USC Gold Folder for Faculty and Staff

Page 1

Campus Support Resources STUDENT EQUITY AND INCLUSION PROGRAMS

Asian Pacific American Student Services (APASS) (STU 410)

(213) 740-4999 apass@usc.edu

Center for Black Cultural and Student Affairs (CBCSA) (STU 100)

(213) 740-8257 cbcsa@usc.edu

La CASA Latinx Chicanx Center (STU 402)

(213) 740-1480 lacasa@usc.edu

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Plus Student Center (LGBTQ+SC) (STU 415)

(213) 740-7619 lgbt@usc.edu

TROJAN SUCCESS INITIATIVES

Student Basic Needs provides resources for students experiencing food, housing or financial insecurity.

studentbasicneeds.usc.edu

First Generation Plus Success Center provides resources for students who identify as first generation, undocumented, former foster youth and transfer students.

firstgenplussc.usc.edu

PASTORAL CARE

Office of Religious Life UPC (URC 106) HSC (McKibben Hall 160)

(213) 740-6110 orl@usc.edu

ACCESSIBILITY

Office of Student Accessibility Services

(GFS 120) (213) 740-0076 ability@usc.edu

Veterans Resource Center (TCC 330)

(213) 821-6028 vrc@usc.edu

Supporting Student Well-being

MEDICAL, COUNSELING, SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVOR CARE (24/7)

USC Student Health Medical/Counseling and Mental Health/Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services available 24/7.

(213) 740-9355/WELL

USC CAMPUS SUPPORT

Campus Support and Intervention assists students, faculty and staff in navigating complex issues, understanding options and connecting to resources. This includes Trojans Care 4 Trojans (bit.ly/tc4t), a way to inform CSI if you are concerned about a fellow Trojan.

(213) 740-0411 uscsupport@usc.edu Trojan Food Pantry (PKS 135)

pantry@usc.edu

USC Kortschak Center for Learning and Creativity provides academic support services for students with diverse learning needs. (STU 311)

(213) 740-7884 kortschakcenter@usc.edu

Ask Ari connects students to helpful wellbeing and self care resources, videos, guided information and more.

askari.usc.edu

USC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE (24/7)

The Department of Public Safety can conduct welfare checks, transport students to care in the event of illness or injury, and respond to any campus emergency.

UPC (213) 740-4321 HSC (323) 442-1000

NATIONAL NONPROFIT/ GOVERNMENT RESOURCE LINKS

The Jed Foundation Mental Health Resource Center

bit.ly/jedresources

RAINN Warning signs that a college-age adult may have been sexually assaulted or abused

bit.ly/rainnwarningsigns Find Treatment From the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

findtreatment.gov

In addition, connecting students to campus resources helps us create a culture of care. Well-being is essential if everyone in our university is to thrive, and so everyone plays an important role to engage, connect and create community. There is no expectation for faculty and staff to master the role of a mental health professional, but we know that many of you care deeply about the well-being of our students and express a strong desire to know what to do when encountering a student in need.

For faculty and staff who provide guidance, mentoring, support and assistance to USC students.

Your influence shapes much of our students’ experiences at the university. Many have asked for guidance on how to respond when students express the need for emotional or mental health support in our campus community. This guide is intended to help you gain a better understanding of how you might respond in these moments.

Supporting Student Well-being


Supporting Student Well-being

Stress

Substance Abuse

Experts agree that some stress can be positive and motivating. But there are also ways we can create stress that are harmful to the well-being of our students. Our high-achieving students are often already extremely hard on themselves. Add to this the fact that they are in a critical period of their development as young adults. They are developing their identities and learning how to establish and maintain relationships. To reduce stress: Get to know your students. Try to foster more collaboration than competition in your class. Communicate expectations clearly. Keep breaks as breaks. Try to be flexible about extensions. Be familiar with the student health leave process. Model healthy behavior, including alcohol and other drugs, and appropriate expectations at university events—including social, professional, recreational and athletic events. Become familiar with resources and share them with students when they need them. Make sure your teaching assistants can recognize signs of distress and know the resources, too.

