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Winter 2012

F A M I L Y

TAKING THE LEAD GLORYA KAUFMAN ESTABLISHES A NEW SCHOOL OF DANCE AT USC


Where

Trojan Tradition meets Latino Culture Be part of their success. Contribute to the legacy. Join us today in The Campaign for USC.

USC Latino Alumni Association Gabriela Martinez (B.S. Business Administration ’11) and Alexandra Ruelas (B.A. Neuroscience ’10, Master of Arts in Teaching ’11)

Get involved. Call us at (213) 740-4735.

latinoalumni@usc.edu  www.usc.edu/latinoalumni


inside [ FEATURES ]

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Shall We Dance?

Soaring Strings

Onward in Online Ed

Partisan Peacemaker

By Cristy Lytal

By Diane Krieger

By Susan L. Wampler

By Diane Krieger

Glorya Kaufman’s landmark gift creates a new dance school at USC.

A hiring boom in superstar string faculty propels USC Thornton to new heights.

The university pioneers online degree programs that maintain the academic rigor and quality of a USC education.

USC’s Schwarzenegger Institute gathered political, environmental and entertainment innovators at its inaugural symposium.

22 Campus Catalysts: Real-Time Economist

By Diane Krieger

Number-cruncher, Middle East expert, software developer and scholar par excellence, M. Hashem Pesaran makes economics interesting. (No, really.)

28 Listen Up

By Allison Engel

USC’s investment in Bay Area classical radio pleases fans and strengthens the university’s ties to the region.

03 President’s Page

26 Field of Champions

Continuing to build on USC’s already-stellar foundation in the arts

Saluting USC Olympians of the 2012 London Games

05 Media Bytes

32 Keck Medical Center of USC

USC in the news and the social mediasphere

New, advanced ways to fight prostate cancer at the USC Institute of Urology

06 Trojan Beat

36 Family Ties

A new home for neuroscience, a triple bachelor’s degree and more

News from the USC Alumni Association

09 Support Report

Who’s doing what and where

42 Class Notes

Contributions to music, undergraduate education, student scholarships and athletics

On the cover: Arts philanthropist Glorya Kaufman Photo courtesy of the Glorya Kaufman Dance Foundation U S C T R O JA N FA M I LY M AG A Z I N E

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Te quarterly magazine of the University of Southern California

A HISTORIC GIFT CREATES THE USC GLORYA KAUFMAN SCHOOL OF DANCE ANNOUNCING A NEW SCHOOL OF DANCE AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE G LORYA K A U F M A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L D A N C E C E N T E R

INTERIM EDITOR

Minne Ho SENIOR EDITOR

Diane Krieger FEATURES EDITOR

Robin Heffler MANAGING EDITOR

Mary Modina

ART DIRECTOR

Sheharazad P. Fleming DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

Russell Ono Dongyi Wu

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Orli Belman Robert Bradford Katie Dunham Allison Engel Eliza Gallo Andrew Good Amy Hamaker Timothy O. Knight Ross M. Levine Maya Meinert Annette Moore Liz Segal Lauren Walser Susan L. Wampler Suzanne Wu ADVERTISING MANAGER

Mary Modina | modina@usc.edu CIRCULATION MANAGER

Vickie Kebler

USC Trojan Family Magazine 3434 South Grand Avenue CAL 140, First Floor Los Angeles, CA 90089-2818 magazines@usc.edu | (213) 740-2684 USC Trojan Family Magazine (ISSN 87507927) is published four times a year, in March, June, September and December, by USC University Communications.

MOVING? Submit your updated mailing

Glorya Kaufman stands among the nation’s foremost patrons of the arts. With her visionary gift, USC will offer students an exceptional education in dance, enhanced by the broad offerings of the university in digital technology and the humanities. Visit kaufman.usc.edu

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address at tfm.usc.edu/subscribe


president's page BY C. L. MAX NIKIAS

Among major research universities, USC claims a number of special distinctions, but there is one I take particular pride in sharing: our singular strength in the arts. No other university pairs a world-class cinema school with a world-class engineering school, or a top-notch music school with a top-notch medical school.

P H OTO B Y S T E V E C O H N

USC Kaufman’s inaugural Dean Robert Cutietta with philanthropist Glorya Kaufman and President C. L. Max Nikias

No other university offers conservatory-level instruction, along with opportunities to pursue cutting-edge research with professors. For students who seek a balanced education — one that blends the sciences and engineering with the arts and humanities — USC is truly in a league of its own. The university is now home to its sixth art school: the USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance. Ms. Kaufman’s gift — the single largest individual gift in the history of dance in the United States — will fund the initial construction of the school’s primary facility, which will be named the Glorya Kaufman International Dance Center. It will also create an endowment to support the school’s programs and faculty, as well as student recruitment and scholarships. The school will offer classes in a broad range of dance performance, including classical ballet, and modern, jazz and world dance. The Kaufman School of Dance — scheduled to open in fall 2015 — completes USC’s dynamic portfolio of visual and performing arts programs, as it assumes its place alongside our School of Architecture, School of Cinematic Arts, School of Dramatic Arts, Roski School of Fine Arts and Thornton School of Music. USC currently has more than 3,600 undergraduates majoring in the arts, with nearly 1,300 students pursuing graduate degrees in the arts. Further, more than 1,000 students carry a minor in the arts. USC has more top students in the arts and humanities than the world’s leading universities and conservatories. The university offers impressively diverse academic arts programs, including an outstanding department of art history, housed in our Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sci-

ences. Taken together, this speaks to the exceptional vibrancy of the arts at USC. I want to add that this vibrancy extends well beyond formal instruction. Visions and Voices, for example, enlivens our campuses throughout the year. Its events, which range from discussions with venerated writers to screenings of thought-provoking films, complement classroom instruction, enhancing our students’ education, regardless of their majors. These events always include a reflective component, while encouraging students to develop a deep, lifelong appreciation for the arts. The 100-plus events of Visions and Voices stand alongside scores more that are organized by other units at the university, including the USC Fisher Museum of Art, the USC Libraries and USC Spectrum. The President’s Distinguished Artist and Lecture Series also brings illustrious visitors to our campuses throughout the year. In addition to these events, USC is home to KUSC, the largest classical public radio station in the nation. KUSC offers classical music and arts programming to listeners throughout southern and northern California, as well as worldwide through its live stream on the Web. USC also recently launched an International Artist Fellowship Program, which brings emerging artists from other countries to our campuses, allowing them to pursue graduate studies and focus on producing new work. At the same time, they interact with our community, allowing for productive exchanges and collaborations with our students and faculty. These international artists have shown particular promise, and stand at the dawn of what will surely be highly creative careers. As USC continues to build on its already-stellar foundation in the arts, the creation of the Kaufman School of Dance represents a significant step forward, as well as a landmark moment in the university’s history. Our ambition is to make the USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance the most elite on the West Coast and in the Pacific Rim. ●

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Global Changes For Humanity          

Please join the University of Southern California at the 2013 USC Global Conference in Seoul, Korea. The conference will reflect on the interrelated themes of science, technology and health; global business, international stability and the rule of law; and education, the arts and cultural institutions. Join USC experts in these fields and special keynote speaker Arnold Schwarzenegger, 38th Governor of California and Governor Downey Professor of State and Global Policy at USC, for an exciting and engaging event.

2013 USC Global Conference “Global Challenges For Humanity�          All speakers are subject to change without notice.

To register and learn about sponsorship opportunities visit globalconference2013.usc.edu


media bytes FACULTY SOUND BYTES “Separation of church and state is a legal concept that is enshrined in the First Amendment. But it is a mistake to think that just because legally we don’t allow church and state to commingle that we don’t culturally see the two as being bound together. Culturally, most people do feel as if God should be part of national conversations.”

Social Trojans

D I A N E W I N S T O N — USC Annenberg UT-San Diego bit.ly/debateovergod

ALL EYES turned to the skies on Sept. 21, as the space shuttle Endeavor made its final flight into Los Angeles. Trojans captured the event in videos and photos — including this dramatic image of the Endeavor against the globe atop Von KleinSmid Center tower — and spread the word on social media.

TWEET! @tanya_says: Everyone coming to a standstill between classes @USCedu to #spottheshuttle

FACEBOOK “Te Endeavor giving USC a wave!”

MALIE COLLINS

“... being four minutes late to class was worth it!”

“Public opinion, facilitated by gossiping, always guides the (social) band’s decision process, and fear of gossip all by itself serves as a preemptive social deterrent because most people are so sensitive about their reputations.” C H R I S T O P H E R B O E H M — USC Dornsife Slate bit.ly/fearofgossip

ALLEGR A CARMAN

“Tat moment when you’re an astronautical engineering major but miss getting to see Endeavor fly right over your head.” S H I VA M D E S A I

“Walk Your Horse, Please” Thanks to student Ari Oh for snapping this photo of Traveler trotting across campus.

“[With regard to circadian rhythms] we are not only what we eat, we are when we eat.” S T E V E A . K AY — USC Dornsife, Dean Te Wall Street Journal bit.ly/thepeaktime

“Retirement is a difficult issue and doesn’t have a positive connotation, perhaps especially so in our culture.” WA R R E N B E N N I S — USC Marshall Bloomberg Businessweek bit.ly/BillGeorge

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trojan beat

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Brain and Creativity

most brilliant young scientists of the year include USC Dornsife biophysicist Moh El-Naggar, according to Popular Science magazine BOOKISH BOYS

Artful Brainpower The new home for neuroscience research at USC is organized like a brain, with spaces for both rational inquiry and emotiondriven performance. Opened in November, the 20,000-square-foot USC Brain and Creativity Institute (BCI) building is located in the Dornsife Neuroscience Pavilion, which also houses the Dornsife Neuroimaging Center. Upon entering, visitors see the dramatic Joyce J. Cammilleri Hall for concerts on the left, and laboratories and brain-imaging machines on the right. Connecting labs and practice areas are spaces for gathering and solitary contemplation, highlighted by a glass-enclosed central courtyard. “We wanted to persuade people to go back and forth across these worlds, and to help them see how these worlds interconnect,” says neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, director of BCI. “It’s important for science and the humanities to work together, and to do so manifestly.”

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A new literacy program is giving 30 kindergartners from USC’s Family of Schools a reason to read. Created by USC Civic Engagement, the Kinder to College program uses play-based activities that require reading — such as following a map or making a lava lamp. The Saturday program focuses on minority boys, who typically struggle to attain the same reading and writing proficiency as girls do by third grade.

SMALL SATELLITE, BIG ADVANCE On Sept. 13, USC’s Space Engineering Research Center launched Aeneas, a nanosatellite built in cubic compartments. Aeneas marks two firsts for “CubeSat” technology: It can track moving objects on the Earth’s surface, such as shipping containers on the open ocean; and it can deploy a parabolic dish from a structure no larger than a loaf of bread. Because they’re tiny, CubeSats can piggyback on other space launches, making them very costeffective.

MARIJUANA AND CANCER Recreational marijuana use is linked to increased risk of testicular cancer, according to new research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC. Lead scientist Victoria Cortessis found that pot smokers were twice as likely to have testicular cancers of the non-seminoma subtype and mixed germ-cell tumors — types that carry a somewhat worse prognosis than the seminoma subtype. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men ages 15 to 45 years.

109 -year-old Victor Wellington Peters, USC’s oldest known alumnus, died on Aug. 12.


Three Degrees of Education Beginning next fall, 45 students will embark on a unique undergraduate program in global business — earning three degrees from three universities on three continents. USC Marshall School of Business has partnered with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Bocconi University in Milan to offer the World Bachelor in Business (WBB) degree. Students will spend a full academic year on each campus, beginning at USC. In the fourth year, they’ll finish their studies at the school of their choice. Instruction will be in English, though students will have the opportunity to learn Chinese, Italian and another European language. The WBB program is designed to cultivate a student’s understanding of the business practices, economies, cultures and societies of the different regions while focusing on the distinctive strengths of each university.

GANGSTERS WITHOUT BORDERS Thomas Ward of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences offers an inside look into the Salvadoran street gang Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13. An anthropologist who spent 16 years inside the gang, Ward takes readers on a journey from El Salvador to the streets of Los Angeles, retracing MS-13 members’ lives before, during and after their involvement. (Oxford University Press, $19.95)

HE’S WATCHING YOU (TUBE) Louis-Philippe Morency studies YouTube videos on everything from presidential politics to peanut butter preferences. A computer scientist at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies, Morency works in the growing field of opinion mining. He has developed a database of 500 videos that help researchers decode the subtleties of human nonverbal behavior. Possible applications could include better diagnosis of autism or depression and the design of more engaging educational systems.

