Page 1

How to Start a Girls’ Gymnastics Program

JULY 2011 – VOL. 31 – #7

Handstand World Record Attempt


EVENTS

2011 JULY 8–10 10–15 10–16 15–17 22–24 22–27 23-24 28–31

Trampoline & Tumbling U.S. Champs. JO Championships (TT) World Gymnaestrada (GG) Region 8 Congress Covergirl Classic/Challenge (W) Acrobactic National Championships Rhythmic National Qualifier TOPs Invitational Training Camp (W)

2012 JANUARY San Antonio, TX San Antonio, TX Lausanne, SUI New Orleans, LA Chicago, IL San Jose, CA Downers Grove, IL Houston, TX

AUGUST

10–18

2–4

Nastia Liukin Supergirl Cup (W)

TBD

3

AT&T American Cup (M/W)

TBD

16–18

Pacific Rim Championships (M/W/R/T)

TBD

USA Gymnastics Collegiate Champs. (M)

TBD

23–24

5–8

JO Begin. Optional Open Training Camp (W)

Houston, TX

9–11

JO Inter./Adv. Optional Open Training Camp (W)

Houston, TX

APRIL

17–20

Visa Championships (M/W/R)

Saint Paul, MN

TBD

18–20

National Congress and Trade Show

Saint Paul, MN

25–28

ODP Selection Camp (TT)

MAY

26–28

Region 1 Congress

9–11 13–26 15–18 17 23–25

Region 2 Congress Rhythmic World Championships State and Regional Chairman’s Workshop (M) National Gymnastics Day Region 5 Congress

30–Oct. 2

National TOP Testing (W)

Everett, WA Montpellier, France TBD various locations Indianapolis,IN Houston, TX

OCTOBER

1–3

National TOP Testing (W)

7–16 13-16

World Artistic Championships (M/W) JO Team Coaches Course (W)

Tokyo, Japan Huntsville, Texas

14–30

Pan American Games (M/W/R/TR)

Guadalajara, MX

22–25

JO National Team Training Camp (W)

Houston, TX

27–30

Level 9/10 Training Camp (W)

Houston, TX

NOVEMBER

Houston, TX

10–13

Fut. Stars Champs./Coaches Wrkshp.(M)

Colo. Springs, CO

16–19

T & T World Championships

Birmingham, ENG

20–26

World Age Group Championships (TT)

Birmingham, ENG

30–Dec. 4

National TOP Team Training Camp (W)

Houston, TX

DECEMBER 4–8

TOP B Training Camp (W)

Acro Gymnastics World Championships & World Age Group Competition TBD

3–6

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

7

USA Gymnastics Special Olympics Championships (M/W/R/GG)

7–13

JO National Championships (M)

Cincinnati, OH

10–12

JO National Championships(W)

TBD

13

JO–NIT (W)

24–26

Cover Girl Classic (W)

Chicago, IL

31–June 3

Open Championships (W)

Orlando, FL

2

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

TBD Marietta, GA

TBD

JUNE 7–10

Visa Championships

St. Louis, MO

28–July1

USA Gymn. Nat. Congress and Trade Show

San Jose, CA

28–July1

U.S. Olympic Team Trials–Gymnastics (M/W)

San Jose, CA

2013 MAY 2–5

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

TBD

9–11

JO National Championships (W)

TBD

12

JO–NIT (W)

31–June 2

2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – East (W)

Orlando, FL

2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – West (W)

Reno, NV

TBD

JUNE 7–9

Houston, TX

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GG = Group Gymnastics, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling NOTE: Dates and events subject to change or cancellation.

Las Vegas, NV

2

Boston, MA

SEPTEMBER

Winter Cup Challenge (M)

MARCH

Region 6 Congress

Santa Clara, CA

London, ENG

FEBRUARY

5–7

Houston, TX

Olympic Test Event


TECHNIQUE

an official publication of USA Gymnastics University

JULY

PUBLISHER

Steve Penny EDITOR

Luan Peszek

2011

•VOLUME 31 • #7

8

F E AT U R E S 8

Back Pain An Understanding of Its Cause and Treatment

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

12

Women’s Program Educational Opportunity

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

14

How to Start a Girls’ Gymnastics Program

30

National Gymnastics Day and Handstand World Record Attempt

Jeannie Shaw

Chair: Peter Vidmar Vice-Chair: Paul Parilla Secretary: Gary Anderson Treasurer: Jim Morris National Membership - Women: Tom Koll National Membership - Women: Steve Rybacki National Membership - Men: Yoichi Tomita National Membership - Men: Russ Fystrom National Membership - Rhythmic: Brooke Bushnell-Toohey National Membership - Trampoline & Tumbling: George Drew National Membership - Acrobatic Gymnastics: Dr. Jay Binder Advisory Council: Mike Burns Advisory Council: Ron Ferris Advisory Council: Carole Ide Athlete Director - Women: Terin Humphrey Athlete Director - Men: John Roethlisberger Athlete Director - Rhythmic: Jessica Howard Athlete Director - Trampoline & Tumbling: Karl Heger Athlete Director - Acrobatic Gymanstics: Michael Rodrigues Public Sector: Frank Marshall Public Sector: Bitsy Kelley Public Sector: Jim Morris Public Sector: Mary Lou Retton

D E PA R T M E N T S 2

Event Schedule

4

USA Gymnastics Message

20

Congress Information

28

Member Services Update

31

Spotlight

36

What’s New

38

Committee Meeting Minutes

46

Classified Ads

12

14

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 . TECHNIQUE is published monthly except bimonthly in Sept/ Oct and Nov/Dec by USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-2375050) or visit online @ www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.–$25 per year; Canada/Mexico–$48 per year; all other foreign countries–$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2011 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. All rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719 Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

31 EN STEV IN TE S K LUC

G

Cover photo: open Championships by gameday photos

SAVANNAH VINSANT

Collage

www.usagym.org

JUSTIN HACKE TT MARCH 2011 • TECHNIQUE

3


INSIDE INSIDE INSIDE

PARTNERSHIP IS ABOUT LISTENING TO EACH OTHER

D

uring the past few years, USA Gymnastics has focused on creating a stronger partnership with the gymnastics community, particularly our member clubs. There has been a shift in the paradigm of the organization’s thinking – from being primarily concerned about the top athletes to becoming more keenly aware of the grassroots efforts and recreational aspect of this great sport.

USA Gymnastics must continue its success at the international level. For years, the sport’s bestknown names and role models have emerged through great moments at the World Championships and Olympic Games. The legacy has remained strong since the mid-’70s when names like Marcia Frederick, Cathy Rigby and Kurt Thomas brought new recognition to the sport. Through the ’80s it was Mary Lou Retton, Bart Conner, Peter Vidmar, and Tim Daggett among others. Into the ’90s, Kim Zmeskal opened a decade of success that was highlighted by the performance of the Magnificent 7 at the Atlanta Olympics, and Shannon Miller became America’s most decorated gymnast. Now, since 2000, the names have grown exponentially, and USA Gymnastics proudly claims three Olympic all-around champions from the past two Olympic Games – Carly Patterson, Paul Hamm and Nastia Liukin. The exploits of these great champions and all of our national team members on the world stage help build awareness and inspire youngsters to become involved, which grows the sport across all levels. We recognize that success at the highest level requires the support and teamwork that occurs on a daily basis within gymnastics clubs. Our gym owners and coaches are vital to sustaining the sport, and positioning USA Gymnastics for national team success. Through a concentrated effort, and the help of our Program committees and Member Club Task Force, we have identified a few key areas where we can further strengthen our partnership with the clubs. They are athlete development; participant welfare; coaching education, and marketing support. We have created a variety of tools to help our clubs improve their business practices and “strengthen their core.” And, we will continue to do more. We have created national competitive opportunities such as the Nastia Liukin Cup Series and the USA Gymnastics Open Championships for women and rhythmic that took place in early June at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex at Walt Disney World Resort near Orlando, Fla. The USA Gymnastics Open Championships was an integral component of the inaugural ESPN RISE Girls Showcase, and opened new doors to this global giant in the world of sports media. I am also excited about the emerging USA Gymnastics University. The coaching certification structure will be rolled out at the upcoming USA Gymnastics National Congress in Saint Paul, Minn., and you will continue to see new courses unveiled on a regular basis. But this is only another step in the right direction. My three daughters remain actively involved in the sport. This provides me new insights into an entire realm of work that lies ahead for USA Gymnastics and stimulating ideas on how we can strengthen our partnership with the Member Clubs and the gymnastics community. I look forward to being with you in Saint Paul, and wish you all the best for a wonderful summer. See you in the gym,

Steve Penny President and CEO

4

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


6

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

7


BACK PAIN IN

AN UNDERSTANDING OF I

David Kruse, M.D. Former Senior Men’s National Team Member; USA Gymnastics Men’s National Team Physician; Assistant Clinical Professor & Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine University of California, Irvine; Sibylle Mehta, P.T. Former Austrian Women’s Senior National Team Member; Physical Therapist, Orange County, CA

INTRODUCTION

As we all know, gymnastics requires a level of fitness and total body control that is rarely matched by other sports. As a result, there are many different injuries that can hamper a gymnast’s training, competition schedule, and ultimately his/her career. In particular, the back can be a common source of injury in gymnastics. Back pain has long been recognized as a major reason for doctor visits. This results in medical costs amounting to billions of dollars annually.1,2 Recently, more attention has been brought to the high prevalence of back pain in children, more common than previously thought, with multiple medical studies showing back pain in 30-50% of adolescents studied.3,4,5 In many sports, including gymnastics, the prevalence of low back injury is even higher.6,7,8,9 Studies have shown that in female and male artistic gymnasts the rates of low back pain can be as high as 75% to 85%, respectively.10 For rhythmic gymnasts, one study published in 1999 showed reports of low back pain in 86% of the gymnasts studied.11 Consequently, for coaches and parents, it is important to know how to recognize back pain, common causes, and how to facilitate the full recovery of your gymnasts.

