pays for the coach. The team covers other expenses, from costumes to travel. The team’s dancers and coaches collaborate on the choreography, and have made the finals at Nationals competing against teams that hire professional choreographers! Now that you know what the USC Dance Team is, make it a point to see them perform. You may be watching future national champions! ■

Fall 2002

Multicultural Club

Baseball

CHANGES

Dance Team Front row—Maria Iracki, Katie Law, Taryn Bird, Cecilia Petursson, Amy McGinnis, Courtney Benedetti and Stephanie Sheppard Back row—Lexy Martin, Katie Orchowski, Stephanie Knopp, Brianna Lewis, Shannon Whalen, Karen McClintock and Kelsey Bird.

Mountain Biking and Cycling

Orchestra Outdoors Club Pantherettes Principals’ Advisory Council PTSO Quill and Scroll Rifle Team Rugby Safe Rides Senior Class Officers Students Against Drunk Driving Science/Technology Club

Ecology Faith Action

Soccer Softball

Fall Play Fencing Club Fishing Club Field Hockey

Sophmore Class Officers Spanish Club Spring Musical Stage Crew

Football

St. Clarion (High School Newspaper)

Forensics F. R. I. E. N. D. S. French Club Freshmen Class Officers Future Business Leaders Future Now Club German Club Golf

Student Council Student Environment Action Coalition Swimming Tennis Thespian Society Track Ultimate Frisbee Club

Hepcats Swing Club Ice Hockey Interact Club International Thespian Interscholastic Athletics for Boys and Girls Junior Class Officers Lacrosse Clubs Language Clubs

Uncommon Commons Volleyball Volunteer Corps Westinghouse Institute World Affairs Club Wrestling Young Conservatives Club Young Writers Guild

Latin Club

For information, call 412-833-1600. UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

53


Youth Steering Committee Teenage Drinking—You Can’t Afford It! Daniel C. Lawson, Esquire, Upper St. Clair Youth Steering Committee Member Portersville Valve Company, 504 Pa. 157, 470 A.2d 515, 1983.) While the case recognizing and applying this principle involved an employer, the principle applies to everyone, including parents. It has even been applied to the roommate of a college student on the eve of his 21st birthday. The roommate was civilly liable for damages deriving from his friend’s death by acute alcohol poisoning. While the $1,000 mandatory minimum penalty for a first violation of the law,

excuse. The $1,000 misdemeanor fine for furnishing alcohol to someone under 21 with the message “DUI—You can’t afford years of age will be a mere trifle. it.” Most of us have long since received and You could be held civilly liable for alunderstood the message as to the costs and lowing and negligently failing to prevent consequences of driving under the influan alcohol-fueled party from occurring at ence, which derive from a governmental your home. Perhaps an older sibling, such effort in the early 1980s to reduce the inas a college student over the age of 21 but cidence of drunken driving. The “legal” technically still living at home, supplies blood alcohol level was reduced, and penthe alcohol for a party in your home. alties were made more stringent, and, in Clearly, the older sibling is criminally and some aspects, mandatory. potentially civilly liable. However, you, as In earlier times, an the parents, may be arrest for driving while civilly liable as well. intoxicated was often In any situation reduced to “reckless where your child/teendriving” at the magisager is involved with trate level. This is no alcohol, there is a polonger the case. tential for a very A related phenompenetrating inquiry as enon that many of us to its source. If there is may have failed to noinjury or damage, the tice is the developing possibility of a civil law or perhaps specter damage award is a conof civil liability for unsiderable incentive on derage drinking. Our the part of the injured state government has party and creates a The Youth Steering Committee decided that persons Angela Petersen, Susan Smith, Jan Moore, Barbara Rahr, Glenn Child, Shree Kumar, Daniel Lawson comparable financial and Debra Burkey Piecka, Chairman. Not pictured—Russell DelRe, Robert Bellamy, Brenda Beck, under the age of 21 are exposure on the part of Jeffrey Krantz, Sheila Bartlett, Dr. Kevin Buckley and student representatives Jessica Gipson, Rohan Sheth, Kelly Borra and Brian Stout. incapable of handling the supplier/facilitator. alcohol. While we There are other should accept this determination and pro- making it a misdemeanor to furnish alco- problems and costs that can be associated tect our children out of a sense of love and hol to a minor may not seem particularly with underage drinking. For instance, there concern for their safety, sometimes we are costly to some, civil damages in a death is an automatic suspension of driving privimotivated by the “bottom line.” Accord- case involving a college-age person can leges of anyone under the age of 21 as a ingly, we need to be aware of what items, easily exceed one million dollars. consequence of the violation of various laws including potentially “big ticket items” Suppose that your son or daughter de- regarding the purchase, attempted purchase, may go into establishing that ultimate cides to host a small party at your home. A possession, consumption, etc. of alcoholic economic cost. few beers from your refrigerator are con- beverage notwithstanding the fact that no Considerable impetus for civil liability sumed and something goes wrong. It could motor vehicle was involved. If your child came from a 1983 Pennsylvania Supreme be a motor vehicle accident on the way does not yet have a driver’s license, the law Court decision involving an 18-year-old home, alcohol poisoning, a drug/alcohol provides that the automatic suspension bedriver who had attended an employer- interaction, date rape, or any one of vari- gins on the day that your child would sponsored Christmas party where alcohol ous other unpleasant scenarios. You could otherwise be entitled to apply for a license. was furnished. The 18-year-old consumed very well find yourself defending a civil Do any of us really have the time or the alcohol and on his way home from the lawsuit seeking substantial money dam- inclination to serve as a chauffeur for our party caused a motor vehicle accident. The ages. Exactly what you did, what you did 19 or 20 year old? Also, if there was any employer was held to be civilly liable for not do, what you knew, and when you motor vehicle involvement in the alcohol monetary damages resulting from that ac- knew it will be examined in laborious de- infraction, your automobile insurance precident on the basis of Pennsylvania law, tail by the lawyers. The explanation that miums will have been adjusted upwardly, which makes it a misdemeanor to sell or you were in the other room watching a and to a significant degree. furnish beverage alcohol to a person less movie or that you had “gone out to dinthan 21 years of age. (Congini v. ner” will probably not be a sufficient Continued on page 57 We have all seen the public service billboards along the highways

54

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Parenting Tips for Teen Parties

When Your Teen is Hosting a Party

Glenn Child, USC Youth Steering Committee Member

When Your Teen is Going to a Party These tips also apply to before and after activities for a formal dance. While the dinner and formal dance may be alcohol and drug free, other activities may not. For example, coming back to an unsupervised home for picture taking prior to the start of a formal dance is an invitation for problems. Establish a clear position on alcohol and drug use. If you have not already done so, discuss your family position on drugs and the consequences of not following these established guidelines with your teen. Be sure the consequences are something you can and will enforce. Discuss how they plan to deal with various situations that could arise at parties and how to make smart choices. Don’t pressure kids to attend parties if they do not want to go. Your teen may have good reasons for not wanting to go. They may know that alcohol and drugs will be present, but they are not willing to tell you. Get details on the party. Discuss your children’s celebration plans in advance with them, including pre and post activities and how they’ll be getting home from the party. For school events, discuss the school rules and consequences for violating the rules. Get the address and phone number of the host of the party or pre and post activities. Make sure that you are informed of any changes in plans or location of activities. Call the Host’s/Participants’ Parents Before giving permission for your child to attend a party, speak to the host’s parents. Make sure the party will have adult supervision and that no alcohol or drugs will be allowed. For formal dances, that involve pre- or post activities such as dinner, picture taking, call the other teens’ parents to confirm plans. Establish a curfew. Set a time when you expect your teen to arrive home and make sure they make their arrival known to you. Require a call home for any delay. You may want to establish a check-in time with your teen during the party. This gives the teen an out if problems are occurring. Take your teen to the party. When taking your teenager to a party, wait to see that he or she is inside the home. If you do not know the parents take a moment to introduce yourself. This is especially important if last minute changes occurred and you were not able to talk with the parents hosting the party.

Hiring a Limousine Some families pool funds to hire a limousine to drive their teens to dinner, the prom and the after-prom party. Don’t leave the hiring to your teen. Make the arrangements yourself and make it clear that the driver is to make no stops other than those you’ve pre-authorized. Ask what measures the drivers take to prevent the limousine from becoming a place for kids to drink. For example, some drivers require that kids’ bags be placed in the trunk. Don’t allow your teens to take beverage containers in the limousine. Do Not Rent Hotel Rooms! It is recommended to not rent hotel rooms for prom-goers. But, some proms are held at hotels. It’s not uncommon for teens to use private suites in the hotel for afterprom parties. In general, hotels don’t rent to minors so they need a parent’s involvement. A parent whose credit card is used, is liable for damages which can be considerable if a party gets out of hand. Don’t let your child attend a hotel party unless you know and trust the chaperones or are chaperoning yourself. Make It Easy for your Teenager to Leave a Party Provide your child with phone numbers where you can be reached throughout the evening. If there is drinking or drug taking or any other reason that your teen wishes to leave the party, make arrangements so that your teen can call you or another designated adult who will pick them up. Urge your teen never to ride with a driver who has been drinking or using drugs. Establish a code word or sentence that your child can use when they want you to say “no” in front of friends. For example, use the code words— “My throat hurts.” When a parent hears, “Mom, I’m having a great time. My throat hurts but I really want to stay longer,” the child means he/she wants the parent to say “no” to the request he or she is making.

Set ground rules. Establish the rules with your teen before the event. Make sure they know how you intend on chaperoning. Chaperoning— Greet all guests at the door and be wary of guests who arrive more than half an hour late. Guests should be by invitation only. Do not allow party crashers to stay. Do not allow kids to come and go. They may leave to drink and then want to return. Do not allow open containers of sodas or other beverages to be brought into the home. Provide all refreshments. An innocent looking bottle of water may be filled with vodka. Be at home and visible during the entire party. Invite other adults to help supervise. Uphold the law— Never allow minors to have access to alcohol in your homes. Lockup or remove any easily obtained alcohol. Recognize signs of alcohol or other drug use and immediately notify parents of teens who arrive under the influence to assure that they get safe, supervised transportation home. Avoiding unwanted parties— Establish a clear agreement with neighbors concerning unwanted parties. If they have a reasonable suspicion that a teen alcohol party is occurring on the premises, have them contact an adult in your household. If no adult is present, have the neighbor call law enforcement. Make sure your teen knows you have an arrangement with neighbors concerning parties. ■

Coming Home Always be up to greet your teen when he or she returns home from a social gathering. Talk to your teen when he or she comes home. This gives you the opportunity to detect any problems and lets your teen know you care. ■ Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

55


Upper St. Clair Clubs and Organization Directory 1830 Log House Association Kimberly Guzzi .................................................................. 412-851-0570 American Assoc. of Retired Persons M. Virginia Flynn ................................................................ 724-941-0365 American Assoc. of University Women Helpline ....................................................................... 1-800-326-AAUW Bethel-St. Clair Evening Rotary Club Tom Atkins ......................................................................... 412-831-2844 Bethel/St. Clair Breakfast Rotary Alan Axelson .................................................................... 412-221-2159 Boy Scouts of America Chris Handa ...................................................................... 412-471-2927 Boyce Road Gardeners Phyllis Kender, Registrar ................................................... 412-221-3118 Camp Fire Boys/Girls Karen Driscoll ................................................................... 412-835-1332 Christian and Missionary Alliance Church Pastor Jack Williams ......................................................... 412-835-4775 B.J. Santiso, Education Director Matt Elser, Youth Minister Civil Air Patrol Glenn Ward ...................................................................... 412-221-0846 Community Foundation of USC Linda Serene, Executive Director .................................. 412-831-1107 Democratic Committee Chris Conrad ................................................................... 412-831-6362 Different Strokes Tennis League Gina Braun ........................................................................ 412-221-5717 Faith Lutheran Church Pastor Ronald Weryha ..................................................... 412-835-4590 Friends of the Library Kim Kanik, President ......................................................... 412-854-0319 Friends of the Montour Trail in Bethel Park Peter Kohnke, President .................................................. 412-854-1835 Girl Scouts of USC Kris Overstreet .................................................................. 412-835-2643 League of Women Voters Trudy Rose ........................................................................ 412-831-3448 Lifespan Virginia Jorofcik, Executive Director .............................. 412-464-1300 PTA Council Beth Hornak ...................................................................... 412-833-4993 Parent/Teacher/Student Organization Shree Kumar ..................................................................... 412-851-0920 Praise Assembly of God Pastor Jeffrey A. Marshall ............................................... 724-941-1661 St. Gregory Byzantine Catholic Church Rev. Bruno Asturi .............................................................. 412-835-7800 St. John Capistran Church Rev. Robert J. Reardon ................................................... 412-221-6275 St. Louise de Marillac Rev. Tom E. Kredel ............................................................ 412-833-1010 St. Thomas More Rev. Kenneth White ......................................................... 412-833-0031 South Hills Chorale (Performances) Jean Wright ...................................................................... 412-429-9501 South Hills Community Baptist Church Pastor Alan Berg .............................................................. 412-833-1313 Cheryl Hardy, Secretary South Hills Interfaith Ministry (SHIM) Donald Guinn, Executive Director ................................. 412-854-9120 South Hills Junior Orchestra Janet Vukotich ................................................................. 412-341-5160

South Hills Kennel Club Thomas Oelschlager ....................................................... South Hills Presby. Church in America John Holmes ..................................................................... Town Hall South Janis O’Brien .................................................................... USC Athletic Association Mike McGroarty, President .............................................. Baseball .......................... Rick Murray ........................ Boys’ Basketball .............. Jeff Conn ........................... Girls’ Basketball .............. Mike McGroarty ................ Football ........................... Joe DeMarco .................... Softball ............................ Steve Zemba ..................... Fall Soccer ...................... Bill Littrell .............................. Traveling Soccer ............. Bruce Stutzman ................. Wrestling .......................... Chris McNally ..................... Fields & Facilities ............. Bill Barnard .......................... Concession Stand .......... Roseanne Geyer ................ USC Band Parents Matt and Cindy Hinnebusch .......................................... USC Band Used Instruments James and Donna Mikula .............................................. USC Chamber of Commerce Rosemary Siddall ............................................................ USC Citizens for Land Stewardship Tracey Buckman ............................................................. USC Coterie ........................................................................ USC Historical Society Jean Brown ...................................................................... USC Hockey Club Chuck Greenberg .......................................................... USC Junior Women’s Club Denise Virgi ...................................................................... USC League for the Arts Fran Quinlan, Co-President ............................................. Joan Newman, Co-President ......................................... USC Library Lois Hoop .......................................................................... USC Lions Club Wesley Hurst ...................................................................... USC Lions Club Garbage Bag Sales Wesley Hurst ...................................................................... USC Newcomers Club Sue Friday ......................................................................... USC Republican Committee Jerry Fulmer ...................................................................... USC Senior Citizens Lynn Walcoff .................................................................... USC Swim Club Terry Kish ............................................................................ USC Volunteer Firemen Russell Rauch ................................................................... USC Welcome Wagon Anarosa Jones ................................................................. USC Women’s Club Shirley Tadda ................................................................... Westminster Presbyterian Church Rev. Robert Norris ............................................................ Mary Kay Mitchell, W.R.O.C. YMCA South Hills Area Martin Brocco .................................................................

724-941-3313 724-941-3480 412-835-1236 412-831-8977 724-941-7183 412-257-3239 412-831-8977 412-221-1325 412-831-7531 412-835-7533 412-831-8884 412-851-1918 412-833-9374 412-854-4314 724-941-0387 412-220-1160 412-833-9111 412-831-3289 412-833-7374 412-833-2323 412-851-9493 412-279-0432 412-835-1970 412-835-8127 412-835-5540 724-941-8329 724-941-8329 412-854-5593 412-831-8664 412-831-9000 412-854-1395 412-835-0660 412-257-8067 412-835-9607 412-835-6630

412-833-5600

If your club or organization is not on our updated list, please call the USC Recreation and Leisure Service office at 412-831-9000, extension 256.

