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A-B - C ratings and found that many disturbing changes had been made. My first reaction was so intensely n e ga tive that I decided to think about the matter for a fe w days before doing some thing rash. After three days of meditation my nega tive reaction turned to a feeling of animosity. I found, upon further study, a totally unrealistic and non-functional listing of daydreams (or nightmares) supposedly presented as A-B-C moves for collegiate trampolinists. I have presumed that whoever presented this gibberish to the NCAA rules committee did one of two things: 1.

N.C.A.A. FINALIST 2.

Presented the proposal to an unsuspecting committee who could have cared less (thinking at that time that the trampoline event would be dropped and it did not matter anyway), or Had decided to insure . that the trampoline event would be most certainly dropped after one year of competition under these rat-

ings. I wish to spell out my primary objections to thses ratings: 1. Safety 2. Artistic gymnastics (see rule book page 12, article 6 "The combinations and difficulty of the exercise must correspond with the capability of the competitor, etc. "

TRAMPOLINE - NCAA vs ABC By: Jerry Wright, San Francisco State

I believe a total disregard of reason and common sense has prevailed here.

When I received my copy of the 196 8 NCAA gymnastics rules the other day I performed my usual microscopic examination of same and was greatly impressed to see the ABC illustrations, Olympic compulsories ( congratulations Pat Arnold), and Apparatus specifications included together for the first time.

For Example: How many trampolinis ts that do:

do you know

full twisting 1 3/4 back? a randolph in the middle of a routine? ~ in ~ out fliffis? full in fliffis?

To my dismay, however, I eventually ¡came to the trampoline section of the

All of those moves are listed as -2 -

"B" moves

CONTINUED PAGE 9

..


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from the

THE U.S.

G UIHAST

EDITOR

MAGAZINE

Well here we are, 24 months ( 2 years) and we have put out 24 issues. Business is good and all back issues in single copies for our first 2 years are no longer available. Volume 1 is available in limited numbers in bound form. Volume 2 will be available in bound form the last of January 1968.

VOLUME 2, NO. 12 DECEMBER

1967

Now that we are on a regular publication schedule again our goal for the coming year will be to give you a better and better magazine. We are well aw-are that we have not met all of the needs of our readers in each issue. And although this is an impossible task we are going to try and come as close as possible to meeting it.

THE U.S. GYMNAST MAGAZINE Iowa City, Iowa 52240 P.O. Box 53

PUBLISHER - Ao L. STATON

U. S. GYMNAST STAFF EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR WOMEN'S EDITOR HIGH SCHOOL EDITOR RESEARCH EDITOR

Sam Bailie Avelyn Bailie Terry Sendgraff Bill Roetzheim Pat Bird

We are reriuesting that our writers give us more instructional material at both the beginning and advanced levels as this is what we get the most re'luests for. They will also continue to keep us posted on the up to date events in each of the areas. We will also try and include some seriuence photos in each issue.

AREA REPORTERS AND FEATURE WRITERS WEST REPORT MID-WEST REPORT MID-EAST REPCYRT EAST REPORT SOUTH REPORT

Dan Millman Art White Fred Orlofsky Carl Patterson Tom Hanvey

Our women's section will also receive more attention. We hope to build this area to at least twice its present size. In this section also, we hope to have more instructional material and sequence photos.

STAFF ARTIST Kathy Thomas

Keep your subscriptions coming in and we will continue to do our best to give you the material you want.

12 ISSUES PER YEAR with the best and most up-to-date coverage of American Gymnastics!.

TRAMPOLINE: as has been mentioned in the past, the trampoline event is still under fire by the NCAA and is in danger of being removed from collegiate competition. Since we strongly feel that this is an important event to gymnastics as well as our international prestiege in the sport a great deal of space has been given to the problem this month in hopes that a true picture may be presented. A few of our regular

Published monthly in Iowa City, Iowa Subscription rates $4.50 per year U.S.A. $6.00 foreign Copyright by U.S. Gymnast Magazine, 1967

CONTINUED PAGE 28 -4-

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Research

arterial pressure in answer to the ~ui:c­ tional test, fulfilled after the training lesson of various strengths ( 3Wo 4Wo and 45-58%) does not change substantially. The revealed changes in the parameters of the functional tests do not give evidence of significant fatigue and even more of over fatigue of the organism .

By: PAT BIRD

.JH~

Please forward all research material directly to Mr. Pat Bird, Dept. of Athletics; Univ. of Minnesota; Minneap~lis, Minnesota 55455.

The strength of the training lessons increased to 45-58% in those cases when in the lesson there were carried out elements of track and field, active and sports games, and various general developmental types of exercises in the training of -!'"oung gymnasts serves to improve the functional capabilities of the organism. Consequently it is advisable to strive for upholding the strength of the training lesson on a higher level.

Edi tor 1 s Note: This article was trans lated from the Russian by Michael Yes sis, Chico State College, Chic_o, California, and reported in the Yessis Translation Review, Vol. 2, No.~ 1967 Romanov, Z . E . , "The Influence of the Training Lesson on the Functional Make -up of the Heart-Circulatory Sys tem of Young Gymnasts", Theory and Practice of Physical Culture, U . S .S .R, 11:53, 1966.

With regard to the influence of separate exercises on the functional make-up of the heart-circulatory system of young gymnasts, the greatest changes in the rea~tions of pulse, arterial pressure and the time of holding the breath are received after exercises in track and field; exercises on the gymnastic apparatus call forth smaller noticed changes and as can be seen, give a lesser effect in the functional development of the organism. Therefore, for better functional preparation of the organism of young gymnasts in their training i t follows to give a greater place to carrying out elements of track and field, active and sporting games.