UNDERSTANDING BACK PAIN

Before you begin to understand your gymnast’s back pain, you need to have a grasp of the anatomy of the back and how it works. The low back, or lumbar spine, is composed of 5 vertebrae, L1 through L5, and are stacked in between the thoracic vertebrae above and the sacrum below. In between each vertebra lies an intervertebral disc, a fluid-filled sac. The spinal column lies behind the vertebral body and discs, through which the nerves from the spinal cord run. The nerves leave the spinal column between each vertebra and control the sensation and strength of our lower body, including pain. (Figure 1) Surrounding the spinal structures are muscles, running up and down and in the front and back of the spine, that provide support and stability. In brief, these include the abdominal and psoas muscles in front and the erector spinae muscles in back. The spine allows for the trunk to flex (forward bend), extend (back bend), side flex (side bend), and rotate (twist). Most of these occur at the joints of the back, called facet joints. FIGURE 1 8

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

The flexion and extension of the spine occurs mostly at the lower two lumbar vertebrae, L4 and L5. Combined movements, such as extension with rotation, as well as repetitive movements have the highest potential for injury.12 With this knowledge; it starts to become obvious why many gymnasts suffer from low back pain.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE LOW BACK PAIN

Depending on the cause of the back pain, your gymnast may complain of a variety of different symptoms. Most commonly for gymnasts, though, onset is gradual and with activity, worse with extension (back bend) of the lumbar spine. The pain can be on one or both sides of the low back and will sometimes be associated with buttock pain. This article will focus on the common causes of back pain in gymnasts but it is important to know how to recognize signs of more dangerous causes of back pain for which your athlete should seek more immediate medical attention. These would include fever, loss of balance, numbness or weakness, and loss of control of urine or stool. In addition, constant pain not related to their gymnastics activity and night pain should prompt a more immediate doctor’s visit.6,13,14

CAUSES OF LOW BACK PAIN

There are many possible causes of back pain in children. A condition called spondylolysis, in particular, has been recognized as a very common source of low back pain in the adolescent sports population and is a common cause of these symptoms in gymnasts.9,15,16 The following discussion will focus on spondylolysis, as well as an associated injury, spondylolisthesis. Other possible causes of low back pain in gymnasts will be briefly mentioned. Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis We should start by discussing the definition of these conditions to better understand how injury happens and pain and disability begins. Spondylolysis can be defined as a defect or stress fracture of a part of the vertebra (back bone) near where one vertebra connects to another. This can occur on one or both sides of a vertebra. Spondylolisthesis is a slippage of one vertebra on another.6 The commonality of spondylolysis in children is becoming more recognized and one medical study showed that 5% of children by the age of 6 will have this back defect.17 The Team Physician’s Handbook, states an even higher incidence for female gymnasts, citing a probable 10-11% incidence, and possibly an even higher risk in rhythmic gymnastics.6 This type of injury usually is a result of repeated hyperextension, hence the increased incidence in gymnastics. As mentioned, the greatest degree of extension occurs at L4 and L5 and consequently the majority of spondylolysis injuries will occur in this area of the spine. Your gymnast will complain of back pain at the site of injury or fracture and will sometimes be associated with buttock pain. The symptoms are activity-related. Common skills that might exacerbate spondylolysis injuries are: back walkover or back handspring, vaulting skills (especially yurchenko), any rebounding


A GYMNAST

F ITS CAUSE AND TREATMENT or punching skill, ring giant swing, release-move tap, and dismount landings, to name a few. If these symptoms are identified in your gymnast, the next step should be an evaluation by their physician. Their doctor will ask detailed questions regarding the history of the injury and complete a comprehensive exam. Initial evaluation will usually include simple back x-rays. The clinician may then choose more advanced studies including SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) scan, thin-cut CT scan or MRI of the lumbar spine.6,9 Depending on the results of the imaging studies and if a diagnosis of spondylolysis is given, your gymnast will need a structured treatment plan, as discussed below. If a spondylolysis injury occurs on both sides of the vertebral bone, this may lead over time to the slippage of one vertebra on another, resulting in spondylolisthesis. Simple x-rays can identify this. Other Causes of Back Pain The following is a brief discussion of other causes of back pain in gymnasts. The goal should be to familiarize yourself with these so you are aware of other conditions your athlete may suffer from: •

Nonspecific back pain (Mechanical Back Pain)– An exact diagnosis for back pain may not be found in up to 78% of children and consequently your athlete’s doctor may not be able to provide an exact reason for the back pain. 13,18 A thorough examination is important to find out what muscles may be too weak and/or too tight, which may be the cause of this pain.

Facet Syndrome – The facet joints are where one vertebrae moves on another. Just like any other joint in the body, the facet joints can become aggravated causing pain. This, like spondylolysis, usually occurs from forceful extension and rotation motions.14

Scoliosis – This is an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine that is routinely screened for during doctor well-child visits, as well as in schools. Among children who have scoliosis, 30% will have back pain. Children who have pain from scoliosis typically have a history of trauma or a fall.19 Meaning, a few falls from the beam or high bar may unmask previously undiagnosed scoliosis.

Other potential causes: Intervertebral disc injury, herniated vertebral disc, vertebral growth plate injury, and Scheuermann’s disease.9,13,20

Life-threatening causes: Diskitis, Osteomyelitis, and Cancer. These are rare but can result in more serious outcomes.13,20

TREATMENT

As a coach or parent, it is important to have a good understanding of the initial treatment and subsequent rehabilitation that is necessary for a back injury. This will ensure that your expectations for when your athlete returns

to full activity are accurate and safe for the athlete. The treatment discussed here will be focused on the management of spondylolysis. All of the principles listed below should be planned and implemented by your athlete’s medical team, i.e. physician, physical therapist, certified athletic trainer, chiropractor, etc. Initial Treatment Pain from a spondylolysis injury will usually resolve if the athlete’s activity is modified. However, if no treatment is pursued, it can cause persistent pain and progress to a slipped vertebra. The initial treatment should protect the injured vertebra. This is done by restricting the gymnast’s activity to avoid further irritation of the injury. The athlete’s medical team should dictate activity modification. Together with this modified activity, pain and inflammation can be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (as directed by the physician), icing, electro-stimulation, heat therapy after the initial inflammation has resolved, and acupuncture. The doctor may elect to put your gymnast in a special brace to help control pain and promote healing. Initial therapeutic exercises are focused on controlling pain, avoiding loss of strength, and restoring overall function. These exercises should be done under the direction of a licensed physical therapist or certified athletic trainer.9,14,21 Rehabilitation As pain lessens, your athlete will be progressed through a more intensive therapy program. In general, the rehabilitation program is divided into three different stages.22 The first stage, as mentioned above, focuses on controlling pain and inflammation through modification of activity. Taking pressure off the spine will help the recovery process. Have your gymnast lie on their back with the hips and knees bent at 90 degrees. Ice and heat can be used as needed. Your gymnast can also perform isometric abdominal squeezes (during which the muscles contract against resistance but movement of the spine is avoided), even if wearing a brace, as long as there is no pain. The second stage focuses on regaining pain-free range of motion, improving strength and function of the lumbar spine, and improving strength and flexibility of the legs. There is also a focus on correcting deficits in posture, flexibility, and mechanics that would J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

9


BACK PAIN IN A GYMNAST ...continued

predispose your gymnast to develop a recurrence of the injury or gymnasts will have excellent outcomes and can return to full activity. pain. It is important to understand that your gymnast is expected The length of time for full recovery is dependent on the initial extent to regain excessive range of motion after the injury and must be of injury and may vary between 2 and 9 months.9 After full recovery, conditioned to regain the strength and endurance necessary to your gymnast’s doctor may choose to obtain more images of the control this motion. 23 Adjacent joints must also be assessed for spine to assess for evidence of bone healing.6,9 lack of flexibility and strength. The spine may be overstressed as a Some gymnasts may have a difficult recovery. In these cases of result of insufficient motion or strength of the surrounding joints. For incomplete recovery, there are other options. Bracing has been used example, insufficient ankle range of motion and quadriceps strength in the treatment of these injuries and is considered an effective option can cause the impact from landing to travel up to the spine and in certain cases. Injections and surgical correction is used in extreme increase your gymnast’s symptoms.24 Components of the strength cases of persistent symptoms, significant vertebral slipping, or in program are: (a) increase the muscular stability of the spine 24,25, (b) cases with ongoing weakness and numbness.6,8,9 increase the ability of the low back to handle muscular conditioning, (c) restore muscle size, strength, and endurance, In routine cases, progression to full activity (d) re-establish coordinated muscle activity, and (e) begins slowly over 4-6 weeks after rehabilitation reduce pain through spine strengthening.24 There TAKE HOME POINTS is complete. When your gymnast returns to are many spine strengthening programs available gymnastics-specific activities, he/she should be that a physical therapist can use too heal your 1. Low back pain can occur in 23, 24, 25, 26 guided by symptoms, i.e. pain. Activity should be gymnast. approximately 80% of gymnasts. reduced or eliminated if pain recurs. Complete 2. Spondylolysis, a vertebral stress lumbar spine function with a lack of symptoms The last stage of rehabilitation focuses on fracture, is a common back injury following return to gymnastics-specific activity functional and gymnastics-specific activities. When in gymnastics and occurs with usually indicates your athlete has had a successful returning to gymnastics, the rehabilitation program repetitive hyperextension and return. It is important to realize, though, that will progress through various levels of dynamic rotation. one of the best predictors of low back injury activity. 23 These exercises should be done under 3. Rehabilitation begins with pain during athletic activity is a previous low back the direction of a certified physical therapist or control and range of motion, and injury. Therefore, a long-term maintenance certified trainer. 9,14 then progresses to strengthening & rehabilitation program should be continued past functional training. An additional component of therapy is to offer the resolution of symptoms in order to help prevent 4. Early diagnosis and treatment rehabilitation while your athlete continues to a recurrence.6,9,13,14,21 with a well-planned rehabilitation participate in gymnastics. Often, the gym becomes program and smart return to full a second home rather than just a place to train. CONCLUSION activity, provides your gymnast with Participation in the gym allows your athlete to the greatest chance for full and As we all know, injury is an inevitable part of maintain camaraderie with teammates, and efficient recovery. gymnastics and dealing with this unfortunate event participate fully in the visual and verbal training can be half the battle of preparing your athlete of the sport. Watching other athletes complete skills, and receive for competition. Therefore, a good understanding of some of the feedback, allows them to learn from observation and through that more common injuries seen in gymnastics will provide you with improve their performance quality even when they cannot physically more knowledge and insight to help prevent injury and facilitate 23 participate. recovery if injury does occur. The best chance for your athlete’s Return to the Mat With athletic injury it is always important to start with a realistic time course of recovery in order to avoid premature return to activity and re-injury. With spondylolysis injury, there is a wide range of possible outcomes. With early recognition and proper rehabilitation, most