Alcohol is the most misused drug in our society, although most people do not even consider alcohol to be a drug. As with any substance—including misused prescription medications and illicit substances—it only takes a single episode of intoxication or substance use to experience life-changing consequences. Some observable signs that a person has a substance use disorder may include changes in: • Mood: apathy, excessive “up” or “down” moods, irritability or anger, hostility when confronted about substance use • Appearance: weight loss/gain, unkempt or poor hygiene, hair/skin changes • Behavior: dropping out of regular activities, secretive or suspicious behaviors, acting uncharacteristically silly • Judgment: making dangerous decisions, obtaining substances illegally or using other people’s prescriptions • Thinking: paranoia, impaired in connecting to reality, confusion, strong cravings for substance that supersede anything else, disorientation, impaired memory

OPTIONS FOR NEXT STEPS

OPTIONS FOR NEXT STEPS

Contact the Office of Campus Support and Intervention, located in TCC 421, by calling (213) 740-0411 or by emailing uscsupport@usc.edu when in doubt about a situation, if you need guidance or if you are concerned about a student.

Contact USC Student Health at (213) 740-9355/WELL or studenthealth@usc.edu for information on training programs, for bystander education on opioid overdose reversal using naloxone or for assistance starting a treatment plan. If you are concerned about a student’s safety or well-being, you may also contact the Office of Campus Support and Intervention at (213) 740-0411 or submit information through Trojans Care for Trojans at bit.ly/tc4t.

• • • • • • • •

Trauma Most trauma that is experienced tends to be emotional in nature and does not leave “physical scars.” Be aware that these types of traumatic experiences are common and have significant impacts on physical, emotional and mental well-being. Students may be survivors of a past trauma or may have recently encountered a traumatic event that alters their usual behaviors. Below are some behavioral and physical signs of trauma reactions.

BEHAVIORAL of activities or places that trigger memories of the event • Avoidance isolation and withdrawal • Social Lack of • interest in previously enjoyable activities

PHYSICAL startled • Easily fatigue and • Tremendous exhaustion (rapid heartbeat) • Tachycardia Edginess • Insomnia • Chronic muscle patterns •

in sleeping and • Changes eating patterns Vague complaints of aches and • pains throughout the body Extreme alertness; always on • the lookout for warnings of potential danger

COGNITIVE A person who has experienced trauma may be experiencing the following cognitive conditions that affect their interactions: intrusive thoughts of the event that may occur out of the blue, nightmares, visual images of the event, loss of memory and concentration abilities, disorientation, confusion and mood swings.

PSYCHOLOGICAL They may also be experiencing a range of psychological states that effect their emotions and behaviors: overwhelming fear, obsessive and compulsive behaviors, detachment from other people and emotions, emotional numbing, depression, guilt—especially if one lived while others perished, shame, emotional shock, disbelief, irritability, anger, anxiety and panic attacks.

ISSUED: JULY 2021

SHAPING OUR RESPONSES A trauma-informed response involves helping the person rebuild a sense of safety, trust and control over their life. • Using active listening skills and empathy is a way to increase feelings of safety, trust and control. That means not giving advice, not judging, reflecting back to the person what you heard for clarity and being reassuring and supportive. Providing that safe place for someone to talk helps to build a sense of trust. • Building safety and trust helps the grieving person to regain some control over their feelings. Giving them information about the grief process, normalizing their feelings and providing resources or referrals gives that person the tools to make decisions, which in turn increases their sense of control over their lives. • Empowering them by discussing their options and supporting their choices continues to build a sense of control.

OPTIONS FOR FOLLOW UP If a student appears to be experiencing immediate emotional or mental health difficulties: • Encourage them/her/him to seek support in the space they feel safe to discuss their concerns. This may include Counseling and Mental Health Services or Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services; both confidential services are part of USC Student Health and are available at Engemann and Eric Cohen Student Health Centers. • Walking the student over to the centers during open hours is encouraged. Phone: (213) 740-9355/WELL. If a student has been uncharacteristically absent from class or activities, missing assignments or exhibiting other cause for concern: • Report a concern through Trojans Care for Trojans (TC4T), online at bit.ly/tc4t; or call (213) 740-0411, so that the interdepartmental response team that reviews students of concern can follow up with the student. This form may be completed anonymously, but faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to provide contact information so that the team can obtain details that help provide context for the student’s change in behavior.