The main problem in the work of the section on sports gymnastics with children of a young age (11-13) is all around physical preparation, having an aim to strengthen health, raise the functional capabilities of the organism and to better the physical preparation of young sportsmen. In our work we studied the influence of various strengths of training lessons on the functional make-up of the heartcirculatory system of young gymnasts (1213 years of age) and the influence of separate exercises on the gymnastic apparatus. Before and after the lesson, determined was a functional test of the circulatory system (running in place for 2 min.) and in the course of it, - pulse rate, arterial pres suer and a test of breath holding. These parameters were investigated after various numbers of repetitions (maximum of 12) of exercises on the apparatus (routines on the rings, vaults over the horse and the exercises on the beam) and likewise after active games or running.

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The strength of the training lesson ranged from 30-58%. From the 52 chronometric lessons in 34 cases it equaled 30 4Wo and in the remainder, 45-58%¡. The character of the :reaction of the pul.se and -6-


Report by Terry Sendgraff

This is Part 1 of a Two Part Series. Next Issue: Judging on a Beginning Level: Modification of the F .I.G. Rules for Judging Optional Routines.

JUDGING ON A BEGINNING OR LOCAL LEVEL

WOMEN JS GYMNASTICS

The 1967 July - October issues of the U. S. Gymnast, Women's Section, have been concerned with the latest and corrected International Fed. of Gymnastics' Rules of judging Women's Gymnastics for high level competition. Complete books on this subject are available through the USGF, Box 4699, Tucson, Ariz. Hoping readers and interested teachers, coaches, gymnasts, and potential judges have become at least familiar with the highly technical method of judging women's gymnastics, it is probable that the questions have been raised for beginning programs of beginning judges "How in the world can we do this on our level?", "Where are we going to obtain enough people to judge when this task is so highly technical when our level of gymnastics is in a beginning or intermediate stage?" It is a fact that in many areas the many phases of gymnastics are new and even non-existant. Qualified women instructors are scarce, little competition is available, possible good gymnasts find it hard to obtain much practice time, training facilities and opportunities for advancement are limited. Let's be optimistic and say that this picture will change - more public schools are providing gymnastic programs, colleges are beginning to train future teachers in this activity as well as offering competition experience, Y .W .C oA .sand Y .M.C .A .s Turner Organizations, Sokol Groups and some private schools are getting on the bandwagon of promoting gymnastics more intensively.

The USGF is offering many services throughout the U.S. (local, state and national) for backing programs. A child neither learns to walk before she crawls, nor run before she walks. A judge should start on a local level or beginning level in a modified manner if pos sible. Students of gymnastics should also be taught and given an opportunity to judge on a modified level, with the understanding that it is modified. A local beginning-intermediate level program of gymnastics is faced with problems of funds, facilities, teachers, coaches, organization, sanctioning, or competition and available qualified judges. Regarding the judging phase of a gymnastics program, several problems seem to exist ... those who know the most about gymnastics in the local area are usually the teachers and coaches of the gymnasts who may participate; others who might be willing to judge are confronted with a highly technical method of officiating which takes time and experience in which to be proficient; new judges are placed in the position of judging a large number of girls of a geginning level and this often times is much more difficult from the point of view -7 -

CONTINUED PAGE 8


WOMEN'S REPORT (con't) of interest, due to lack of variety in skills and style as well as an extremely large number of errors in execution; a lack of opportunity to experience judging because of the lack of competitive opportunities.

mate goal, of course, is to win, BUT the emphasis must not be to win at all costs or that in losing everything is lost. The goal to win and the will to win is good, to reach that goal and consider the welfare of the individual, certain objectives must be emphasized. Competition should strive for the objectives of providing enjoyment of participating in the experience that will provide an opportunity for character growth; a situation that will enable an individual to do her best, not in comparison to someone else but in comparison to her own previous accomplishments; a worthy goal for which to strive - to win or know that she has done her best in trying to win.

For the local judging program on a modified level, the following suggestions are offered: 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Smaller, informal meets and more of them. Judging clinics that provide willing gymnast demonstrators to give judging practice with a chance for discussion after a performance and practice scores are given. Teachers and coaches of gymnastics should practice judging their own gymnasts during their practice presentations of routines. Use simple compulsory routines performed by demonstrators to enable the judge to concentrate on the execution phase of judging because the major emphasis on a beginning or low intermediate level should be execution both from the point of view of the gymnast as well as the judge. Try to obtain enough judges in order that a new judge may become knowledgeable first of all in one event, rather than all four events at once. UseamodificationofF.I.G. Rules that is suitable to the level of the gymnastics program, the gymnasts and the judges.

The adults involved in pre para ti on of gymnasts for competition are all educators in a sense - parents, judges, teachers, coaches, and sponsors. The aims and objectives of these adults are reflected in the attitude of the gymnasts before, during and after competi tio.n. Education for competition should be teaching the real meaning of sportsmanship, respect for teammates, coaches, rules, officials and opponents, regardless of win or lose; preparation of competitors mentally, physically, and emotionally by good, sound coaching and training methods. Considering that a sincere effort is made in the approach to competition for girls on any level, the competition can and should provide the following by products 1. fitness 2. courage 3. confidence 4. self pride 5. sense of accomplishment 6. a sense of values for the sport and sportmanship

THE SPIRIT OF COMPETITION

The spirit of amateur competition for girls can and should be one that is beneficial to the individual participating, from the standpoint of physical, mental and emotional welfare.