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Teenage Drinking— You Can’t Afford It! Continued from page 54

Myths about alcohol and the law include the non-existent “one beer” rule. Pennsylvania law does provide an extremely narrow exception for the consumption of an amount of wine in connection with a religious service in a private home or place of worship where the amount served does not exceed the reasonable, customary or traditional amount and is an integral part of the service or ceremony. This exception does not allow parents to furnish beverage alcohol to their children. It should also be noted that the blood alcohol level for drunk driving applicable to persons over 21 does not apply to persons under 21. In the case of minors, there is essentially a “zero tolerance” provision of the Motor Vehicle Code, which prohibits a minor from operating a vehicle with any alcohol in his or her system. In the event that your child has been a participant in a religious service and consumed some reasonable, customary or traditional amount as an integral part of the ceremony, you would be well advised not to let them drive. You can rest assured that if your child is caught driving after having consumed alcohol, you will experience a significant increase in your auto insurance premium, even though your child only had “one beer.” Alcohol is, unfortunately, often a causative factor in various accidents and is a frequent cause for human suffering. Allowing your teenagers to become involved with alcohol can have profound financial consequences as well. Your teenagers do not need alcohol, and they certainly do not need the consequences. Besides, you can’t afford it! ■

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or visit www.twpusc.org/magazine Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

57


Township of Upper St. Clair Our Community Government

Frank E. Marsh President, Ward 5

The Township of Upper St. Clair

Day 412-831-9000 Evening 724-941-6244

Robert W. Orchowski Vice President, Ward 3 Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-854-1868

Edward S. Long Ward 1 Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-833-7590

Gloria Smith Ward 2 Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-833-1284

Cheryl S. Bayne Ward 4 Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-831-5814

became a Home Rule Community on January 1, 1976. As a Home Rule Community, the Township is governed by a locally drafted charter adopted by the voters of Upper St. Clair. The Home Rule Charter provides for a Board of Commissioners composed of seven members. Two commissioners are elected at large by all the voters of the Township and five are elected by ward. Commissioners are elected for four-year terms. In a Commission/Manager form of government, the Charter provides a clear distinction between policy-making functions and administrative functions. The Board of Commissioners is responsible for the policy-making functions. The Board of Commissioners meets on the first Monday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the Board meeting room in the Township Municipal Building. The Township Manager is appointed by the Board of Commissioners and serves as Chief Administrative Officer. He is responsible for the administrative functions of the Township. The Township Manager is directly responsible and accountable to the Board of Commissioners. The Township Manager and his designated representatives are responsible for the following: directing and supervising the operation of all Township departments, preparing an annual budget and an annual financial report, signing papers, contracts, obligations and documents on behalf of the Township as required by law, preserving order in the Township, enforcing ordinances

and regulations, representing the Township to other governmental organizations and agencies and providing staff assistance to the elected Board of Commissioners. The Board of Commissioners meeting agendas are posted on the bulletin board in the main lobby of the Township Municipal Building and on the website. At the Board of Commissioners meetings, all business with regard to the operation of the Township is conducted and residents are invited to attend. Residents may speak at the meeting during the portion of the meeting designated “Public Comments.” Correspondence regarding the meetings or correspondence to the seven elected Commissioners should be mailed to: Township of Upper St. Clair, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. Minutes from the meetings are public information and can be reviewed at the Township Municipal Building by completing a “Request Form to Review Records.” This form is available from the Township Receptionist or the Community Development Department. The minutes and many other Township documents are also available in the Library. Call us at 412-831-9000 and we will try to get you what you need. Douglas A. Watkins has been Township Manager since 1982. Our Township Attorney is Charles McCullough and our Township Engineer is Ruthann Omer of The Gateway Engineers, Inc. ■

Visit our Website!

www.twpusc.org Bill Bates

Meeting Dates

At Large Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-257-8115

Ernest T. Harris At Large Day 412-831-9000 Evening 412-854-1119

• The Board of Commissioners meets at 7:30 p.m. in the Municipal Building. The regular public meeting is held the first Monday of the month in the Board Room. The informational and general affairs meeting is held the last Monday of the month in the Board Conference Room. • The Planning Commission meets the third Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. • Parks and Recreation Board meets the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m., no meeting in December. • Zoning Hearing Board meets the fourth Wednesday of the month at 8 p.m. • Civil Hearing Board meets as needed. • Building/Fire Codes Appeals and Advisory Board meets as needed. For more information or specific dates, call the Township Office at 412-831-9000 or see the website www.twpusc.org.

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Upper St. Clair’s Boards and Commissions The Township’s Board of Commissioners appoints Boards or Commissions to specialize in selected areas of municipal

government and to serve as advisers. These residents volunteer their expertise to make our community a great place to live. The Township’s Boards and Commissions are as follows:

If you have a question for one of the Boards or Commissions, please call 412-831-9000. For meeting information, see page 58. Library Board— Three Year Term Not pictured: Mike Bova

Civil Service Board— Three Year Term

Gene Musial Chairman

Jim Conn

Building and Fire Codes Appeals and Advisory Board— Three Year Term

P. J. Murray, III Anthony W. Accamando, Jr.

Zoning Hearing Board—Three Year Term

Michael P. McDonnell

Joseph F. Valvo

Parks and Recreation Board—Three Year Term

Dwight D. Ferguson, Vice Chairman; David E. Tungate, Chairman and Robert L. Allman Front row: Tom Browand and Karen McElhinny, Vice Chairman. Back row, left to right: Don Rectenwald, Jr., Roger Hartung and Bill Barnard. Inset: Ray Gergich, Chairman Not shown: Mike Gleason.

Cable TV Board— Three Year Term Not pictured: Rich Sandala

Bob M. Unetich

William Evans

Municipal Authority—Five Year Term

C. James Parks Chairman

Thomas I. Samson Vice Chairman

Douglas A. Watkins Secretary/Treasurer

Russell L. Crane

T.A.Ward

Robert J. Ridge

James E. Sekela

Planning Commission—Four Year Term

David Wade Chairman

Douglas L. Shuck Vice Chairman

Glenn R. Flickinger Secretary

Marvin Haddox

Joel M. Helmrich

Youth Steering Committee (on page 54) Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

59


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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Meet Our Township People Township Manager

Douglas A. Watkins Township Manager 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

The Township Manager is appointed by the Board of Commissioners, serves as Chief Administrative Officer and is responsible for the administrative functions of the Township. The Manager is directly responsible and accountable to the Board of Commissioners. The Township Manager and his designated representatives are responsible for the following:

• Directing and supervising the operation of all Township Departments • Preparing an Annual Budget and Financial Report • Signing papers, contracts, obligations and documents on behalf of the Township as required by law • Preserving order in the Township • Enforcing ordinances and regulations • Representing the Township to other governmental organizations and agencies • Providing staff assistance to the elected Board of Commissioners The Township Manager oversees the activities of the following Departments: • Administration • Community Development • Finance and Tax • Information Technology • Library • Police • Public Works • Recreation and Leisure Services

Assistant Township Manager

Mark S. Mansfield Assistant Township Manager 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

The Assistant Township Manager,

in accordance with the Home Rule Charter, is appointed by and assigned responsibilities and obligations through the Township Manager. The Assistant Township Manager also serves as Director of Administration. In addition to working closely with the Township Manager, on day-to-day matters or special programs, the Assistant Township Manager also takes a lead role in the administrative service areas listed below: • Personnel administration • Purchasing • Labor relations and negotiations • Public relations • Community communications and cable television • Office management • Records maintenance and retrieval • Coordination of departmental operations • In-service training programs • Coordination of grant applications • Staff assistance to Boards and Commissions Candy Moore Assistant Manager’s and Finance Director’s Secretary

Cindy Kane Township Receptionist

Diana Pifer Assistant Manager’s and Finance Director’s Secretary Dorothy Curley, Manager’s Secretary Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Finance Quarterly Tax Dates

August G. Stache, Jr. Director of Finance 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

The Department of Finance is responsible for all fiscal concerns of the Township, including budget preparation, expenditure control, financial reporting and projecting, insurance management, debt management, property and inventory control, purchasing, investment of idle funds, and operation of the Tax office. The Township Tax Office collects taxes for both the Township and the School District. Township Budget is prepared each fall by the Department of Finance. The Township’s fiscal year runs from January 1 through December 31. A public hearing is held at the regular commissioners’ meeting scheduled in November for comments and concerns on budgetary matters. A copy of the budget is available in the Reception Area and in the Library. Taxes and User Fees Taxes are the primary source of revenue for municipal governments and school districts. Tax rates are determined by state and/or local regulations to yield sufficient funds to pay for the expense of providing schools and public services. In April 1999 the Board of Commissioners awarded a tax collection contract to Jordan Tax Service. All payments for School District and Township taxes are still received in the Township Tax office. Real Estate Tax referred to as property taxes, are levied by three separate government entities: Allegheny County, the Township and School District of Upper St. Clair. The tax is levied on all residential, commercial, industrial and other non-exempt real estate.

Vince Yevins Chief Accountant

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First Quarter ................... Second Quarter ............... Third Quarter ................. Fourth Quarter ...............

April 30 July 31 October 31 January 31

The taxes are calculated as the product of two factors: The assessed value of the property and the millage rates. The assessed value is the market value of the property as determined by Allegheny County. The millage rates are set yearly by each of the three taxing jurisdictions. A mill is 1/1000 of a dollar of total assessed property value in the Township. Tenant Registration is required of all property owners and is due each June. Forms are mailed with Township real estate tax statements to all property owners each May. Changes in the status of tenants must be reported to the Tax Office every thirty days. Earned Income and Net Profits Tax is a 1.2 percent (0.7 percent Township; 0.5 percent School District) tax on earned income and compensation (W-2 income from salaries or wages) and net profits from a business, profession, farm or rental property (Federal Schedules C, E, F, and K-1 1065). Two-income households must file separate quarterly and final tax returns. Quarterly tax payments are required. A taxpayer whose employer does not withhold local tax must file quarterly tax returns. Final tax returns are required for all taxpayers. Tax audits are routinely conducted on residents, including those who are moving out of the Township. Failure to comply with the tax regulations will result in penalty and interest charges, charges at the District Justice, fines up to $500 per year and/or wage attachments.

Faye Rush Finance Assistant

Tonia Warnecke Administrative Intern


Tax Due

Township

School District

Bills Mailed

May 1

July 1

Due–2% discount

May 1–June 30

July 1–Aug. 30

Due–face value

July 1–Aug. 30

Sept. 1–Oct. 31

Due–10% penalty

To Lien Date

to Lien Date

Taxes Liened

December

December

2002 BUDGETED REVENUES BY MAJOR CATEGORY 5,000,000

4,500,000

4,000,000

3,500,000

3,000,000

2,500,000

DOLLARS

Sewer User Fees—are based on water meter readings. Sewer billing information and rates are determined by ALCOSAN (the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority) and a Township multiplier for sanitary sewer rehabilitation and repair. Sewer users’ fee bills are issued quarterly. A five percent penalty is assessed for late payments. Failure to pay sewer bills may result in water shut-off and/or liens against the property. Property owners are liable for the unpaid sewer bills of their tenants. A new resident may receive one or two sewer bills for the previous resident. Buyers and sellers of homes should make arrangements for payment of these bills at the time of the closing of the home. ■

2,000,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

500,000

0

CATEGORY Real Estate Taxes

Earned Income Taxes

R.E. Transfer Tax

Other Revenues

Township of Upper St. Clair Real Estate Tax Millage ALLEGHENY COUNTY 18%

USC SCHOOL DISTRICT 73%

2002 GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS BY EXPENDITURE TYPE

USC TOWNSHIP 9%

CONTRACTED SERVICES 23.5%

OTHER 10.8% COMMODITIES 7.5%

PERSONNEL SERVICES 58.2%

USC TOWNSHIP - 2.44 MILLS USC SCHOOL DISTRICT - 18.67 MILLS ALLEGHENY COUNTY - 4.69 MILLS

2002 GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES BY MAJOR EXPENDITURE CATEGORY 3,500,000

3,000,000

DOLLARS

2,500,000

2,000,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

500,000

0

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LIB

EXPENSE CATEGORY

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Police Department Ronald J. Pardini Chief of Police Emergency 412-833-7500 724-941-7500 Non-Emergency 412-833-1113 www.twpusc.org

Public Safety

Ordinance Reminders

The Township of Upper St. Clair has received national recognition as one of the top ten safest communities compared with others of similar population in the United States. Police protection is one of the most vital, visible and costly services provided by local governments. The Police Department is responsible for insuring public safety and for the enforcement of the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the laws and ordinances of the Township of Upper St. Clair. The Police Department is composed of 27 full time, sworn police officers and seven civilian employees. The department maintains a 24-hour dispatch center that coordinates all emergency services, including police, fire and emergency medical services (ambulance).

The Police Department provides the following services: • Patrol squads dedicated to neighborhood patrol and protection of life and property • Criminal investigations • Polygraph service

• On-street parking is prohibited between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. • Dogs and cats must be on a leash when outdoors or kept in an enclosed area. Yearly licenses are required for dogs and cats. • Solicitors and peddlers must be issued a permit. If someone comes to your door, ask to see an Upper St. Clair permit.

• Juvenile investigations • Crime prevention • Telecommunication Devices for Hearing Impaired(TDD) • Traffic squads dedicated to enforcement of traffic laws and safety • Special investigation tactical team prepared to respond to emergencies • Vigorous residential patrol • Vacation home checks • Traffic safety programs

• Pennsylvania Vehicle Code requires that walkers, joggers, bicyclists and people walking dogs yield to the right-of-way to vehicles on the roadway.

Lost and Found Lost items and recovered stolen items frequently turn up in the Police Department’s Lost and Found. Residents who have an item to recover should contact the Police Department.

• Bicycle registration programs each spring • Project Safe Neighbor (community watch) • Business patrol checks • Property identification checks • Engraving services • Law enforcement speakers Doug Burkholder Deputy Chief

John M. Sakoian Lieutenant

District Justice Sally Edkins and Andrew Polk

Andrew Polk was sworn in April 9, 2002, as Upper St. Clair’s newest Police Officer. The 26-year-old has served as a Dispatcher with the Department for three years. Andy is a graduate of Duquesne University. He and his wife are expecting their first child soon.

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Records Coordinator Sue Lekse Fall 2002

Russell Rauch Technical Coordinator

Andrew Polk Dispatch Center


Bicycle Registration and Safety Program

Congratulations!

Sgt. Curtis Gallatin

For the tenth consecutive year, Chief of Police Ron Pardini won the gold medal in the Senior Division at the National Judo Championships in Cleveland. Chief Pardini has been active in Judo for 44 years and trains and instructs at Kim’s Marital Arts and Fitness. He is a sixth degree black belt and the highest ranked Caucasian in Pennsylvania. When asked how much longer he will continue Judo,the Chief responded, “My goal was to win ten in a row, however, the 2003 tournament is in Las Vegas and that appeals to me… we’ll see!”

Left to right: Officer John Beadle, Laura Wallace, Julia Mackewich, JohnWallace, Akhil Venkatesh and Sergeant Ronald Fleischer.

The Upper St. Clair Police Department held its annual bicycle registration and

safety program on May 11, 2002, at the Township Municipal Building. Sixty-nine children participated in the program this year. The Upper St. Clair Police Department would like to thank Sears, McDonald’s, Lorenzato Automotive Service, Tri-Community South Ambulance Service, the Upper St. Clair School District, and the Upper St. Clair Public Works Department for their support and assistance in this annual bicycle program.