eventual full recovery, with the least amount of time lost from training and competition, comes with early diagnosis and treatment. This is true for low back injuries, as well, and I hope that this article has succeeded in making a very common problem more approachable. Good luck in the gym and stay safe.

REFERENCES: 1. Deyo RA, Mirza SK, Martin BI. Back Pain Prevalence and Visit Rates. Spine. 2006;31(23):2724-2727.

15. 18. Micheli LJ, Wood R. Back pain in young athletes: significant differences from adults in causes and patterns. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149:15-

2. Frymoyer JW, Cats-Baril WL. An overview of the incidences and costs of low back pain. Orthop Clin North Am. 1991;22(2):263-271.

16. Goldstein JD, et al. Spine Injuries in gymnasts and swimmers. An epidemiologic investigation. Amer J Sports Med. 1991;19(5):463-468.

3. Olsen TL, et al. The Epidemiology of Low Back Pain in an Adolescent Population. Am J Public Health. 1992;82(4):606-608.

17. Cavalier R, et al. Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents, I: diagnosis, natural history, and nonsurgical management. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006;14:417-424.

4. Skaggs DL, et al. Back pain and backpacks in school children. J Pediatr Orthop. 2006;26(3):358-363. 5. Burton AK. The natural history of low back pain in adolescents. Spine. 1996;21(20):2323-2328. 6. Wilhite JM. Thoracic and Lumbosacral Spine. Team Physician’s Handbook. 3rd ed. Hanley & Belfus, Inc., Philadelphia, 2002:460-479. 7. Sward L, et al. Back pain and radiologic changes in the thoraco-lumbar spine of athletes. Spine. 1990;15:124-129. 8. Micheli LJ. Back Injuries in Gymnastics. Clin Sport Med. 1985;4(1):85-92. 9. Standaert CJ. New strategies in the management of low back injuries in gymnasts. Curr Sports Med Rep. 2002;1(5):293-300. 10. Sward L, et al. Disc degeneration and associated abnormalities of the spine in elite gymnasts. A magnetic resonance imaging study. Spine. 1991;16:437-43. 11. Hutchinson MR. Low back pain in elite rhythmic gymnasts. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 1999;31(11):1686. 12. Hainline B. Low back injury. Clin Sports Med. 1995;14(1):241-265. 13. Shilt JS, Barnett TM. Evaluating and managing back pain in children. J of Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2007;24(2):73-86. 14. Drezner JA, Herring SA. Managing Low-Back Pain. The Physician and Sportsmedicine. 2001;29(8):37-43.

10

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

18. Bhatia NN, et al. Diagnostic modalities for the evaluation of pediatric back pain: a prospective study. J Pediatr Orthop. 2008;28(2):230-3. 19. Ramirez N, et al. The prevalence of back pain in children who have idiopathic scoliosis. J Bone Joint Surg. 1997;79A:364-368. 20. Feldman DS, et al. Evaluation of an Algorithmic Approach to Pediatric Back Pain. J Pediatr Orthop. 2006;26(3):353-357. 21. Bono CM. Current Concepts Review: Low-Back Pain in Athletes. J of Bone and Joint Surg. 2004;86A(2):382-396. 22. Nguyen, D.T., Orgill D.P., Murphy G.F. (2009). Chapter 4: The Pathophysiologic Basis for Wound Healing and Cutaneous Regeneration. Biomaterials for Treating Skin Loss. Woodhead Puplishing (UK/Europe) & CRC Press (US), Cambridge/Boca Raton, p. 25-57 23. Hunter-Giordano AO, Pongetti Angeletti GM, Voelker S, Manal TJ. Physical Therapy for the Performing Artist. 2010, Orthopaedic Section, APTA, Inc. 24. Kolber MJ, Beekhuizen K. Lumbar Stabilization: An Evidence-Based Approach for the Athlete with Low Back Pain. Strength and Conditioning Journal. Lawrence: 2007. Vol. 29, Iss. 2 25. O’Sullivan, B.D. Phyty, L.T. Twomey, and G.T. Allison. Evaluation of specific stabilizing exercises in the treatment of chronic low back pain with radiologic diagnosis of spondylosis or spondylolisthesis. Spine. 22: 2959-2967. 1997. 26. McGill SM. Low back exercises: evidence for improving exercise regimens. Phys Ther. 1998; 78(7): 754-765.


JUNE 2011 •TECHNIQUE

11


USA Gymnastics will conduct camps at the USA Gymnastics National Team Training Center in Huntsville, Texas, that are open to gymnasts and coaches. The USA Gymnastics National Team Training Center has been designated as a U.S. Olympic Training Site. See the list of events below and sign up today! WOMEN’S JUNIOR OLYMPIC OPTIONAL LEVELS TRAINING CAMP AUGUST 9 –12, 2011

This camp is for Junior Olympic athletes that have competed at a minimum of Level 7 (must be at least 9 years old). The focus of this camp is on the preparation and training of beginner through advanced optional skill development. The athletes will received specific instructions on training tips and optional skill technique. The coaches will work with their athletes, assist in the training, observe, take notes and ask questions. WOMEN’S JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACHES COURSE AND LEVELS 5-7 TRAINING CAMP, OCT. 13–16, 2011

This three-day educational opportunity will include 20 hours of practical instruction (where YOU will be di-

12

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

WOMEN’S

EDUCATIONA

WOMEN’S JUNIOR OLYMPIC COACHES’ COURSE CERTIFICATION The inaugural Junior Olympic Team Coaching Certification and Training Camp took place at the U. S. Olympic Training Center at the Karolyi’s Ranch on May 26 – 30, 2011. Thirty-three coaches and forty-five gymnasts took part in this new educational program offered by USA Gymnastics. The coaches certifications included both practical and classroom instruction under the direction of USA Gymnastics National Coaching Staff Tammy Biggs and Steve Rybacki. This new educational opportunity emphasized skills and progressions to train Junior Olympic athletes Levels 5 – 7. Training included hands-on spotting techniques, proper body shaping, lesson plans and lectures on strength, conditioning, flexibility, periodization, sports medicine and psychology. “The practical hands-on training is an essential key for the success of the

beginner compulsory/optional coach,” said Rybacki. “This clinic encouraged coaches to demonstrate proficiency on all four events.” Donna Guenther, attendee and Pennsylvania State Chair, said “The Junior Team Olympic Coaches Certification was a rewarding, educational experience. Steve and Tammy presented the necessary tools to build a foundation in your program. Every moment in the gym, you were learning. The technique, spotting, lesson plans, drills and handouts were priceless!” The athletes trained twice a day with their coaches but found time for fun and games including creating posters for the Senior National Team members. USA Gymnastics will be offering the Coaches Certification and Training Camp again October 13–16, 2011. Registration is available online at: www.usagym.org/university


’S PROGRAM

AL OPPORTUNITY CONGRATULATIONS TO THE INAUGURAL CLASS FOR THE JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACH CERTIFICATION! Lee Coltman Betsy Sprague Kimberly Christensen Donna Guenther Robert Ross Patty Sylvis Bradley Epperson Alex Dickinson Kristen Dowler David Jerger Louise Janecky

Brian Kay Scott Wright Ruth Licata Christine Lafollette Jacquelyn Strahm Annette Kaiser Colleen Ryan Bradley McLaren Gregory M. Ellis Kimberly Cunningham

Courtenay Dickerson Terek Brown Sharon Molina Tina Rusinovich Ashley Porter Ciara Smith Karen Vose Susan C. Pollock Justin Watson

recting the athletes) and more than 10 hours of classroom instruction under the direction of Master Clinician’s, Tammy Biggs and Steve Rybacki, with assistance from National Team Coaches. Developed by USA Gymnastics Wom Women’s Program National Team Coaching Staff, the course is designed to provide the partic participants with a solid knowledge base for coaching. This course is a required USA Gymnastics University course needed for certification. Curriculum includes: Skills and Progressions to train Junior Olympic Athletes Level 5–7; Tools to develop solid basics on all events; Proper Body Shaping; Lesson Plans, Hands Lecon Spotting techniques; Lec Psycholotures in the areas of Psycholo gy, Sports Medicine, Strength, Conditioning & Flexibility and Periodization.