Supporting Student Well-being

Stress

Substance Abuse

Experts agree that some stress can be positive and motivating. But there are also ways we can create stress that are harmful to the well-being of our students. Our high-achieving students are often already extremely hard on themselves. Add to this the fact that they are in a critical period of their development as young adults. They are developing their identities and learning how to establish and maintain relationships. To reduce stress: Get to know your students. Try to foster more collaboration than competition in your class. Communicate expectations clearly. Keep breaks as breaks. Try to be flexible about extensions. Be familiar with the student health leave process. Model healthy behavior, including alcohol and other drugs, and appropriate expectations at university events—including social, professional, recreational and athletic events. Become familiar with resources and share them with students when they need them. Make sure your teaching assistants can recognize signs of distress and know the resources, too.

Alcohol is the most misused drug in our society, although most people do not even consider alcohol to be a drug. As with any substance—including misused prescription medications and illicit substances—it only takes a single episode of intoxication or substance use to experience life-changing consequences. Some observable signs that a person has a substance use disorder may include changes in: • Mood: apathy, excessive “up” or “down” moods, irritability or anger, hostility when confronted about substance use • Appearance: weight loss/gain, unkempt or poor hygiene, hair/skin changes • Behavior: dropping out of regular activities, secretive or suspicious behaviors, acting uncharacteristically silly • Judgment: making dangerous decisions, obtaining substances illegally or using other people’s prescriptions • Thinking: paranoia, impaired in connecting to reality, confusion, strong cravings for substance that supersede anything else, disorientation, impaired memory

OPTIONS FOR NEXT STEPS

OPTIONS FOR NEXT STEPS

Contact the Office of Campus Support and Intervention, located in TCC 421, by calling (213) 740-0411 or by emailing uscsupport@usc.edu when in doubt about a situation, if you need guidance or if you are concerned about a student.

Contact USC Student Health at (213) 740-9355/WELL or studenthealth@usc.edu for information on training programs, for bystander education on opioid overdose reversal using naloxone or for assistance starting a treatment plan. If you are concerned about a student’s safety or well-being, you may also contact the Office of Campus Support and Intervention at (213) 740-0411 or submit information through Trojans Care for Trojans at bit.ly/tc4t.

• • • • • • • •

Trauma Most trauma that is experienced tends to be emotional in nature and does not leave “physical scars.” Be aware that these types of traumatic experiences are common and have significant impacts on physical, emotional and mental well-being. Students may be survivors of a past trauma or may have recently encountered a traumatic event that alters their usual behaviors. Below are some behavioral and physical signs of trauma reactions.

BEHAVIORAL of activities or places that trigger memories of the event • Avoidance isolation and withdrawal • Social Lack of • interest in previously enjoyable activities

PHYSICAL startled • Easily fatigue and • Tremendous exhaustion (rapid heartbeat) • Tachycardia Edginess • Insomnia • Chronic muscle patterns •

in sleeping and • Changes eating patterns Vague complaints of aches and • pains throughout the body Extreme alertness; always on • the lookout for warnings of potential danger

COGNITIVE A person who has experienced trauma may be experiencing the following cognitive conditions that affect their interactions: intrusive thoughts of the event that may occur out of the blue, nightmares, visual images of the event, loss of memory and concentration abilities, disorientation, confusion and mood swings.

PSYCHOLOGICAL They may also be experiencing a range of psychological states that effect their emotions and behaviors: overwhelming fear, obsessive and compulsive behaviors, detachment from other people and emotions, emotional numbing, depression, guilt—especially if one lived while others perished, shame, emotional shock, disbelief, irritability, anger, anxiety and panic attacks.

ISSUED: JULY 2021

SHAPING OUR RESPONSES A trauma-informed response involves helping the person rebuild a sense of safety, trust and control over their life. • Using active listening skills and empathy is a way to increase feelings of safety, trust and control. That means not giving advice, not judging, reflecting back to the person what you heard for clarity and being reassuring and supportive. Providing that safe place for someone to talk helps to build a sense of trust. • Building safety and trust helps the grieving person to regain some control over their feelings. Giving them information about the grief process, normalizing their feelings and providing resources or referrals gives that person the tools to make decisions, which in turn increases their sense of control over their lives. • Empowering them by discussing their options and supporting their choices continues to build a sense of control.