Citizens’ Police Academy for Residents The Upper St. Clair Police Department is hosting its

third Citizens’ Police Academy in October 2002. The Academy classes will be conducted at the Police Department, once a week for seven weeks, with a combination of three-hour evening and day sessions. The course syllabus includes instruction and scenario-based training on various aspects of law enforcement. Objectives would include:

Upper St. Clair Police Department Citizens’ Police Academy Application I would like to participate in the Citizens’ Police Academy. I am willing to assume the responsibilities of the Academy and to permit the required police background investigation. Applicants must be residents of the Township of Upper St. Clair, at least 21 years of age and in good health. Name: (last, first, middle) ____________________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Home Phone: _________________________________________________

An overview of the Criminal Justice System Local Ordinances, Crime and Vehicle Code updates The U.S. Constitution and Citizens’ Rights Firearm Safety, Use of Force Policy and Defensive Tactics Patrol Procedures, Traffic Stops and Officer Safety Criminal, Drug and Gang Investigations (Mock Crime Scene) Domestic Crimes and Custody Disputes The Role of the District Attorney and the Court System Local Programs and Public Issues

Employer(s): __________________________________________________ Social Security #: ______________________________________________

To help us determine interest in the program, please contact the Upper St. Clair Police Administration at 412-833-1113, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Additional applications will be available at the Police Department for Township residents. ■

Signature: ____________________________________________________

• • • • • • • • •

Date of Birth: _________________________________________________ Daytime Phone: _______________________________________________ Business Phone: _______________________________________________ Previous Address(es): (for the last 10 years) ____________________________________________________________ Have you ever been arrested? ____________________________________ If yes, please explain: ___________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ The final decision on class participants is up to the sole discretion of the Upper St. Clair Police Department.

Please mail or deliver to: Upper St. Clair Police Department 1820 McLaughlin Run Road • Upper St. Clair, PA 15241 Emergency 412-833-7500 or 724-941-7500 • Administration 412-833-1113

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Community Development

Matthew R. Serakowski Director of Community Development 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

Community Development’s goals

are to protect the property values and residential character of the Township. Development of the community is guided by the Township’s Comprehensive Plan. The functions of this department include long-range planning assistance in conjunction with the Township’s Comprehensive Plan, administration and enforcement of land use codes, issuing permits related to zoning approvals, building, fire protection, driveways, sewers, alarms, grading and street openings and technical and staff-review assistance to the Planning Commission, Zoning Hearing Board, Building and Fire Codes Appeals and Advisory Board. Permits are required for the following activities: remodeling, adding to or altering any structures, construction of new structures, change in land usage, installation of alarm systems, grading other than minor landscaping, electrical installations, alterations to or enlargement of a driveway, tapping into, altering or constructing a sewer, grading over a sewer and installation of air conditioners/furnaces.

For information on development and land use in the Township, the 1995 Comprehensive Plan, Township Code or the revised Sidewalks and Bikeways Plan, contact the Community Development Department, the Library or visit the Township’s website at www.twpusc.org. A variety of information is available on the website including downloadable permit applications and updates on implementation of the revised Sidewalks and Bikeways Plan. ■

Deborah Waller Fire Marshal

Cathi Macko, Kathie (Kate) Oberle, the Director’s Secretary, and Carla Esselstyn answer many questions about permits, the Comprehensive Plans and the Sidewalks and Bikeways Plans. 66

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Glenn Prokopovitch Code Enforcement Officer

Shannon Miller Planning and Land Use Assistant

Ron S. Veyo Chief Inspector/Deputy Zoning Administrator

Welcome Shannon! Shannon Miller is the Planning and Land Use Assistant in our Community Development division. Shannon graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2001 and is living in Franklin Park Borough. She loves to travel and spend time with her family, especially her niece and nephews.

Township Ordinance Reminders • Yearly permits are required for the operation of a fire and/or intrusive alarm system. • Smoke detectors are required in all residential structures. • Outside burning of leaves, trash, or other material is prohibited by the Township Code and by the Allegheny County Health Department, Air Polution Control Ordinance. • House numbers on residences should be at least a three-inch visible Arabic number close to the door facing the street. • Residents operating a home occupation are required to obtain a permit from the Township. Certain types of businesses qualify as home occupations. • The covering of sewer manholes and interference with drainage facilities, including swales, is prohibited. • There are Township guidelines for erection of mailboxes in street right-of-ways in accordance with the U.S. Postal Service regulations. • Parking is permitted only on paved parking areas or driveways. If you are contemplating expanding your parking areas or driveway, please contact the Community Development Department for guidelines before work begins. Fall 2002

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Library

Lois Hoop Library Director

Debra Conn Head of Children’s and Youth Services Helen Palascak Head of Technical Services

Adult Library Staff Left to right: Nancy Finley, Assistant; Bill Collins, Assistant; Maureen Case, Technology and Reference; Susan Saxman, Reference; Hazel Tanner, Assistant and Marcia Hankey, Assistant

Services: • Reference service at library and, when practical, by telephone and email

Adult Library Easy Access to Your Library Phone: 412-835-5540 FAX: 412-835-6763 INFO LINE: 412-854-5353/113

• Interlibrary loan • Photocopying machine with reduction/enlargement and duplexing capabilities

E-Mail: usc@einetwork.net Homepage: www.twpusc.org/libmain/lib.html

• Typewriter • Computer stations with Microsoft Office, Internet and specialized online databases.

Collection: • Approximately 100,000 circulating items and Reference books • Magazines • Videocassettes and DVDs • Music CDs • CD Roms • E-book Readers • Books on tape and books on CD— abridged and unabridged • Large print books • Vertical file including pictures • Special focus areas for Business/Investing Education/Career Foreign Language Consumer Materials

Program/Activities: • Book reviews for community organizations • Adult volunteer program • Special interest programs throughout the year • Display cases for collections, hobbies and themes • And much more! Friends of the Library collect used books at the USC Community Center Lobby the first Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. Friends annual book sale is in May.

• Microfiche reader • Community Events and Student Job Exchange bulletin boards • Student job opportunities • Tribute Books Collection • Study rooms and Cozy Reading Corner • Online catalog to renew items and place holds

Hours: Monday–Thursday 9:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Friday and Saturday 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

(Closed Summer Sundays) Outside book and video return available 24 hours a day collected daily at 9 a.m.

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Adult Library Staff Left to right: Parry Kokalis, Reference; Linda Messer, Reference; Jack Day, Assistant; Helen Palascak, Head of Technical Services; Lois Hoop, Director; Marie Rutkowski, Assistant; Diane Ornato, Reference; Susan Latshaw, Secretary and Sanchita Ghosh, Head of Circulation

Fall 2002


Children’s Library Staff Left to right, front row: Debra Conn, Bonnie Harper, Pru Cooper, Barbara Campbell, Lauren Alesse, Vanessa Ryner and Eileen Smith. Back row: Colleen Miles, Ellen Nelson, Peg Moody, Linda Olczak, Pat La Rosa, Brooke Cowles, Barbara Brown and Sharon Christianson.

Children’s Library We want to welcome you to the Children’s Library. Here’s what’s available for you and your child: • A friendly and helpful staff • Books for children from birth through high school • Parenting books • Puzzles and puppets • Music cassettes, CDs, audio books, videos, and DVDs • Computers equipped with educational games, reference tools and the Internet • Booklists available in print and on the web

Preschool Storytime I is a thirtyminute program for children ages two to four years of age, accompanied by an adult. This theme based program combines books, songs, rhymes and art activities.

Children’s Library Program Guide The Children’s Library offers a variety of programs throughout the year. Specific information is available in the seasonal program brochures available at the Library, on the web at www.twpusc.org/ libmain/lib.html, on the USC INFO LINE at 412-854-5353, extension 7546, or by calling the Children’s Library at 412-835-5540, extension 251.

More than a Story is a forty-five minute after school program for kids in kindergarten through second grade. Each week the kids explore a different topic using all the Library’s resources. Mother-Daughter Book Discussions meet monthly October through March. There are three discussion groups: third and fourth grades, fifth and sixth grades and seventh through ninth grades. The groups meet one evening a month from October to March.

Preschool Storytime II is a thirtyminute program for children at least four years of age, but not yet in kindergarten. This theme based program combines stories, picture books, songs, poems, games and art activities.

Summer Reading is open to children of all ages. This program provides a nopressure, fun way to read during summer vacation. Summer reading participation promotes retaining and improving reading skills mastered during the school year. ■

Special Events happen throughout the year. Baby and Toddler Time is a language enrichment program for children six to 30 months of age. The program combines songs, fingerplays, action rhymes, and books in a gentle twenty-minute program for the youngest child and their parents or caregivers.

Check the brochure, or website to see what’s happening next.

www.twpusc.org/libmain/lib Fall 2002

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Public Works F. Kyle Robinson Director of Public Works 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

Ron Pardini Deputy Director

Dan Beard Supervising Projects Inspector

Dave Kutschbach Projects Inspector

George Kostelich Superintendent of Operations

The Department of Public Works is

responsible for the management and supervision of all activities relating to street, storm sewers, sanitary sewers, garbage and refuse collection, recycling, leaf waste collection, parks and recreation facility maintenance, building and grounds maintenance and forestry. Six supervisory personnel, two secretarial staff and 22 laborers staff the Public Works Department.

Garbage Collection Garbage and refuse collection is contracted to be removed weekly on Thursdays. Garbage collection will be delayed one day when a holiday falls during the week. Rules and Regulations plus pick-up schedules concerning garbage, recyclable

Walter Jarosh Superintendent of Buildings and Forester

Cindy Lockovich Director’s Secretary

material and leaf and yard wastes are mailed to each resident annually and on the website. Garbage, rubbish, trash and recycling bins must be placed at the curbside either after 6 p.m. Wednesday or by 6 a.m. Thursday. Garbage and/or recycling reported by the hauler as “late” (placed at the curbside after 6 a.m. Thursday) should be held for disposal the following Thursday or may be disposed of at the homeowner’s expense. Containers must be removed from the curbside by midnight on Thursday. During the winter months (November-March) garbage may be placed at the curbside as early as 4:30 p.m. due to the decrease in daylight.

Recycling The Township of Upper St. Clair contracts for a bi-weekly collection on Thursdays of the following recyclables: • Aluminum and bi-metal beverage cans • Steel cans (tin) • Plastic PETE such as a two-liter pop bottle and HDPE such as milk container • Newsprint and inserts (Must be placed in, on top of, or beside recycling container. Plastic bags or bundles will not be accepted.) • Clear, green and brown glass containers Tires may be returned to tire dealers or automotive centers for a small charge. Used motor oil may be dropped off at various Valvoline or Pennzoil oil-change centers.

Charolotte Adams Clerk

Recyclable Material All recyclable material, with the exception of newsprint, may be co-mingled. Recyclable materials, which exceed the designated bins capacity, may be placed into an open paper bag and placed next to the bins at the curb. White recycling stickers may be placed (available at the Municipal Building or Public Works Building) on containers purchased by residents to hold additional recycling material.) Recyclable materials must be properly prepared before they can be placed in the bins. All cans should be drained and free of foreign materials. The metal or plastic safety rings remaining on the neck of all bottles with twist-off caps must be removed. All containers should be rinsed, and the lids should be removed. Plastic containers should be crushed to save space.

Leaf and Yard Waste Leaf and yard waste will be collected on Saturdays in the fall and on one Saturday in the spring. Check the Rules and Regulations for the collection dates involved. Any mixture of grass clippings and leaves is considered leaf and yard waste and should be placed in an appropriate compatible paper bag. These bags are taken to the Township’s composting site for processing and must be free of foreign objects such as stones, plastic and duct tape. Under no circumstances will leaf and yard waste in plastic bags be picked up during the scheduled leaf waste collection.

Fall Leaf Collection Dates are: October 19, October 26, November 2, November 9, November 16, November 23 and December 7. Leaves must be in compostable paper bags only!

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Winter Snow Reminders In case of inclement weather, it may be necessary to delay or cancel garbage collection. Please refer to Cable 7, the Township INFO LINE on page 94, or see our website twpusc.org. • Residents are asked not to shovel or blow snow from sidewalks or driveways into the street. • Residents are reminded not to park their vehicles on the street. • Residents with sidewalks are requested to clear their sidewalks of snow. ■

Dave Byrne, Gary Pitchok, Jim Kane, Dave Richards and Ron Sarrick

Summer Staff, front row, left to right: Bill Trocano, Scott Wuenschell, Steve Herring. Back row, left to right: Biff Heisler, Phil Gossic, Nate Meerstein, KC Hartman. Not shown: Pat Ramsey, Nick Medvid, Rob Meston, Dave McKinney, Dom Leopardi, Dan Zelik, Chris Martin, Doug Marstellar and Chris Heisler.

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Left to right: Jim Stewart, Chovi Iagnemma, Tom Welsh, Bill Pinto, Mike Inks, Walt Donaldson, Dave Bressanelli, Jeff Charlier, Greg Totin, Piero Pasquarelli, Mike Deferio and Tom Skiba

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St. Clair Medical Suites Comprehensive health care services for your family and business: Family Practice Medical Associates South (Southpointe) Medical Diagnostics x-rays, EKGs, Bone Density testing, Ultrasound LabLink Laboratory services SHORE - (412) 835-7100 Physical, Occupational, Speech and Massage Therapies St. Clair OB-GYN Associates, Inc. (Southpointe) Occupational Medicine Work injury, pre-employment physicals and drug screening Travel Medicine Pre-travel medical consultation, vaccinations

w w w. s t c l a i r. o r g

St. Clair Medical Suites An affiliate of St. Clair Hospital

Two convenient locations St. Clair Medical Suite at Bethel Park (across from South Hills Village) 2000 Oxford Drive, Suite 112 Bethel Park, PA 15102 (412) 344-6388 St. Clair Medical Suite at Southpointe (Route 79S, Exit 48) 501 Corporate Drive Canonsburg, PA 15317 (724) 746-3369 No appointment for general x-ray or lab services.

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Recreation and Leisure Services Paul Besterman Director of Recreation and Leisure Services 412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

The Department of Recreation and Leisure Services is responsible for rec-

reation programming and activities for Township residents of all ages and scheduling the use of the Township facilities, such as meeting rooms, the Recreation Center and ball fields. The Recreation and Leisure Services brochure is published bi-annually at the end of March and the beginning of September. This outlines programs and activities and includes registration information, a map of the parks and recreational facilities, and a directory of community activities. Cable 7/Public Access TV—offers community access television to residents of the Township. A Video Newspaper on Cable 7 displays information and meeting announcements for a variety of Township activities, community groups and churches. Senior Citizens of Upper St. Clair— provides Wednesday lunches and programs for all residents ages 62 and older. A variety of activities and field trips is planned each year. Meetings are held every Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. at the Recreation Center Parks and Recreation Board—meets the fourth Tuesday of the month Outdoor Tennis Permit Registration— for use of the Township’s tennis courts. Held on a Saturday in April from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Recreation Department. Indoor Tennis Bubble Permit Registration—held on a Saturday in September from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Recreation Department. 72

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Community Day—a day of activities for the entire family held on a Saturday in May. Annual Flea Market—held on a Saturday in July.

Parks and Facilities The Township has more than 500 acres of community and neighborhood parks and facilities. These include: ten parks, five baseball fields, 16 tennis courts, a three-hole golf course, nine basketball courts, five soccer fields, two roller hockey decks, a walking trail in Gilfillan Park, and various other recreational areas. ■

Julie Shriver, Director’s Secretary and Karen Babeji, Program Coordinator


Upper St. Clair Cable 7

Animal Control 412-833-7500

yu Glenn Ward—Cable 7

Cable 7 is located in the Township Building near the Recreation and Leisure Services office. Cable 7’s purpose is to provide a conduit for information from community groups and individuals to the residents of the Township. Volunteers produce all locally produced programs on Cable 7. Cable 7 provides training and production support to resident volunteers who want to share their event with the community. With the lighter weight professional video equipment, training has been simplified and is open to any resident. The equipment and facilities are available to any qualified resident to produce programming to share with the community. For additional information, call 412-831-1030.

II ! e en s p a O Ph w o N

Animal Control Officers Don Cooley, Dan Spinnenweber, Tony Capozzoli, Bob Habjanetz and Spot, a rescued dog.

The Township participates in a joint Animal Control program with Mt.

Lebanon, Scott Township, Dormont, Greentree, Castle Shannon, Whitehall and Heidelberg Borough. Four Animal Control officers are on duty seven days a week, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., and provide emergency service 24-hours per day. Clair’s Kennel provides a temporary home for wandering pets. Residents can call the Police Department for Animal Control Service to report animals running at large, to enforce nuisance animal regulations, and to report injured or killed animals. Returning pets to their proper owner and finding homes for unclaimed animals are priorities for Animal Control officers. ■

It’s What You’ve Been Waiting For!