A Gro up medals of Coache s rece for the iv Certifi cation ir performa ed “Outstan nces a d Progra t the Ju ing” and re m. Back ro nior O c lympic eived Front ro w L to R: G Coach re es Louise w L to R: In gor y Ellis, T str in Ja (Not p necky, Kris uctor Steve a Rusinovic ictured ten Do h, Sha Rybac ki, ro w , Kimb erly C ler and instr Alexandra n Molina. unning uctor T D ham) ammy ickinson, Biggs.

If you are interested in attending or would like more details, go to http://usagym.org/ pages/women/pages/ trainingcamps.html trainingcamps.html. The deadline to register for the first two camps is July 22 or until camp is full.

J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

13


How to Start a Girls’ Girls’G

W

ith some space, just a few mats, and a curriculum of basic skills, a gymnastics program can be born. At the basic level, gymnastics is all about developing physical fitness, agility, strength, and flexibility. By starting with basic body positions, skills, progressions; introductory strength and flexibility activities; and interactive games, girls will have fun and develop their abilities in the sport of gymnastics.

Original hoto by Gameday Photos (Background photo by Larry Gibson)

To start out, only basic gymnastics equipment, such as folding mats (or a spring floor area), wedge mat, trapezoid mats, spring board, minitrampoline, single bar system, and low balance beam, is needed. This basic equipment would be helpful in teaching introductory skills and progressions for each of the apparatus, also known as events – vault, uneven bars, balance beam, and floor exercise. As your program grows and the skill level of your athletes develop, you can progress to larger, standard-size gymnastics apparatuses. Using a step-by-step approach allows a coach or facility to more easily implement a program and simply grow as needed.

14

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

As you will see from the list of benefits in the following section, gymnastics is a wonderful activity for all children. A wide variety of gymgymnastics programs including recreational classes, preschool classes, fitness camps, tumbling classes, just to name a few, can be offered before even reaching the competitive levels of the sport. The e most important aspects of gymnastics are aidaiding children in their physical, mental and social development and “WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS HAS BEEN allowing COMPLETELY ELIMINATED IN OUR them to AREA IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM. have fun. OFFERING GYMNASTICS TO YOUNG If your GIRLS IN OUR CLUB PROVIDES A program GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR GIRLS achieves GYMTO ENJOY ALL THE BENEFITS GYMthese NASTICS HAS TO OFFER INCLUDING STRENGTH, FLEXIBILITY, COORDINACOORDINATION AND OVERALL PHYSICAL FITNESS THROUGH INTERACTING WITH OTHER CHILDREN WITH LIKE INTERESTS.” Tom Koll and Jody Newman, Co-Owners– Premier Gymnastics, Omaha, NE


’ ’Gymnastics Gymnastics Program

Photo by Larry Gibson

WHAT IS THE STRUCTURE OF A GIRLS GYMNASTICS PROGRAM? Clubs should develop their programs and class offerings to meet the needs of their clients and the community. Below we have offered an example of various levels: • Parent/Child classes for toddlers – the focus of these classes would be on gross motor development and coordination using structured activities, obstacle courses, basic body positions and shapes, music, etc. • Preschool gymnastics classes – again, much of the focus would be on the development of gross and fine motor skills, coordination, body awareness, and balance. The use of music, games, and activities, as well as the introduction of basic gymnastics movements, such as rolls, swings, and jumps, are helpful.

as beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Typically athletes in these classes are schoolage children. A curriculum may focus on basic skills and progressions on each of the four apparatuses. • Competitive gymnastics teams – USA Gymnastics provides competitive programs and opportunities for Levels 1-10 as part of the Junior Olympic program. Within the JO program, the “Developmental Levels,” as they are referred to, are Levels 1– 4 and can be used as non-competitive, achievementoriented programming or “pre-team” within the club. They may also be used as an introductory competitive program. Levels 5 –6 are compulsory level competitive programs and Levels 7–10 are optional level competitive programs. A typical session, or term, may run 8–12 weeks. Recreational classes may meet 1 or 2 times per week, enabling the girls to achieve tangible goals within each term. TTerms erms can begin at any time, but usually start

• Recreational gymnastics classes – a club may choose to divide this group of athletes by age or skill level, such J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

15

Photo by John Cheng

objectives, you are well on your way. Be sure to take time to develop your program’s curriculum, prioritize safety, and communicate with your athletes and their parents.


How to Start a Girls’ Gymnastics Program

...continued

as Fall, Winter, or Spring terms. Some gyms offer introductory summer programs or daily or weekly camps when enrollment is generally lower. WHY PARTICIPATE IN GYMNASTICS? Girls can benefit from gymnastics participation in the following ways: • It’s fun and it’s great exercise! • Physical fitness development - especially in the areas of strength, flexibility, agility, balance, and coordination. • Cognitive skill development – such as listening and following directions. • Life skills development – particularly selfconfidence, teamwork, responsibility, friendship, and sportsmanship. • “GYMNASTICS DEVELOPS MANY ATTRIBUTES THAT YOUNG GIRLS TAKE WITH THEM THROUGHOUT THEIR LIFETIME. GYMNASTICS DEVELOPS GIRLS INTO SELF-CONFIDENT YOUNG WOMEN. GYMNASTICS PROMOTES A STRONG WORK ETHIC, CONFIDENCE, DISCIPLINE AND TEACHES HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF ONESELF. GIVE YOUR DAUGHTER THE START SHE NEEDS TO BE SUCCESSFUL! ENROLL HER IN GYMNASTICS!” – Bryon Hough, Owner Classic Gymnastics, Chanhassen MN.

Original photo (and background photo) by John Cheng

16

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

Accomplishment of goals – setting goals and working to achieve them. • It is a great developmental activity, whether the goal is advancement in gymnastics or preparation for another sport. HOW DO I LEARN GYMNASTICS SKILLS, PROGRESSIONS, AND TECHNIQUES? The materials referenced on page18 provide a wealth of information to help get you started and are the best available for girls gymnastics. All of these materials, plus much more skill specific education and online courses are available through the USA Gymnastics website. website.


J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

17


How to Start a Girls’ Gymnastics Program

...continued

REFERENCE MATERIALS

• Coaching Youth Gymnastics – covers coaching basics in a concise style that is customized for entry-level gymnastics coaches, offering a unique blend of general coaching and sportspecific information. Techniques and skills

for bars, floor, beam, and vault are presented by skill level and are applicable to both boys and girls where appropriate. Information on developing a coaching philosophy, communicating with athletes and parents, and providing basic sport first aid are included. • Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction – This online educational course provides a wealth of information on topics ranging from safety to coaching principles to curriculum development and also includes video clips of beginning and intermediate gymnastics movements and skills.

Photo by John Cheng

• Preschool Fundamentals – This two-part course focuses on curriculum development, child development, safety concerns, age-appropriate skills, and fun games and activities for toddler and preschool-age students. • Women’s Junior Olympic Compulsory Program materials – A text book and DVD provide demonstrations of compulsory exercises plus supplemental training skills for Levels 1– 6. For these items above as well as additional materials, go to www.usagym.org and click on the STORE tab.

18

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


2011 NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW August 18 – 20, 2011 Saint Paul, MN

T

A New Educational Experience for 2011!!

The 2011 National Congress and Trade Show has something for everyone: new preschool instructors, office managers, beginner/ advanced coaches, and club owners, with education and experience vital to continued growth of your staff, programs and business. Some of the educational opportunities include: • 15 total “Hands-on” Spotting Clinics (includes women, men, trampoline & tumbling, cheer, and acro** • Women’s Development Coaches’ Certification** • Business Certification Level (2 & 3)** • Trampoline & Tumbling Developmental Coaches’ Certification (T&T Level 1)** • Special Olympics Course & Certification • USA Gymnastics Safety/Risk Management* • USA Gymnastics Preschool Fundamentals Handson Training (H.O.T.) * *available at additional fee ** All congress attendees are highly advised to complete the Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction Course prior to attending. For more information regarding the Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction please visit www.usagym.org/education

This year’s event will feature three days of education with more than 200 sessions. Sessions are provided on coaching, judging, business, preschool, school age, sports science, fitness, and

20

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

cheerleading. Learn from leading experts from all six disciplines, Women’s, Men’s, Rhythmic, Acrobatics, Trampoline & Tumbling, and Gymnastics for All. For registration details and more please visit www.usagymnasticsnationalcongress.org or refer to the individual registration form in this issue of Technique. Hotel/Travel Reservations: National Travel Systems: 888-603-8747 Email: sportsinfo@nationaltravelsystems.com Website: www.ntssportstravel.com Visa Championships are Aug. 17–21. Men’s and Women’s Artistic events take place at the Xcel Energy Center and Rhythmic competition is at the Roy Wilkins Auditorium. With all that the 2011 National Congress has to offer, this is the best educational investment you will make all year. Pre-registration is available until July 15. Don’t Delay! Register Today! For a complete congress schedule, please log on to www.usagym.org/congress.


Wednesday, August 17, 2011 • 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. The RiverCentre, Saint Paul, Minn. To sign up for the Business Conference call (800) 345.4719 or visit www.usagym.org/nationalcongress Join USA Gymnastics and a panel of industry leaders and Olympians at the 2011 National Business Conference! THIS YEAR’S TOPIC: Preparing for the Olympic Year, will deliver a comprehensive day of expert-led discussion and insight driven roundtables, offering participants key information needed to effectively prepare for the journey to the 2012 Olympic Games. Whether its identifying and securing grant funding, starting or improving your club programming, or building the social network and media platform to strengthen your club brand, this year’s conference is designed to fully equip you and your staff with industry leading tools, techniques, and proven practices necessary to take your business to the next level. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn from the best and prepare your business for an exciting year leading up to the Olympics. Register and reserve your seat today!