49,000 folded business cards make up the Mosely Snowflake Fractal, a unique 3-D mathematical art object on display at USC’s Doheny Memorial Library

Philanthropist, actor and businesswoman Michele Dedeaux Engemann ’68 was elected to the USC Board of Trustees. She is the daughter of legendary Trojan baseball coach Rod Dedeaux.

Health care economist Darius Lakdawalla has been named the first holder of the Quintiles Chair in Pharmaceutical Development and Regulatory Innovation at USC’s Sol Price School of Public Policy.


Give today. It doesn’t matter what year you were born or what year you graduated from USC. We all share a love for cardinal and gold. Participate today. Tat’s how families thrive! https://giveto.usc.edu

the campaign for the University of Southern California FA S R E G N A T R O J A E

Please call or make a gift online: USC Office of Annual Giving (213) 740-7500 Toll Free: 877 GIVE USC https://giveto.usc.edu


[ CAMPAIGN FOR USC ]

A Gift of Music

By Allison Engel

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F A L I C E S C H O E N F E L D

Alice Schoenfeld said she gave the gift to leave a legacy and “to perpetuate the name of my sister. She organized the annual Piatigorsky Seminar from 1979 until she passed away, where she would get great, great performers to hold master classes every day.” She said she kept watch over the hall’s construction last summer and pronounced it “very beautiful.” The longtime violin teacher still practices between two and four hours each day, and takes her commitment to students seriously. “Who carries most of the load in a university?” she asks. “It’s the dedicated teacher. My sister and I have outstanding students working all over the world — in Shanghai, in Germany, in Britain, in Australia, practically everywhere.” Her students reciprocate with flowers and heartfelt thank-you notes. Wrote one current student, Michelle Tseng: “My time here with Professor Schoenfeld has been priceless. She is such a loving, unbelievably devoted and nurturing teacher and human being, and I am so thankful for the experience of learning from such an inspiring woman and violinist.” ● SISTERS ALICE AND ELEONORE Schoenfeld began as child prodigies in Europe, and spent decades touring the world’s great music halls as soloists and later as the Schoenfeld Duo, with Alice on violin and Eleonore on cello. Both joined the USC Thornton School of Music in the middle of the last century and continued touring internationally until shortly before Eleonore died in 2007. Now, Alice, still teaching outstanding students and giving master classes worldwide, has committed $3 million to create a new symphonic hall for USC Thornton. The 3,700-square-foot Alice and Eleonore Schoenfeld Symphonic Hall was dedicated Oct. 28. The facility, which was previously used by the USC School of Cinematic Arts, was redesigned with the aid of an acoustician and is the first dedicated orchestra rehearsal hall in USC Thornton’s 128-year history. At the ceremony, USC President C. L. Max Nikias hailed the commitment of both

Schoenfelds to their students. “Through their dedication as teachers, and their generosity as philanthropists, they have nurtured some of the greatest musicians in the world, while creating an extraordinary legacy for themselves and USC Thornton,” he said. USC Thornton Dean Robert Cutietta said that the legendary sisters, with their combined careers of more than 100 years at the school, “exemplify all that is great in our school.” He continued, “We still feel the loss of Eleonore but celebrate Alice daily.” Cutietta also celebrated the fact that the USC Thornton Symphony and Wind Ensemble, among the best collegiate groups in the country, now has a custom designed space. The newly refurbished hall has complete audio and video recording capabilities, a percussion storage area, new air conditioning and humidity control systems, and suspended flooring for sound isolation.

Alice Schoenfeld

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THE USC MARSHALL SCHOOL of Business has received a leadership gift from Frank Fertitta ’84 and his wife, Jill, to name a state-of-the-art building for the school’s undergraduate programs and also endow a faculty chair.

Jill and Frank Fertitta Hall will transform the educational environment at USC Marshall. Its classrooms, vibrant library, open meeting areas and improved student-services facilities will foster more collaborative and technology-enabled learning experiences for undergraduates. Equally important, with its prominent location adjacent to Popovich Hall and the school’s graduate programs, the new building will anchor the identity of the USC Marshall undergraduate business program and create a fertile environment for growing a more cohesive learning community. “As the nature of business continues to evolve,” USC President C. L. Max Nikias says, “Fertitta Hall will ensure that our students receive a world-class education in a world-class facility.”

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The Fertittas’ gift also will establish the USC Jill and Frank Fertitta Endowed Chair in Business — bolstering the school’s efforts to hire transformative new faculty as part of its Thought Leadership program. “This endowed chair supports our ongoing priority to recruit and retain influential academicians, leading policymakers and real-world practitioners who are eager to share their insights, experiences and connections with our students,” USC Marshall Dean James G. Ellis says. The gift also represents significant support for the $6 billion Campaign for the University of Southern California, a multiyear effort to advance USC’s academic priorities and expand the university’s positive impact on the community and world. Frank Fertitta, a 1984 graduate of USC Marshall, is chairman and CEO of Fertitta Entertainment, a resort and casino development and management company, and Station Casinos, the largest provider of gaming entertainment to the residents of Southern Nevada. He is also a principal owner of Zuffa LLC, which owns and operates the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). In 2001 Frank and his brother, Lorenzo, purchased the UFC, transforming it into a highly successful global sports enterprise that is now the largest live pay-per-view content provider in the world. The Fertittas are also Trojan parents. Their daughter, Kelley-Ann, is a 2012 graduate of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. “I am grateful to the university for the outstanding educational opportunities I received at USC Marshall and to experience this once again as a Trojan parent,” Fertitta says. “Jill and I are proud and very pleased to be able to give back to USC, and to future generations whose careers will be shaped at USC Marshall.” ●

Fostering Success WENDY SMITH MEYER has been an ardent advocate for children in foster care ever since her first child-welfare field placement as a Master of Social Work (MSW) student. Since then, she has designed a course on transition-age foster youth for the USC School of Social Work and written a book that provides a theoretical framework for policies and services to help these youths transition into successful adult lives. Now, Smith Meyer and her husband, Barry Meyer, have gone a step further — establishing two scholarships for MSW students at USC who are also alumni of the foster care system. The Wendy and Barry Meyer Foster Care Alumni Scholarship supports current full-time students who have been in foster care, and the Wendy Smith Meyer and Barry Meyer UFC to USC Scholarship supports students who have been participants in a United Friends of the Children transitional living, college sponsorship or college readiness program. “Both of us care deeply about children in foster care and young people emerging from foster care because in almost every case their network of support is small, if it exists at all,” says Smith Meyer, associate dean for faculty development at the USC School of Social Work and a member of the school’s Board of Councilors. “They don’t have the kind of family backing to help with education or when difficult or unexpected things happen,” says Smith Meyer, who is also a clinical associate professor. “We want to make attending the USC School of Social Work more of a possibility for them.” ●

Wendy and Barry Meyer are devoted to serving the needs of foster youth.

F E R T I T TA P H OTO B Y C L I N T J E N K I N S ; M E Y E R P H OTO B Y S T E V E C O H N

New Heights for USC Marshall


Rendering of the expanded Heritage Hall’s two-story Heisman Lobby, a museum space featuring permanent displays and interactive content

Moving Forward the ‘Heritage’

R E N D E R I N G C O U R T E S Y O F U S C AT H L E T I C S

USC athletics aims to raise $300 million for new facilities, winning coaches and well-educated scholar-athletes. IN LATE SUMMER, USC’s Athletics Department launched the $300 million “Heritage Initiative.” It’s the most ambitious fundraising drive in the history of one of the nation’s most successful and storied collegiate athletic programs, and $160 million has already been raised. The Aug. 21 announcement of the initiative coincided with the dedication of the newly completed John McKay Center – a $70 million facility that serves all of USC’s 21 sports. Meanwhile an $8 million lead gift from businessman Wilfred “Fred” Uytengsu ’83, announced in May, will help fund the $16 million Uytengsu Aquatics Center. Part of the university’s $6 billion Campaign for the University of Southern California, the Heritage Initiative will support capital projects, annual scholarships for student-athletes, academic support and programming costs, endowments, and recruitment and retention of coaches and staff. “The opening of the John McKay Center is an especially appropriate time to announce our Heritage Initiative,” USC Athletic Director Pat Haden said at the dedication ceremony. “We are going from 30 years behind the times in our facilities to moving 30 years ahead of our competitors.” The McKay Center is named for USC’s most successful football coach, the legendary John McKay, winner of four national championships for Troy. The 110,000-square-foot building houses state-of-the-art training facilities, classrooms, offices for coaches, men’s and women’s locker rooms, weight

rooms and even an indoor football field. Its weight room alone triples what was previously available at USC, and its athletic training room is more than six times the size of Heritage Hall’s training room. The McKay Center also houses the Stevens Academic Center, which provides tutoring, counseling, computer labs and study space for USC athletes. The Uytengsu Aquatics Center will include a new diving dry-land training area, dive tower, coaches’ offices, multipurpose room, locker and team rooms, and scoreboard with video capabilities, along with a shaded stadium seating up to 2,500 spectators. Other planned capital projects to be funded through the initiative include reno-

vation of historic Heritage Hall, upgrades to Marks Tennis Stadium, construction of Merle Norman Stadium (sand volleyball courts for USC’s newest women’s team) and completion of suites at the Galen Center. “We have an athletic heritage unmatched by most universities, and we look forward to building upon that heritage,” Haden said. John Robinson, one of USC’s most popular and successful football coaches, and Barbara Hedges, who developed the USC women’s athletics program during her tenure as a Trojan athletics administrator, serve as co-chairs of the Heritage Initiative. “The athletic spirit of this university is the glue that holds the Trojan Family together,” President C. L. Max Nikias has remarked. It’s an athletic spirit that grows stronger with each gift. ● To watch a video of the McKay Center dedication, go to bit.ly/McKayCenter

Communication by Design THE USC ANNENBERG SCHOOL for Communication and Journalism broke ground Nov. 8 on a building that will turn the fundamentals of human interaction into physical reality. The ceremony also marked the launch of the school’s $150 million fundraising initiative, part of the $6 billion Campaign for the University of Southern California. Funded with a $50 million gift from the Annenberg Foundation, the five-story, 88,000-square-foot Wallis Annenberg Hall will bridge the traditional and transformational. Its exterior harmonizes with USC’s iconic architecture, while its ultramodern interior fosters “blue-sky” thinking. “USC Annenberg is widely recognized as a world leader in journalism and communication,” Dean Ernest J. Wilson III says. “This new facility, and the initiative, will enable us to expand our innovative teaching, research and service, and spark a new era of creativity among our faculty and students in this new digital age.” ●

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TAKING THE LEAD GLORYA KAUFMAN’S TRANSFORMATIVE NAMING GIFT CREATES A NEW SCHOOL OF DANCE AT USC. BY CRISTY LYTAL

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WHEN PHILANTHROPIST GLORYA KAUFMAN WAS A LITTLE GIRL, SHE USED TO STAND ON HER FATHER’S FEET AS HE LED HER THROUGH VARIOUS DANCE STEPS. IT WAS AN EXERCISE IN IMPROVISATION, ONE THAT HAS LASTED FOR MANY YEARS.

“I don’t do, ‘One two, one two three,’ ” says the Los Angeles philanthropist, with a grin. “But if I’m with a good partner, I can dance to just about anything. And that’s because I grew up with it.” After decades of passionate support of the art through the dance foundation that bears her name, Kaufman is taking a bold new step: A transformative gift that will create the USC Kaufman School of Dance, the first new school to be endowed at the university since 1975. Te addition of the Kaufman School to the university’s five existing arts schools (music, dramatic arts, cinematic arts, fine arts and architecture) completes a worldclass portfolio of arts education at USC. With nearly 6,000 students enrolled in the arts, the university is a major destination for aspiring artists pursuing careers in the performing and visual arts professions. Funds from the gift will be used for student and faculty recruitment and scholarships, as well as academic programs. In addition, Kaufman’s landmark gift also will support construction of a state-of-the-art instructional building, the Glorya Kaufman International Dance Center. Graduates of the Kaufman School will be awarded a new bachelor of fine arts degree in dance. “Glorya Kaufman’s extraordinarily generous gift cements her legacy as an arts benefactor. Her vision for dance education is bold and far-reaching, and she brings fresh momentum to USC’s stellar arts schools,” says President C. L. Max Nikias. “Te USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance will certainly distinguish USC among elite research universities. More and more, USC is becoming the place to pursue an arts education, a place in which any student can perform innovative research in a lab, or create imaginative art in a studio.”