7. 8. 9.

In gymnastics as in other sports there are different levels of amateur competition (local, state, national and international) and in all levels there should be common objectives and goals. The ul ti-

team spirit the value of friendship an appreciation of hard work to reach a goal

Unfortunately, there are many external pressures and situations that make it very difficult for all involved to be -8-

v


WOMEN'S REPORT (con't) pressures, selfish gains, a nd the desire for self-recognition and rationalize about all obstacles. Then i t becomes a situation of WIN at any cost or sacrifice regardless of individuals and the welfare of those individuals.

staunch in their main goals, aims a nd objectives. Coaches and gymnasts alike are pre ss ured to feel that they must win at all costs, regardless of the mental, physical a nd emotional price that must be paid. There are pressures from employers, sponsprs, parents, and even fri ends. There are pressures of practice time (or lack of it), finances involved a nd obligations to other phases of life, personal as well as professional. Just as in every other human endeavor, so in gymnastics, there are those who let themselves be guided in to outside

It is hopeful that as opportunities for competition for girls increase, that there are many more individuals of in tegrity and strength of character who will follow the path that will bring about the best possible "SPIRIT OF COMPETITION".

TRAMPO LINE - NCAA vs A-B-C (con't) top 10 trampolinists in the country but the other 340 will all fall in a big group or fall off!

and I 1 11 bet no one knows more than 15 trampolinists who can do these moves. Out of some 350 collegiate trampolinists, only 15 can do these moves --- does that sound to you like they ought to be "B" moves???

Why should a trampolinist do a double back when a back h as the same value -- both are listed as "A" moves?

Can you believe that the proponent of this guide has the audacity to list a triple cody as a "C" move ---- BEAUTIFUL - how many triple cody' s have any of you seen under a ny circumstances??? I have seen all of the top trampolinists in the last 5 years and I have only seen two and both were on the Australian bed L Let's worry about the Australian bed when it is approved for competition. That's like listing a double fly-away from the high bar as a "B" move just because Dan Millman has done a full in fliffis â&#x20AC;˘..

Why should a gymnast use a barani out when a barani has the same value -both are "A" moves? etc.

etc.

etc.

etc.

Let it not be said that I offer only criticism --- perceive the following: It is extremely dangerous to force everyone to go for the big trick to get a 10.0 point routine. I would rather see him lose points for lack of form, control or h eight.

I believe a follow through adoption of this guide will lead to disaster. Teams fighting for championships will be forced to have their trampolinists try for more difficulty in order to get a decent score.

-::- Proposed A-B-C list by Jerry Wright on Page 10

There are no more than four or five teams in the country that have more than one trampolinist that can come up with a 10. 0 routine wi th this guide. Probably the easiest " C" listed is ~ in ~ out flif fis-to barani out fliffis which is "C" plus "A"! There a re no combination "C" parts like 3 consecutive "B" moves for example -- even the FIG allows A+B+B to e~ual B+C on the side horse which is almost insurmountable.

EDITORS NOTE: The 1 968 N.C.A.A. h andbook which Mr. Wright refers to, and which includes all up to date rules for competition is now available at the fallowing address : College Athletics Publishing Service, 349 East Thomas Ro ad, Phoenix, Arizona 85012, price - $1. 00.

This guide will help to separate the -9-

I also have read with great interest the n ew proposed A-B-C listings on trampoline, and to an extent I agree with Jerry that the "C" parts in some cases seem to CONTINUED PAGE 10


ORIGIN

A PARTS

Front Somersaults

B PARTS

C PARTS

a. front somersault b. front 1 3/4 to back c. front cody

b. front cody with full twist

Back Somersaults

a. back somersault b. 3/4 back c. back cody

a. double back b. 1 3/4 back c. double cody

a. triple back b. 2 3/4 back

Twisting Forward Somersaults

a. barani b. front with full twist

a. b. c. d.

a. Randolph b. Triffis c. 2 3/4 front, rudolph ball out

a. double front

Rudolph full twisting 1 3/4 barani in fliff is brani out fliffis, rudolph B+B

a. triple front b. front 2 3/4 c. double front cody

-

Twisting Backward Somersaults

a. full twisting back somersault

a. back with double twist b. full twisting cody

a . back with triple twist b. ~ in ~ out fliffis c. full in fliffis d. full out fl iffis e. double twist. cody f. full twist. 1 3/4

Combinations

a. Back somersault to barani A+A

a. 1 3/4 to cody B+A b. any combination of two consecutive "B" moves = B+B

a . any combination of three consecutive "B" moves = B+C b. 1 3/4 back to double cody = C

EDITORS NOTE (con't) be unrealistic or more difficult than they should be.

stunts as compared with the big stunt or "C" move. For exampl e the tuck Rudolph out fliffis would receive "B" value while a piked Rudolph out fliffis would receive a "C" r ating; or, the tuck 1 3/4 to a double cody would be a "B" stunt while the piked 1 3/4 to double cody would be a "C" move.

I feel also that some consideration should have been given to the difference iii difficulty between piked and tucked

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Due to unfortunate circumstances Fred Dennis was unable to acquire the proper documents and Jim Amerine replaced him just before flight time.

OLYMPIC REPORT By Jack Beckner, 1968 Olympic Coach

Background Last May the Olympic Gymnastics Comm. recognized the necessity of US participation in the 3rd Pre-Olympic Gymnastic Meet to be held in Mexico City, Oct. 15-19. Since this meet fell under the jurisdiction of the AAU action was finally initiated primarily through the efforts of Mr. Maloney, Mr. Meade , the NAAU Comm. , Mr. Barak of the Luxford Foundation and myself to see that this necessary experience take place.