Key Note Speaker Jay Ebben will discuss 3 Things Successful Businesses Have in Common and will give specific takeaways. JAY EBBEN, Associate Professor, Schulze School of Entrepreneurship, University of St. Thomas – Jay is a former small business owner who has worked with hundreds of entrepreneurs at various stages of business development, advising them on market assessment, business modeling, financing, and entry and growth strategies. He has been a professor of entrepreneurship at the University of St. Thomas for nine years and has taught courses on opportunity assessment, entrepreneurial finance, business development, and small business management. Jay won the inaugural Julie Hays Teaching Award in 2010 and received a Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Ljubljana, Slovenia in 2011. SHANNON MILLER, Seven time Olympic Medalist and founder of Shannon Miller Foundation – womAs a spokesperson for women’s health issues and a new mother, Shannon’s goal is to empower wom en with the knowledge and education they need to make informed decisions on health and fitness. Her website www.shannonmillerlifestyle.com provides professional and interactive user content. In 2011 she launched Shannon Miller’s Walk-Fit Program to help get the community fit. Through her weekly call in radio show, Shannon Miller Lifestyle, she focuses on creating dialogue with experts to inform and entertain. PETER VIDMAR, Chairman, USA Gymnastics, Board of Directors – Peter Vidmar, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, was named chairman of USA Gymnastics Board of Directors in December 2008. Vidmar is a professional speaker who has given more than 1,000 presentations on risk-taking, innovation and quality to the USA’s top corporations and associations, as well as sales, marketing and management audiences. He has worked as a journalist at the OlymOlym pic Games and as a gymnastics television commentator. Vidmar has also published several books and articles.

Panel Discussions from our industry leaders will share the top three things they have done to move their business forward this year: Patti Komara, Tom Forster, Julia Thompson, Jeff Metzger, Frank Sahelin, Sean Dever, Dave Peterson, Jeff LaFleuer, Nancy Bates, Steve Greeley, and Jeff Lulla

22

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


2011 Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony and Luncheon Friday, August 19, 2011, Crowne Plaza St. Paul, Minnesota – Riverfront Hotel 11:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m.

Hall of Fame Class of 2011:

Jim Culhane • Kristen Maloney • Elise Ray • Chelle Stack Jill Hollembeak • Tamara Levinson • Stacy Maloney Please print and submit email address. Confirmation will be sent via email. Name Address City State Email Address (required for confirmation) Phone (daytime) Credit Card Type Number Name on card # of tickets @ $45 each or # of tables Donation to Hall of Fame Total Amount Due Table(s) reserved in name of

Zip

Exp. Signature @ $400 each (10 per table)

*All donations of $50 or more will be listed in the Hall of Fame program, Congress Information Guide, and Technique magazine. Must be received by July 15 in order to be in publications. Fax form with credit card information to 317-692-5212 or mail form and check (made out to USA Gymnastics) to: USA Gymnastics, Erica Koven Hall of Fame Ceremony 132 E. Washington St., Ste. 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Hall of Fame Sponsorships available: Gold: $ 5,000 Silver: $ 2,500 Bronze: $1,000 Contact Erica Koven at ekoven@usagym.org or call 317-829-5622


CONGRESS AND VISA CHAMPIONSHIPS

2011 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 RiverCentre

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre–Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Opening Event/Gym Club Demos

Rice Park

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Men’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Men’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

9:30 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

1:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Safety/Risk Management Course

RiverCentre

10:00 p.m.

Rice Park

2:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Preschool Fundamental Hands On Training RiverCentre

5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Trade Show Hall Opening

RiverCentre

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Men’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

12:30 – 7:00 p.m.

National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

National Business Conference

Visa Fan Fest Post-Event Celebration (music, athlete interviews)

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Morning Fitness

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. National Congress Registration Hours

Rice Park RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks) RiverCentre

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Morning Fitness

Rice Park

7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

7:30 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks)

RiverCentre

9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

9:00 a.m.

Rhythmic Jr. & Sr. All-Around Finals

Roy Wilkins

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Women’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

3:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Visa Fan Fest (music, autographs, food) Rice Park

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre–Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Women’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Gymnastics Club Demonstrations

Rice Park

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. National Congress Lunch Break & Raffle

RiverCentre

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Women’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

4:30 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Reception & Raffle Drawing

RiverCentre

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Women’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

*All times and activities are subject to change.

9:00 – 11:30 p.m.

Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

All times are Central. Doors open 60 minutes early for each session at Visa Championships.

6:30 – 7:30 am

Morning Fitness

Rice Park

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks)

RiverCentre

9:00 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

9:00 a.m.

Rhythmic Jr. & Sr. AA Prelim & Event Finals Roy Wilkins

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. National Congress Lunch Break & Raffle

RiverCentre

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Hall of Fame Ceremony & Luncheon

Crowne Plaza

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Gymnastics Club Demonstrations

Rice Park

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Men’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

4:30 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Reception & Raffle Drawing

RiverCentre

26

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

9:30 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

10:00 p.m.

Rice Park

Visa Fan Fest Post-Event Celebration (music, athlete interviews)


J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

27


MEMBER UPDATE MEMBER SERVICES MEMBER SERVICES SERVICES UPDATE UPDATE

ATHLETE REGI S l l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

l

28

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

IMPORTANT UPDATES A

On March 15, 2011, USA Gymnastics implemented phase 1 of our new online membership system. Clubs will no longer use their club number and club password to register/renew athletes, or view athlete or professional membership rosters. Moving forward only those individual that have been given “permission” to be Club Administrators by the club owner/primary contact will be able to access the club athlete renewal and club roster lists. The Club Administration feature will allow the club owner, primary contact, or anyone the club owner deems as a club administrator to access and update the club information, review, renew, both their athlete and professional member roster(s) and print membership cards. If you have not already done so, please visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagym.org and click on the white log in link to create your new profile. USA Gymnastics will not be mailing out membership forms or CDs that contain the membership forms. All membership forms are available on the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagym.org/forms. Both Athletes and Introductory Athletes receive membership cards in the mail. Clubs are required to keep a copy of completed athlete registration forms on file in there gym, regardless of whether the athlete membership was registered online, fax or mailed. Insurance benefits may not be paid out if forms cannot be supplied. You should plan to store for a minimum of 7 years. Please consult attorney/legal council to determine the proper length of time to save and store forms. Destroy all unused, 2010–2011 registration forms. Those forms are invalid after August 1, and will not be accepted. The Prep-Opt program within the women’s discipline name has been changed to Xcel Prep.


I STRATION NOW AVAILABLE!

S AND REMINDERS l

l

l

l

Athletes Level 4 and above are required to obtain an Athlete membership. Levels 1–3 and Xcel Prep are required to obtain an Introductory Membership. USA Gymnastics online registration system is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week Member Services phone hours are: Monday: 12:30–5:30 p.m. EST and Tuesday–Friday: 8:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m. EST.

J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

29


National Gymnastics Day &

handstand world record attempt

2011 is the Year of the Handstand, and USA Gymnastics hopes gymnastics clubs across the country will join forces to break the world record for most handstands done at one time! This is a fun and easy way to build interest in gymnastics in your community, generate excitement with your gymnasts, and be a part of breaking a record! Here’s a quick snapshot of this year’s plan.

Who: Gymnasts, families, friends and enthusiasts from gymnastics clubs across the country. Why: To celebrate National Gymnastics Day and build awareness of gymnastics by attempting to break a world record. The handstand initiative is also a fun way to raise funds for Children’s Miracle Network, which benefits children battling illnesses in each club’s local community. What: As part of your National Gymnastics Day celebration at your gym, organize all interested students, families and friends to perform a handstand at the designated time to break the record for the most simultaneous handstands. It also provides a fun way to raise funds for Children’s Miracle Network hospitals. Where: Gym clubs may host their activities at the gym, a local park, the local Children’s Miracle Network hospital, or as part of a community event. This is a great chance to be creative and take advantage of what could be successful in your community.

How: Spread the news to your club’s students and families, share the information with the local media, schools and children’s groups. Don’t worry about how to organize it. Member Club Services will have sample action plans that may be used as a template. It really can be as simple as having your students show up 30 minutes before the event; practice the simultaneous inversion of the handstand a few times; and right before the attempt, have cameras ready, start the countdown and have them perform the handstands for the world record attempt. You will need to count how many gymnasts successfully do a handstand so we can let everyone know if we broke the record. We need your club to email the number of successful handstands, the name of your club and your city and state by 2:00 p.m. ET on September 17 to worldrecordattempt@usagym.org. Also be sure to submit any photos and video clips! Success: We will announce if we broke the world record on our website at usagym.org and we’ll send participating clubs an email with the news!

When: Saturday, September 17, at 1 p.m. ET. It is important that all handstand participants have “feet up” at the same time across the country. Activities can be planned leading up to and after the attempt, but the actual handstands must be done on the dot. Right now, you only need to decide to participate and spread the word. Send an email to worldrecordattempt@usagym.org, and we will send you more detailed information, including the template for the timeline and activities. Please join together and help USA Gymnastics celebrate the Year of the Handstand and National Gymnastics Day by breaking the world record!