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“IT WAS A BIG DECISION. EVERY DANCE COMPANY IN THE UNITED STATES HAS SOMETHING TO OFFER, AND THAT’S WONDERFUL. BUT [COMPANIES] CAN CHANGE. EDUCATION IS PERMANENT.” GLORYA KAUFMAN

Groundbreaking for the school’s instructional building will take place in spring 2014, and the school will welcome its first freshman class of dance majors in fall 2015. Rob Cutietta, dean of the USC Thornton School of Music, will lead this historic journey by taking on an additional role as the first dean of USC Kaufman. An expert in music education, he first met Kaufman in November 2011 at a USC performance featuring Alonzo King LINES Ballet Company. “By the end of the night, we were already talking about what we could accomplish by creating a new kind of dance school,” Cutietta says. “One of the things that’s so exciting is that we get to build it from scratch, and ask: ‘What does it mean to be a dancer in the 21st century?’ ” USC Kaufman will teach students everything from ballet to contemporary and international styles, as well as build a firm foundation in the commercial aspects of the profession. Its students will be able to double-major or minor in disciplines across the university, with access to a broad range of subjects in the sciences, the professional schools and the humanities. Currently enrolled dance minors will continue their courses of dance study in the Kaufman School. “I want them to graduate as extraordinary dancers and also understand the business side of their profession,” Kaufman says. “They need to know how to take care of themselves in the world. So it’s an all-around education.” BORN AND RAISED IN DETROIT, THE DAUGHTER of a printer and a seamstress, Kaufman traces her philanthropy to her upbringing. “[My parents] always kept pushke boxes of coins to donate to the poor. We were taught the tradition of tzedakah — performing acts of righteousness.” Kaufman remembers dancing ever “since I was a little child, before I could walk.” There was always music in the house. By the time

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she was a teenager, she would occasionally win a bottle of wine in a dance contest at a local club, whether it was for the mambo, rumba, cha-cha-cha, or her favorite dance — the Argentine tango. “I wouldn’t go out with anyone unless he could dance,” Kaufman says. “They had what they called black and tan clubs, and there was a lot of jazz music. Everybody that could dance would get up, but one by one the people who couldn’t keep up would sit down. Then they’d watch us, because we knew what we were doing!” In the early 1950s, she met homebuilder Donald Bruce Kaufman, the young entrepreneur behind the ABCO Home Building Company, who won her heart even though he didn’t like to dance. They married in 1954 and had four children. She worked as a bookkeeper for a medical clinic and sold her car and some of her jewelry to help her husband buy land lots. In 1957, he co-founded Kaufman & Broad, now known as KB Home, a Fortune 500 home building company. By the 1970s, Glorya Kaufman began to explore a new artistic interest — painting — and today her impressionistic oils speak to her talent and sense of whimsy. “This one is called Effervescent,” she says, pointing to an abstract canvas of shimmering spheres. “When I was painting it, I imagined a child blowing bubbles.” Gardening was another source of pride and joy. Purple morning glories wind up tree trunks, and native scrub oaks rise above roses and fruit trees in her backyard. “It’s something to smile at,” she says, picking a ripe fig as Troy, one of her two Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs, stands by her heel. In 1983, tragedy struck. Her husband and son-in-law died in a plane crash. She views this terrible moment as a turning point. “You know, life is difficult,” she says quietly. “I decided I wanted to do something to make people happy.”

She found comfort in refocusing her energies on supporting the arts, especially dance — and its performers. Her past gifts have established a dance studio at Juilliard and created a popular dance performance series at the Los Angeles Country Music Center. During a dance performance, she notes, “I look around and I see everybody is smiling. They’re so into the moment. Everybody in that audience has problems, and for an hour and a half, it’s like therapy. They can’t think of [their problems] because of the music and the beauty. Dance is beautiful. It just brings happiness. It captivates the imagination.” It is her own imagination for what a dance school at USC could become that led her to make her transformative gift. By creating USC Kaufman, she hopes to change not only the lives of generations of students, but also the future of dance in Los Angeles and around the world. “Glorya Kaufman’s generosity will have a profound impact on the art of dance — not only at USC, but also across the globe,” Nikias says. “The university’s ambition is to make the USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance the most elite on the West Coast and in the Pacific Rim.” For Kaufman, it was important to invest in the future through dance education. “It was a big decision,” she says. “Every dance company in the United States has something to offer, and that’s wonderful. But [companies] can change. Education is permanent.” In the end, it is something very simple that motivated Kaufman to make such an extraordinary commitment to USC and the students who will enroll in the school that bears her name in perpetuity. “What I want for them,” she says with a smile, “is to feel joy — pure and simple — as they dance.” ●

Sign up to learn more about the USC Kaufman School of Dance at kaufman.usc.edu


D A N C E P H OTO S B Y B I L L H E B E R T; K A U F M A N P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F T H E G L O R YA K A U F M A N D A N C E F O U N D AT I O N

“THE UNIVERSITY’S AMBITION IS TO MAKE THE USC GLORYA KAUFMAN SCHOOL OF DANCE THE MOST ELITE ON THE WEST COAST AND IN THE PACIFIC RIM.” C. L. MAX NIKIAS

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Strings Theory BY DIANE KRIEGER


[ USC THORNTON LUMINARIES ]

T

Te true measure of a music school is the strength of its orchestra. At the USC Tornton School of Music, the orchestra program has been riding a crescendo for a decade, especially its strings section. Te latest high point came in May, with the announcement that violinist Glenn Dicterow, for 32 years the concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, will join USC’s full-time faculty as inaugural holder of the Robert Mann Chair in Strings and Chamber Music. In addition, accompanying Dicterow to USC Tornton will be his wife, virtuoso violist Karen Dreyfus.

In taking his post next fall, Dicterow will hold a chair named after an equally illustrious string player, the founding first violinist of the legendary Juilliard String Quartet. Te Robert Mann Chair, established in 2010, brings the number of endowed professorships in USC’s strings program to four — a concentration unparalleled for an American music school, let alone a single department within it, according to USC Tornton Dean Rob Cutietta. Just 10 years ago, the school was home to only one endowed string professorship – the Gregor Piatigorsky Endowed Chair in Violincello. Created in 1974, it was named for the storied Russian artist who devoted the last 15 years of his life to teaching at USC. Te current chairholder is cello virtuoso Ralph Kirshbaum, recruited four years ago from Britain’s Royal Northern College of Music. It was the Jascha Heifetz Chair in Violin that enticed violin superstar Midori Goto to USC in 2006, when she became its first holder. Next came the Alice and Eleonore Schoenfeld Endowed Chair in String Instruction, created in 2008 and named for the beloved sister duo that had graced USC’s strings faculty since the 1950s. Eleonore passed away in 2007, and the chair is currently occupied by Alice. (See related story on page 9.) Tere’s nothing serendipitous about this profusion of musical chairs. For the last decade, it has been USC Tornton’s stated ambition to add a new chair every few years. Te goal is to secure the school’s financial future, while responding to the growing importance of the chamber ensemble in the world of classical music. “Chamber music is very demanding,” Cutietta says. “You have to be musically strong, because students are [alone] on their own parts.” Ten there are the economic advantages. While 80-piece orchestras are

Violinist Glenn Dicterow, who has served as concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic for 32 years, and his wife, Karen Dreyfus, an acclaimed violist who teaches at the Manhattan School of Music, will join the USC Thornton School of Music in fall 2013.

struggling to stay afloat, ensembles of fewer than 10 players are booming. “In Los Angeles, chamber music is vibrant. It seems like there’s a new series [announced] every day,” he notes. Te strings program is also changing on the instructional level, with increasing focus on individual artists. Spots for violin students were strategically reduced from 60 students a few years ago to just over 30 today, including both graduates and undergraduates. “By narrowing the student count, we have improved the student-teacher ratio, so we are able to better prepare our graduates for their careers,” says Cutietta. Tis is

in stark contrast to other top music schools, where strings studios are so large they’re sometimes called “factories.” “Our students deserve a perfect combination of great instruction and personal inspiration,” says Goto, who now serves as Strings Department chair. “I feel extremely happy to see all the pieces of the puzzle coming together.” In addition to lavishing attention on the student soloists assigned to their studios, star USC Tornton faculty members are now expected to coach small ensembles. Goto has done it enthusiastically from the start, sometimes even taking a turn at second fiddle in concerts by her student quartets. Dicterow himself looks forward to the challenge of coaching chamber players. “It’s exciting — a whole different world for me,” says the veteran concertmaster, who is no stranger to chamber play. He and Dreyfus are both founding and active members of the Amerigo Trio and the Lyric Piano Quartet. Another important change at USC Tornton is a thematic approach to concert programming that puts the spotlight on indepth learning. In his new role as artistic leader as well as principal conductor of the USC Tornton Symphonies, Carl St.Clair is carefully planning the school’s “musical diet” across the curriculum and within the playbills of its many ensembles. St.Clair, who is also musical director of the Pacific Symphony in Orange County, speaks glowingly of the new reality at USC Tornton. “I don’t think there’s a conductor on the planet who wouldn’t be totally ecstatic about the faculty that we have — not just in the strings, but throughout the performance arena: brass, wind, percussion, voice, the choral program,” he says. “I’m very, very honored to work with these virtuosi.” ● For additional content, go to tfm.usc.edu/strings

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BRAVE

new online

world Academic rigor, integrity and lively community are the hallmarks of USC’s pioneering online degree programs. BY SUSAN L. WAMPLER

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ACROSS THE UNIVERSITY, groups of students completing their master’s degrees in a wide variety of disciplines have been meeting their classmates in person for the first time — at commencement. For many, this is also the first time they set foot on the USC campus. While these Trojans earn their diplomas online, their curriculum is every bit as rigorous as that of their oncampus counterparts. Their connections to USC, and camaraderie with one another, are just as strong. And their numbers are rapidly growing. “Eighty-five percent of our online students come to campus for graduation,” says Karen Symms Gallagher, dean of the USC Rossier School of Education. The number of graduates of the school’s online Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) has grown tenfold since the program’s launch in 2009. Some 1,200 have completed the program, with enrollees coming from all 50 states and two dozen countries. “We’ve had to move our satellite commencement ceremony from Founder’s Park to the football practice field,” she says. That growth resonates throughout the university. To date, nine graduate schools offer online degree programs serving more than 4,800 students. The longest-standing program, the USC Viterbi School of Engineering’s 40-year-old Distance Education Network (DEN@ Viterbi), alone offers some 40 programs, including nearly 140 courses per semester, to students across the U.S. and in 21 countries. “Every department has at least one online degree offering, but most have several,” notes Kelly Goulis, senior associate dean for graduate and professional programs at the school. “Total annual revenues for online USC professional, graduate and continuing education programs are expected to reach $114.5 million this year, a figure that may be unprecedented for a top American research university,” USC President C. L. Max Nikias says. “We expect to double our enrollment and degree offerings within five years.”

HIGH DEMAND FOR QUALITY ONLINE EDUCATION A key tenet of the university’s online strategy is maintaining the academic rigor, integrity and quality of a USC education. Remote students must meet the

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“USC is taking our professional programs, [developing] the right models and attracting very strong students who otherwise might not be able to come to campus.”