RICHARD LOYD - N. W. LOUISIANA

Mexico After a pleasant flight on Mexicana Airlines we arrived and departed for our hotel only to find we had to temporarily move to another hotel. Even though fatigued we proceeded to the Audi torio National, the site of competition, in order to

Thanks and credit for our successful venture must also go to the three top gymnastics eriuipment companies who helped underwrite the expenses: The Nissen Corp. who in addition provided fine warm-up suits The Gym Master Gymnastic Enuipment Co and the American Gymnastics Eauipment Corp. Many thanks. Trial A trial was held at Pasadena City College Oct. 12-13 to select 6 gymnasts who would depart the following day for Mexico under the direction of the 1968 Olympic coach and manager. An appropriate field of 13 gymnasts entered this competition scheduled for Friday the 13th. Following are the results: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Steve Hug Bob Lynn Fred Roethlisberger Richard Loyd

STEVE HUG (age 15)-LOS ANGELES

105.15 104.85 104.60 103.70

CONTINUED PAGE 12 -11-


OLYMPIC REPORT (con't) famili a rize the team with the apparatus and enjoy a light workout. We found the apparatus excellent (Fritzen and Jannson with the exception of Japanese S. Horse and Rings). The only shortcoming was the chalk which was more suitable to bowling than gymnastics. Sunday afternoon we observed the Womens Compulsory Competition which developed into a close race between the Czechs and the Russians. The Czechs ultimately won the team title, and without Caslavaska. The day of c-ompeti ti on we arrived early for warm-up and found the warm-up gym to be extremely cold. Our order of competition was set so as to help us achieve the best team effort and score possible. The team accepted coaching decisions without nuestion and even though minor problems arose these young men re sponded in a fine manner. Our team started on the Parallel Ba rs with the USSR preceeding us on each apparatus and the Japanese following us on each, finishing on Long Horse. On the optiona ls we started on Side Horse, finishing on Floor Exercise.

ALL-AROUND NAME 1. Diamidov Rus sia 2. Nakayama Japan 3. Endo Y. Japan 20. Roethlisberger U.S.A. 21. Hug, Steve U.S.A. 22. Loyd, Richa rd U .S .A. 24. Ame rine, Jim U .S .A. 26 . Lynn, Robert U .S .A. 29 . Tucker, R. U.S .A.

NAME 1. 2. 2. 16. 16. 18. 30. 34. 37.

Nakayama, A Japan Kato, S Japan Diamidov Russia Roethlisberger U.S.A. Loyd U.S.A. Hug U.S.A. Lynn U .S .A. Tucker U .S .A. Amerine U.S.A.

We s uffered no ill effects from a ltitude or gastric-enteritis, this l a tter due to disiplined eating habits.

57.45

57.90

115.35

57.85

57.10

114.95

57.35

57.35

114 .70

52.60

55.00

107.60

51.80

54.15

105.95

52.15

53 .45

105 .60

51.50

54.00

105.50

53.50

50.25

103.75

49.40

54.05

103.45

COMP.

OPT.

TOTAL

9.70

9.60

19.30

9.60

9.55

19.15

9.55

9.60

19.15

9.25

9.25

1 8 .50

9.25

9.25

1 8 .50

9.10

9.30

18.40

8.85

9 .00

17.85

8.65

9.10

17.75

8.35

8.90

17.25

COMP.

OPT.

TOTAL

9.55

9.70

19.25

9.40

9.70

19.20

9.40

9.55

18.95

8.60

9.15

17.75

1.

Diamidov Russia 2. Cerar Yugoslavia 3. Ka rassev Russia 20. Hug U.S.A.

RESULTS

place place place Pla ce

FINAL

SIDE HORSE NAME

1st 2nd 3rd 4th

OPT.

FLOOR EXERCISE

Needless to say, l ac k of group training prior to departure and lack of internationa l experience resulted in some individual low scores which we expected, but morale was high and mis takes immedia tely forgotten. Conseouently the team effort was strong. This held true throughout the whole meet and resulted in a 3rd place team victory for the U.S. This team did an outstanding job considering the level of comp~ti tion and their own experience. Individua lly they will be the better for the experience and I would not be surprised if these boys show the necessary improvement next year to make our Olympic Team.

PLACE

COMP.

COUNTRY

SCORE

JAPAN RUSSIA U .S .A. MEXICO

572 .40 568.10 534.30 483.40 -1 2-


23. Amerine U.S .A. 23. Loyd U.S .A. 25. Roethlisberger U.S .A. 27. Tucker U.S.A. 33. Lynn U.S .A.

HORIZONTAL BAR 8.55

8.75

17.30

9.10

8.20

17.30

8.30

8.80

17.10

7.80

9.00

16.80

8.80

7.05

15.85

NAME Nakayama Japan 2. Endo Japan 3. Diamidov Russia 3. Kato, s. Japan 3. Kato, T. Japan 20. Lynn U.S .A. 22. Loyd U.S .A. 24. Amerine U.S .A.

1.

2. 3. 18. 24. 32. 33. 37. 39.

COMP.

Endo Japan Matsuda Japan Klimenko Russia Roethlisberger U.S .A. Amerine U.S .A. Hug U.S .A. Tucker U.S .A. Loyd U.S .A. Lynn U.S .A.

OPT.

TOTAL

9.50

9.70

19.20

9.45

9.65

19.10

9.40

9.55

18.95

8.95

9.10

17.95

8.70

8.85

17.55

8.80

8.35

17.15

7.95

9.00

16.95

7 .90

8.65

16.95

8.50

7.65

16.15

COMP.