TRAMPOLINE AND TUMBLING SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED

T

he USA Gymnastics Trampoline and Tumbling program offers numerous scholarships each year to trampoline and tumbling athletes. This year just over $30K was awarded to deserving athletes.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR’S SCHOLARSHIP AWARD WINNERS

The scholarships recognize that college-age athletes are essential to our international competitive standing. The scholarship fund was established to give these athletes every opportunity to meet the demands of higher education while still training and competing for the program. The scholarship committee selects the scholarship recipients. The scholarships are provided through donations from our sanctioned competitions and the USA Gymnastics T&T Scholarship Camp at Camp Wakeshma held in Three Rivers, Mich.

JUSTIN HACKE TT

SAVANNAH VINSANT

EN STEV IN E T S K LUC

Steven Gluckstein Savannah Vinsant Justin Hackett Drew Collins Tanner Page Alaina Williams Alicia Powder Neil Gulati Justin Celeski Kristle Lowell Kristin Day

Jeff T. Hennessey George Nissen Jordan Bonne Tyson Smith Tyson Smith USA Gymnastics T&T USA Gymnastics T&T USA Gymnastics T&T USA Gymnastics T&T USA Gymnastics T&T USA Gymnastics T&T

$5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $1,500 $1,500 $1,500

For a full explanation of each of the awards, go to usagym.org/tt usagym.org/tt.

G

J U LY 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

31


32

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


LIVE COURSE SCHEDULES Live course schedules are updated weekly on our website www.usagym.org/university Please see the website for the most current schedule. SAFETY/RISK MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION COURSE Safety/Risk Management Certification is required for all Professional, Junior Professional, Introductory Coach, and Junior Introductory Coach Members. *Course dates and times are subject to change and/or cancellation. aValuable risk management information for everyone in the gym, from administrators to athletes, coaches to owners aCertification is valid for four years aHandbook available through the online technical materials store Course Description: The primary goal of this course is to increase safety and risk management awareness. The course has been designed for a variety of audiences – gymnastics coaches, teachers, instructors, club owners, meet directors, judges, athletes and others. The course addresses the two basic areas of risk in gymnastics – risk of injury, which is the primary risk, and risk of a lawsuit. Education, preparation, and vigilance are the primary tools gymnastics professionals need to deal with risk and uncertainty in the sport of gymnastics. To register for a course, visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagym.org/university. Register online or download the registration form. **Save $5 by registering online!**

34

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

Preschool Fundamentals Hands-On Training (Part 2): Certification: Course Description: This is a live, hands-on training course designed for preschool instructors and teachers. Course topics include fundamental movement for children, class safety overview, games, activities to avoid, manipulatives, lesson planning, inclusion of music, thematic teaching, parent/ child teaching, and the use of apparatus. This is a great hands on follow-up to the theory course, with course instructors demonstrating practical examples of many of the concepts taught in Part 1. Completion of Part 1 is recommended, but not required, prior to registering for Part 2. The course is scheduled for four hours and will provide a great deal of hands-on instruction for participants. Participants will be challenged with activities during the course. The cost for the live course is $70 for professional, junior professional, instructor or athlete members; $120 for introductory coach, junior intro coach, and non-members.

UPCOMING LIVE COURSES

UPCOMING LIVE COURSES

SAFETY CERTIFICATION (LIVE) July 14 (New Orleans, LA) July 16 (Uniontown, OH) August 4 (Boston, MA) August 17 (St. Paul, MN) August 25 (Santa Clara, CA) September 2 (Austin, TX) September 8 (Seattle, WA) September 17 (White River Jct., VT) September 22 (Indianapolis, IN) October 7 (Kent, OH)

PRESCHOOL FUNDAMENTALS HANDS ON TRAINING (PART 2) July 17 (New Orleans, LA) August 7 (Boston, MA) August 17 (St. Paul, MN) August 28 (Santa Clara, CA) September 2 (Austin, TX) September 25 (Indianapolis, IN)


MARCH 2011 • TECHNIQUE

35


WHAT’S NEW!

RILEY JOINS USA GYMNASTICS AS MANAGING DIRECTOR OF ATHLETE AND COACHING PROGRAMS FOR WOMEN USA Gymnastics announced that Kim Riley of Novi, Mich., has been named the managing director of athlete and coaching programs for women’s program. Riley began with USA Gymnastics on May 25. “Kim brings a unique blend of experience and a passion for women’s gymnastics to the position,” said Steve Penny, president of USA Gymnastics. “As a coach, judge, event organizer and former business professional, she has a solid understanding of what is involved in the development of athletes and coaching programs within the sport.”

36

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

Riley combines a gymnastics, communications and advertising background for her role with USA Gymnastics. She was a gymnastics team coach at Farmington Gymnastics Center from 1981-2003 and 2007-present. She coached Levels 3-10 and was involved in all aspects of team events including team unity, training clinics, travel and staging special events. Riley opened the gymnastics center in 1981 and was awarded Michigan Coach of the Year in 1999. She has been involved with NAWGJ since 1974 and holds a national rating. She is a former board member for the state of Michigan and has volunteered at regional and national Junior Olympic competitions. As the coordinator of the 2007 U.S. Classic and Challenge in Battle Creek, Mich., Riley developed and executed an aggressive marketing plan. She worked for Carver Yachts as Director of Communications from June 2003-2006. Riley also brings advertising agency experience to USA Gymnastics, serving as account supervisor and media planner for several Detroit advertising agencies.


MINUTES MINUTES TECHNICAL COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES May 16-17, 2011

I. ROLL CALL: Chairman Cheryl Hamilton called the meeting to order at 6:45 p.m. on May 16.

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Asst. Tech. Comm. Chair JO Program Director

Neela Nelson Linda Mulvihill Carole Bunge Linda Thorberg Char Christensen Pat Panichas - Absent Myra Elfenbein Marian Dykes Audrey Schweyer Connie Maloney

II. CLARIFICATION OF THE USA GYMNASTICS-BREVET AND

NATIONAL JUDGES COURSE “VOLUNTEER” REQUIREMENTS: • Any type of women’s artistic or Special Olympics gymnastics competition may be used. • Volunteering at training camps, Congresses, and other USA Gymnastics-sponsored events may also be used. • NAWGJ sponsored “State Judges’ Cup” competitions may NOT be used for this purpose; however, volunteer hours at National Judges’ Cup will count.

These volunteer credits used toward eligibility for the Courses may also be used, if needed, for the annual CPE report. Note: The State NAWGJ Judges’ cups may still be used (maximum of 4 hours) for the normal “annual” CPE miscellaneous credits and the National Judges’ Cup can be used to fulfill both the annual and the National/USAG-Brevet Course requirements.

III. REGIONAL JUDGES’ FEES RECOMMENDATION to the national office to change the daily Championships rate for Regional and East/West Championships judges’ to reflect a minimum of 75% of the normal 8 hour fee. The additional time over 8 hours will be compensated at the regular hourly rate. Rating Brevet National Level 10

38

Suggested Regional Championships Daily Rate (8 hours) $188.16 $175.20 $162.24

Level 9

$142.74

Level 8

$116.82

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

Any change would be reflected in the 2011-12 Women’s Rules and Policies. Motion: L. Thorberg Second: M. Dykes PASSED

This recommendation was not accepted by the National Office at this time due to the economic climate of the country. IV. 2013 NATIONAL JUDGES’ COURSES The committee discussed the format and timing of the National courses and the possibility of offering an online judges’ course. Concerns: Method to provide participants with an opportunity for Q&A Testing: Testing centers vs. specific events at which testing could be conducted. V. NEW BUSINESS CLARIFICATION for LEVEL 8 Beam Acro series: Any handstand that does not require a 2-second hold for Value-part recognition (such as press handstand or a handstand with turn) and is performed within the exercise (not as a mount) may be used as the first element of the acro series, provided there is not a 2-second hold and the handstand phase (vertical) is reached. Example: Press to handstand, immediate step down to back handspring. VI. EAST/WEST & JO NATIONAL JUDGES’ RECOMMENDATIONS The due date for the RTCCs to submit their Regional recommendations for judges at East/West and JO National Championships to Cheryl Hamilton and Connie Maloney was changed to November 1 to facilitate the assignment of judges for Regional and State Championships. VII. CLARIFICATION FOR LEVEL 9 AND 10 FLOOR EXERCISE COMPOSITION When applying the deduction for lack of balance between acro and dance elements, consider both the quality and quantity of the dance elements. The lack of dance connection bonus in Level 9 and 10 Floor Exercise is not necessarily a compositional deduction. VIII. PRACTICE JUDGING ONLINE Marian Dykes made the suggestion that the national office post online a few optional routines with a script of deductions to provide a practice judging opportunity for judges. Connie will check with the media department regarding this possibility. IX. THE WOMEN’S ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE requested that the Technical Committee review the Rules and Policies, Part One, Section III (Duties and Responsibilities of Professional Members) and IV (Rights and Obligations of Athlete members) and to submit revisions/deletions to Kathy Ostberg and Connie Maloney by June 1, 2011.