OPTIONS FOR FOLLOW UP If a student appears to be experiencing immediate emotional or mental health difficulties: • Encourage them/her/him to seek support in the space they feel safe to discuss their concerns. This may include Counseling and Mental Health Services or Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services; both confidential services are part of USC Student Health and are available at Engemann and Eric Cohen Student Health Centers. • Walking the student over to the centers during open hours is encouraged. Phone: (213) 740-9355/WELL. If a student has been uncharacteristically absent from class or activities, missing assignments or exhibiting other cause for concern: • Report a concern through Trojans Care for Trojans (TC4T), online at bit.ly/tc4t; or call (213) 740-0411, so that the interdepartmental response team that reviews students of concern can follow up with the student. This form may be completed anonymously, but faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to provide contact information so that the team can obtain details that help provide context for the student’s change in behavior.


Campus Support Resources STUDENT EQUITY AND INCLUSION PROGRAMS

Asian Pacific American Student Services (APASS) (STU 410)

(213) 740-4999 apass@usc.edu

Center for Black Cultural and Student Affairs (CBCSA) (STU 100)

(213) 740-8257 cbcsa@usc.edu

Student Basic Needs provides resources for students experiencing food, housing or financial insecurity.

studentbasicneeds.usc.edu

First Generation Plus Success Center provides resources for students who identify as first generation, undocumented, former foster youth and transfer students.

firstgenplussc.usc.edu

La CASA Latinx Chicanx Center (STU 402)

(213) 740-1480 lacasa@usc.edu

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Plus Student Center (LGBTQ+SC) (STU 415)

(213) 740-7619 lgbt@usc.edu

PASTORAL CARE

Office of Religious Life UPC (URC 106) HSC (McKibben Hall 160)

(213) 740-6110 orl@usc.edu

ACCESSIBILITY

Office of Student Accessibility Services

(GFS 120) (213) 740-0076 ability@usc.edu

TROJAN SUCCESS INITIATIVES

Veterans Resource Center (TCC 330)

(213) 821-6028 vrc@usc.edu

Supporting Student Well-being

MEDICAL, COUNSELING, SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVOR CARE (24/7)

USC Student Health Medical/Counseling and Mental Health/Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services available 24/7.

(213) 740-9355/WELL

USC CAMPUS SUPPORT

Campus Support and Intervention assists students, faculty and staff in navigating complex issues, understanding options and connecting to resources. This includes Trojans Care 4 Trojans (bit.ly/tc4t), a way to inform CSI if you are concerned about a fellow Trojan.

(213) 740-0411 uscsupport@usc.edu Trojan Food Pantry (PKS 135)

pantry@usc.edu

USC Kortschak Center for Learning and Creativity provides academic support services for students with diverse learning needs. (STU 311)

(213) 740-7884 kortschakcenter@usc.edu

Ask Ari connects students to helpful wellbeing and self care resources, videos, guided information and more.

askari.usc.edu

USC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE (24/7)

The Department of Public Safety can conduct welfare checks, transport students to care in the event of illness or injury, and respond to any campus emergency.

UPC (213) 740-4321 HSC (323) 442-1000

NATIONAL NONPROFIT/ GOVERNMENT RESOURCE LINKS

The Jed Foundation Mental Health Resource Center

bit.ly/jedresources

RAINN Warning signs that a college-age adult may have been sexually assaulted or abused

bit.ly/rainnwarningsigns Find Treatment From the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

findtreatment.gov

In addition, connecting students to campus resources helps us create a culture of care. Well-being is essential if everyone in our university is to thrive, and so everyone plays an important role to engage, connect and create community. There is no expectation for faculty and staff to master the role of a mental health professional, but we know that many of you care deeply about the well-being of our students and express a strong desire to know what to do when encountering a student in need.

For faculty and staff who provide guidance, mentoring, support and assistance to USC students.

Your influence shapes much of our students’ experiences at the university. Many have asked for guidance on how to respond when students express the need for emotional or mental health support in our campus community. This guide is intended to help you gain a better understanding of how you might respond in these moments.

Supporting Student Well-being