OPT.

TOTAL

9.70

9.90

19 .60

9.75

9.70

19 .45

9.65

9.65

19.30

9.00

9.35

18.35

9.05

9.05

18.10

8.70

9.25

17.95

8.55

9.20

17.75

8.80

8.90

17.70

7.95

8.45

16.40

OPT.

TOTAL

9.70

9.75

19.45

9.70

9.70

19.40

9.60

9.75

19.35

9.65

9,70

19.35

9.65

9.70

19.35

8.90

9.40

18.30

8 .60

9.50

18.10

8.65

9.15

17.80

8.45

9.30

17.75

8.00

9 .60

17.60

8.05

9.25

17 .30

1.

LONG HORSE NAME

COMP.

28. Roethlisberger U.S .A. 29. Tucker U.S.A. 32. Hug U.S .A.

See Page 29 for Ring Results

PARALLEL BARS NAME 1.

2. 3. 19. 22. 24. 27. 28. 37.

Nakayama Japan Diamidov Russia Haya ta Japan Roethlisberger U.S .A. Lynn U.S.A. Hug U.S.A. Amerine U.S .A. Loyd U.S .A. Tucker U.S .A.

RICK TUCKER - SO. ILLINOIS

Our best efforts were on the optional routines, (see event score sheet). Our best individual effort was earned by Rick Tucker (S .I.U .) on Horizontal Bar optional routine; 9.6 over-all, our best event was -13-

CONTINUED PAGE 14


OLYMPIC REPORT (con't) Floor Exercise; over-all average for pulsories and optionals was 9 .1. Our 5 routines were on the Horizontal Bar an average of 9 .4. Our poorest effort on the Long Horse with an average of on compulsory vaults.

combest with came 8.56

It is my feeling that gymnasts and coaches should not become complacent over good scores on Horizontal Bar, however, I feel that judging standards, particularly on the compulsory Long Horse vault, are much higher than in the U.S. Judges Forty judges were present and of those 11 were from Mexico. Next year of 11 only about 3 will be Mexican, the rest will be from countries in direct competition with the U.S. for top honors. The U.S. delegation was represented by 2 judges: Tom Maloney and Armando Vega (on Side Horse and Rings respectively). Both did an outstanding job. NOTES ON THE EXECUTION OF COMPULSORY EXERCISES The F .I.G. Table of Deductions must be followed but, more important, a higher standard of performance must be achieved in order to riualify for the top scores. The following points are primarily the "movements" that must be developed to the ultimate. Be advised that execution of thB compulsory exercises literally sets a standard of judging for your team throughout the entire competition, in such large international meets as Olympic Games.

SIDE HORSE Amplitude on high double leg circles and scissors. Disengaging hips on scissors. Uniform rhythm and form throughout exercise. UNDERCUT TO REVERSE HIGH DOUBLES - A void hitting the horse. DISMOUNT - On inverted stockli move to the end of the horse, a void placing the hand near the pommel. Body must lay out over the horse and land next to the end of the horse (not pommels). RINGS MOUNT - Shoot handstand with straight arms (to secure handstand but not held). On lowering from handstand do not touch straps. BACK KIP - perform to straight arm support then lower to cross. CROSS - Arms and shoulders locked, body "ramrod" straight. 2ND DISLOCATE - should be performed with straight arms and little or no hip f'lexion (a low giant). BACK UPRISE - perform high enough to show "horizontal support lever" with arms straight. Best ones performed completely with straight arms to lever position. DISMOUNT - high approaching handstand and little or no hip flexion. LONG HORSE Emphasis on lift after hand contact, complete opening and distance greater than the length of horse. A strong run is indicated and contact with horse is in the 30° position. PARALLEL BARS MOUNT - A strong

jump to stretched horizontal body position above the bars with hand ahead of shoulders. Do not bend the arms or body. STREULI - Move rapidly to handstand. Do not hold. PEACH BASKET - Early drop and move rapidly to a position just short of a handst~nd. FRONT UPRISE - Little body bend and high. STRADDLE CUT TO "L" - Perform as high as possible landing in strong "L" position. BACK STUTZ - At least at horizontal position. DISMOUNT - Must flow and push off to free stand.

FLOOR EXERCISE MOUNT - Back handspring high then landing in handstand position (no hold). 1/8 turn (after leg circle to handstand) inside hand moves to rear. AFTER CARTWHEEL TO STANDHigh back handspring step out. DISMOUNT - One step, roundoff, flip-flop, high layout, Maximum lift attained with body straight, (chin in), then head back for rotation.

-14-

CONTINUED PAGE 29


OLYMPIC REPORT (con't) HORIZONTAL BAR MOUNT - Above horizontal. I prefer Russian technique of shooting near handstand and using slight hip flexion to kill downward swing. (Note: Mr. A. Gander, Presi dent ofF.I.G., in a compulsory discussion in Kansas City stated that the Russian technique was all wrong a,nd execution above the horizontal would meet the requirement. The killing of the swing definitely wrong - Bill Meade.) FINISH TURN - Must be performed high and stretched (above horizontal). UPRISE TO STRADDLE "L" - hips must rise to at least bar height. STRADDLE CUT - Should be high, utilize leg flexibility and hand push off. KIP - Should be performed with straight arms. DISMOUNT - must be of the high flying, "straddle hecht" type. Avoid unnecessary preliminary tap. RANDOM NOTES Miroslav Cerar of Yugoslavia worked with the US team and performed at his usual best affording our team an opportunity of a close-up view of him in action. On high bar his Stalder shoot with a !z turn to forward giants was one of the best executed Super C moves. Hurzeler (Switz) coached by Jack Gunthard looked to be an exceptional gymnast. I'm sure the 1 68 Swiss team will be a tough