• Custom carriage homes and patio homes • First floor master suites and two car attached garages • Lawn care and snow removal • Fabulous clubhouse, pool and tennis courts • Pricing starts at $235,000 Open Tuesday, Thursday & Sunday from 1-4 p.m.

For Information Call Bonnie Byrnes or John Geisler at 412-344-0500 x210 or x222

www.waterdamfarms.com Fall 2002

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Information Technology

Coffey Contracting Co.

Barbara Hull Director of Information Technology

ROOFING & CHIMNEYS Slate • Tile • Shakes Tinning • Spouting Flashing • Box Gutter Repair

412-831-9000 www.twpusc.org

We can recreate workmanship and styles from any Architectural Era

Joan Raymond Web Developer

The Department of Information Technology is responsible for the com-

puter needs of all Township departments. The functions of this department include installing and troubleshooting hardware/software, maintaining the Township’s LAN and Internet access, supporting various department applications and maintaining the Township’s website.

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

412.341.1127

Visit us at www.twpusc.org

Shaun Lemley—I.T. Systems Management Assistant

The Township’s website, www.twpusc.org, provides residents with general government information. The site contains: • Board agendas and minutes • Downloadable applications and permits • Garbage and recycling information • Calendars providing Township, School and Community events • UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY magazine • Departmental Information • And much more… ■

Tri-Community South Emergency Numbers 412-833-7500 724-941-7500

Non-Emergency Number 412-831-3710

Emergency Medical Services The Township participates in a jointly-operated and financed emergency medical services program with the Township of South Park and the Municipality of Bethel Park. This program provides emergency and non-emergency ambulance transport. An annual subscription drive is held each fall for Township residents. For a nominal fee, the entire household and visitors are provided with emergency ambulance coverage when emergency transport is needed. 74

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Highlights of the Board of Commissioners Meetings The regular meeting of the Board of Commissioners takes place on the first Monday of each month in the Board of Commissioners meeting room in the Township Municipal Building. All business regarding the operation of the Township is conducted, and citizens are invited to comment on any Township matters. Complete Board minutes can be found at the Library or on the website at www.twpusc.org. For more information, please call 412-831-9000. Special Board of Commissioners Meeting

March 11, 2002 Approximately 20 people attended.

• Commissioner Marsh announced that the meeting had been called to hear a presentation by the Environmental Education Center [EEC] Project Development Committee [PDC].

• Executed a contract with DEP for the Non-Point Source Management Program–McLaughlin Run Road. • Amended Bill No. 10-02 to change the fee for junior resident golf increase from $2.50 to $3.50 instead of $2.50 to $4. • Adopted Bill No. 10-02, authorizing the amendment of Chapter 57 of the Township Code entitled, “Fees,” to adjust fees for recreational programs. Approved contracts:

April 1, 2002 Approximately 22 people attended.

• Commissioner Harris presented a Proclamation designating April 20, 2002, as Upper St. Clair Clean-Up Day and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Day. • Commissioner Bayne presented a Proclamation designating April 14-22, 2002, as National Library Week in Upper St. Clair. In addition, the following Library volunteers were recognized for their service: Kim Kanik President, Friends of the Library Phyllis Deibler ..................................... Ada Bates ............................................. Nina Goldsmith ................................... Ferne Martineau .................................. Nancy Gompers ...................................

• Adopted Bill No. 9-02, amending the real estate tax rate for 2002.

10 Years 14 Years 15 Years 21 Years 25 Years

The Board: • Adopted Bill No. 7-02, amending Chapter 130 of the Code of the Township, entitled “Zoning,” to revise the requirements for communications antennas not located in the communications antenna overlay district. • Adopted Bill No. 8-02, granting unified conditional use/preliminary and final land development approval to PNC Bank for an ATM addition.

• Lakewood Mechanical Pittsburgh HVAC Unit for Public Works ................ $20,050 • Davey Expert Tree Company Lawrence Category 7 Pesticide Applications for Municipal Golf Course .................... $29,500 • Clean Net USA Sewickley One-Year Contract Extension for Custodial Services .................. $3,250/month

The Township of Upper St. Clair

May 6, 2002 Approximately 22 people attended.

Recognitions • Commissioner Smith presented a Certificate of Appreciation for Dean Hampton to his wife, Jan, in recognition of his years of service on the Building and Fire Code Appeals and Advisory Board. Mr. Hampton recently passed away. • Commissioner Long presented a Proclamation designating the week of May 19-25, 2002, as Emergency Medical Services Week in Upper St. Clair. Nora Helfrich, Director of Tri-Community South EMS, was present to receive the Proclamation, along with paramedics, Marian Wawrzkowicz and Jen Derringer. The Board adopted: • Bill No. 11-02, granting unified conditional use/ preliminary and final land development plan approval to St. Louise de Marillac Phase 1 final development for a new parish hall and site improvements. • Resolution No. 1416, authorizing the execution of an updated multi-municipal police Mutual Aid Agreement. • Resolution No. 1417, adopting a strategy for developing a Visitors’ Center and related site improvements at Gilfillan Park in conjunction with the adjoining historical Gilfillan Farm.

is accepting Talent Bank applications from residents interested in serving on various Township Boards and Committees.

The Board approved the following contracts: • A & H Equipment Bridgeville 2002 Elgin Geo Vac Street Sweeper with a three-year Labor and Parts Warranty .. $140,150

Call the Township receptionist at

• Kiefer Coal & Supply Bethel Park Ready-Mix Concrete ........................ $76.50/yard

412-831-9000 for a form or information.

Township Manager Doug Watkins, Jean Brown, President of the USC Historical Society, and School Superintendent Bill Pope open the Spring 2002 magazine.

• Commissioner Smith recognized the Boy Scout in the audience who was attending the meeting as part of his Citizenship merit badge.

Commissioners Gloria Smith, Ernie Harris and Cheryl Bayne swearing in with Judge Del Sole. Fall 2002

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Setting the Stage… A Phased Approach to the Regional Environmental Education Center at Boyce Mayview Park Every masterpiece starts with a first step. The regional Environmental

Education Center proposed for the Boyce Mayview property is no exception. The first step in bringing the project to fruition was taken by the Board of Commissioners of the Township of Upper St. Clair on June 3 when they voted to move the Environmental Education Center [EEC] project forward in a phased approach. In 2000 the PA Department of Environmental Protection awarded a $2,000,000 grant to the Township of Upper St. Clair for the development of a regional Environmental Education Center. The Township Commissioners appointed a 21 member EEC Project Development Committee to prepare a recommendation for development of the EEC. After a year and a half of

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hard work, a strategy has been adopted to effectively utilize the grant funds and activate the EEC in two phases. Phase I will launch distinctive sitebased curricula as well as a capital campaign for completion of Phase II. The Phase I facilities will accommodate limited programming for school groups and put

Fall 2002

in place the infrastructure to support the development of Phase II. The Master Plan for the Boyce Mayview park property promotes compliance with “sustainability principles” such as “recycling” existing structures for a new purpose. Toward that end, the old Mayview Farm kitchen will be revitalized to serve as a temporary four-season classroom and office space for the EEC. Since the natural resources of the outdoors are the most valuable resource for providing environmental education, the focus will be on getting outdoors. The building facilities provide a brief staging or study area before and after students investigate concepts such as watersheds, biological diversity, ecosystems and human interactions with the environment.


A second resource to be developed for Phase I is the construction of a laboratory facility in the future Mine Garden area with an adjacent outdoor seating area. Students will use the lab to do simple experiments relating to the surrounding environment. Other Phase I components consist of parking, limited trails, signage, and utilities. All are part of the long-range plan for the EEC. The goal is to have programs up and running on a pilot basis by mid-October. The development of the larger EEC facility seen in earlier editions of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY is still the ultimate objective. If you would like to have a presentation about this exciting project for your organization, contact G. Edward Lyness, Community Liaison, at 412-221-2607 or Mary Wilson at 412-831-9000, extension 293. Stay tuned for regular updates on the status of this exciting project and visit the website at www.twpusc.org. for postings as well. â–

Fall 2002

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A Culinary Masterpiece

Indulge in all the pleasures of the Café Lunch and Afternoon Tea, Tuesday through Sunday

The Café at The Frick

Distinctive Garden Dining

The Frick Art & Historical Center 7227 Reynolds Street in Pittsburgh’s East End

For reservations call

412.371.0600 www.frickart.org

Always in the Spotlight! STRIP DISTRICT at 18th & SMALLMAN (412) 263-2143

ROBINSON TOWNSHIP 4501 Steubenville Pike (RT 60 – South of RT 79) (412) 921-6677

DOWNTOWN at CHERRY WAY (412) 566-8051

NORTH VERSAILLES Off Rt. 30 • 921 E. PGH. McKEESPORT BLVD. (412) 829-4700

MARKET SQUARE 2 SOUTH MARKET PLACE (412) 261-1599

VISIT OUR NEWEST LOCATION PLEASANT HILLS RT 51 – South (Past Century III) (412) 653-6779

OAKLAND at FORBES AVENUE (412) 621-4444 SOUTHSIDE (Blues Cafe) (412) 381-2583

Be sure to visit us at PNC Park & Heinz Field • If you’re in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, A1A – On the Beach 954-565-0605 78

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


“BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT” a magic carpet ride... First Place Winner, 2001, Middle Eastern, Pittsburgh Magazine Reader’s Poll

st

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- VOTED BY POST-GAZETTE READERS - VOTED BY TRIBUNE REVIEW READERS - VOTED BY MT. LEBANON MAGAZINE READERS 2002 - VOTED BY PITTSBURGH MAGAZINE READERS 2002

• Parties, call for reservations, 6 to 40 people

RATED ★★★★ - BY KDKA

• Creative Party Trays • Dine on our New Patio • Great Bar

Lunch ’til 5 PM Dinners and Snacks ’til midnight

Amel’s Restaurant McNeilly Road at Sussex

412-563-3466

Thank You for Voting Us the “BEST” Chinese Restaurant in Pittsburgh!

Fall 2002

UPPERFeasting ST. CLAIRon TODAY 79 More Page 80!


Block Party Time is Any Time! Block Parties are Easy to Organize and Fun! 1. Send a letter requesting permission for a Block Party with a specific date to: Township Manager, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. 2. You will receive a letter granting authorization to have the party in your neighborhood. Activities must be held between noon and 10 p.m.

MORE ELBOW ROOM. SAME GREAT CUISINE. MORE TABLES TO EAT IT ON. CALL 412 431-3535.

BRUSCHETTA’S - 19TH & CARSON STREETS • SOUTHSIDE -

OUTDOOR DINING AVAILABLE

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002

3. The Public Works Department will deliver barricades to your residence a day or two before the event and will pick up the barricades soon after the event. The street may not be barricaded for more than six hours. 4. Residents in the neighborhood are responsible for providing adequate access for public safety vehicles during the event. Please be considerate to any neighbors who may not be involved in the festivities. 5. The Police and Fire Departments give informational talks to kids— call 412-833-1113 or 412-835-0660 to schedule a time. 6. If you have additional questions, please call 412-831-9000. 7. Take photos, write a short article about your event and send to Editors, UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241.


k

River City Brass Band At the Upper St. Clair Theatre

Presents on the following Tuesdays at 8 p.m.: September 10, 2002 High Strung Brass October 8, 2002 Forward March November 5, 2002 The Great American Concert December 10, 2002 The Holly and The Brass

USC-BP Breakfast Rotary Club

The Pittsburgh Civic Orchestra Saturday, October 5, 2002 USCHS Theatre—8 p.m.

Sunday, October 20, 2002 St. Thomas More—7:30 p.m.

Saturday, December 14, 2002 USCHS Theatre Dr. William Pope narrates The Night Before Christmas—8 p.m.

Saturday, February 8, 2003 USCHS Theatre Young Artists—8 p.m.

Saturday, April 12, 2003 USCHS—8 p.m.

Saturday, May 10, 2003 USCHS Theatre—8 p.m. Harry Coleman, Soloist

Annual Chicken Barbecue Dinner

May 6, 2003 High-Spirited Brass!

Tickets: $9 Seniors: $6 Youth/Students: Free with an adult

September 28, 2002

Call 412-322-7222 or 1-800-292-7222 or visit http://www.rcbb.com

For information, please call 412-278-2326.

February 25, 2003 Big Brass and Bluegrass April 8, 2003 Big Band Royalty

Wesley’s Tour of Homes Sunday, October 6, 2002 Noon to 5 p.m.

$15 Proceeds support the Wesley Institute. For more information, call 412-831-9390.

At Westminister Presbyterian Church

11 a.m. to 7 p.m.• Tickets $10 For information, call 412-221-3932.

Subscribe Now for Town Hall South Lecture Series

TOWN HALL SOUTH

The subscription campaign for Town Hall South’s 34th annual lecture series is underway. This year’s line-up includes:

2002–2003 MEMBERSHIP

David Halberstam

APPLICATION

Author, Journalist, Historian Tuesday, October 1, 2002

SERIES $80

Frank Deford

Please list the names, addresses and phone number of all persons for whom tickets are being purchased. If additional space is required or if you would like brochures mailed to others, continue on a separate sheet.

Sports Writer Tuesday, December 3, 2002

Name __________________________________

Robert Young Pelton

Address _________________________________

Exotic Traveler Tuesday, February 4, 2003

_______________________________________

Ken Auletta Author, Media Columnist Tuesday, November 12, 2002

Phone Number ___________________________

Ronan Tynan Irish Tenor Tuesday, March 4, 2003

Number of memberships @ $80 each _________ Total amount enclosed ____________________

All lectures take place at Upper St. Clair High School at 10 a.m. The lecture series costs $80. Send check payable to: Town Hall South at 2040 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. For more information, call Debbie Norris at 412-854-4393 or Martha Brown at 412-833-8503.

Fall 2002

Please enclose a check payable to: Town Hall South 2040 Washington Road Upper St. Clair, PA 15241-1599 Detach and mail with your check today.

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

81


U will enjoy New friends I nteresting activities T asty food E ntertainment D ay trips S pecial events E lderly excellence N ice people I nspiration O rganization R ecreation

ff inator Lynn Walco hy, Senior Coord Senator Tim Murp Past President Alice Lesica and Seniors’

C heerful atmosphere I ntelligent conversation T ranquil environment I mmediate acceptance Z esty salad dressing ?? E cdysiast—Sorry, no way. N ewcomers welcomed! S ilver card—Golf, swim, tennis

VIPs enjoy Senior Lunch

More VIPs or Lunch ni Se e th at

Silver Card Senior Citizens of Upper St. Clair, the Recreation and Leisure Services Department offers for your consideration the Silver Card. Holders of this card are entitled to free admittance to the three-hole golf course, outdoor tennis facilities and family swim at the High School pool. Any resident age 62 and retired or age 65 with no restrictions is eligible for the Silver Card Program. Applications are available at the Recreation Department, so stop in and ask for your Silver Card! 82 82

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002 Fall 2002

Life is mostly froth and bubble, Two things stand like stone, Kindness in another’s trouble, Courage in your own. —Adam Lindsay Gordon 1833-1870


G old card—Music, drama, athletics O ld friends F estive occasions O pportunity to socialize R etirees—Refined, reasonable I nformative discussions T ime to join us!!

Vips enjoy Senior lunch

Senior Site information and articles have been gathered and written by John Kotzuk.

O! while you live, tell truth, and shame the devil! —Shakespeare

Gold Card Senior Citizens of Upper St. Clair, apply now for your Gold Card. See and enjoy drama and musical performances, exciting athletic events, and other activities, courtesy of the Upper St. Clair School District. No credit checks, income information or your mother’s maiden name needed. If you are a resident, 62 years of age or older, just stop by the School District receptionist desk and ask for your Gold Card!