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same admission standards and pay the same tuition as regular students. “It’s the exact same diploma,” says Rebecca Weintraub, director of the Communication Management master’s program at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. USC’s remote offerings focus on graduatelevel instruction aimed primarily at working professionals. By design, undergraduate education remains a traditional, on-campus experience. “Those massive free online courses other universities are doing — that’s not the USC model,” Goulis says. “USC is taking our professional programs, [developing] the right models and attracting very strong students who otherwise might not be able to come to campus.” Frequently uprooted military personnel and their spouses, for instance, are enrolled in a wide range of USC online programs. The Rossier School has increased the number of math and science teaching candidates, which are greatly needed by the education profession. And, Gallagher notes, “They didn’t have to quit their jobs to come here.” Demand for USC’s online-learning approach is robust. The USC School of Social Work admitted the first cohort of 80 Master of Social Work students to its Virtual Academic Center in October 2010. By fall 2012, approximately 1,580 were enrolled — outpacing the school’s on-the-ground program, which numbers 1,300. “We’re the first national school of social work,” says Paul Maiden, vice dean. “We drive the agenda [in online learning for the profession].” Similarly, the USC Davis School of Gerontology was the first to offer a gerontology degree online and now has five Web-based programs. In fall 2011, the USC Price School of Public Policy established the first online Master of Public Administration (MPA) at a top-10 school. Christopher Weare, program director, says students tell him they had been clamoring to pursue an online MPA but, before USC, “no place worth doing it” offered the degree. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL Each USC online program is custom-built, reflecting the educational needs of the academic discipline. Most sprang from traditional

degrees but underwent significant transformation to take advantage of increasingly sophisticated technology and support, as well as assistance with student recruiting. Curriculum design and content remain strictly USC’s purview. In some courses, students primarily learn on their own schedules within the parameters of set milestones, while in others they meet weekly online for live class sessions. Many programs combine both approaches. A common advantage is that students and faculty can be present for classes even when on vacation, at a conference or traveling for business. And students — often both on-campus and in distance programs — can review archived sessions anytime. Still, not all degree requirements can be met online. USC Rossier MAT students complete 20 weeks of student teaching. “We have partnerships with about 1,500 school districts and more than 4,000 schools,” Gallagher says. “From the first day, our students are teaching in the classroom.” Field placement is the signature feature of social work education. “We have regional field faculty in New England, the Midwest, the Southeast, the Southwest, Southern California and the Northwest,” Maiden says. “They do full reviews and credential the agencies before we place our students.” Master of Public Health students also complete a culminating practicum in the field, says Luanne Rohrbach, program director. FOSTERING COLLEGIALITY, HANDS-ON LEARNING Still other programs bring students together for short-term residencies. While the Geographic Information Science and Technology program in the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences incorporates a substantial hands-on component year-round — with students working on virtual desktops — the program also requires a weeklong field experience at USC’s Wrigley Institute on Catalina Island, now offered nine times a year. “Very few of our peer institutions require field work,” says John Wilson, who launched the program in the late 1990s. Students in the Master of Academic Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC spend seven days together each spring. They


quickly become colleagues, often making presentations together at national meetings. “We’re truly building a learning community,” says the program’s director, Julie Nyquist. Those in the Keck School’s Executive Master of Health Administration meet in person for two five-day periods, but even those are flexible. “If we have a large international cohort or large number of East Coast-based students, there’s no reason we can’t hold one of the inresidence sessions there,” notes Mike Nichol, program director. That flexibility is a key hallmark of online learning at USC, as programs are continuously re-evaluated to share advances between online and traditional courses. The result is changes ranging from small tweaks to restructuring of entire programs. In response to student demand, the USC School of Pharmacy’s Regulatory Science program now enables students to “move back and forth seamlessly between distance courses and live courses at our locations in San Francisco or Los Angeles,” says Frances Richmond, program director. “We’re one big happy family.” Such collegiality, surprisingly, may be even more evident in strictly online courses. “Some students say it’s actually more intimate than a regular classroom because you can’t hide in the back of the room,” Gallagher says. At USC Annenberg, Neil Teixeira, director of distance learning, fosters intimacy by building social-media networking into the online learning platform “so that students are not forced outside of that [network] to communicate with their classmates.” Weintraub adds, “The dirty little secret is that the interaction and connection among classmates are actually stronger online.” USC’s online learning certainly has come a long way since that day in 1972 when the Viterbi School first used microwave technology to beam courses to fewer than 50 engineers. “We will support our faculty and students as they continue to experiment with new digital technologies and new educational paradigms — within classrooms, libraries, laboratories and online — to kindle and maintain a lifelong fire of learning within all of our current and future students,” Nikias says. ●

“The dirty little secret is that the interaction and connection among classmates are actually stronger online.”

ONLINE & UPWARD Ashley Rhodes-Courter is maintaining a busy life as an author, speaker, advocate for foster children and politician — all while pursuing her Masters in Social Work (MSW) through the USC School of Social Work’s Virtual Academic Center. “USC’s online MSW program seemed like the perfect fit for me, since my professional life takes me all around the world,” she says. “I don’t know that I [otherwise] would have been able to complete a graduate program given my current schedule. It was as if school would have interfered with my education.” Rhodes-Courter’s education in life began traumatically at age 3. Taken from her single teen mother and thrust into foster care, she endured years of abuse and neglect until she was adopted at age 9. Still, she excelled in school, knowing that an education was the one thing that could never be taken away from her. She also found an outlet in writing, telling her story in an essay published by The New York Times Magazine, and later in a best-selling memoir, Three Little Words. A Families and Children concentration student, Rhodes-Courter describes the online MSW program as blending “the best of all worlds. It makes high-quality academics accessible to someone like me, who already has a hectic schedule of travel, advocacy and being a foster mom.” That last part is especially important to Rhodes-Courter, as she tries to help as many foster children as she can. She and her husband currently foster three kids and have cared for 12 altogether. She says studying social work has helped her be a better foster parent, as she can identify their mental-health needs. Rhodes-Courter’s schedule has become even more demanding, as she recently gave birth to the couple’s first biological child, and ran for the Florida State Senate in November, though she lost the race. MAYA MEINERT

If you have questions or comments on this article, go to tfm.usc.edu/mailbag.

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REAL-TIME

ECONOMIST Public intellectual, software developer, Middle East expert and scholar par excellence, M. Hashem Pesaran makes economics interesting. No, really. This number-crunching econometrician makes the “dismal science” accessible. He recently spoke with USC Trojan Family Magazine’s Diane Krieger about his interests and ideas for building up USC’s economics department.

Having divided his time between Cambridge University and USC for the last six years, macroeconomist and econometrician M. Hashem Pesaran retired from his professorship at Cambridge University earlier this year and formally joined the USC faculty full-time.

What brought you to USC? One of the reasons I’m here is that the administration is really determined to help the economics department grow. We have such a large body of undergraduates — 800 plus — and many natural links to other USC programs, such as law, business, political science, real estate and history. They know we need to develop a larger area of expertise. USC Dornsife Dean Steve Kay asked me to head a search committee to find a new chairperson for the economics department, so I’ve spent the last three weeks talking to people to entice them to apply.

Holder of the John Elliott Chair in Economics in USC’s Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Pesaran has contributed mightily to his field. In 1986, he founded the respected Journal of Applied Econometrics, where he continues as editor. Together with his brother, Bahram, an economist based at a London hedge fund, he developed Microfit, a standard econometric software used in forecasting, hypothesis testing and estimation, now in its fifth version. In 1998, he developed GVAR, a global macroeconometric model commonly used in financial stress testing, shock scenario analysis and forecasting. His publications — more than 147 journal articles, 44 book chapters and 16 books and edited volumes — have fundamentally changed our understanding of the interrelatedness of global financial systems and risk.

You are launching a new Center in Applied Financial Economics. Yes. We had our first conference Nov. 16, on “The Global Economic Crisis and Latin America.” The idea is to build a better bridge between economics and the USC Marshall School of Business. They have some very good economists there, like Wayne Ferson and Vincenzo Quadrini. The center aims to promote a unified and rigorous interdisciplinary approach to research that cuts across finance, econometrics and international macroeconomics.

“The world is like interconnected containers of water. You move the water up at one end, and you may not see it everywhere immediately. But it will happen. It will spread out. This is the picture you should have in mind of how the global economy operates. We are all interrelated.” ted.”

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The world economy has been in a bad way since 2008. How are we doing with the recovery? We actually came out of the woods fairly quickly. Looking at the data on output across different countries, I was really worried. All economies — the U.S., Europe, China, India, everywhere in the world — they all fell. This correlation, this dependence, was very scary. I think a lot of good work was done. The G20 got together. They did not start putting up trade restrictions on each other, which we saw happen in the 1920s and ’30s. To me that was really important. It shows the power of economic science. We had learned that, as nations, we should cooperate with each other, particularly in times of crisis. The world is like interconnected containers of water. You move the water up at one end, and you may not see it everywhere immediately. But it will happen. It will spread out. This is the picture you should have in mind of how the global economy operates. We are all interrelated. You’re known as a leading exponent of “real-time econometrics.” What is that? Imagine having your economic preferences coded in an application that picks up data and makes suggestions to you. This is what is called real-time analysis. We already are using these techniques when we use Google or Amazon. The more important use of real-time econometrics is at the level of large organizations, financial institutions and governments. Morning traders are subject to huge amounts of data coming from all over the world. You could imagine a way of using this data — together with some strategy vis-à-vis risk management— to develop procedures that help them make buy-sell decisions. Governments need to decide whether to expand the economy, what tax rates to change, what interest rate strategy to implement. Satisfactory answers to all these questions are very difficult to arrive at without data analysis of the type I am suggesting. To read more of this interview, go to tfm.usc.edu/Pesaran. If you have questions or comments on this article, go to tfm.usc.edu/mailbag.


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P H OTO B Y D I E T M A R Q U I S TO R F ; I L L U S T R AT I O N / V E E R


ALL STAR LINE-UP: (Top) Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger; (bottom, from left) ABC News political commentator Cokie Roberts moderated a panel that included John McCain, U.S. senator from Arizona, and Tom Daschle, former U.S. Senate majority leader. Photos by Steve Cohn

USC Schwarzenegger Institute recruits an all-star lineup of political, environmental and entertainment leaders to tackle an ambitious agenda at its inaugural symposium.

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BRIDGING THE

Partisan divide BY DIANE KRIEGER

With hyper-partisanship reaching a fever pitch in late September, the new USC Schwarzenegger Institute for State and Global Policy hit the ground running — and not a moment too soon. Forty-five days from the election, the nation was yet again being battered by attack ads, daily polling data and “political process” stories. On TV talk shows, candidate surrogates spun and sparred, pundits shouted from the sidelines, and fact-checkers scurried to referee charges and counter-charges. In this tempestuous atmosphere, the institute held its inaugural symposium on Sept. 24. Part of the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, the Schwarzenegger Institute focuses on ways to transcend partisanship and implement policies that most benefit the people. Its specific niches are energy and environment, fiscal and economic policy, health and human wellness, and political reform. The daylong symposium — which was covered by 30 national and international news media outlets — began with a pantheon of Washington heavy-hitters notable for their willingness to work across the partisan aisle. Nearly 1,000 guests packed the Tutor Campus Center’s ballroom to hear current U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) and past U.S. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) probe the conditions that make political compromise possible. McCain and Daschle shared the stage with four former governors also known for their bipartisan agility: Tom Ridge (R-Penn.), Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), Charlie Crist (R-Fla.) and Arnold Schwarzenegger (R-Calif.). ABC News political commentator Cokie Roberts, herself the daughter of a former House of Representatives majority leader, moderated the session. Noting that the approval rating of Congress is at a near-rock-bottom 11 percent, McCain joked that “we’re down to paid staffers and blood relatives,” and warned that the consequences of continued hyper-partisanship might be a popular rejection of both parties. “What we are seeing in America,” said McCain, the 2008 Republican presidential nominee, “is a dramatic increase in independent voter registration. In many states, it’s a

majority or close to it,” he observed. “Both parties either have to adjust to that, or sooner or later, you are going to see an independent party with a candidate that has appeal.” Ridge, the nation’s first secretary of Homeland Security, referenced the coarseness in current political dialogue and cited a neglected concept: “a decent respect for the opinions of mankind,” from the Declaration of Independence. Richardson, who serves on the Schwarzenegger Institute’s advisory board, sounded more optimistic. “The states are laboratories of bipartisanship that the federal government can learn from,” said the former U.N. ambassador and U.S. Energy secretary, noting that gridlock is unsustainable when governors are required by law to balance budgets. He suggested that the institute can promote an understanding of the dynamics that make political compromise attractive. Schwarzenegger outlined an institutional vision built upon the three rules he used in governing California: first, “the best policies are written in the absence of fear”; second, “the closer you are to the people, the more action [you can take]”; and finally, “no ideology has a monopoly on solutions.” USC created the institute with a $20 million commitment from Schwarzenegger, who will remain deeply involved in its activities. The former California governor chairs its board of advisors and serves as the Gov. Downey Professor of State and Global Policy in USC Price. “Our school has a simple but noble message and mission, and that is to improve the quality of life for people and their communities here and aboard,” said USC Price Dean Jack Knott, who introduced the symposium’s afternoon session. Noting the school’s leadership in scholarship and research on critical policy challenges, he continued, “We are also home to 12 major research centers and institutes. The Schwarzenegger Institute is our newest. You can see how perfectly it fits our mission.” Earlier, a lunchtime panel tackled environmental policymaking — both local and global. Addressing environmental policy issues on the macro level was 2007 Nobel Peace Prize laureate R. K. Pachauri, chairman of

the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Speaking on the micro level was two-term Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, who reduced pollution at the nation’s largest port by 70 percent in just four years. Today, the roughly 11,000 cargo trucks serving the Port of Long Beach are the more environmentally friendly 2007 models or newer. Long Beach’s successful pollution-reduction efforts can have “a very powerful impact on other places,” said Pachauri, a New Delhibased economist and industrial engineer, who also serves on the Schwarzenegger Institute’s board of advisors. The afternoon panel on innovation brought together several film, television and music industry leaders, including Lionsgate Cochairman Rob Friedman, Imagine Entertainment Chairman Brian Grazer, Interscope Geffen A&M Chairman Jimmy Iovine and Universal Studios President and CEO Ron Meyer. Ben Smith, editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed, moderated the panel, which also featured Schwarzenegger. The actor-turned-politician said that the policymaking muscle of films and television is “much more powerful than politicians can ever be in convincing the voters of going in a certain direction.” To illustrate, Schwarzenegger shared an experience from his days chairing the President’s Council on Physical Fitness. After the council had been debating policy for decades, “all of a sudden … the movie Saturday Night Fever [came out],” he said. “Around the globe, they opened up discos. Even in my village in Austria, with a population of 800, two discos opened in the same year. All the policy and debates couldn’t come close to the calories burned off [by youths responding to the disco phenomenon]. It just shows you the power of one movie.” Political muscle, environmental muscle, entertainment muscle. With its first symposium, the Schwarzenegger Institute clearly demonstrated it intends to be a policy think tank like no other. ●