By virtue of their score Roethlisberger, Hug, Loyd, and Amerine should be qualified for the First Team Trials to be held in June. All scored above 104.00 points. SUMMARY Particiapation in the Pre-Olympics was a worthwhile experience for U.S. Gymnastics. We accomplished the following objectives: 1. A contingent of Olympic candi dates and coaches had the opportunity to observe the interpretation and execution of the compulsory and optional exercises by the best gymnasts in the world. 2. We had the chance to check facilities, equipment, effects of altitude, and other conditions and possible problems which will face us in the coming Olympiade. 3. We had the opportunity of measuring the readiness and capacity of U.S. gymnasts and coaches to meet the challenge of the compulsory exercises. 4. Under existing conditions of: a) physical conditioning, b) readiness to compete, and c) general lack of top level international experience, we found our gymnasts ready to meet the challenge even though they were not completely prepared as compared with ORGANIZED gymnastics nations. 5. Our team performed far better than expected, which reflects their experience, ¡ desire, ability, coaching, and their understanding of 'this discipline (Gymnastics).

one.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Dolling and Doste of the DDR (E. Ger.) showed some fine techniriue and difficulty, one doing a "free hip, hop to reversed grip, immediate stoop through and shoot to "Takamoto" on the H. Bar. Their team will be as tough as in Tokyo. Their de termination and organization was evidenced particularly by their girls; 15 yr. old Karin Janz (2 medals) and 16 yr. old Marianne Noack (1 medal ) . In both mens and womens teams the Champs stayed home.

A more intensive effort must be made to develop U.S. gymnasts for the Olympic Program.

Lisi tsky and Soshin (USSR) mounted the side horse with back loops on the end. Klimenko demonstrated unusual ability and daring on Diamodov, stutz to handstand and dismounting with "back semi full twist".

Funds must be found to underwrite a U.S. National Program and an Olympic Program in order to provide the necessary consistency in coaching (technical deve¡1 opment) and discipline of gymnasts and

Additional Olympic Training and Clinic opportunities must be set up on national and regional bases to a) teach proper techninues in the compulsory exercises(basic movements: develop all-around gymnastic competitors for this '68 Team and future teams.

CONTINUED PAGE 29 -15-


oline which has now become a world event? The U.S.A. is number 1 with England, Japan, Russia and other countries gaining rapidly. Is it not important to maintain this level which we have gained and in particular in a sport which was invented and developed here in the U.S.? If the colleges drop trampoline from their competitive program the high schools will be forced to follow. How is a high school coach going to get a boy to work on an event that will not help him get a collegiate athletic scholarship? The other nations will very ~uickly fill the gap and become the leaders in this American event ! In a proper well rounded training program both trampoline and the all-around program can be developed at the same time. SUMMARY

1.

WORLD CHAMPIONS WAYNE MILLER & JUDY WILLS

2.

3. TRAMPOLINE STUDIES

These few studies that we have presented here give strong indication that trampoline is by far not the most dangerous event in gymnastics. And I am sure if one would take the time to look for additional information the facts would back the material which has been presented here. Also, in relation to the number of reports of death and serious injuries in High School football and Little League baseball it is hard for us to even rate the sport of gymnastics as dangerous in any of its various events.

4.

Al though a few coaches have had a serious injury on the trampoline statistics do not warrent dropping the event for this reason. No statistical proof has shown that the trampoline interferes with the allaround program of our nation. If properly used it can be a great training aid for the all-around performer. As shown by Dr. Dunn 1 s study those who strongly opposed trampoline are now and have been in the past those who have made weak showings in national competition on the trampoline. This tends to lead one to believe that personal motives are involved. Results of the 4th World Trampoline Championships (London, June 1967)follow: MEN:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Dave Jacobs, U .S .A. D. Curtis, Great Britain M. Williams, G. Britain K. Treiter, Germany

46.70 44.10 43.70 42.95

'

WOMEN: It is common knowledge in the coaching ranks that a number of coaches feel trampoline should be dropped so that full time can be spent on developing our all-around Olympic program. This is all well and good as we are ranked about 5th or 6th on the international level, but what about tramp-

1. 2. 3. 4.

-16-

Judy Wills, U.S.A. Nancy Smith, U.S.A. Charlene Palets, So. Africa Ute Czech, Germany

44.70 41.10 40.50 38.70


Floor Ex Vaulting

0 0

6 3

Fred Orlofsky reported that a research study that he completed during the summer of 1966 regarding injuries in gymnastics resulted in the following findings: ( 225 ~uestionnaires were sent to colleges and universities, Y.M.C.A.s, Clubs, etc. 135 were returned) EVENT

NUMBER OF INJURIES

High Bar Parallel Bars Still Rings Tumbling Floor Exercise REBOUND TUMBLING (TRAMP.) Side Horse Long Horse

117 78 78 44 40 36 22 18

The following are quotes from a letter sent May 19, 1967 to Mr. Walter Byers, Executive Director, NCAA by Mr. Gay Hughes, President of the Illinois High School Gymnastic Coaches Association and approved unanimously by the associations members.