X. JO CODE OF POINTS CLARIFICATIONS Add to page 147, #3 regarding Series on Beam: When evaluating a connection of two dance elements, if the first element lands in plié on two feet, then straightens the legs totally before a second plié occurs to initiate the jump into the next element, the straightening of the legs will break the series. Pages 139 & 219, regarding Technique of Turns on one foot and Leaps/Jumps/Hops with Turns on Beam and Floor: The degrees listed and illustration shown refers to turns with a minimum of 360°. If 90° or more of the turn is missing, award the lower value part. However, when evaluating jumps/leaps/hops/ turns that have values based upon less than a 360° turn (example, wolf jump ¾), the gymnast must finish a minimum of 1° past the half-way mark between the two value parts. Example: Since there is a value-part listed for the wolf ½, ¾ and 1/1 on Beam, we must evaluate how much of the turn was completed and which value to award. If the turn is completed within 44° or less of the designated degree of turn, it will be awarded the higher Value part. Basically, in order to receive credit for the higher value part, the turn must be finished closer to the higher degree of turn. Technique on the Sissone and Ring Jump on Beam and Floor: The front leg is required to be in a forward-downward diagonal position at a minimum of 45° (see page 140, 142, and 220). If the front leg is less than 45°, deduct “up to 0.10” for insufficient amplitude of the front leg. Landing of Dance elements on Beam and Floor: RECOMMENDATION to add an “up to 0.10” deduction for failure to land with legs/feet together on: • Jumps/leaps/hops that land on two feet on Floor Exercise • Jumps/leaps/hops that land on two feet in SIDE POSITION on Balance Beam to be effective August 1, 2011. Motion: A. Schweyer Second: M. Dykes PASSED XI. THE REMAINDER OF THE MEETING was spent evaluating the elements for the 2011 Congress presentations. The next meeting will be conducted in the Fall of 2011 in Indianapolis. Specific date to be determined. Meeting adjourned Tuesday, May 17 at 7:30 p.m.

ATTENTION WOMEN’S JUDGES AND MEET DIRECTORS: JUDGES’ MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT FOR JULY 1– DECEMBER 31, 2011 Effective July 1, 2011, the rate for mileage reimbursement for judges is $.55/mile to reflect the recent increase in the IRS standard mileage rate for July – December, 2011.


MINUTES MINUTES JOINT MEETING JUNIOR OLYMPIC & TECHICAL COMMITTEES Long Beach, CA May 16, 2011

Meeting called to order by Tom Koll (NJOCC) and Cheryl Hamilton (NTCC) at 9:00 a.m. ROLL CALL:

TECHNICAL COMMITTEE

JO COMMITTEE

Region 1

Neela Nelson

Dan Witenstein

Region 2

Linda Mulvihill

Laurie Reid

Region 3

Carole Bunge

Mark Folger

Region 4

Linda Thorberg

Bryon Hough

Region 5

Char Christensen

John Geddert

Region 6

Pat Panichas (absent)

Larry Goldsmith

Region 7

Myra Elfenbein

Linda Johnson

Region 8

Marian Dykes

Brad Harris

ATCC

Audrey Schweyer

NACC

Kathy Ostberg

Vice President – Program

Kathy Kelly

Junior Olympic Program Director

Connie Maloney

Director of Program Administration

Rachel Brazo

Past Reg. 3 Chair & VP of Member Services

Cheryl Jarrett

Guest – NAWGJ President

Evelyn Chandler

On behalf of both committees, Tom Koll welcomed the committee members and guests. He introduced the new Region 3 JO Chair, Mark Folger. The agenda is full and Tom requested the committee members to be succinct in their comments. I. NAWGJ Evelyn Chandler, the new President of NAWGJ, addressed the committee and said that she would be meeting with her board in July. II. JUDGES’ FEES Kathy Ostberg addressed the committee and brought forth the following recommendation from the National Administrative Committee concerning judges’ fees for the Xcel (Prep Op) competitions. Discussion followed and the committees made the following recommendation: RECOMMENDATION to the national office that the current judge’s fee for Xcel (Prep Op) be applied only when the recommended entry fee of $35 or less is followed. Motion: L. Mulvihill Second: C. Christensen PASSED III. USE OF VIDEO REVIEW The committee referred to the minutes of the November 2010 Technical Committee meeting regarding the use of Video Review and requested that the exact wording be included in the 2011-12 R&P. IV. MATS FOR MOUNTING BARS AND BEAM RECOMMENDATION that a manufactured (folded) panel mat be allowed as a mounting surface for Bars and Beam at the Optional levels, but it must be removed as soon as possible after the gymnast has mounted. It may not be placed on an 8-inch skill cushion. Motion: B. Harris Second: M. Dykes PASSED

40

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

V. JO OPTIONAL VAULT The committees discussed the bonus system used for Level 10 vaulting, but made no change. It was suggested that a survey be taken on a number of issues that can be incorporated into the new JO Optional Program to begin August 2013. RECOMMENDATION that the Tsukahara Tucked with ½ (180°) twist be eliminated from the Level 8 vault chart. Motion: M. Elfenbein Second: D. Witenstein PASSED VI. LANDING DEDUCTIONS The committees discussed the landing deductions for Vault and Bar/ Beam dismounts and concluded that we currently have adequate tools (deductions) to address the lack of balance which would cause the athlete to turn quickly to salute the judges. Judges’ education will continue to reinforce the proper use of these deductions. VII. LEVEL 8 RESTRICTIONS The committees discussed restrictions for Level 8 and decided to make no change until the new Optional program is introduced in 2013. The future limitations will be presented enough in advance to give the coaches adequate time to prepare their athletes. VIII. VERBAL REVIEW OF THE NEW COMPULSORY PROGRAM The committees discussed the “Points of Emphasis” boxes for the new elements and will include a statement in the 2013-20 Compulsory book to refer to the General Faults and Penalities for deductions. IX. FLOOR EXERCISE New Element Evaluation for Floor Exercise RECOMEMNDATION to award B Value for a Switch-leg stag ring leap on Floor (#1.211) Motion: L. Johnson Second: A. Schweyer PASSED CLARIFICATION: The 0.3 insufficient amplitude deduction will not be applied to a front layout used as an accelerating element in a directly connected front salto series. (Example: Front layout directly connected to any another Front salto) CORRECTION Delete III. C. #2. in the May 2010 Joint JO/Technical Minutes: “If the forward leg of one of the two dance Value parts finishes in a stag position, it will NOT fulfill the Special Requirement.” CLARIFICATION: Only the leap that is used to fulfill the 180° split requirement in the dance passage may not finish in a stag position. CLARIFICATION: No deduction would be applied for the coach stepping onto the floor exercise area to adjust mat placement. Add to pages 6 and 213 in the JO Code of Points the inadvertently deleted statement: “also to adjust placement of the mat” as part of the bullet stating examples of no deduction.

continued...


MARCH 2011 • TECHNIQUE

41


MINUTES MINUTES ...continued CLARIFICATION: The committee discussed using additional matting on floor exercise as the takeoff surface for tumbling elements. Although this was not the intent for the usage of this matting, no deduction will be taken if it occurs.

CLARIFICATION FOR LEVEL 7 & 8 BARS: A Clear Hip Circle performed at 45° or above will receive NO deduction for insufficient amplitude. The 0.05 deduction for “C” clear hip circles performed between 11-20° is not applied at Level 7 or 8.

2013 COMPULSORY MUSIC Tom presented a DVD of the new Floor Exercise routines with musical accompaniment. Levels 3, 4 and 5 will each have three (3) musical versions. The committees accepted the routines and the music.

CLARIFICATION: In Level 8, if a gymnast performs skills on both low bar and high bar, she has fulfilled the Special Requirement of a bar change. At Levels 8-10, the bar change SR does not imply that a value-part must be used to transfer from one bar to another; only that the gymnast must work on both rails a minimum of one time (at Level 8) or at Levels 9 and 10, work one rail at least twice and the other rail at least once.

X. BALANCE BEAM NEW ELEMENTS ON BEAM: RECOMMENDATION that the following values be awarded to these new Beam elements: • Switch-leg stag ring leap (#2.407) D • Full illuson to scale on Beam (#3.505) (Jarred and Medvitz) E • One leg take-off Front Salto Piked with ¼ twist to land on two feet (#8.502) (Oswalt) E Motion: L. Johnson Second: M. Elfenbein PASSED RECOMMENDATION to award B value to a “Kick to a Cross Handstand with a full (360°) pirouette” (ending position optional) (#5.206) Motion: L. Thorberg Second: C. Bunge PASSED RECOMMENDATION to add the following to the Level 9 Beam Bonus Principles: In a direct connection of two Acro flight elements B+ C, the Level 9 gymnast may use either a C salto or any aerial element to receive bonus. Motion: B. Harris Second: C. Christensen PASSED RECOMMENDATION that any C + C directly connected Dance elements will receive 0.2 bonus on Beam for Levels 9 and 10. Motion: L. Johnson Second: N. Nelson PASSED XI. UNEVEN BARS NEW ELEMENTS ON UNEVEN BARS RECOMMENDATION that an Underswing (pike sole circle) on LB, release and counter movement forward in flight with 1/1 turn to hang on HB (toe shoot with full twist) be awarded a value of D (Oster) (#7.410) Motion: M. Folger Second: L. Goldsmith PASSED RECOMMENDATION that the following element be awarded E-value (# 3.508) (Sims): From near handstand, clear hip circle forward to immediate front salto straddled to catch same bar Motion: M. Dykes Second: B. Harris PASSED RECOMMENDATION that an “A” Clear Hip Circle would receive NO deduction if the angle achieved was from 1 to 10 degrees below horizontal. More than 10 degrees below horizontal would receive “up to 0.2” deduction for insufficient amplitude. Motion: L. Thorberg Second: C. Bunge PASSED

42

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

CLARIFICATION ON COMPULSORY BARS: LEVEL 3 & 4: When evaluating the Stride Circle in Level 3 and 4 Bars, NO deduction is taken if the “front leg touches the bar on the upswing of the circle prior to the clear support. RECOMMENDATION to delete the word “signals” from the general deduction listed in the JO Code of Points (page 6. J.) regarding the coach or teammates coaching the gymnast. Motion: M. Folger Second: C. Bunge PASSED CLARIFICATION FOR COMPULSORY BARS: When a gymnast uses a straddle-pike casting technique, apply the deduction for incorrect body postion and leg separation. This is NOT considered a change of element. XII. NEW BUSINESS RECOMMENDATION that a 1.00 final score will be awarded for Compulsory or Optional Bars, Beam or Floor Exercise routines that would result in a score equal to or less than one point. Motion: C. Bunge Second: J. Geddert PASSED XIII. 2013 COMPULSORY PROGRAM The remainder of the joint committee meeting was spent on determining the deductions for the new compulsory exercises. XV. THE NEXT MEETING of the joint Jr. Olympic and Technical committees will be held the Monday following the 2012 JO Nationals. Meeting adjourned at 6:30 p.m.