To view video from this USC Symposium, go to youtube.com/user/USCSPPD

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field of IF OLYMPIC MEDALS WERE tallied not by nation but by alma mater, where would the most international university in America stand? In the No. 1 spot, naturally. When the exhilarating 2012 London Olympics drew to a close, Trojans had collected more total medals than athletes from any American university: 25 medals in all — 12 golds, 9 silvers and 4 bronzes. If these USC-educated athletes had competed as a country, they would have placed sixth in the gold medal standings and 11th in overall medals. Pat Haden, holder of USC’s Charles Griffin Cale Director of Athletics’ Chair, pronounced them “the most successful class of USC Olympians ever.” A remarkable achievement, given the university’s storied heritage dating back to the 1904 Games. “It is safe to say that USC is the ‘Home of Olympians,’ ” Haden declared. At the victorious homecoming matchup with Arizona State University on Nov. 10, 24 of the 41 Trojan Olympians who had competed in the 2012 London Games were saluted during half time. — DIANE KRIEGER

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champions Saluting the USC Olympians of the 2012 London Games

HOME OF OLYMPIANS: (From left to right) Tumua Anae ’10, sophomore Flora Bolonyai, Kami Craig ’10, freshman Anna Espar, Lauren Wenger ’10, freshman James Clark, senior Amy Rodriguez, junior Aaron Brown, sophomore Josh Mance, senior Bryshon Nellum, Felix Sanchez, Duane Solomon Jr. ’10, Jesse Williams ’07, Allyson Felix ’08, Carol Rodriguez ’08, Ph.D. student Joseph Veloce, Nicole Davis ’06, April Ross ’05, Jennifer Kessy, senior Haley Anderson, sophomore Stina Gardell, senior Lynette Lim, freshman Kasia Wilk and Rebecca Soni ’09. Photo by Dan Avila

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A N I

R

O

USC RADIO

in northern

california


[ LISTEN UP ]

USC’s investment in Bay Area classical radio pleases fans and strengthens the university’s ties to the region. By ALLISON ENGEL Illustrations by DONGYI WU

SAN FRANCISCO IS A CLASSICAL MUSIC STRONGHOLD, and radio station KDFC, founded there in 1946, was one of the country’s most successful commercial classical stations for decades. More than once it was rated the No. 1 station in the city in all categories. It had a stellar lineup of veteran announcers (see page 30) and a creative leader, Bill Lueth, who kept it profitable. But by 2010, KDFC was one of the few classical stations still operating under a commercial license, and the only one in a top-50 market. Its parent company had begun buying and selling stations and shuffling formats. Employees feared for the station’s future. Enter USC Radio President Brenda Barnes, who had spearheaded a financial turnaround when she became Classical KUSC’s general manager in 1997. A nonprofit, listener-supported station whose signal can be heard from the Mexican border to the central coast, KUSC is licensed to the university and, like KDFC, seeks to make classical music accessible to all. (Recently, it even released a free app, developed by KUSC’s interactive division and available at soundsnips.org, that helps listeners learn about classical music as they listen.) When Barnes arrived at KUSC, the station was losing listeners and hemorrhaging money. Under her leadership, KUSC today is on solid footing, collaborating with a growing number of performing groups and expanding its coverage of all the arts in Southern California. Sensing business and creative opportunities, Barnes wanted to ensure KDFC’s future as well. USC President C. L. Max Nikias agreed. He immediately authorized her to move forward and convince the USC Board of Trustees to advance USC Radio $10.5 million for KDFC’s intellectual property and to purchase two stations in San Francisco and Napa/Sonoma. The sale allowed KDFC to convert from a commercial station to a public, nonprofit one. USC Radio determined that the Los Angeles and San Francisco classical stations would keep their individual programming and announcers, but share membership and fundraising functions, as well as some managers. KDFC’s newly purchased licenses, however, provided coverage only to San Francisco and north. Its frequency did not extend to Silicon Valley and the rest of the South Bay, an area where KDFC had long reached. When the sale was complete, classical music aficionados in the South Bay could hear KDFC solely on the Internet. In the first month after the South Bay signal stopped, streaming numbers soared from 70,000 unique online listeners to 125,000. President Nikias pledged publicly that Classical KDFC would restore its signal to the South Bay, but an additional $7.5 million from USC was needed to make it happen. It was a long, complicated process to negotiate for the frequency needed, and classical radio was silent in the South Bay for 18 months before the signal returned in mid-June 2012. Listeners were enthusiastic about the comeback. Gloria Spitzer ’57, who lives in Mountain View, near San Jose, wrote an email to the USC Alumni Association, thanking the university for its efforts. “I want to let you know how absolutely splendid it is to have KDFC back again enriching our lives,” she wrote. “I am also a graduate of USC and proud that the school is associated with KDFC.” Even before service was restored, South Bay residents from Palo Alto to Los Gatos were calling in their support during the station’s pledge drive.

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“I’ve been waiting for the day when I could turn on my radio and receive your wonderful station,” said supporter Mary of Fremont. “Best music in the world, wonderful, erudite and ever-personable DJs — who could ask for more?” President Nikias and the trustees expect $7.5 million of the $18 million USC Radio spent on Classical KDFC to be repaid to the university. Barnes is confident the San Francisco station will be able to do that, thanks to supportive listeners and a healthy community of arts philanthropists in the Bay Area. Even before the station held its first public fund drive, it received $200,000 in the mail from listeners who were grateful that classical music would continue in San Francisco, as well as from those who were hopeful that it would return to the South Bay. “KDFC lasted as long as it did because of the market it is in and also because of Bill Lueth’s strong leadership,” Barnes says. “He kept making it profitable.” Barnes gives great credit to President Nikias for being willing to take the risk. “He had a vision,” she says. “The Bay Area is USC’s second most important region behind Southern California in terms of alumni, prospective students and parents. President Nikias wanted a tangible presence in the Bay Area and has since opened a USC office in San Francisco. He took it from ‘Brenda’s crazy idea’ to something real.” Barnes also credits USC Trustee Jeffrey Smulyan, a veteran of the broadcast industry with whom she spoke almost daily during the negotiations, for a key role in making the purchases successful. KDFC announcer and music director Rik Malone says he is confident that KDFC and KUSC’s inclusive approach to classical music has a bright future. “We’re sharing our favorite music and breaking down barriers and walls,” he says. “There are so many ways to listen and appreciate this music.” ●

“The Bay Area is USC’s second most important region behind Southern California in terms of alumni, prospective students and parents.”

If you have questions or comments on this article, go to tfm.usc.edu/mailbag. Listen to Classical KDFC online at kdfc.com and Classical KUSC at kusc.org. Each website has complete listings of programs, music blogs and arts news.

THE DAILY PROGRAM LINEUP AT CLASSICAL KDFC SAN FRANCISCO Veteran Announcers Connect with Bay Area Classical Music Fans

Hoyt Smith

Dianne Nicolini

Ray White

Rik Malone

“Hoyt Smith and the KDFC Morning Show” Weekdays 6:30 – 11 a.m. Saturday 7 a.m. – noon

“KDFC While You Work with Dianne Nicolini” Weekdays 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Saturday noon – 6 p.m.

“Homestretch with Ray White” Weekdays 3:30 – 8 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

“Evenings with Rik Malone” Weekdays 8 p.m. – midnight Saturday 6 – 10 p.m.

A 17-year veteran of the station, Nicolini “radiates an air of quiet intelligence and warmth that resonates with listeners,” says an admiring colleague. She coanchors the simulcasts of the San Francisco Opera at AT&T Park — the home of the Giants — with Hoyt Smith.

White studied classical guitar and was a host on rock and jazz stations in New York City and San Francisco before coming to KDFC. “You don’t have to do 20 years of prep to listen to classical music,” he says. “If you play a piece by Bach, you and Bach have something going on.”

Before Smith arrived at KDFC in 1999, he had worked at a commercial smooth jazz station but was a fan of classical music. He has gone on to become a multi-year winner of the “Favorite Morning Show” award as determined by San Francisco magazine readers.

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Malone, who also is the host of the San Francisco Symphony broadcasts, played in a rock band and acted before announcing on an East Coast classical station. “I was lucky to find KDFC President Bill Lueth, who felt like I did that classical music should be accessible.”


Strong Signals With the purchase of Classical KDFC, USC Radio now reaches from California’s southern border through the central coast and well north of San Francisco.

1

2

3 4 5

6

7 8 9

CLASSICAL KDFC Station Locations 1 2 3 4 5

Ukiah / Lakeport Napa / Sonoma / East Bay SF / Oakland / Berkeley / Marin South Bay / Peninsula Los Gatos / Saratoga

STATION COVERAGE AREAS

CLASSICAL KUSC Station Locations 6 7 8 9 10

Morro Bay / San Luis Obispo Santa Barbara Thousand Oaks Los Angeles / Santa Clarita Palm Springs

10


Among men, it’s the second most common cancer, and probably the most feared. Until recently, those who survived faced major losses in quality of life. But times have changed, and the USC Institute of Urology — a national and international leader in the field — has some knock-out new therapies.

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ILLUSTRATIONS / VEER

New Ways to Fight


[ KECK MEDICAL CENTER OF USC ]

Urologist Inderbir S. Gill recently sat down with Amy Hamaker to discuss recent advances in the fight against prostate cancer. Gill is the USC Institute of Urology’s founding executive director, chairman of and professor in the Catherine and Joseph Aresty Department of Urology, and associate dean for clinical innovation at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

Are there warning signs for men that it’s time to get a prostate cancer screening test? There are no reliable physical warning signs for early detection of the disease. Practically speaking, the only way to identify earlystage prostate cancer is with a blood test that measures prostatespecific antigen (PSA). In the past, the prognosis for prostate cancer was generally poor. Is there more reason for hope now? There’s every reason for hope and optimism because we’ve made a lot of strides in categorizing cancer risk and treating the disease. It used to be that every diagnosis of prostate cancer was seen as an urgent threat to life. Now, we know that about 30 to 40 percent of men who are diagnosed will have low-risk disease that is unlikely to impact their longevity; another 30 percent will have intermediate-risk disease that merits a thorough discussion about individualized treatment options; and, finally, 30 percent will have the kind of aggressive prostate cancer that will compromise their longevity in the near-term, requiring urgent, definitive treatment.

What strides have been made in treating prostate cancer? Formerly, open, radical prostatectomy surgery — the traditional procedure with a large, open incision — was the only option available for removing a cancerous prostate gland. Today, more than 200,000 prostate cancer surgeries are performed in the U.S. every year, and approximately 80 percent of them are done robotically. This enables a quicker recovery and reduced possibility of complications. Surgeons make four or five small, key-hole cuts and remove the prostate using robotic instruments and a high-definition laparoscope, or viewing tube, with exquisite, threedimensional vision. What are the outcomes with the robotic procedure? Merely having a robot doesn’t make one a superstar surgeon. The critical requirements, as with any surgery, are still expertise, skill and experience. Our team at USC was among the first, if not the first, in the country to perform robotic and laparoscopic prostatectomy surgery. We have now performed more than 5,000 of these minimally invasive cancer procedures — making us one of the most experienced teams in the world.