"If the trampoline is eliminated there will be several hundred boys throughout the nation that have a lready wasted from one to four years in perfecting skills that will be utterly useless on the collegiate level. There are also gymnasts already in college on athletic scholars hip s because of their ability on the trampoline. The Athletic Directors in this State have spent close to $30, 000 on Golia th trampolines to standardize our enuipment on the collegiate level and now they will see this money literally go to waste. "

JUDY WILLS - WORLD CHAMPION

-,

The results of a 'lUestionnaire regarding injuries circulated by coach Jerry Jacquin during the 1966-67 season in the state of Illinois are as follows: (the Illinois high school gymnastics program is considered one of the largest and most advanced in the country) EVENT

'¡

High Bar Tumbling Side Horse P. Bars TRAMPOLINE Rings

BROKEN BONES

TOTAL INJURIES

17 11 4 8 4 1

46 46

"To quote the press , "The committee said its act ion was a safety measure." We know of no statistical proof that shows the trampoline to be any more dangerous than any other event, in fact it is probably safer than the so-called Olympic events. We are aware of one college coach 1 s misfortune with several severe accidents, one

22 22 19 16 -17-

CONTINUED PAGE 18


TRAMPOLINE STUDIES (can't) of which included the horizontal bar, but we strongly recommend that this coach reevaluate his coaching and safety techniques rather than condemn the trampoline". "The trampoline is gaining international popularity every year. This is one event created by America ns and we excell in this type of competition. Should we now eliminate an American innovation in favor of events in which we are yet to match the Europeans?

"Some of the NCAA coaches are now contemplating the elimination of the specialist and concentrating on the a ll-around man - the specia list to be phased out over a 3 to 4 year period. Again these college coaches are planning for their own purposes without considering the ramifications on high school and lower level programs". "We have 8500 boys participa ting in competitive gymnastics at the high school level and probably a nother 10, 000 children participating in park, YMCA, youth organizations, and summer camp programs that filter into our high school programs ."

T.HE UPWARD LOOK AT THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

"We have a 1 going thing' here in Illinois and we sincerely ask that you carefully consider the conserruences that your rule changes may have, not only on our programs but all high school programs throughout the nation." Dr. Ralph Piper, gymnastics coach, University of Minnesota conducted a survey (1960-61) on gymnastics 1IlJUries. Dr. Piper sent out 125 rruestionnaires receiving 79 in return. Results of this survey a re: EVENT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

#

Tumbling High Bar "P" Bars REBOUND TUMB . (TRAMPOLINE) Floor Ex Flying Rings Still Rings Side Horse Long Horse

INJURIES

DAYS LOST

32 28 21

12.2 20.8 17.3

19 15 13 10 9 1

10.3 9 .1 41.5 15.1 12.2

TRAMPOLINE CLASS

o.o

-18-


pared and published by the Statistics Cammi ttee of the National Association of College Gymnastics Coaches. THE OPINIONS OF HEAD COACHES OF GYMNASTICS IN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES REGARDING THE TRAMPOLINE

Replies were received from head coaches of ninety-nine institutions which represented a return of slightly more than 78%. To be included in the summary, the returned questionnaire had to confirm that the ins ti tut ion was a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NC AA), that the respondent was the head coach of gymnastics, and that a program of intercollegiate competition was in fact being conducted.

By Hubert Dunn Gymnastics Coach at Northern Illinois University and President of the National Association of College Gymnastics Coaches

The majority of the head coaches of gymnastics in colleges a nd universities favor the retention of trampoline as an event in both the NCAA Championship meet and in dual meet competition. Over 6 0 per cent of the head coaches who participated in a survey study responded that they did not favor the elimination of the trampoline as a competitive event. The study was undertaken to secure the opinions of the head coaches with regard to recent and proposed changes to gymnastics rules.

Fourteen returns were eliminated for failure to meet one of the criteria established. The summary is based, therefore, on the opinions of eighty-five coaches of gymnastics. Table I presents a summary of the responses to the question, "Do you favor the elimination of the trampoline from the NCAA Gymnastics Championship Meet?"

To obtain the data, a questionnaire was sent to each of 126 head coaches of gymnastics in colleges and universities in the United States. The selection of the ins titutions to be surveyed was based on listings in the 1966-67 edition of the Blue Book of College A thlet1cs, and the weekly reports of dual meet results pre-

Fifty-two, or 61.9 per cent, of the eighty-four coaches who responded to the question do not favor the elimination of the trampoline as a competitive event in the NCAA meet. It is interesting to note

TABLE I Number and Percentage of Coaches who Favor and who Do Not Favor the Elimination of Trampoline from the NCAA Championship Meet, by Region Region

Favor Elimination Number Per Cent

Do Not Favor Elimination Per Cent Number

Total for Region

17

63.0

10

37.0

27

Mideast

3

15.8

16

84.2

19

Midwest

2

10. 0

18

90.0

20

He st

10

55.6

8

44.4

18

Total

32

38. l

52

61. 9

84

East

--

-19-

CONTINUED P-AGE 20


TRAMPOLINE STUDIES (con' t ) that s upport for trampoline follows a regional pattern. Coac hes from both the Mideast ( 84.2 per cent ) and Midwest ( 90.0 per cent ) strongly support it. Coaches from the Eastern Region are rather s trongly opposed to it while those from tne West are moderately oppose d. Almost identical res ults were obtained in answer to the question, 11 Do you favor the elimination of trampoline as a dual meet event? 11 Fifty, or 59. 5 per cent of eighty-four coaches favor its retention as an event.

THE INJURY FACTOR Each coach was a sked to list in r a nk order the thr ee events which, in his opinion, were the ones in which the grea t es t number of serious injuries occur. A "serious injury" was defined a s one which r e quired the attention of a medical doctor and resulted in at least two weeks restriction from prac tice or compe tition. Table II gives a summary of the number a nd percentage of times each event was listed first.