Fall 2002 Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

83 83


Around The Township

Dave Batchelor— Participation is the Key

David A. Batchelor

Recently inducted into the Pennsylvania High School Track and Field Hall of Fame, longtime resident, coach, PIAA official, track statistician, volunteer and teacher, Dave Batchelor shared some of his memories. Growing up in Dormont, Dave’s favorite class was gym or as the teachers labeled it— physical education. Dave’s father was a physical education instructor at Peabody High School, an assistant football coach and was nationally recognized for his championship volleyball teams. Dave loved all sports and served as a high school football and basketball manager and was a member of the fencing and track teams. Early in the spring of his senior year he severely sprained his ankle while high jumping and was unable to participate with any degree of success. After high school graduation in 1938, Dave worked two years before entering Springfield College in 1940, where he majored in Health and Physical Education. During his freshman year he lettered in football, swimming and track. In track, he high jumped and threw the javelin. Early in the season, three varsity track members informed Dave that he would be a hammer thrower! “Who me?” responded Dave. His only knowledge of hammer throwing had been a picture in a German sports magazine of Karl Hein, a 84

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

German Olympic hammer champion in 1936. So Dave took up hammer throwing. The final freshman track meet that year Dave tied for first in the high jump, placed second in the javelin and first in the hammer throw. Thus began a life-long love for the hammer throw and similar Celtic throwing events. During his sophomore year, Dave competed in junior varsity basketball and track, limiting his events to the hammer and weight throw. Unfortunately, due to the war, the allmale college closed its doors until 1946. On returning to Springfield, Dave competed in football, volleyball and indoor and outdoor track and graduated in 1947. He was employed at Mellon Institute of Industrial Research and obtained his master’s degree at the University of Pittsburgh in 1949. In 1950 Dave served as vice president of the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh and lectured on astronomy. In the fall of 1951, Dave decided to enter the teaching and coaching fields. He worked for the Etna School District and served as assistant football and assistant basketball coach for three years. During one stretch his J.V. basketball team won 17 consecutive games and the varsity was section champions. All this with a school having a total of 249 students in grades nine through twelve! Etna is part of the Shaler Area School District. In the fall of 1954, the Mt. Lebanon School District hired Dave as a teacher and assistant football and assistant track coach. Dave’s coaching skills improved and successful athletes were produced. He also traveled abroad earning academic credits.

Fall 2002

Throwing at the State PIAA Meet-1988

Dave Batchelor National Masters Hammer Champion 1982

In 1963, Dave became head track and cross country coach at the new Churchill High School. The cross-country captain, Craig Stern, won the WPIAL individual championship and placed second at the State championship meet. In 1966, Dave served as men’s throwing events coach at the University of Pittsburgh. Coach Batchelor was active in his academic field as well. He held membership in a variety of historical and archaeological societies and he was employed as an assistant project director with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit working on curriculum development in social studies in 1968-1969. Dave went on three archaeological expeditions in the Middle East and taught adult education classes in descriptive archaeology. Dave moved his family to USC in September 1968 specifically for its excellent school system and because of the Township’s high rating as a modern, progressive residential community. Dave’s two sons and his granddaughters are USC High School graduates. Dave also taught at Boyle High School and coached at Pittsburgh Central Catholic High School. Over the years Dave applied for a teaching position in the USC School District. After substituting in USC and volunteering as a throwing events coach, Dave became a full-time social studies teacher and assistant track coach in 1975.


Rotational Style Throw Mark White winning the State PIAA Shot Put Championship

Not satisfied with just coaching, Dave participated in Masters (age group) track and field competition. From 1976 through 1983, he won seven national championships in throwing events and formerly held the U.S. record in the hammer throw for age 58 men! After Coach Batchelor’s retirement in 1986, he was asked to continue as a volunteer throwing events coach at USC. He volunteered from 1987 through 1998, helping to produce a number of outstanding throwers. With the successful years of 1997-1998, he ended his coaching career as John Welch captured two WPIAL javelin championships and placed second at state and third in the high school division of the Pennsylvania Relays. John has since won two Atlantic Coast Conference javelin championships. Dave says there were numerous highlights in his career. One of the highlights occurred in 1994 when USC discus throwers took— first, Josh Currence (166 feet 6 inches); second, Mike Chadwick (155 feet 5 inches) and fifth, Zack Furness (145 feet 4 inches).

Three Place Winners Discus 1994 WPIAL Championship Meet Left to right: Tom Mellett, Throwing Events Coach; Josh Currence, 1st, 166 ft. 6 in.; Mike Chadwich, 2nd, 155 ft. 5 in.; Zach Furness, 5th, 145 ft. 4 in. and Dave Batchelor, Volunteer Coach

Another triple “whammy” by USC throwers occurred in 1978 during the WPIAL Relays. Jim Joiner (173 feet 5 inches), Craig Dunaway (180 feet 11 inches) and Jeff Roweme (186 feet 4 inches) had a total of 540 feet 8 inches to win the javelin throw and defeat perennial winner, Ambridge, by four inches. Several of Dave’s athletes went on to successful college careers in throwing events. Jim Stevenson (USC resident) of Mt. Lebanon High School was a Pennsylvania Relays, IC4a and NCAA javelin champion, as well as an Olympic Trials finalist. Mark White, WPIAL and state shot put champion and two-time WPIAL and state discus champion, threw successfully in college and at the age of 33 in 2000, was an Olympic trials finalist! White’s WPIAL and PIAA meet records of 193 feet 7 inches and 184 feet 7 inches in the discus still stand after 17 years! Dave’s boys and girls also were ranked nationally with Khristine Yarosh’s (CanonMcMillan High School) winning the national girls’ high school championship in the hammer in 1995. Dave spent most of his instructional years in the social studies field teaching World Cultures or U.S. History. His special interests are ancient history and Colonial America with emphasis on the French and Indian War. The excavation, preservation and restoration of military fortifications of that period have always been of special interest. He has a collection of artifacts including two rusty nails from Fort William Henry, which was burned and destroyed by the French and their Indian allies in 1757. Dave also has three bricks and a number of wooden palisado fragments from the second Fort Pitt obtained during the clearance of the point area in 1950. Dave has a French flint lock pistol and a Pennsylvania flint lock rifle of the late 18th century. His Civil War interest is centered on turreted iron-clads (metal covered war vessels) and recent attempts to recover the remains of the USS Monitor off Cape Hatteras. Did you know that two of the Union Navy’s ironclad monitors were built at a ship yard on the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh? Both monitors were commissioned after the war ended. The Umpqua was sold in 1874, but the Manayunk remained in navy service until 1899 when it was sold for scrap iron. Dave has been a long time member of the Association of Track and Field Statisticians, an international organization. He is also a charter member of the Federation of American Statisticians of Track. Dave has published two books of statistics dealing with the U.S. Men’s hammer and throwing performances yearly since 1870. His most recent compilations have been the yearly

performance lists of U.S. women hammer and weight throwers. Before retiring in 1986, he researched and compiled the USC High School boys’ and girls’ sports records by teams John Welch from 1958-1986. Nationally Ranked Javelin He is working with Thrower, 1998, 208 ft. 6 in. Board of Commissioners President Frank Marsh on a monograph about the life and times of Major General Arthur St. Clair. Dave is also updating the team and individual WPIAL sports champions and includes both boys’ and girls’ teams. ■

Fall 2002

While Coaching, Dave’s teams earned: WPIAL Championship Meets Total places won—52 First place wins—15 PIAA (State) Championship Meets Total places won—21 First place wins—6 National Scholastic Championship Meet First place win—1 (Girls’ Hammer Champion 1995)

Pittsburgh Catholic Schools Championships (two years) Total places won—11 First place wins—4 Awards and Honors • 1996 Lifetime Achievement Award by the Tri-State Track Coaches Association • 1998 Fifth Annual Don H. Potts Award by the Federation of American Statisticians of Track • 2002 Induction into the Pennsylvania High School Track and Field Hall of Fame by the Pennsylvania Track and Field Coaches Association USC Athletes Coached by Dave Batchelor who received National Scholastic Recognition by the High School Editor of Track and Field News: Jeff Roseme, Javelin ....................... 1978 Mark White, Discus ............... 1984-1985 Mark White, Shot Put ..................... 1985 Mark Rudolph, Shot Put ................. 1988 Rachel Heins, Hammer Throw ........ 1995 John Welch, Javelin ........................ 1998

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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A Champion Survivor— Gail McTiernan We Share A Bond (written for the Race for the Cure, Pittsburgh) Music and Lyrics by Lucas Richman

We share a bond That goes beyond our private fight We share a goal To have the whole world unite For together we can win Our battle to survive Together we have strength to stay alive. When I look back On the day I found out That my world had been shaken at the core, I can still feel the love From my family and friends That helped me prepare For the struggle yet in store. I remember waiting And hoping for some news That might shed a little light On the unknown. But then, instead of waiting, I reached out to a friend Who helped me understand That I wasn’t all alone.

Gail McTiernan

Diagnosed with cancer in 1998,

Gail McTiernan is a three and a half year survivor and a champion pledge raiser for the Tenth Anniversary Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh Race for the Cure. Gail raised $4,601 which is the top pledge amount for the 2002 Mother’s Day race. In 2001, Gail also turned in the top pledge amount raised by an individual with $4000. She was the third survivor to finish the Race—in 25 minutes 58 seconds.

“Every donation means so much to me. I was touched by the generosity of family, friends and the Upper St. Clair community. Many donations included personal sentiments that touched my heart. One woman wrote that my letter inspired her to schedule her long overdue mammogram,” says Gail. Last year, Gail served as the Survivor Chair for the 2002 race. She planned and chaired the fourth annual Tickled Pink Reception in March and the Survivor Tribute Reception right before the race. “Both programs celebrate the courage and strength of survivors,” Gail states. In honor of the tenth anniversary of the race, Penny Brill, a survivor and violist in the Pittsburgh Symphony and Gail met with Lucas Richman and asked him to write a song for the Survivor Tribute. “We shared our feelings and perspectives as survivors,” Gail continues. “I organized the survivors’ choir and Penny organized the Symphony accompaniment. The song sends a message of hope, strength and unity among survivors, families and friends and the community. The song touches all of us and has relevance for all survivors, not only those battling breast cancer.” Gail and her husband, Francis, have two children—Erin, nine, and Mark, seven. ■

Show your pride in Upper St. Clair!

How many times Had it been someone else Who saw her life grow shorter every day? Now it was me In that someone else’s shoes But this is war And nothing’s going to get in my way! I may still have fears But I’ve taken back control ’Cause my thirst for life cannot be satisfied. I drink of love and time And I share what I have learned With others who must know hope and faith Can turn the tide.

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

License plates are available in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Services for $5. They are also great gifts for newcomers or neighbors moving.

Fall 2002


The Mt. Lebanon Junior Women’s Club

C.W. CARLSON CONTRACTORS, INC.

Back row—Angie Joint-Kweder, Teresa Scotti, Karen Block Johnese Front—Susan Mason, BJ Horn, Melissa Tai and Sharon McGraw

The Mt. Lebanon Junior Women’s Club presented $30,000 to Pittsburgh Action against Rape and $2500 to the Todd M. Beamer Foundation in May. The MLJWC is a civic, philanthropic and social organization that was founded in 1968 and has grown to an annual membership of over 130 women from the South Hills. New members are welcome to the next meeting Tuesday, September 17, 2002. ■

Decorá Les Care StarMark ADDITIONS • KITCHENS • BATHS

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Banking and Finance Business and Estates Litigation Administrative Law and Government Relations

OUR ATTORNEYS WHO ARE PROUD RESIDENTS OF UPPER ST. CLAIR: Dana Bacsi • Wally Enick • Terry Himes Rich Kennedy • Ralph Manning Chuck McCullough • Dan Perry Jim Poerio • Brad Tupi • Chuck Vater Tucker Arensberg, P.C. 1500 One PPG Place Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.566.1212 Fax 412.594.5619 www.tuckerlaw.com Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Serving Upper St. Clair Churches and Synagogues Alliance Church of Upper St. Clair 2510 Old Washington Road—412-835-4775 Berean Fellowship Church 300 Rockfield Circle, Scott Township 412-220-4673 Beth-El Congregation Of South Hills 1900 Cochran Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-561-1168

Beverly Heights United Presbyterian Church 1207 Washington Road—412-561-5100 Center Presbyterian Church 255 Center Church Road, McMurray 724-941-9050 Christ United Methodist Church 44 Highland Road, Bethel Park—412-835-6621 Faith Lutheran Church of Upper St. Clair Bartley Road, Mt. Lebanon—412-835-4590

Good Shepherd Church USC High School, LGI Room—724-746-0224 Holy Child Parish 212 Station Street, Bridgeville—412-221-5213

Hope Lutheran Church 2799 Old Washington Road—724-941-9441 Mt. Lebanon Christian Church Cedar Blvd., at Hollycrest Dr.—412-531-8554

Prime Time Adult Care, Inc. 44 Highland Road—412-835-6661 Alzheimer Day Care 44 Highland Road—412-835-5509

St. David’s Episcopal Church 905 E. McMurray Road, Peters Twp. 724-941-4060

Beverly Heights Christian Preschool 1207 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-561-7200

St. George Orthodox Church 610 Dewey Avenue, Bridgeville—412-221-2277

Center Church Christian Preschool 255 Center Church Road, McMurray 724-941-9050

St. John Capistran Roman Catholic Church 1610 McMillan Road—412-221-5445

Christ United Methodist Child Care Center 44 Highland Road—412-854-4310

St. Louise de Marillac Roman Catholic Church 312 McMurray Road—412-833-1010

Hillcrest Christian School 2500 Bethel Church Road, Bethel Park 412-835-4040

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Washington Road—412-531-7153

Little Lambs Of Hope Preschool 2799 Old Washington Road—724-941-9441

St. Thomas More Roman Catholic Church 126 Fort Couch Road, Bethel Park 412-833-0031

Montessori Nursery School 957 Connor Road—412-833-2439

South Hills Community Baptist Church 2400 Old Washington Road—412-833-1313 South Hills Interfaith Ministries 1900 Sleepy Hollow Road, South Park 412-854-9120 South Hills Presbyterian Church in America 110 Hays Road—724-941-3480

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox 123 Gilkeson Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-833-3355

Day Care (Adult)

Beth-El Nursery School 1900 Cochran Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-561-1168

South Hills Assembly of God 2725 Bethel Church Road, Bethel Park 412-835-8900

First Church of Christ Scientist 1100 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-561-1125

New Song Church 3755 Library Road, Castle Shannon 412-341-1293

Ruthfred Lutheran Church Patterson and South Park Roads, Bethel Park 412-835-7140

St. Gregory Byzantine Catholic Church 2005 Mohawk Road—412-835-7800

Bethel Presbyterian Church 2999 Bethel Church Road, Bethel Park 412-835-0405

New Day Assembly of God 701 Circle Drive—724-941-1661

Nursery Schools

Temple Emmanuel 1250 Bower Hill Road—412-279-7600 The Unitarian Universalist Church of the South Hills 1240 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon 412-561-6277 Westminister Presbyterian Church 2040 Washington Road—412-835-6630

Mushroom Family Nursery 1240 Washington Road—412-531-1225 Holy Child Catholic Preschool Bridgeville—412-221-4720 St. David’s Episcopal Nursery McMurray and Hays—724-941-4060 St. Louise de Marillac Nursery School 310 McMurrary Road—412-833-4330 St. Paul’s Episcopal Nursery Washington and Mayfair—412-531-2644 Temple Emmanuel 1250 Bower Hill Road—412-279-7687 Westminster Nursery School 2040 Washington Road—412-835-2906 YMCA 79 McMurray Road—412-833-5600

Day Care (Children) Alphabet Land Day Care Center 3918 Washington Road, McMurray 724-941-4011 Bethel Park Presbyterian Church 2999 Bethel Church Road, Bethel Park 412-835-1043 Christ United Methodist Child Care Center 44 Highland Road, Bethel Park—412-854-4310 Happy Face Day Care Center 3540 Washington Road, McMurray 724-941-4172

KinderCare Learning Center 1040 Clifton Road, Bethel Park—412-831-1888 Magic Years 119 Hidden Valley Road, McMurray 724-941-5569 Westminster Child Care 2040 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair 412-835-9450

If we overlooked your information, or have incorrect information, please write to: Editor, UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241 or email us at brown@twpusc.org. Thank you! 88

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Fall 2002


If you have additional suggestions for the Grapevine, please send them to UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY, 1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241. Upper St. Clair Lost and Found 412-833-1113 Local Live Theaters South Park—412-831-8552

Have some spare time? Read our Happenings Page and volunteer!