MINUTES MINUTES MCKAYLA MARONEY MAKING HER MOVE

WOMEN’S JUNIOR OLYMPIC COMMITTEE MEETING Long Beach, CA May 16-17, 2011

ROLL CALL: Tom Koll called the meeting to order at 6:45 pm Region 1 Dan Witenstein Region 2 Laurie Reid Region 3 Mark Folger Region 4 Bryon Hough Region 5 John Geddert Region 6 Larry Goldsmith Region 7 Linda Johnson (5/16 in part – 5/17 in part by phone) Region 8 Brad Harris VP-Program Kathy Kelly Dir. Prog. Adm. Rachel Brazo Guest Cheryl Jarrett I. JUNIOR OLYMPIC NATIONAL COACH OF THE YEAR Nominees for this honor are: Region 1 Dayna Waroe/Terry Gray Region 2 Brent Phelps/Lauren Phelps/Peter Flores/Jill Sorensen Region 3 Dennis Harrison Region 4 Mike Hunger/Sarah Jantzi Region 5 Todd Gardiner Region 6 Maureen Chagnon/Blaine Jefferson Region 7 John Holman/Robin Netwell Region 8 Brad Harris Brad Harris was elected as the 2011 National Junior Olympic Coach of the Year.

III.

FOREIGN NATIONAL TEAM MEMBERS RECOMMENDATION that Foreign National Team members who are currently living and training in the United States and have followed the FIG Regulations according to their stature, be allowed to compete in the Jr. Olympic Program and represent their US club up to and including the Regional Championships. Refer to Part Four, Section II in the Women’s Rules & Policies for FIG foreign sanctions.

Motion Second PASSED IV.

J. Geddert L. Reid

ELITE MOBILITY TO LEVEL 10 RECOMMENDATION that an elite athlete may petition to compete in the Jr. Olympic Program by sending a “reason for change” letter to the National Junior Olympic Committee Chairman. These petitions will be reviewed by the JO Committee. The Rules and Policies for 2011-12 is to be revised under Part Two, Section I, II. C. Dropping back through the levels #4. to reflect this change. Motion Second PASSED

J. Geddert M. Folger

V. XCEL (PREP OP) PROGRAM The Committee members discussed this program and are very much in support of this level. They are reviewing how to structure a “national” program that can complement and be integrated, if so desired, into the JO Program. Tom Koll will address this issue at the upcoming State Chairman Workshop and form an ad-hoc committee of regional representatives to work on establishing a set of national rules. JO Committee’s considerations for the Xcel Program: Four Levels of Competitions Common Names Ages Divisions consistent with the JO Program Competition Rules

RECOMMENDATION to cover the expenses and provide VIP credentials for Visa Championships, as well as a Congress credential, for the JO Coach of the Year.

VI. NEW PROGRAM STRUCTURE The committee worked on the structure for the new 2013 optional program.

Motion Second PASSED

VII. MEET FORMAT The committee discussed the necessity for 30-second touch warm-up for competitions that use Traditional formats. The following recommendation was made.

C. Jarrett L. Johnson

RECOMMENDATION that a “National Jr. Olympic Club of the Year” award, selected by the National JO Committee, replace the current “National JO Coach of the Year” award. Motion: B. Harris Second: L. Johnson PASSED The committee reviewed the guidelines for nomination criteria agreed upon in 2010 and determined that the criteria would remain the same: • Excellence in coaching at multiple JO Levels with an emphasis at the highest level in the current year. •

Displays Good Sportsmanship, Team Spirit and Ethics.

Contributes to regional efforts (camps, clinics, congresses, volunteer positions).

Coaching resumes may be considered.

II. EQUIPMENT ISSUES The committee discussed the use of 20 cm mats at JO Nationals. The committee would like to send a survey to all of the clubs that participated at this year’s JO Nationals for their opinion.

RECOMMENDATION to re-word the Rules and Polices, page 39: B. Types of Competition Formats 1. Traditional Formats: c. When using either of the above formats, if squads consist of 13 or more Compulsory gymnasts or 9 or more Optional gymnasts, the squad MAY be divided into two sub-groups for the competition warm ups (30-second touch.) The first half takes their 30-second touch warm-ups, and then competes; then the second half takes their 30-second touch warm-up, and then competes. Touch warm-ups on Beam and Floor may be staggered. Taking the 30-second touch in this instance is up to the discretion of the personal coach and MUST be allowed if wanted. Motion: Second: PASSED

B. Hough B. Harris

VIII. THE REMAINDER OF THE MEETING was spent on proofing the text of the 2013 Compulsory exercises. IX.

THE NEXT MEETING is to be determined, following the filming of the 2013-20 Compulsory exercises.

Meeting adjourned at 2:00 p.m.

44

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1


CLASSIFIEDS

for sale • position available • seeking employment • education • consignment

POSITION AVAILABLE

GYMNASTICS COACHES/INSTRUCTORS WANTED. Great with kids? Head Over Heels Gymnastics is looking for enthusiastic, positive and motivated people to join our team. Class instructors and prep-op coaches needed and program director positions available. We are also looking for team players to work with our Men’s and Women’s JO team programs. Part time and full time positions available. Full time benefits include health, retirement, dental, and sick/vacation days. Salary is based on experience. Visit us at headoverheelsma.com. Email resume’s to headoverheelsgym@verizon. net or call Patricia at 781-659-3378. Nashoba Gymnastics Academy at One Stop Fun, Westford, Massachusetts is looking for an enthusiastic, experienced, highly motivated TEAM COACHES for pre-team, compulsory and optional teams. Ideal candidates are team players, mature, career-minded, energetic and have a positive attitude. Compensation based upon experience. Benefits available to full time coaches. Send resume to Glen Mair: onestopfun@charter.net INSTRUCTOR/COACHES. Paragon Gymnastics of Norwood NJ (Bergen County), is looking for instructors and coaches, P/T – F/T. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and love of children. Position available for competitive team coach level 6 and up with flexible hours. Also preschool through intermediate instruction. Company sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid). Benefits available, paid vacations & sick days. Salary commensurate with experience. NEW facility, state-of-theart approx. 11,000sq ft. Located in the NY/ NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact Dot: email: paragongymnastics@verizon.net, 201-7676921 or fax to 201-767-6693 or at 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648. www.paragongym.com.

46

T E C H N I Q U E • J U LY 2 0 1 1

GIRL’S ARTISTIC TEAM DIRECTOR. Premier Gymnastics in Omaha, NE is looking for a full time position with the responsibility of overseeing the entire girl’s artistic team (80 girls - Pre Team through Level 10). Coaching responsibilities include: Level 7-10 vault, bars and tumbling. Supervisor responsibilities include: maintaining/building a strong cohesive staff, ensuring all levels are working toward set goals and standards, setting meet schedules, staff education, lesson plans and more. Applicants must complete forms found at: www.premier-gymnastics.com/ positions.php Club information found on website. LOOKING FOR AN INSTRUCTOR/ COACH. Danik Gymnastics, Meridian, ID, has an immediate full time/part time position open for Acro Gymnastics Team Coach. Candidate must be energetic and highly motivated to work with Acro Team (must have choreography knowledge), Teach tumbling and rec. gymnastics classes as needed. Coaching experience and appropriate USA Gymnastics certification are required. Salary based on experience. Contact: Viktor Danilovitch (208)846-8311 and send resume to viktor@danikgym.com FOR SALE

GK RISK FREE PROGRAM: Get with the program! It’s better than ever, with a terrific assortment of NEW styles and fabrics and incomparable sales potential. Plus, it’s easier than ever to order, sell and return your RISK FREE garments. We offer customized packages for your pro shop, meets and summer camp. You only pay for what you’ve sold and may return the rest, there is absolutely NO RISK! If you haven’t tried us lately, it’s time you started earning extra profits with our RISK FREE merchandise. Call 1-800-345-4087 for more information on how you can get started today! Email: customerservice@gkelite.com SCORE MASTER – Scorekeeping software interfaced to many different score boards: EliteScore, BetaBrites, TV’s & Projectors.

Download team rosters from the USAG website. Features include: random draws, create rotations, assign #’s, the most comprehensive reporting and results can go directly to your website. Supports: womens/mens, individual/team, artistic/rhythmic/trampoline, compulsory/optional. Download a FREE demo at www.Score-Master.com EDUCATION

Available now! The NEW GYMCERT Gymnastics training manuals (Levels 1, 2, 3, & the NEW Skills & Drills for the Compulsory Coach Level’s 4, 5 & 6) a must for training your staff; cut your lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions and skill training methods; and, best of all have a quick reference that is easy to use which includes Lesson Planning Forms and Class Evaluation Forms by level. The GYMCERT manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, and several coaching, spotting, and safety tips. Will your staff be ready for your fall students? Order direct by calling toll free: 1-866-591-8500 or online: www.GYMCERT.com. FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to http://www.usagym.org/publications Or call Luan Peszek at 317-829-5646.


USA Gymnastics 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 7867

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Technique - July 2011 - Vol. 31, #7  

Technique Magazine - July 2011 - Vol. 31, #7

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you