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If the cancer is confined to the prostate, we have a 95 to 98 percent chance of getting it all. If it locally extends outside the prostate, we still have a greater than 90 percent chance of getting it all. Our outcomes on cancer cure are among the best in the field. And, we’re now routinely performing this procedure on patients with high-risk disease because we can deliver chances of a cancer cure that are similar to open surgery, while considerably decreasing trauma to the patient. At the same time, this operation used to take more than three hours to perform, with a blood loss of approximately 300 cubic centimeters. We’ve now easily cut these numbers in half. What about side effects? We can prevent surgical side effects by saving the nerve bundle responsible for erections, and preserving the sphincter responsible for urinary continence, all while removing the entire cancer. In our most recent experience, the average time for patients’ return of complete continence is 21 days. In those with good erectile function before surgery, our potency rate at one year is 82 to 86 percent. How long is the hospital stay and recovery period after prostate surgery? We’re now offering outpatient, catheter-free robotic prostatectomy, which reduces operative time and blood loss, while being

more comfortable for patients. In place of a catheter in the urethra, we put a tube into the bladder from the belly, which patients strongly prefer. Most patients return to regular activities within three to seven days, and to work within seven to 10 days. To my knowledge, we’re the only ones in the country offering this. Are there advances on the horizon? The most exciting thing we’re developing is focal therapy for prostate cancer, the novel concept of “male lumpectomy.” Currently, for prostate cancer, the entire prostate gland has to be removed because we don’t know the exact location of the cancer within it. However, we’re now developing highly precise and targeted biopsies using MRI and trans-rectal ultrasound imaging techniques to determine the cancer’s exact location. Once we find it, we can go back to that location, and use techniques like laser, cryotherapy [freezing], and radio frequency [heat] to kill the cancer, while leaving the rest of the prostate intact. The major advantage of this approach is that there is no injury to the surrounding nerves and tissues, which maximally preserves erections and urinary continence. This “male lumpectomy” approach is likely to become a paradigm-shifting advance for approximately 30 percent of men with prostate cancer who have low-risk, organ-confined disease. ●

Inderbir S. Gill, Niki C. Nikias and USC President C. L. Max Nikias

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BUILDING UPON USC’S LEADERSHIP in innovative surgical techniques for prostate and bladder cancer, an anonymous $13.3 million gift will fund the future USC Urology Robotics Center of Excellence and a program for targeted prostate cancer biopsies. “Today the USC Institute of Urology is an internationally renowned powerhouse in robotic and open surgery,” President C. L. Max Nikias says. “Tomorrow we look forward to being a comprehensive world leader in urology. … Te Institute of Urology is helping to redefine and reshape the field of urology.” In 2011, the institute was second in the National Institutes of Health rankings of research funding for urology programs nationwide. Under the three-year leadership of Executive Director Inderbir S. Gill, the institute’s expert clinical and research team has grown, enabling significantly more patients to be treated — both at USC and through physician trips worldwide — and more research to be pursued. Tis gift will enable the institute’s physicians to provide the most advanced treatments and personalized care in a thoroughly modern and sophisticated environment. As a one-stop, high-tech outpatient urology facility, the new center will bring together disease-specific disciplines and generate research that develops novel, clinic-based therapeutic technologies for urological cancers. ●

PHOTO BY PHILIP CHANNING

A GIFT TO Save AND Change LIVES


For more information or to make an appointment, visit uscurology.com or call 323-865-3700

80

%

Prostate cancers that are diagnosed when the disease is still confined to the prostate and highly treatable. Most men diagnosed with the disease do not die of it.

The average age at diagnosis of prostate cancer. Nearly two-thirds are diagnosed at age 65 or older.

Robotic and laparoscopic prostatectomy surgeries performed by USC’s highly skilled specialists**

154.8 per 100,000

White

146.9 per 100,000

Black

236.0 per 100,000

Asian/Pacific Islander

85.4 per 100,000

American Indian/ Alaska Native

78.4 per 100,000

Hispanic

125.9 per 100,00

65 85 95-98 %|

%|

Good outcomes for urinary continence at six weeks, six months and one year following prostate cancer surgery at USC

100,000

All Races

Prostate cancer surgeries performed in the U.S. every year

28,000

American men who will die of the disease in 2012

MALES

240,000

5000

INCIDENCE RATES BY RACE RACE/ETHNICITY

USC’s combined experiences with cutting-edge and traditional prostate surgeries

%

American men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2012*

in six

1

Men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among American men, exceeded only by skin cancer.

67

8000

* All national statistics are from the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute. ** USC statistics are from the USC Institute of Urology.

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family ties

[NEWS FROM THE USC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION]

Celebrating a

CULTURE

of Volunteerism

AT THE 2012 VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION DINNER on Sept. 21, the USC Alumni Association (USCAA) celebrated the alumni volunteers, organizations and friends who dedicate their time, energy and expertise to support the advancement of USC. USCAA Board of Governors President Mitchell Lew ’83, MD ’87 and USCAA CEO Scott M. Mory co-hosted the event, at which they presented the Widney Alumni House Award to 46 alumni club and university group volunteers in recognition of their exceptional service. Te Keck School of Medicine of USC’s Salerni Collegium Alumni Associa-

BY TIMOTHY O. KNIGHT

’86, MBA ’92 USCAA Board of Governors USC Associates USC Athletics Board of Councilors

“As an undergrad, I was very fortunate to have pretty much my full tuition covered through financial aid and scholarships. I always said that when I became successful, I would repay the money that USC invested in me. Little did I realize that I would do that many times over, and love doing every minute of it.”

U S C T R O JA N FA M I LY M AG A Z I N E

Dolly Harris

’05

MSW ’74, PharmD ’77, MPA ’79

USC Alumni Club of the San Gabriel Valley

Michael Adler

36

Randyn Calvo

“The achievements of USC’s students, alumni, faculty and staff inspire me to keep spreading the Trojan spirit beyond the 90089 ZIP code. I’m constantly in awe of the outstanding contributions Trojans make each day. As volunteers, we give our time and energy, but what we get back is so much more.”

winter 2012

Scott L. Gilmore

USCAA Board of Governors

’75, JD/MBA ’78

USC School of Pharmacy Alumni Association

USCAA Board of Governors

“Being honored recognizes my commitment to USC on a personal level. I am inspired every time I attend a USC School of Pharmacy Alumni Association meeting to brainstorm ideas to help students or hear President [C. L. Max] Nikias and other university leaders discuss the innovations taking place at USC.”

USC Marshall Partners

“Being honored for doing something that I enjoy so much is an unexpected benefit. My motivation to volunteer was reignited when my children began attending USC. Their experiences brought back great memories and exposed me to all the amazing strides USC had made since I graduated.”


tion, the Trojan League of South Bay and the USC Alumni Club of Beverly Hills-Hollywood were named Volunteer Organizations of the Year for their efforts to build a culture of philanthropy among the Trojan Family. Amy-Jo Luna received the Volunteer Friend of the Year award for her outstanding work as director of alumni relations at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. In recognition of their leadership, achievements and overall contributions to USC, eight alumni received the President’s Award. Here’s what each had to say about why they give back to USC:

Nancy Clark Hillgren

James Lewis

’76

’97

USCAA Board of Governors Trojan League Associates of San Diego P H OTO S B Y S T E P H E N B L A H A ; L E B O W I T Z P H OTO C O U R T E S T Y O F S T E V E N L E B O W I T Z

County

“Growing up in a home with a cardinal and gold den, I guess I was destined to become an active member of the Trojan Family. My commitment to the university runs deep and my desire to give back comes naturally. I’ve seen the direct impact volunteers can make by raising money for student scholarships and working to advance the university’s long-term goals.”

Steven Lebowitz ’62, MBA ’65 USC Davis School of Gerontology Board of Councilors

“I was very fortunate to receive a terrific education at USC. The people I met then are many of my friends today, and my education has played a significant role in my career and my success. Sharing my 40-plus years of business experience with the university is easy to do and rewarding.”

USCAA Board of Governors

Rick Stephens

USC Price School of Public Policy Leadership Council

’74

“I am inspired to volunteer because I could never give USC as much as it has given me: professional skills, an appreciation for the arts, amazing experiences and memories and, most importantly, lifelong friends and membership in the Trojan Family.”

USC Viterbi School of Engineering Board of Governors

“To help an ’SC student pursue his or her professional dream is a reward in itself. My contributions pale in comparison to what I’ve gained from my relationship with USC and the Trojan community.”

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For over 30 years, Trojan Travel has delivered the best in Trojan Family group travel, and now, for the first time, we’re expanding our services to include online hotel bookings at some of the best prices anywhere!

Save Big — Book Your Hotel through Trojan Travel!

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z Use us instead of Expedia, Orbitz, hotel websites and other major online booking portals and you can regularly save 10-15% and sometimes up to 50% more! Expect the same ease of use and level of customer service, too!

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z We offer the best inventory of hotels and resorts anywhere in the U.S. and around the world. z This service is open to all, with a portion of every booking directly supporting USC Alumni Association programs and services!

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InnerALUM

The new Student Alumni Society helps students embrace their future identity. BY ROSS M. LEVINE

P H OTO S B Y D A N AV I L A

“STUDENT ALUMNI” MAY SOUND like an oxymoron, but students and alumni are actually two sides of the same coin — current USC students are future USC alumni. To foster this alumni identity, the USC Alumni Association (USCAA) launched the new Student Alumni Society (SAS). Open to all students, SAS gives students the opportunity to connect with the Trojan Family at large through events and programs such as the Trojan SCuppers (alumni-hosted dinners for students during the spring semester) and the USC Alumni Day of SCervice (volunteer opportunities on local community service projects) that enrich their USC experience. SAS is also the gateway to Society 53, a student leadership program whose members serve as official ambassadors at top-tier university and USCAA events. To kick off SAS, hundreds of new members and alumni — including members from the USCAA Board of Governors and USC volunteer organizations — participated in a “Speed Networking” event on Sept. 20. “Alumni are a tremendous resource to our students,” Amy Ross PhD ’86 said. “We have the capacity to help them define their career goals and stay connected with the Trojan Family well after the ink on their diplomas dries!” Sophomore Josh Romanu said meeting USC alumni “is a great way for students to see how people managed to do well in school, have a social life and become successful in their fields of study. Alumni are reallife examples of how balance and hard work come together.” Freshman Yasmeen Serhan said SAS is a great way for students to get involved on campus. “It’s important that students are able to reach out to their extended Trojan Family for advice and guidance. I’m excited to learn from the experiences they had at USC.” ● Top, USCAA Board of Governors member Jim Bogenreif ’81 with sophomore Anjali Daniels; bottom, USCAA Board of Governors President Mitchell Lew ’83, MD ’87 with sophomore Matthew Chen and junior Patrick Tanahan

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Alumni SCene Featuring Olympians, football fans, alumni leaders and new students

2

1

1. Olympic Overture The USC Alumni Club of London rolled out the red carpet when the 2012 Olympic Games arrived in its hometown. On July 25, the club held a special welcome for USC athletes and coaches at London’s stately Oxford and Cambridge Club. Pictured with Duane Solomon ’10, right, of the U.S. track and field team (800 meters), is László Tábori, USC distance coach and the third man to run a mile in less than four minutes (3:59 in 1955).

2. Occupy Times ’SCuare Trojans took over New York’s Times Square on Sept. 7 to cheer for the Men of Troy during the USC Alumni Association’s Syracuse Football Weekender pep rally. The next day,

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1,400 Trojans braved a summer lightning storm to attend a tailgate at MetLife Stadium before watching the Trojans defeat the Syracuse Orange 42-29.

’04 (pictured) — the co-founder and president of Global Brigades, the world’s largest student-led sustainable development organization — spoke about “Motivating and Maximizing Millennials.”

3. Volunteer Leaders Hit Refresh The annual USC Alumni Leadership Conference on Sept. 20-21 gathered hundreds of USC alumni and volunteers from around the world to hear about the latest university developments from USC administration, including President C. L. Max Nikias. Elizabeth Garrett, USC provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, hosted a panel on “Why We’re Here,” introducing five students who “exemplify USC’s commitment to scholarship with consequence.” USCAA CEO Scott M. Mory and Steven Atamian

4. Rites of Passage Throughout July and August each year, members of the USC alumni community from around the world host SCend Off receptions to welcome new and current students and their parents to USC. This year, USC alumni clubs and regional representatives hosted SCend Offs in nearly half of the 50 states and in 10 nations across Asia, Europe and Latin America. Pictured are students at the USC Alumni Club of San Diego SCend Off held in Del Mar on Aug. 5. ●

P H OTO S B Y V O J T E C H H O R N A , D A N AV I L A A N D R A D I N E S A L LY O X L E Y

4

3


Te USC Alumni Association proudly announces the launch of the new

USC Alumni Business and Service Directory TrojanBusinessDirectory.com

the Trojan Family Trojans doing business with Trojans!

 Locate Trojan-owned/affiliated businesses searchable by category, keyword or city

 Reach members of the Trojan Family near you with our location-aware app notifications

 Grow your business while giving back to the Trojan community, with proceeds helping to support USC Alumni Association programs and services

 Automatic inclusion in the business directory iPhone app  Business listings include business name, map, description, logo and more!