Round Hill Farm—412-384-4701,

Little Lake—724-745-6300

South Park Skating Rink— 412-833-1199,

Need chairs caned? Try Sullivan’s 412-882-9337. Going somewhere on the Trolley or bus in Pittsburgh? Call Port Authority of Allegheny County at 412-442-2000.

Great places to walk your dog: Montour Trail located at Cecil-Henderson Road.

Have furniture with broken handles? Contact 18th Century Hardware Co., Inc. at 724-694-2708 or Fax: 724-694-9587. How about a Downtown Walking Tour? Meet at the USX Tower Plaza, near the fountain, on Wednesday at noon through September 30, for a 45 minute tour. Fee: $2-$3. Questions: Mary Lu Denny at 412-471-5808. Have you been to the Frick? 412-371-0600 Delayed at the Pittsburgh International Airport? Check out the art work, work out at the health club, visit the KidsPort, shop, or eat!

Cleaning out the closet— Call Salvation Army (truck pick-up 412-481-7900 or drop off 412-221-0927),

South Park Wave Pool— 412-831-0810 Wildwood Highlands Family Fun Center in North Park— 412-487-5507.

Need a special pair of shoes (ladies heels to athletic shoes) reconditioned? Call Palermo & Co. at 412-781-7477.

Got an old computer? Donate it to Goodwill— 412-481-9005.

Looking for family fun? Try Kennywood—412-461-0500,

South Park Children’s— 412-831-8552 Looking Glass (Children’s)— 724-745-6300

Pink Flamingos— 412-344-7533

It is primarily grass and gravel… much easier on doggie’s footpads on hot summer days than asphalt, which can burn!

Goodwill 412-481-9005 or SHIM 412-854-9120. Great Birthday Cakes and other yummy pastries— Bethel Bakery 412-835-6658 Need cookies? Pati Petite Cookies, 1785 Mayview Road, Upper St. Clair 412-221-0433.

Peterswood Trail in Peters Township and Ohiopyle are also a delight. Gardening questions? Call 724-228-6881. Penn State Cooperative Extension volunteers will answer Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9-11 a.m.

Time for Tea… Sip a variety of delicious teas along with delectable sandwiches and scones at: The Ann Berry’s Tea Room— 724-228-7377

Lost a Pet? Call 412-833-1113 for Animal Control. Want a pet? Call Animal Control, Animal Friends—412-566-2103 or Western PA Humane Society— 412-321-4657.

Still looking for more to do? Check these sites— www.mainstreetusc.org www.twpusc.org

The Johnson House in Cranberry— 724-625-2636

www.uscsd.k12.pa.us

Sewickley’s Victorian Tea Parlour

www.pittsburghpirates.com

the Café at the Frick Museum

www.pittsburghpenguins.com

and the Omni William Penn Hotel.

www.steelers.com

Great ice cream— Sarris Candies and Ice Cream Parlour, Canonsburg, PA 724-745-4042 Bruster’s Ice Cream—412-831-8407 Fall 2002

www.pittsburgh.net

www.washingtonwildthings.com Best Restrooms at South Hills Village Mall— Lazarus’ third floor ladies room Roxy Cafe UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

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Upper St. Clair Lions Club

USC Lions Treasurer Bob Spears, Pittsburgh Vision Services President Dr. Richard Welsh and USC Lions Vice President Paul Rebholz

Upper St. Clair Lions Club presented Pittsburgh Vision

Services (PVS) with a gift of $3,000 at its April 17, 2002, meeting held at Pittsburgh Vision Services’ Bridgeville facility. The meeting featured a presentation by Pat Hauser, Supervisor of the PVS Preschool Vision Screening Program. The screenings help identify serious vision problems in the early stages when medical treatment can prevent vision loss.

The USC Lions Club has been a financial supporter of PVS for many years. Over the last 12 years, USC Lions’ gifts have totaled nearly $50,000. The Club also supports a number of other organizations, including: USC Volunteer Fire Department, South Hills Interfaith Ministry, Leader Dog, Beacon Lodge, Meals-on-Wheels, USC Library for large print books, Radio Information Services, South Hills Hospice, Lions International, Western PA School for Blind Children, Community Food Bank, Pennsylvania Lions Foundation. For information about the USC Lions Club, call Roy Johnson at 412-835-7330. For information about PVS Preschool Vision Screening, call Pat Hauser at 412-682-5600, extension 2283. ■

Help Us Help Others We sell high quality (1.5 mil) vinyl trash bags and corn brooms which are made by the Pittsburgh Vision Services. We deliver to your home or office. Name _____________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________

Ray Wirth, Wes Hurst, Paul Rebholz, Bob Spears and Roy Johnson

__________________________________________________________ Phone_____________________________________________________ 30 Gallon bags (black, 100 per box)

Number of boxes _______ @ $12 ______

33 Gallon bags (black, 100 per box)

Number of boxes _______ @ $13 ______

Tall kitchen bags (white, 100 per box) Number of boxes _______ @ $13 ______ Bag Dispenser

@ $15 ______

Brooms:

Every Saturday - 9 a.m. to Noon Beginning October 12, 2002 Last sale: November 23, 2002 Questions? Call Wes Hurst at 724-941-8329.

House broom __________ @ $15 ______ 18 inch garage broom ___ @ $15 ______

Sales benefit these local organizations:

Snow broom ___________ @ $15 ______

Pittsburgh Vision Services Radio Information Services Leader Dogs Meals on Wheels South Hills Hospice USC Public Library

Total amount $ ________ Please send the order form and make check payable to the

USC Lions Club, Post Office Box 12778, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241-0778. 90

Leaf Bag Sale this Fall at the USC Public Works Building on McLaughlin Run Road

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


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Are you missing out on life because of a non-healing wound?

Being healthy is one of life’s great pleasures, but for people with wounds that won’t heal because of diabetes or other health conditions, sometimes life is less than enjoyable because of the pain, the worries, and other difficulties. Now there’s hope. St. Clair Hospital has brought together a team of wound care specialists -- doctors, nurses, therapists and other medical professionals -- who use the latest, most advanced treatments to help you heal and get back to enjoying life. If you or someone you love has a nonhealing wound, please see your doctor or call the Wound Healing Center at St. Clair Hospital to make an appointment for a consultation with our wound care specialists. Please call (412) 344-6600, ext. HEAL (4325)

The Wound Healing Center at St. Clair Hospital Professional Office Building 1050 Bower Hill Road Suite 107 Pittsburgh, PA 15243

w w w. s t c l a i r. o r g Fall 2002

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UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Magazine Survey The Community Day survey shows that our readers like: Local student news, photographs, knowing and learning about events and clubs, local stories, the extensive information about USC, and they enjoy reading about the cooperation between the School District and the Township in creating a wonderful magazine. Some suggestions for improvement: More pictures of the community, highlight more local people and local homes, coupons for local businesses.

The 15th annual Family Hospice and Palliative Care/Rohrich Lexus Golf Benefit in June was a success raising over $70,000 for services for patients and families. Pictured is Doug Miller of Upper St. Clair, Chairman of the golf benefit and Tom Rohrich from sponsor Rohrich Lexus.

The articles enjoyed: Family trips, Gilfillan history and property, early history of USC, youth traveling abroad, and the Daytrip articles. Readers want to see articles about: Remodeling of local homes, high school sports, park information and plans, activities and plans of the USCVFD, school’s state and national rankings and statistics. Thanks to the participants for filling out our survey! If you have any compliments, suggestions, or articles for the magazine, visit us online at www.twpusc.org/magazine, write to us at UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY,

1820 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241, or call 412-831-9000, extension 232.

We love a Parade—Especially the Community Day Parade. UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY volunteer writer John Kotzuk and Scott Ritchey of Exoticars-Pittsburgh, ride in

style in a Ferrari, while staff members Lynn Dempsey, Suzanne Vernon, Susan Depe, Dawn McQuillen, Cande Day and Harla Brown are left holding the sign! Lucky John!

General Election—Tuesday, November 5, 2002 (Date subject to change pending Pennsylvania legislative action.)

If you have questions regarding the election, registration or absentee ballots, please call the Allegheny County Elections Department at 412-350-4500 or visit www.twpusc.org. The Township Library and the post office have voter registration forms.

Please exercise your right to vote! Ward

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District

Polling Place

Ward

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Township Building, Library Multi-purpose Room, Ground Floor - McLaughlin Run Road

1

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USCVF Department - Morton Road

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3

Fort Couch Middle School, Multi-purpose Room (Miranda Drive Entrance) - Fort Couch Road

1

4

Fort Couch Middle School, Multi-purpose Room (Miranda Drive Entrance) - Fort Couch Road

District

Polling Place

3

1

Recreation Center - McLaughlin Run Road

3

2

St. Louise de Marillac School - McMurray Road

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Recreation Center - McLaughlin Run Road

4

1

USCVF Department - Morton Road

4

2

Boyce Middle School, Gymnasium - Boyce Road

2

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Fort Couch Middle School, Gymnasium (Miranda Drive Entrance) - Fort Couch Road

4

3

Boyce Middle School, Gymnasium - Boyce Road

2

2

Westminster Presbyterian Church - Washington Road

4

4

Boyce Middle School, Gymnasium - Boyce Road

2

3

Fort Couch Middle School, Multi-purpose Room (Miranda Drive Entrance) - Fort Couch Road

5

1

Wesley Institute, Gymnasium - Johnston Road

2

4

Fort Couch Middle School, Gymnasium (Miranda Drive Entrance) - Fort Couch Road

5

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Wesley Institute, Gymnasium - Johnston Road

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Boyce Middle School, Gymnasium - Boyce Road

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


The Township of Upper St. Clair Federal and State Elected Officials

Federal Government Elected Executive Officials President George W. Bush Vice President Dick Cheney Comments Line: 202-456-1111 • Fax: 202-456-2461

Elected Legislative Officials U.S. Senators Website or email: www.senate.gov Arlen Specter - 412-644-3400 • Fax: 412-644-9871 Rick Santorum - 412-562-0533 • Fax: 412-562-4313 House of Representatives Frank R. Mascara–20th District 800-213-5570 • Fax 724-483-9044

Pennsylvania State Government Elected Executive Officials 800-932-0784 www.state.pa.us Governor Mark S. Schweiker Lieutenant Governor Robert C. Jubelirer Auditor General Bob Casey, Jr. State Treasurer Barbara Hafer Attorney General Mike Fisher

Elected Legislative Officials State Senator Tim Murphy 412-344-5583 • Fax: 412-429-5092 37th District State Representative John Maher 412-831-8080 • Fax: 412-886-8083 40th District District Justice Sally A. Edkins 724-941-6724 Information from Facts for Citizens published by the League of Women Voters 412-261-4285.

VOTER REGISTRATION 412-350-4500

Directory of Important Numbers Police/Fire/Ambulance—Emergency

412-833-7500

724-941-7500

Township Offices are open 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday - Friday Administration/ Township Manager ................... 412-831-9000, ext. 216 Community Development ........ 412-831-9000, ext. 501 Finance/Tax .............................. 412-831-9000, ext. 226 Recreation ................................. 412-831-9000, ext. 256 Public Works ............................ 412-831-9000, ext. 271 Public Works Hotline Emergency After Hours .......................... 412-833-7500 Police Administration.............................. 412-833-1113 Animal Control ........... 412-833-7500 or 724-941-7500 Tri-Community South EMS ..................... 412-831-3710 Volunteer Fire Department (Fire Station) 412-835-3339 Library ..................................................... 412-835-5540 Township INFO LINE (24-hour access) . 412-854-5353 For a complete listing of INFO LINE, see page 94.

Frequently Called Numbers Cable 7—Public Access Television .......... 412-831-1030 Sally Edkins, District Justice ...................... 724-941-6724 League Of Women Voters ........................ 412-261-4284 Post Office ............................................ 1-800-275-8777 School District ......................................... 412-833-1600 Tennis Administration ............................. 412-831-7556 Three-Hole Golf Course .......................... 412-831-7556 USC Chamber of Commerce ................... 412-833-9111 Neighborhood Greetings ......................... 724-772-2860

Utilities & Services Adelphia Cable Communications Sales, Service and Billing ................. 1-800-892-7300 Allegheny Power .................................. 1-800-255-3443 Verizon ................................................. 1-800-660-7111 Columbia Gas Company ......................... 412-344-9800 Equitable Gas Company .......................... 412-395-3050 PA American Water Company ................. 412-344-4400 Dominion People’s Gas Company ........ 1-800-764-0111

Registration closes October 7, 2002

Fall 2002

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UPPER ST. CLAIR INFO LINE 412-854-5353 Information on Township of Upper St. Clair services and resources is available 24 hours a day, courtesy of the UPPER ST. CLAIR INFO LINE 412-854-5353. Residents calling the INFO LINE may request messages on a variety of topics ranging from dog licenses (message 7233) to street maps (message 7332) to Tax Office (message 7815) through the use of a touch tone phone. Using the listings below, you may quickly access messages and information of interest to you. Department Directory ........................................................ 7000 General Box ........................................................................ 7100 Administration ................................................................... 7101 Request Township Services ............................................... 7201 Reviewing Public Records ................................................. 7202 Animal Control ................................................................... 7102 Animal Bites ...................................................................... 7230 Animal Control and Kennel .............................................. 7231 Dead Animals on Roadway ............................................... 7232 Dog Licenses ..................................................................... 7233 Lost or Found Dogs .......................................................... 7236 Loud or Barking Dogs ....................................................... 7238 Rabies ................................................................................ 7239 Rodent Control ................................................................. 7240 Wildlife Problems/Animal Traps ....................................... 7241 Building Requirements ....................................................... 7103 Building a House ............................................................... 7270 Building Inspections ......................................................... 7271 Building Permit Requirements .......................................... 7272 Construction Debris .......................................................... 7273 Occupancy Standards ........................................................ 7276 Property Surveys ............................................................... 7277 Swimming Pool/Hot Tub Installation ................................ 7279 Code Enforcement .............................................................. 7104 Brush, Grass, and Weed Control ....................................... 7300 Frequently Requested Chapters of the Township Code ....................................................... 7301 Health and Safety Ordinance ............................................ 7302 House Numbering ............................................................. 7303 Open Storage of “Junk” ....................................................... 7305 Swimming Pool Operation and Safety .............................. 7306 Community Development ................................................... 7105 Demographics/Census Data .............................................. 7331 Street Maps ........................................................................ 7332 District Court ..................................................................... 7106 District Court .................................................................... 7350 Employment ....................................................................... 7108 Applying for Job Vacancies ............................................... 7400 Available Positions ............................................................ 7401 Fire Department ................................................................. 7109 Fire Code ........................................................................... 7430 General Information ......................................................... 7435 Hazardous Materials .......................................................... 7436 Services ............................................................................. 7439 Smoke Detector Program .................................................. 7440 Tours of Fire and Police Facilities ..................................... 7441 General Information .......................................................... 7110 Board of Commissioners ................................................... 7460 Federal & State Elected Officials ...................................... 7463 Township General Information ......................................... 7467 Homeowner Information .................................................... 7112 Garage and Yard Sales ....................................................... 7510 Inactive/Underground Coal Mines/ Mine Subsidence Insurance .............................................. 7511 National Flood Insurance ................................................. 7512 Library Services ................................................................. 7113 Children’s Programs ......................................................... 7540 General Information ......................................................... 7541 Special Children’s Programs .............................................. 7546