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tfm.usc.edu 41 lifelong and worldwide

U S C T R O JA N FA M I LY M AG A Z I N E


class notes Transforming Urban Education

1940s Jack McClellan ’42, ME ’50, EdD ’56 published his third novel, Let Love Be the Victor, a story of romance and mystery set in 17th-century Cornwall, England. He lives in Alhambra, Calif. Jim McGregor ’44 was inducted into the Portland (Ore.) Interscholastic League Hall of Fame this summer for his long career as a basketball coach. He lives in Bellevue, Wash.

1950s Ralph R. Villani ’53, MA ’57 was elected to the Riverside County (Calif.) Board of Education this summer. He also serves as an elected member of the California Retired Teachers Association’s Board of Directors. He lives in Palm Springs, Calif., with his wife, Barbara.

›› 42

CLASS NOTES ALSO APPEARS ONLINE. READ NEWS ABOUT EACH GRADUATE AT tfm.usc.edu/classnotes SEND US YOUR NEWS AT classnotes@usc.edu

U S C T R O JA N FA M I LY M AG A Z I N E

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1960s Kurt Hahn PA ’61 was named a delegate to the 2012 Republican National Convention. He retired in 1998 after a long career in city management and currently is board chair of the North Sonoma County (Calif.) Healthcare District. He lives in Healdsburg, Calif., with his wife, Joandell. Gail Wilson Kenna ’65 of Wilcoma Church, Va., was awarded the Donald Everett Axinn Contributor Scholarship for fiction writing to attend the 2012 Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Vermont. A retired professor, she recently completed her fourth book. Roger B. Baron MA ’66 retired from Draftfcb advertising agency in Chicago as senior vice president, media research director. He led a 42-year career in advertising and was the primary author of Advertising Media Planning, Seventh Edition. Terry Hodge Taylor ’69 of New York City is celebrating 30 years of his production company, Hodge Taylor Productions. He is

P H OTO B Y D I E T M A R Q U I S TO R F

When Lizette Zarate ’02 looks at students in USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative (NAI), she sees herself almost 20 years ago — an academically gifted young girl who was getting an education that she otherwise wouldn’t have received in her inner-city Los Angeles community. “It completely changed my life,” says Zarate, who attended a Catholic school in her neighborhood before enrolling in NAI in 1995 and is now a curriculum and instruction specialist for the program. “I was building my cultural and social capital with exposure to field trips, museums and different parts of L.A., and engaging in meaningful discussions. NAI pushed me to excel, finish well and be competitive when I applied to college.” After earning a bachelor’s degree in English from USC, her first job was coordinating a literacy program at a Los Angeles high school, where many students were reading at an elementary-school level and couldn’t write even a paragraph, she says. “Tat’s when I decided that I wanted to dedicate my work to improving the education of urban students, ultimately offering opportunities for them to learn and go to college — to give them what I was given,” Zarate adds. She went on to hold several administrative positions with after-school programs before landing back at NAI. She also obtained a master’s degree in education from Loyola Marymount University, and soon expects to complete a doctorate in the field with a concentration in leadership for social justice. “I’m serving the community I’m passionate about in a program that transforms lives. Being a part of that means the world to me.” ●


alumni profile ’77

also the executive producer of the Theater Hall of Fame.

Food and Water Steward

1970s L. Joseph Martini MS ’71 of San Diego published ICE-X ’86: Freezing the Cold War, a book detailing his experiences launching torpedoes from the surface of the Arctic ice pack during the Cold War. Ralph Campillo ’73, a partner at Sedgwick LLP, was recognized as a Life Sciences Star in the inaugural edition of LMG Life Sciences 2012, a directory of the life sciences industry’s leading law firms and litigators. He lives in Los Angeles. Gary Milliman ’76, city manager for the city of Brookings, Ore., received the 2012 Award for Career Excellence from the International City/County Management Association. Robert M. A. Wilson MPA ’76 is the author of more than 25 history books and was interviewed in the August 2012 issue of Wild West magazine. He lives in Las Vegas. Maureen A. Flanagan CFA ’78 recently joined First Republic Investment Management in Newport Beach, Calif., as managing director and portfolio manager after 17 years at U.S. Trust. She serves as chairman of the finance counsel and investment committee for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange.

P H OTO B Y K E V I N S C A N L O N

Melissa J. Johnson ’78, MS ’80, PhD ’90, founder and CEO of the Institute for Girls’ Development in Pasadena, Calif., was recognized for her achievements at the 12th annual Outstanding Women in Business Awards luncheon, and was named the Junior League of Pasadena’s 2012 honoree for her contributions to the community. Diane Wilk ’78 and her husband, Michael Burch, were selected to exhibit their work at the 13th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale in Venice, Italy. They are principals of Los Angelesbased architectural firm Michael Burch Architects.

When Paula Daniels ’77, Broadcast Journalism, was growing up in Hawaii, her grandfather taught her about malama aina — stewardship of the land. “He said, ‘We don’t own this land, we’re just taking care of it for the next generations,’” Daniels recalls. “This made a big impression on me.” So it’s no surprise that when Daniels came to USC, she brought a strong interest in environmental issues, along with hopes of becoming a documentary filmmaker. In 2012, 35 years later, she was named one of LA Weekly’s “Ten People Making L.A. a Better Place” for her lauded environmental work at Los Angeles City Hall. During her undergraduate years, she never would have imagined the winding road she’d take to get there. Her USC experience included being a photographer for the Daily Trojan. “I covered every sport and did my own photo essays,” Daniels says. She also remembers her freshman-year photos of streakers, and the Symbionese Liberation Army shoot-out on nearby East 56th Street. In her sophomore year, she was accepted into the Semester of the Arts immersion program. “We had the best of the arts education on campus,” she says. “It opened me up completely.” But after graduation, Daniels took a less-than-passionate detour into a legal career focused on entertainment law and litigation. “Options for documentary film were incredibly limited then,” she explains. Still, in her spare time Daniels was active in local water and food policy issues. She became president of the Heal the Bay board, and later was asked by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to serve on the city’s Coastal Commission. In 2003, Daniels was appointed by then-Governor Gray Davis to the California Bay-Delta Authority, the state water resources board, which spurred her interest in food and agribusiness. Her current position as Mayor Villaraigosa’s senior adviser on food policy — and, as part of that, founding chair of the new L.A. Food Policy Council — is “the best job I’ve ever had,” she says. Daniels describes her policy work as “a multi-layered strategy” built on 28 priorities. It includes providing disadvantaged neighborhoods access to higher quality food, and developing an institutional food-procurement policy that embraces local, sustainable and fair labor practices; animal welfare; and health and nutrition initiatives. Some of this work is also being reviewed as a model for other cities and states. As for her career, Daniels has no regrets about its unexpected turns. “Everything in my background is coming together,” she says. Everything includes acting on her grandfather’s advice about malama aina. On March 1, 2013, Daniels will take her message home to USC in a panel discussion on “Just Food and Fair Food: A Multidisciplinary Exploration.” It will be held in Doheny Memorial Library on the University Park Campus as part of Visions and Voices, the university-wide arts and humanities initiative. LIZ SEGAL

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Pioneer. Teacher. Researcher. Life Changer.

Top Doctor. Our physicians wear many hats, and they look good in all of them. We salute the nearly 200 Keck Medical Center of USC physicians recognized by their peers as Top Doctors in Pasadena Magazine.

KeckMedicalCenterofUSC.org/TopDoctors To make an appointment with a USC physician, call (800) USC-CARE.

Fight On.


alumni profile ’90

Kim Thurman Spirito ’79 is vice president of loss prevention and claims and senior claims counsel for Lawyers’ Mutual Insurance Company in Burbank, Calif. She lives in Palos Verdes Estates, Calif., and is a member of Trojan League of South Bay.

1980s Gordon Adams ’80 of Laguna Niguel, Calif., contributed to the recently published book The Wisdom of Walk-Ons: 7 Winning Strategies for College, Business and Life, which tells the stories of three unrecruited college football players who found success on and off the field. Rick Caruso ’80, a USC trustee, presented $10,000 checks to the 2012 Spirit of American Youth Scholarship winners this summer as part of a program his development company, Caruso Affiliated, launched in 2009 to recognize outstanding high school students. He lives in Los Angeles. Owen Newcomer PhD ’80 was appointed mayor of Whittier, Calif., for the third time. He serves as chair of both the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority and the League of California Cities’ Environmental Quality Policy Committee, and he continues to teach part time at Rio Hondo Community College since retiring in 2005. Janie Watts Spataro MA ’82 published her first novel, Moon Over Taylor’s Ridge, about a woman who returns home to settle her father’s estate. She lives in Ringgold, Ga., and writes under the name Janie Dempsey Watts.

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F J A M E S L O R D

Susan Straight ’82 is the author of Between Heaven and Here, the final novel in her Rio Seco trilogy. She is a distinguished professor of creative writing at University of California, Riverside. Darryl R. Adams ’84 is serving his fifth consecutive term as a school board member in the Norwalk-La Mirada (Calif.) Unified School District. He has served as board president four times, and has been named a Local Hero by the city of Long Beach, Calif., a Citizen of the Year finalist in Norwalk, and a PTSA Honorary Service Award winner

A Life by Design “Intuitive design” — design with a user-friendly feel — is a topic that landscape architect James Lord BArch ’90 thinks about a lot. He’s won national and international awards for designs that successfully mold earth to structures in many landmark green projects. And recently, Lord’s San Francisco-based firm, Surfacedesign — which he founded in 2006 — built the new visitor plaza for the Golden Gate Bridge’s 75th anniversary. Design is also a way he thinks about his life: the fact that he comes from a USC-strong family (his father was at the engineering school, his mother a staff librarian), and landed on campus during the heady, progressive days of USC’s mid-1980s Architecture program. He remembers his professors as including “modernists who cracked the whip, and then this fresh influx of disciples of Frank Gehry. You also had characters who were more socially oriented, who designed multiple housing, and emphasized that [it] could be elegant. It was a pivotal moment.” Topping off his education was a scholarship to the Artists-In-Residence program at Pasadena’s historic Gamble House, with its coterie of visiting architects. Graduate school in landscape architecture at Harvard followed. Later, he teamed up with architect George Hargreaves, with whom he won a competition for the design of World Expo ’98 in Lisbon on a “denigrated site,” and learned all about environmentally conscious building. Lord also was inspired to enter his architectural team in the competition to design venues for the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games — the “first green games.” Lord and his colleagues won, and the Sydney Olympic Park they designed became one of the largest plazas in the world. “But it was a huge toxic site,” he explains. “We were cleaning up everything while building, and putting in things like permeable unit pavers, which allow water to more quickly enter the water table and benefit tree roots. This was the first time pavers were utilized on a grand scale. [They’re] commonplace now.” On another project, a water drainage system for Mumbai’s streets, he worked in tandem with the office of venerated architect I. M. Pei. Today, Lord’s own firm is winning kudos for his challenging latest project. “The Golden Gate Bridge plaza was a former military [site] that had been bare since the Civil War,” he says. “The site was a mess … But this was an icon for the country — we didn’t want a design for a plaza that was going to compete with the bridge.” Lord says he is proud of the praise the Golden Gate project has garnered from often-critical observers such as SFCurbed.com. Describing the project’s intuitive design as built-in “poetry of the plaza,” he considers it to be “like a new living room for the bridge! Now you can spend time there and, literally, watch the fog roll in.” LIZ SEGAL

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Sponsored by:


from John Glenn High School in Norwalk. Russ Reabold MLA ’84 has retired after 34 years as a teacher and coach at La Puente (Calif.) High School. He served as president of the USC Alumni Club of the San Gabriel Valley from 2002 to 2009, and currently serves as a board member of the Trojan Force. Hwashik D. Bong ’88 of Santa Clarita, Calif., was recently appointed sports section editor of the Los Angeles chapter of the newspaper JoongAng Ilbo (Korea JoongAng Daily) after covering 10 Super Bowl and 11 Rose Bowl games as the only Korean journalist since the 2000 season. He covers the Dodgers, Lakers, Kings and USC Trojans beats. Lucia Paula Furuta MSW ’89, a supervising psychiatric social worker for the Los

Angeles County Department of Mental Health, received the department’s 2012 Social Worker of the Year award.

1990s Kimberley (Dumm) Lovato ’90 was recently awarded the Lowell Tomas Award by the Society of American Travel Writers for her book Walnut Wine & Truffle Groves: Culinary Adventures in the Dordogne. She lives in Belvedere Tiburon, Calif. Joseph Gilbert PhD ’91, associate professor of management at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, published Ethics for Managers: Philosophical Foundations & Business Realities. Zev S. Brooks JD ’92 of Fountain Valley,

Calif., co-wrote and served as the executive producer of The Yankles, an independent film about a Jewish, orthodox baseball team. Te film won nine festival awards across the country and played in 54 cities and 10 foreign countries. Geoffrey D. Chin MA ’94 recently published The Last Magi, a spiritual novel. He lives in Los Angeles. Pamela E. Fagan MBA ’96 is an acquisitions analyst at the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, PARCA CACI Office in Washington, D.C. Christian D. Orr ’97 works in the United Arab Emirates for Al Shaheen Adventure LLC, a training and consultancy program, as a police instructor in the Al Bayariq youth program. Previously, he spent four

A New Home at USC Te USC Catholic Community welcomes students, parents, alumni, faculty and staff in celebrating the long-anticipated grand

opening of our new Church and Center on December 9.