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New Residents .................................................................... 7114 General Information ......................................................... 7570 Welcome Wagon ............................................................... 7571 Parks and Recreation ......................................................... 7115 Department of Recreation and Leisure .............................. 7587 General Recreation Programs ............................................ 7588 Golf Course ....................................................................... 7589 Tennis Courts .................................................................... 7598 Tennis Registration ............................................................ 7599 Permit Information ............................................................ 7116 Decks and Patios ............................................................... 7616 Driveway Permits .............................................................. 7618 Electrical Permits .............................................................. 7619 Fences ............................................................................... 7620 Retaining Walls, Driveway Pillars, Basement/ Garage Wall Repair ........................................................... 7622 Storage Sheds .................................................................... 7623 Wood Stoves ...................................................................... 7626 Planning and Zoning .......................................................... 7117 Board Meetings .................................................................. 7640 Signs .................................................................................. 7644 Zoning Code ..................................................................... 7647 Police Department .............................................................. 7118 Department of Police ........................................................ 7675 General Information ......................................................... 7677 On-Street Parking .............................................................. 7680 Public Works ...................................................................... 7119 General Information ......................................................... 7695 Recycling ............................................................................ 7120 Curbside Pickup ................................................................ 7711 Newspaper ........................................................................ 7714 Recycling ........................................................................... 7716 School District ................................................................... 7121 Calendar and Holiday Schedule ........................................ 7730 Challenged Student Protection ......................................... 7731 Education General Health Policy ...................................... 7732 Emergency School Closing Announcement ...................... 7733 Registration of New Students ............................................ 7734 School Attendance ............................................................ 7735 School Board Information ................................................. 7736 Special Education .............................................................. 7737 Transportation to School ................................................... 7738 Elementary School Lunches .............................................. 7739 Middle School Lunches ..................................................... 7740 High School Lunches ........................................................ 7741 Tax and Finance Department ............................................. 7125 Earned Income and Net Profits Tax .................................. 7807 Real Estate Assessment and Appeals ................................. 7812 Real Estate Tax .................................................................. 7813 Sewer User’s Fee Bills ....................................................... 7814 Tax Office .......................................................................... 7815 Voter Information .............................................................. 7126 General Information ......................................................... 7825 Waste Management ............................................................ 7127 Appliance/Furniture Removal ........................................... 7835 Disposal of Motor Oil and Flammable Materials ........................................................ 7837 Disposal of Refrigerators, Freon, CFC’s, etc. .................... 7838 Garbage Collection ........................................................... 7840 Grass Clippings Removal .................................................. 7841 Leaf and Yard Waste Collection ........................................ 7843


Profiles Dr. Wendy L. Stuhldreher, a professor of allied health at Slippery Rock University (SRU), was recently presented the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Wendy also served as convocation speaker linking the events of September 11th to her own life and pointing to the importance of education in today’s world. A registered dietician and member of the SRU faculty since 1993, Wendy earned her doctorate at the University of Pittsburgh. She was nominated for the award by her students, who recognized her commitment to teaching, including her work in creating inspiring classes and her work as a student mentor to both undergraduate and graduate students involved in research. That work has resulted in published papers in the Journal of Consumer and Family Studies and Athletic Therapy Today. Her work with students also resulted in an internship project at the national Conference for Undergraduate Research, and she has served as the Community Health Program coordinator at SRU since 1995. She also was instrumental in creating the Pennsylvania Public Health Association Collegiate Chapter at SRU. ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

The law firm of Tucker Arensberg, P.C. announced that James M. Poerio has joined the firm as a shareholder. Jim is an attorney in the Litigation group. He concentrates his practice on workers’ compensation matters. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Pittsburgh and his law degree from Duquesne University School of Law. Jim and his wife, ZeeAnn, have two children, Anthony, an eighth grader and Dominic, a sixth grader.

School District Information Laura Rosenberger (USCHS ’98 and a valedictorian) was selected from a pool of outstanding undergraduates to be the Student Marshall for Penn State’s College of the Liberal Arts’ spring 2002 graduates. Laura graduated with three bachelor’s degrees, in sociology, women’s studies, and psychology, as well as a minor in information systems and statistical analysis. While maintaining a 4.0 grade point average—earning membership in Phi Beta Kappa and a space on the Dean’s list every semester at the University— Laura also held leadership positions in several campus organizations. During the summers of her college years, Laura participated in international study in the Netherlands on the Holocaust and human rights. She interned at the Feminist Majority Foundation in Washington, D.C., the American Civil Liberties Union’s Pittsburgh office and Pittsburgh’s Office of the Attorney General and traveled throughout Europe, as well as to Israel and Hong Kong. Laura has been an active volunteer in the community of the Centre Region. She is a Pennsylvania State certified Domestic Violence and Rape Counselor and volunteers in that capacity at the Centre County Women’s Resource Center. Her future plans include pursuing a master’s degree at American University’s program in international peace and conflict resolution.

Advertise in UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Magazine Call Dawn at 412-833-1600, extension 2284 or visit www.twpusc.org/magazine

Fall 2002

Continued from page 48

Extracurriculars Sports programs are available at all levels. For information regarding High School sports, call Athletic Director Ted Petersen at 412-833-1600 ext. 2261 or Athletic Office secretary Cindy Storer at 412-833-1600 ext. 2260. Music programs, including chorus, theater, band, as well as cheerleading and dance (see article on page 53) are available at each grade level. For information regarding High School activities, call Activities Director Danny Holzer at 412-833-1600 ext. 2263, or Assistant Activities Director Sheila Bartlett at 412-833-1600 ext. 2264. Also, see page 53 for a list of High School activities. For information regarding elementary and middle school activities, call your building’s school principal. Rent School Gyms, Panther Stadium and the Theatre School gyms are often available for rent. For High School gym rental contact Cindy Storer at 412-833-1600, ext. 2260. For rental of arts wing rooms, including the theatre, call James Bennett at 412-833-1600, ext. 2353. For all other facility rentals or for information, call Cheryl Ellison at Central Office—412-833-1600, ext. 2202. Kennywood Day (Community-Wide Tradition) Kennywood Day, originally sponsored by the PTA Council for school age children, is now truly a communitywide tradition. Each June after the last day of school all Upper St. Clair residents are invited to participate in a day at Kennywood Park. Discount tickets are sold at the schools and at Central Office on designated days during the last few weeks of the school year. Bus transportation is available from the School District. Breaking tradition, to accomodate the late 2002-03 school year, Kennywood Day is planned for Monday, June 16. School remains in session until Tuesday, June 24. For information, contact your PTA representative or Cheryl Ellison at 412-833-1600 ext. 2202. ■

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Meet the USC Volunteer Firefighters Continued from page 19

Dave Kish, the department’s vice-president, has been a firefighter for 11 years: six with USCVFD and five with Sturgeon VFD. He and his wife Terry have two daughters, Nicole and Kristen. Dave earned a BA from West Virginia University and a diploma in nursing from OVGH School of Nursing. He is employed as chief flight nurse for Life Flight at the West Penn/Allegheny General Health System. His hobbies include golfing, traveling, computers and attending his daughters’ swim meets.

John Lekse, a captain for the department, has been with USCVFD for six years. When you add his time as a volunteer with Broughton VFD, he’s been a firefighter for 17 years! He and his wife Sue have two children—Jonathan and Tori. John, a professional engineer, works as a construction manager. He has a BS in Civil Engineering. When he has free time, John is interested in carpentry and steam engines.

Jim Smearman has been with the USCVFD for three years. This USC High School graduate works as an Emergency Medical Technician and at Outback Steakhouse. Working two jobs and volunteering as a firefighter doesn’t leave much free time, but Jim enjoys golf, swimming and baseball whenever he gets some downtime.

Doug Heckman has been with the USCVFD for three years. An Upper St. Clair graduate, Doug has an Associates Degree in Criminal Justice. He is a first responder, and has Act 120 certification at the Allegheny County Police Academy. Doug is a recent graduate of the Police Academy.

John W. Doebler has been with the USCVFD for six years and is recording secretary for the department. John is a project manager for an engineering and surveying firm. His son Zachary and their pug dog keep him busy, but in his spare time he enjoys weight training and Tang Soo Do Karate.

Mike Thomas, president of the USCVFD board of directors, has been with the department for four years. He and his wife Tracey are the parents of Nicholaus and Noah, and at the time this went to print, awaiting the arrival of the newest member of their family around the end of June. A graduate of Waynesburg College with a BSBA in Business Management, Mike is employed as a purchasing agent with A & L, Inc. Mike’s hobbies include skiing, whitewater rafting, biking and his kids!

Upper St. Clair Volunteer Fire Department For Emergencies call: 412-833-7500 or 724-941-7500 The Township is served by a volunteer fire department. With financial assistance from the Township, the Volunteer Fire Department provides fire protection services and fire prevention efforts within the community. Each spring, an Annual Fund Drive is held to benefit the Volunteer Fire Department. 96

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Fall 2002

Andy Murphy has been with the USCVFD for 12 years. A 1991 graduate of USC High School, Andy attended All State Career for Tractor Trailers and the Western Pennsylvania Training Academy for Equipment Operators. He is a tunnel maintainer for the Pittsburgh Tunnel District with PENN-DOT. In his spare time, Andy enjoys fishing and volleyball.


Mike Russell has been a firefighter with the USCVFD for about five months. Mike and his wife Renee have three children—Brittney, Mikey and Scott. Mike has a BA in Economics and Political Science from Grove City College and an MBA from Waynesburg College. He is employed as a Physician Practice Consultant with Serono, Inc., a bio-tech company. In his free time, Mike is involved with his kids sporting activities and enjoys golf, reading and freestyle Jui-Jitsu. ■

One of the newer members of the department is C.J.’s brother, Joe Pascarella. The USC graduate has been with the department for one year. Joe works as a landscaper, and enjoys water skiing, snow skiing and college.

Another new member of the USCVFD is Darren Gilbert, who has been a firefighter for one year. Darren and his wife Patti are the parents of four children—Emily, Brendan, Christopher and Michael. Darren served with the US Navy and is employed as U.S. Sales Manager for Epic Plant Company. In his spare time, Darren enjoys golf and woodworking. A ten year member of the USCVFD, Dave Ickes also had five years experience with the Keating VFD in the North Hills. Dave served two years in the Army and four years in the Army Reserve. He is employed as an auto technician. Dave and his wife Mary-Jo have two cats— Stormy and Dusty—and one dog Georgia Girl.

A 1999 USC High School graduate, C.J. Pascarella has been with the USCVFD for three years. C.J. is a student at Penn State, majoring in accounting with a minor in MIS. During warmer weather he enjoys waterskiing, wakeboarding, and boating; when the snow flies, he hits the slopes to ski or snowboard! USC High School graduate Shannon Fife has also been with the USCVFD for three years. Shannon attends Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, where she is on the EC Board of Zeta Tau Alpha fraternity. She also works as a server at Outback Steakhouse.

Dan Iracki has been with the USCVFD for three years. He is currently a student at Duquesne University, and plans to enter Duquesne’s Law School in the fall of 2003. Dan is on the Duquesne football team. His hobbies and interests are rock climbing and skydiving.

Justin Willott has 11 years of firefighting experience—eight with USCVFD and three with Bridgeville VFD. He and his wife Melissa recently celebrated the birth of their first child. Justin earned his BS in Business from the University of Pittsburgh and an MBA from Waynesburg College. He is employed as an Operations Manager for Gega Corporation. In his spare time (which is probably a lot less since the baby’s arrival!) Justin enjoys sailing and skiing.

WE NEED YOUR HELP! I am interested in serving my community through the Upper St. Clair Volunteer Fire Department. I am interested in the following areas: ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

Fire Fighting Rescue Support/Helpers Fire Prevention Program Presenter Salvage and Overhaul Babysitting

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

Safety Pump Operations Communication Fund Raising Secretarial/Filing

Name ___________________________________________________________________ Dennis Herisko has been with the USCVFD for three years. He and his wife Camellia have two daughters—Olivia and Alexandra. Dennis attended the University of Pittsburgh and is employed as a loan closer. His hobby is videotaping.

Address __________________________________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________________________________ Please return to USCVFD, P.O. Box 12583, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241 or call 412-835-0660 for more information. THANK YOU! Fall 2002

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Dr. Pope’s Graduation Speech

School Board Response

Continued from page 27

be hundreds of people out there with your degree—thousands doing what you want to do for a living. But you will be the only person alive who has sole custody of your life. Your particular life—not just your life at a desk, or your life in a car, or at the computer, not just the life of your minds, but the life of your heart!” The challenges for you are just beginning, but my, what practice you have had for these past thirteen years! Meryl Streep, the Oscar winning actress, when asked at a commencement speech what life was like after graduation responded, “You’re leaving college now, and going out into real life. And you have to realize that real life is not like college. Real life is like high school.” If Meryl Streep is right you have already tasted, heard and felt the real world. You’ve been living in the real world for eighteen years or more. The difference as Bill Cosby said to the graduates at UConn, “This is stupid. You’ve seen the real world, been out there. You just keep coming back. The truth is responsibility. You can’t blame anyone.” There, that’s it. You are responsible for your own story. That story will include

moments of happiness and sorrow, of triumph and defeat, of truth and integrity and the disappointment we feel when we fail to live up to our own values. Regardless, your personal integrity is the “one true measure of the quality of your character.” Listen, laugh, be kind and humble and if you are determined to see into the future, go to the movies and watch Star Wars. To the Class of 2002, education begins at your mother’s knee, and every word spoken within the hearing of little children is inclined toward the formation of character. Let me close with the advice of John Wesley, an 18th century clergyman: “Do all the good you can, By all the means you can, In all the ways you can, In all the places you can, At all the times you can, To all the people you can, As long as you ever can.” May God always bless you, the Class of 2002. Thank you. ■

Continued from page 28

Today’s speeches have included many thoughtful quotes. In closing, let’s add another—a quote that must set the tone for this class. Remember the truly heroic passengers who forced Flight 93 to crash near Somerset on September 11, just nine months ago? Think of what those heroes did. They had three data points and a few brief minutes to recognize and react to a devastating threat. Our government is now convinced that plane was headed for the White House. Those heroes on board believed they were the only answer to that threat. So what did they say when they took their bold action? They roared, “Let’s roll!” This evening your moms and your dads, your grandmothers and your grandfathers, your entire family, your teachers, and everyone here in Upper St. Clair want you to recognize in your bright young minds and in your God-given souls that you also need to do honorable brave things in your life. Everyday we want you to wake up and say, “I can do it—We can do it—Let’s roll!” ■

The Big Ten Continued from page 43

personal feelings aside. Don’t waste time or energy thinking about the opposing coach—forget him. You cannot control when he makes substitutions or when he tries for a late touchdown with a 40-point lead. All you can do is try to make your team better. Don’t play the game in the newspapers. You have one assignment—teach your team to advance, defend and kick. Period.

assistant coaches say, that after a Wednesday practice that we have done all we can do and now it’s up to the players. Keep studying and working until you find one more way to help your kids be successful.

8. Fundamentals win football games As a coach, you must get your priorities in order. The first and most important objective is to begin teaching the fundamentals of blocking and tackling. You don’t have to be in pads to teach stance and proper steps. Then work on speed, agility, catching, kicking, passing and all the mechanics of playing the game. The fundamentals and the foundation must come first. The last thing you should do is buy new uniforms. Improve the “product” first, then dress it up. You win by being fundamentally sound—first, last and always.

10. Attack on a broad spectrum Use all of your talents. Find the things your players can do and let them be a part of the process. Then use the entire field. Spread the defense and never become too predictable. Take some calculated risks, making sure the players are confident. You probably have more assets than you realize. General George Patton, Jr. said it best, “Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by men. It is the spirit of the men who follow and of the man who leads that gains the victory.” Many thanks to the Pennsylvania Scholastic Football Coaches Association for honoring me as the head coach of the 1993 Big 33 football team, and for placing me in the PSFCA Hall of Fame in 1998. ■

9. Always study films and plan a strategy In coaching and teaching, as in life, there is always something to do. I continually find something new when I watch more tapes. I never put the game plan to rest. If there is something that can be adjusted, even right before the kickoff, I will do it if the players are comfortable with the change. I have never said, nor do any of my

Editor’s note: Jim recently wrote this article for the Pennsylvania Scholastic Football Coaches Association Journal. Simply substitute the words “teacher and student” or “parent and child” for “coach and player” and we see how this article can bring personal meaning. Jim reminds us to work for the good of the group always being the ultimate team player, even when performing in a coach’s role.

98

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

Fall 2002


Fall 2002

UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY

99


Street Index for the Township of Upper St. Clair ADAMS DRIVE .............................. J4 FIELDMONT DRIVE ...................... I4 AETNA DRIVE ............................... E6 FIFE DRIVE ................................... F10-F11 ALAMO DRIVE .............................. F12-G12 FIRSTON CIRCLE .......................... D4 ALGONQUIN ROAD ...................... I7 FOREST BROOK DRIVE ................ F11 ALJO DRIVE ................................. H2-I2 FORT COUCH ROAD ..................... H2-J4 ALLENCLAIR CIRCLE ................... E5 FOX CHASE LANE ......................... G2-H2 ALLISON DRIVE ........................... F3-G3 FOX RUN CIRCLE ......................... E5 ALTHERTON DRIVE ...................... I8 FRANKLIN DRIVE ......................... E12-E13 AMESBURY DRIVE ....................... H8-H9 FREDERICK DRIVE ....................... E11-F11 APACHE ROAD ............................. I7 GALAXY CIRCLE ........................... C5 APPLETREE DRIVE ....................... F10 GAYWOOD CIRCLE ....................... I3-I4 ASHLAWN DRIVE ......................... E8-E9 GERRIE DRIVE ............................. E12-F13 ASHLEY CIRCLE ........................... F2 GIANT OAKS DRIVE ..................... E8-E10 ASHWOOD CIRCLE ...................... E5 GLENCAIRN CIRCLE ..................... H3 ASTER CIRCLE ............................. C4 GLENDALE DRIVE ........................ H7-G8 ASTRONAUT CIRCLE .................... C6 GLENWOOD ROAD ....................... D8-E8 BARTLEY ROAD ........................... J3-J4 GLOMIN DRIVE ............................ H3-I3 BERKSHIRE DRIVE ....................... F9-G8 GLOUCESTER DRIVE .................... E11-D12 BETHEL CHURCH ROAD ............... H8-I8 GOLFVIEW DRIVE ........................ E7-E8 BILLINGS DRIVE .......................... D4 GREENFIELD DRIVE ..................... C11 BINGHAM DRIVE .......................... C10-C11 GREY MILL DRIVE ....................... E9-E10 BLACKHAWK TRAIL ..................... I7 GREYSTONE DRIVE ...................... E5 BLAIRMONT DRIVE ...................... H5-H6 HACIENDA DRIVE ......................... F10 BONVUE DRIVE ............................ G1 HARDY DRIVE .............................. F11 BOWER HILL ROAD ..................... E1-F1 HARROGATE ROAD ...................... I2-H3 BOXFIELD ROAD .......................... H4-I4 HARROW ROAD ........................... G9-H9 BOYCE ROAD ............................... A10-E11 HARVESTER CIRCLE .................... H2 BOYCE PLAZA ROAD .................... B9-B10 HASTINGS MILL ROAD ................ E7-F8 BOYCE SCHOOL ROAD ................. D9-E10 HATHAWAY LANE ......................... G6-F7 BRIDGE STREET ........................... I1-I2 HAYS ROAD .................................. E12-G13 BROADLAWN DRIVE .................... F9-G9 HEARTWOOD DRIVE .................... F8-F9 BROOKDALE DRIVE ..................... H7-I7 HEMPSTEAD LANE ....................... I3-J3 BROOKHAVEN LANE .................... F11 HIDDEN TIMBER DRIVE ............... E6-E7 BROOKSIDE BOULEVARD ............ H6-I7 HIDDEN VALLEY DRIVE ............... B10 BYRNWICK DRIVE ........................ G1 HIGH KNOLLS DRIVE ................... E6 CADBERRY COURT ...................... J3 HIGH OAK COURT ........................ D6-E6 CANDLEWOOD DRIVE .................. C11-D11 HIGH SIERRA CIRCLE .................. F12-G12 CARMELITA DRIVE ....................... F13 HIGHGATE ROAD .......................... H5 CARMELL DRIVE .......................... F12-G12 HIGHVIEW DRIVE ......................... H9 CARRIAGE LANE .......................... F10 HOLLOW TREE DRIVE .................. C11-D12 CASA DRIVE ................................. F12 HOLLYDALE CIRCLE ..................... G13 CATALINA DRIVE .......................... H10 HOLLYDALE DRIVE ...................... G13 CEDARVUE DRIVE ........................ D11-E11 HOWARD DRIVE .......................... J3-J4 CHAPELWOOD DRIVE .................. E8-E9 HUNTERS PATH LANE .................. G2 CHARTWELL DRIVE ..................... E4 HUNTINGTON DRIVE .................... F9-F10 CHELSEA COURT ......................... J3 HYCROFT DRIVE .......................... H5-H6 CHEROKEE ROAD ......................... I6 IVANHOE ROAD ............................ H6-I7 CIRCLE DRIVE .............................. D12 IVYDALE DRIVE ............................ D10-D11 CLAIR DRIVE ................................ I2-J4 JENKINS DRIVE ............................ E7 CLAIRMONT DRIVE ...................... E4-F6 JOHNSTON ROAD ........................ E10-H10 CLEARVIEW DRIVE ...................... I3 KEIFER STREET ............................ J2-J3 COCHISE DRIVE ........................... H7 KENT DRIVE ................................. H3-I4 COMANCHE ROAD ....................... I6-I7 KINGS LANE ................................. F10-G10 CONEWANTA ROAD ..................... I7 LAMAR ROAD .............................. I6-H7 COOK SCHOOL ROAD .................. D2-G3 LAMBETH DRIVE .......................... G7-H9 CORAL DRIVE .............................. H9-H10 LAMSON CIRCLE .......................... D4-E4 CORTELAND DRIVE ...................... F10-G11 LANGPORT DRIVE ........................ C5 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE ................ G8-G9 LARCH CIRCLE ............................. E11 CRAMDEN ROAD .......................... G9-H9 LAREDO DRIVE ............................ G12-G13 CREMONA DRIVE ......................... H8 LATTIDOME DRIVE ....................... E8-D9 CREOLE CIRCLE ........................... I7 LESNETT ROAD ............................ C4-F5 CYNTHIA LANE ............................. H11 LINCOLN DRIVE ........................... E12-F13 CYPRESS DRIVE .......................... H9-I9 LINDENWOOD DRIVE ................... F10-F12 DEARMENT PARKWAY ................. J3 LITTLE MEADOW ROAD ............... H2-H3 DEEP WOOD DRIVE ..................... E3-E4 LOCHLIN DRIVE ........................... G1 DEER MEADOW DRIVE ................ G6-H6 LOCUST DRIVE ............................ F13 DEVONWOOD DRIVE .................... G5-H6 LOCUST LANE .............................. I2-J4 DIABLO DRIVE ............................. G12-G13 LONG DRIVE ................................ I2-J4 DOMINION COURT ....................... F2 LORLITA LANE ............................. H12-G13 DOMINION DRIVE ........................ F2-F3 MANOR DRIVE ............................. D8-E8 DOMINION HEIGHTS .................... F3 MANORDALE ROAD ..................... H3-I4 DRAKE ROAD ............................... I8-I9 MAPLE LANE ................................ B9-B10 EDGEWOOD DRIVE ...................... G10-G11 MARSHFIELD DRIVE .................... E12-F12 ENGELWOOD DRIVE .................... E6-E7 MARWOOD DRIVE ....................... H8 ETON ROAD .................................. G9 MARYLAND DRIVE ....................... F9-G9 EWING CIRCLE ............................. F6 MAYVIEW ROAD .......................... C4-B7 FAIRGREEN DRIVE ....................... D11-E10 MCLAUGHLIN RUN ROAD ............ D2-H7 FAIRWAY CIRCLE ......................... H8 MCMILLAN ROAD ........................ F5-H2 FERNRIDGE DRIVE ....................... D4 MCMURRAY ROAD ...................... G10-H7 FIELDGATE DRIVE ........................ I4-I5 MEADOWCREST DRIVE ............... I3-I4 100 UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Fall 2002

MEADOWMONT DRIVE ................ E5 MELROSE PLACE ......................... H9-I9 MERRYOAK LANE ........................ D11 MESA CIRCLE .............................. F12 METEOR CIRCLE .......................... C5 MILL GROVE ROAD ...................... F6-F7 MILLWOOD DRIVE ....................... C10 MINGO ROAD ............................... I6-I7 MIRANDA ROAD .......................... H3-I3 MITCHELL DRIVE ......................... J3 MOHAWK DRIVE .......................... H7-I6 MONTCLAIR DRIVE ...................... D4-E4 MONTEREY DRIVE ....................... F12-G11 MOON RIDGE DRIVE .................... C6-D6 MORROW ROAD .......................... C5-G6 MORTON ROAD ............................ C11-E7 MOYNELLE DRIVE ........................ G1 MURDSTONE ROAD ..................... G6-H3 MYRNA DRIVE ............................. H10 NAVAJO ROAD ............................. I6 NORSEN DRIVE ............................ G1 NORTH HIGHLAND ROAD ............ J4-K3 NORTH OLD MEADOW ROAD ...... D3-E4 NORTHGATE DRIVE ...................... E4-F5 NORTON ROAD ............................ G9-G10 OAK LEDGE COURT ...................... D6 OAK PARK COURT ........................ C5 OAKLAWN DRIVE ......................... G10-G12 OLD BOYCE ROAD ....................... B10 OLD LESNETT ROAD .................... C4-D4 OLD MEADOW ROAD ................... C4-D4 OLD WASHINGTON ROAD ........... E12-H7 ORCHARD DRIVE ......................... F10 ORR ROAD ................................... G4-I5 OUTLOOK DRIVE .......................... G5-G6 OXFORD PLACE ............................ F3 PAINTERS DRIVE ......................... H1 PAINTERS RUN ROAD .................. F1-H2 PARAGON PLACE ......................... F3 PARTRIDGE DRIVE ....................... E9-E10 PARTRIDGE RUN ROAD ............... E9 PATTON DRIVE ............................. J3 PETERSON PLACE ........................ F2 PHEASANT CIRCLE ...................... E3 PHILLIP DRIVE ............................. E11 PHILLIPS DRIVE .......................... J3-J4 PHILLIPS WAY ............................. J3-J4 PINEHAVEN DRIVE ....................... H10 PINEHURST DRIVE ...................... F4-F5 PINETREE DRIVE .......................... D10-D12 PINEVIEW DRIVE ......................... F4 PLEASANTVUE CIRCLE ................ H8 POLARIS CIRCLE ......................... C6 PONOKA ROAD ............................ H7-I7 QUAIL HILL ROAD ........................ D10-D11 QUIGG DRIVE ............................... I2 RAMADA DRIVE ........................... G13 RED MILL DRIVE .......................... E9-E10 REDFERN DRIVE .......................... C11-D10 REDPATH TRAIL ........................... I7 RHETT DRIVE ............................... F2 RIDGEWOOD ROAD ..................... D8-E7 RIO CIRCLE .................................. G12 ROBB HOLLOW ROAD ................. H1 ROBSON CIRCLE .......................... F3-G3 ROLLING MEADOW CIRCLE ......... D4 ROLLING MEADOW ROAD ........... D4-D5 ROSE CIRCLE ............................... D4 ROSE DRIVE ................................. E12 ROSSMOOR DRIVE ...................... F11-F12 ROSTRON DRIVE ......................... D9 ROYANNA DRIVE .......................... J3 RUTHFRED DRIVE ........................ H9-I9 RUTLEDGE DRIVE ........................ C11 SALEM DRIVE .............................. G4-H4 SANDHURST ROAD ...................... G9 SATELLITE CIRCLE ....................... C6 SAXONY DRIVE ............................ G8-G9 SCARLETT DRIVE ......................... F1-F2 SCENERY RIDGE DRIVE ............... D7-E7

SEEGAR CIRCLE ........................... I3 SEEGAR DRIVE ............................ G3 SEEGAR ROAD ............................. G3-I3 SEQUOIA DRIVE ........................... E5 SHAWNEE ROAD .......................... I6 SHENANDOAH DRIVE .................. D8-D9 SHERBROOK DRIVE ..................... E4 SHIRE LANE ................................. F1-G1 SIDGEFIELD LANE ........................ F6 SIESTA DRIVE .............................. F12-G12 SILLVIEW DRIVE .......................... G1 SKENDER DRIVE .......................... I2 SKY RIDGE DRIVE ........................ C6-D6 SKYVIEW DRIVE .......................... E13 SOMERVILLE DRIVE .................... H1 SOUTHAMPTON DRIVE ................ E6 SOUTHERN HILANDS DRIVE ....... G8 SOUTHGATE DRIVE ...................... E5-F4 SOUTHRIDGE DRIVE .................... H10-H11 SOUTHVUE DRIVE ........................ F10-G11 SOUTHWICK DRIVE ..................... C5 SOUTHWOOD DRIVE .................... E6-E7 SPRINGMEADOW DRIVE ............. I4-I5 SPRINGMONT DRIVE ................... I4-I5 STAR RIDGE ROAD ...................... C5-D6 SUN RIDGE ROAD ........................ C5-D6 SUNNYFIELD DRIVE ..................... E11-E12 SURREY LANE .............................. E9 SWANSON LANE .......................... F6 TALL TREES DRIVE ...................... D5-E6 TAPER DRIVE ............................... F3-G4 TERPHIN DRIVE ........................... F3-G3 TERRIE DRIVE .............................. G3 THAMES PLACE ........................... G9 THORNTREE DRIVE ...................... D11-E11 THORNWICK DRIVE ..................... G1-G2 THOUSAND OAKS DRIVE ............. E12 TIER DRIVE .................................. G3-G4 TIFFANY CIRCLE ........................... F5 TIFFANY DRIVE ............................ E4-E5 TIFFANY LANE .............................. F5 TIFFANY RIDGE ............................ F5 TILTON DRIVE .............................. F4-G4 TIMBERWOOD DRIVE .................. E3 TOPSFIELD ROAD ........................ H4 TRAGONE DRIVE .......................... G3-G4 TROLIST DRIVE ............................ F4-G4 TROTWOOD CIRCLE .................... G5 TROTWOOD DRIVE ...................... G5-H5 TROTWOOD RIDGE ROAD ........... H2-H3 TROTWOOD WEST DRIVE ............ G3-H3 TRUXTON DRIVE .......................... G6-H6 TURNBERRY DRIVE ..................... C11-D11 TUSCANY DRIVE .......................... H2 TYBURN DRIVE ............................ G3-G4 TYRIS DRIVE ................................ G3 UPPER ROAD ............................... I1-I2 UPPER ST. CLAIR DRIVE .............. G3 VALLEY COURT ............................ F6-F7 VILLAGE COURT .......................... F8-G8 VILLAGE DRIVE ............................ I5-I6 WALTHER DRIVE .......................... H7-I8 WARWICK DRIVE ......................... G4-I4 WASHINGTON ROAD ................... D12-K4 WATERFORD COURT .................... E2-F2 WATTERSON COURT…………...G2-H2 WELLINGTON DRIVE .................... F4 WEST GATE DRIVE ....................... H2 WESTON DRIVE ........................... F9-G10 WILLIAMSBURG CIRCLE ............. E11-E12 WILLOWBROOK ROAD ................ G9-G11 WILLOWBROOK ROAD EXT ......... G12-H11 WILTSHIRE DRIVE ....................... H8-H9 WINDSOR COURT ........................ F4 WOODLANDS CIRCLE .................. F4-F5 WOODLAWN COURT .................... D6 WOODSDALE DRIVE .................... E8 YORK ROAD ................................. G9 ZENITH COURT ............................ F3

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FALL 2002  

Fall 2002 issue of UPPER ST. CLAIR TODAY Magazine.

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