USC Caruso Catholic Center Now Open for Students To schedule a personal or group “sneak peek”, visit us on Facebook (USC Caruso Catholic Center) or call 213-749-5341.

Save the Date!

Official Grand Opening & Celebration December 9, 2012

844 thirty second street los angeles, california 90007

www.catholictrojan.org

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New Hope for Cancer Patients. You or someone you love has been diagnosed with cancer. At the USC Norris Cancer Hospital we can help you find the best treatment possible. USC Norris is one of only a few facilities built exclusively for cancer research and patient care. It’s part of the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center - one of the original eight comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute. We pioneer and offer clinical trials that are a crucial step in advancing care and developing potentially beneficial drugs and treatments. Our expert, caring physicians and researchers will work side by side with you to develop a personalized plan for your care, including the innovative trials that can save lives.

Call today to make an appointment and learn more about your options. (323) 865-3111 uscnorriscancer.usc.edu/cltrials/


months as a security contractor for SOC LLC at Al Asad Airbase in Iraq, two years as an immigration and customs enforcement special agent in Long Beach, Calif., and three years as a customs and border protection officer at the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport. Nell (Buckner) Stephenson ’97 of Los Angeles published her second book, Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat. She runs a nutritional counseling business. Paul Galichia MFA ’98 of Los Angeles coproduced a documentary film, Speak, about the fear of public speaking. Gary Chau MBA ’99 and Mark Wain MBA ’99, founders of Caffe Luxxe, a coffee and espresso bar with three locations throughout Los Angeles, recently opened their own cof-

fee roasting facility in the South Bay.

left behind in Berlin during World War II. He lives in Amherst, Mass.

2000s Reina Smyth ’01, president of handbag company Flying Buttress, and Julie Quinnan ’02, CEO and head designer, launched a website, myflyingbuttress.com, to sell their handbags, lunch bags and tech sleeves geared toward tweens. Their company is based in El Segundo, Calif. Eric Kahnert ’02 is an evening anchor at KSTP, the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis/ St. Paul. He previously worked as a weekend anchor at KUSA, the NBC affiliate in Denver. David R. Gilliam ’04 recently published his first novel, City of Women, about the women

Diidri Wells Robinson JD ’04 of St. Johns, Fla., was appointed to the Seventh Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission by Florida Gov. Rick Scott last summer after more than a year serving as an assistant United States attorney for the Middle District of Florida. She will be celebrating her second wedding anniversary with her husband, Michael C. Robinson MBA ’11, in April. Jason S. Vega MPA ’05 of Sacramento, Calif., serves as the vice president of state affairs for Magellan Health Services, a health care management organization. He recently climbed Mount Shasta on behalf of disabled veterans and Hero Health Hire, an initiative that promotes workforce development efforts for disabled veterans.

Leadership, Legacy & Scholarship The USC Black Alumni Association proudly continues its mission to support successful outcomes for USC black students through scholarship, mentoring and leadership opportunities by engaging our Trojan Family network. Learn more online at usc.edu/baa

Black Alumni Association A division of USC Student Affairs

Pictured, bottom right: Rev. Dr. Thomas Kilgore, Jr., founder, USC Black Alumni Association

NETWORKING

MENTORING

“1,000 FOR $1,000” SCHOLARSHIP CAMPAIGN

COMMITTEE SERVICE

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Mandale “Rob” White MPDS ’05 was recently named one of the 13 Local Innovation Champions of Change by the White House for his work as director of economic development for the city of Livermore, Calif., and as interim CEO for the i-GATE Innovation Hub. He is a doctoral candidate at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy.

Heather Pennington ’07 is pursuing a Master of Arts in Performance and Culture: Interdisciplinary Perspectives at Goldsmiths, University of London. She previously lived in Los Angeles, where she founded a private tutoring business and worked as a writer, editor, script supervisor and voice actor.

Jennifer Jane McCard ’06 was recently named an environmental and health affairs officer at the U.S. Embassy in Brasilia, Brazil. She and her husband, Alex Peterson ’05, who works for the U.S. State Department at the embassy, are in the middle of a two-year post in South America after having served two years at the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda.

Ben Emons EMBA ’08 published his book studying chain reactions in financial markets, The Financial Domino Effect. He lives in San Gabriel, Calif.

Nicole Aronson ’07, a Los Angeles-based artist, was featured on the cover of the July 2012 issue of ArtLA Magazine.

Rich Martini MPW ’08 recently published his book Flipside: A Journey into the Afterlife and directed a 90-minute documentary by the same name. He lives in Santa Monica, Calif. Jay Vincent ’08 and Michael Kramer ’09 received a 2012 Broadcast Music Inc.

Film/TV Award for their music composition for the animated series LEGO Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu. Catherine Ricafort ’09 is currently performing in the Broadway production of Mamma Mia! She played the principal role of Connie on the Broadway National Tour of A Chorus Line.

2010s Branché Foston ’11 was named to the inaugural class of Alfred Fleishman Diversity Fellows and will work in the Chicago office of Fleishman-Hillard International Communications, a global strategic communications firm. Catherine Karayan JD ’11 recently began

‘‘We choose Belmont Village.” “Dad is getting older now and needs a little help with things like meals and daily living activities. Belmont Village is the perfect choice. He has his own apartment in a beautiful community. He has friends, activities to keep him busy, a driver to take him places, even chefs to cook his meals. Plus, he receives hands-on assistance from Belmont’s trained staff whenever he needs it. He’s happy! That makes us happy, too.”

“We choose Belmont Village.”

‡ Chef-prepared, restaurant-style dining ‡ Free scheduled transportation daily ‡ Fitness and social activities ‡ Licensed nurse on-site ‡ Medication management ‡ Housekeeping and laundry ‡ Assistance with daily living ‡ Award-winning Circle of Friends®

Burbank (818) 972-2405

Rancho Palos Verdes (310) 377-9977

Encino (818) 788-8870

Westwood (310) 475-7501

Hollywood Hills (323) 874-7711

Thousand Oaks (805) 496-9301

memory program

‡ Short-term stays available ‡ Specialized Alzheimer’s care RCFE Lic 197603515, 197603848, 197605090, 198204246, 197608291, 306003668 © 2012 Belmont Villlage, L.P.

The Community Built for Life ® www.belmontvillage.com

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in memoriam

a two-year clerkship with the United States Tax Court in Washington, D.C. She earned her LL.M. in taxation from the New York University School of Law in May. Kamala Kirk ’11 published an article about architect Douglas W. Burdge in a recent issue of Malibu Times Magazine. She lives in Los Angeles. Bonnie Nadzam MA ’09, PhD ’11 of Colorado Springs, Colo., won the Center for Fiction’s 2011 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize for her book, Lamb. Her short fiction has appeared in Kenyon Review, Epoch, Granta and other publications.

MARRIAGES James Terzian ’96 and Tamar Kouyoumjian Daniel Weisinger ’02 and Lindsey Rosenberg ’06 Lisa Day ’03 and Richard Kiley Etter.

ALUMNI

Victor Wellington Peters ’24, Las Vegas; Aug. 12, at the age of 109 Ruthmarie Launer Gruber ’41, Alhambra, Calif.; June 10, at the age of 92 Joyce Rippé Tanton JD ’41, Corona del Mar; June 21, at the age of 96 Merrill E. Harrington DDS ’43, Palm Desert, Calif.; June 26, at the age of 99 Robert E. Schultz MBA ’49, San Marino, Calif.; June 26, at the age of 87 Elaine M. Smith Shelton ’49, Sylmar, Calif.; May 8, at the age of 85 Robert Warren Effler ’50, MS ’52, EdD ’71, Los Angeles; Oct. 20, 2011, at the age of 86

William Russell Buffkin Sr. MS ’75, Panama City, Fla.; June 17, at the age of 81 Richard H. Stewart DMA ’77, Escondido, Calif.; May 22, at the age of 82 Mary DeMario Hearne EdD ’79, Falls Church, Va.; May 31, at the age of 96 Hanna Hoesli DDS ’82, Hollywood, Calif.; Feb. 17, at the age of 55 Wayne Douglas Williams MSW ’95, Oceanside, Calif.; Oct. 5, 2011, at the age of 45 Fred Matua ’11, Carson, Calif.; Aug. 5, at the age of 28

FA C U LT Y, S TA F F & F R I E N D S Jack Davis San Diego; July 20, at the age of 81

BIRTHS Shane Foley ’91 and Farrell Foley, a son, Patrick Quinn. He joins brother Connor Ryan J. Keefe ’98, a son, Sean Lawrence Sarkis Baltaian ’99, MM ’01, DMA ’07 and In-Sook Park-Baltaian ’08, a son, Arsen Sarkis Baltaian

John Tamlin Holland Redfern ’50, La Jolla, Calif.; May 31, at the age of 85 Stan Jolley ’51, Rancho Mirage, Calif.; June 4, at the age of 86 Leon R. Sellers ’54, Hemet, Calif.; Jan. 4, at the age of 80

Katherine November ’02, MSW ’04 and Jared Andersen ’02, MBA ’12, a daughter, Alice Bernice. She joins sister Frances and brother Michael

Charles Thomas Tucker ’59, Escondido, Calif.; April 8, at the age of 79

Campbell Coulter ’04 and Krista (Perry) Coulter ’07, MA ’08, a son, Scott Perry. He is the nephew of Andrea Coulter ’11

M. Dale Nelson DDS ’66, Glendora, Calif.; May 5, at the age of 80

Jessica Ashley (Jones) Nelson ’05 and Trevor Carl Nelson, a son, Lazarus Wood.

Elmer J. Becky ’73, Sacramento, Calif.; July 24, at the age of 88

Denis Mitchell Aug. 21 Irving S. Reed Santa Monica, Calif.; Sept. 11, at the age of 88 Philip Stephens Los Angeles; July 31, at the age of 71. ●

››

READ THE OBITUARIES OF THESE MEMBERS OF THE TROJAN FAMILY AT

tfm.usc.edu/memoriam

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last look Footloose and Fancy-Free

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y U S C U N I V E R S I T Y A R C H I V E S

This 1933 May Fête celebration, hosted by the Trojan Women’s Club benefiting its scholarship fund, took place in the gardens surrounding the home of President and Mrs. Rufus von KleinSmid at the Doheny Mansion in Los Angeles. Hundreds of guests attended, as the gardens and marble fountains provided an old-world setting for the Maypole dances.

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Since 1942, USC occupational therapists have been helping others to build better lives.

Prepare for your career in occupational therapy at USC, ranked the nation’s #1 program by U.S. News & World Report “Best Careers” –U.S. News & World Report “Top 10 Jobs” –MSN.com “Best Master’s Degrees for Jobs” –Forbes “Best Jobs in America” –Money/payscale.com “10 Booming Jobs” –cnnmoney.com

70 YEARS

USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Terapy

www.usc.edu/ot

facebook.com/uscosot

@uscosot


USC Trojan Family Magazine University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-2818

non-profit organization u.s. postage paid university of southern california

Change Service Requested

World-class medical care.

Local address. At the Keck Medical Center of USC, you will find some of the finest physicians in the world. From the most complex diagnoses and treatments to primary care for the entire family, more than 500 USC physicians are in your community providing world-class care. Our physicians practice in locations throughout Southern California including downtown Los Angeles, La Ca単ada Flintridge, Beverly Hills and now, Pasadena. Visit our new medical office in Pasadena 210

Keck Medical Center of USC Pasadena 625 S. Fair Oaks Avenue, Suite 400

E Walnut St

134 E Colorado Blvd

KeckMedicalCenterofUSC.org/Pasadena (626) 568-1622 E Del Mar Blvd vd

E California Bl Blvd

S Los Robles Ave

S Arroyo Pkwy

S Fair Oaks Ave

na Ave

e Pasad

S Orange Grove Blvd

Glenarm St

110

Visit KeckMedicalCenterofUSC.org for a complete list of locations or call (800) USC-CARE.

Trojan Family Magazine Winter 2012  

University of Southern California's Trojan Family Magazine (Winter 2012). Features: Shall We Dance? (Glorya Kaufman’s landmark gift creates...

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