TABLE II Number and Percentage of Coaches Selecting Event Indicated as the One in which Greatest Number of Serious Injuries Occur, by Region

RE GI 0 N East Mideast Midwest West No. Per Cent No. Per Cent No. Per Cent No. Per Cent

Total No. Per Cent

20

83.3

4

21. 0

6

31.6

11

61. l

41

51. 2

Horizontal Bar

3

12.5

13

68.4

11

57.9

5

27.7

32

40.0

Rings

l

4.2

l

5.3

2

2.5

l

5.3

2

2.5

2

2.5

Event Trampoline

Tumbling

l 2

Free Exercise

10.5

Long Horse Total

24

100.0

19

100.0

Forty-one of the eighty coaches who responded to the question ranked the trampoline as the numbe r one event which, in their opinion, resulted in the greatest number of serious injuries. The horizonta l bar was the second most frequently me ntioned with thirty-two coach es designating it. Seventy-three, or 91 per cent of the e i ghty coaches who responded to the question selected either the trampoline or the hori zontal bar.

19

5.6

100.0

l

5.6

l

l. 3

18

100.0

80

100.0

As for the pre ceding ones, the response to this ques ti on followed a r egiona l pattern. The Easte rn Coaches, in par ticular, a nd the Western Coaches considered the trampoline the event in which the most serious injuries occurred. However, the Mideast a nd Midwest coach es lis ted the horizontal bar. Two questions were included in the -20-


TRAMPOLINE STUDIES (con't) per cent), the Mideast (68.4 per cent) and the Midwest (70.0 per cent) had no serious accident during the past five years. One-half of the number of coaches from the West reported that serious accidents did occur during that time period. These data appear in Table III.

questionnaire to establish the number and extent of injuries occurring in the trampoline event. The first of these asked, "Within the past five years have you had a serious injury to a varsity gymnast on the trampoline?" Fifty-three, or 62.4 per cent of the eighty-five coaches have not had a serious injury during the five year period. The majority of coaches from the East (60.7

TABLE III Number and Percentage of Coaches Who Have Had and Who Have Not Had Serious Injuries on the Trampoline During the Past Five Years, by Region

Region East

Have Had Injuries Number Per Cent

Have Not Had Injuries Number Per Cent

Total for Region

11

39.3

17

60.7

28

Mideast

6

31. 6

13

68.4

19

Midwest

6

30.0

14

70.0

20

West

9

50.0

9

50.0

18

Total

32

37.6

53

62.4

85

were reported by coaches from the Eastern Region, while the remaining 50 per cent was about equally distributed among the other three regions.

The data concerning the number and extent of injuries reported by thirtytwo coaches were not easily summarized. For example, one respondent wrote that eight serious injuries had occurred to his gymnasts including dislocated knees, fractured ankles, and other sprains or fractures.

2.

Forty-two of the inJuries were to the lower extremity and involved fractures, sprains, dislocations, or lacerations to the leg, knee or foot. Thirteen of the fortytwo were fractures, eight to the ankle, four to the leg, and one to the foot.

3.

Six injuries were reported for the upper extremity, including three to the elbow, and one each to the shoulder, thumb, and arm.

The number of accidents actually identified and reported were as follows: East 34, Mideast 11, Midwest 11, West 12, for a total of 68. Further analysis of the reports of these injuries revealed the following:

1.

Fifty per cent of all injuries -21-

CONTINUED PAGE 22


TRAMPOLINE STUDIES (con't) 4. Four injuries occurred to the head and face. Two of these were lacerations on the head. One fractured nose and one concussion were reported. 5.

One fracture to the rib was mentioned by one coach.

6.

The remaining fifteen injuries involved the neck or back. Of this number, 10 were listed a's "sprains" or "injury" to the neck or back. The other-five involved either a fractured vertebra or separated vertebrae. Four of the five serious injuries to the back or neck were reported by coaches from the Western Region, and two of the four injuries occurred at the same institution. The fifth injury was to a gymnast from the Mideast. Of the total fifteen injuries to the head and neck, thirteen were at institutions located in the Eastern and Western Regions.

7.

No deaths as a result of participating on the trampoline, occurred to a varsity gymnast during the five year period.

SUMMARY The majority ( 61. 9 per cent) of the head coaches of gymnastics in colleges and universities do approve of the trampoline as an event in the NCAA Championship Meet. The degree of support given to the event tends to follow a regional pattern. The Mideastern (84.2 per cent) and Midwestern ( 90. 0 per cent) coaches strongly support it. Sixty-three per cent of the Eastern Coaches would prefer to see it eliminated, as would 55.6 per cent of the Western coaches.

injuries reported, themost prevalent ones were to the lower extremity and to the neck and back. Since the present study did not do so, it is recommended that a future study be made to determine the number and extent of serious injuries which have occurred to participants on the horizontal bar, and in other events during the same time period. It would be interesting to know what factors influenced the attitude of the coach toward the trampoline as a competitive event. Some coaches might consider it too dangerous. In an effort to determine to what extent this might be true, the answers to two of the questions in the questionnaire were analyzed by means of the Phi Coefficient of Correlation. To obtain the necessary data, the responses of each coach to two of the questions were interpreted, namely does he favor the elimination of the trampoline as a competitive event, and did he list the trampoline as the event which results in the greatest number of serious injuries. A correlation coefficient of .598, significant at the .01 level, was obtained. Eight-seven per cent of the coaches who approved of the elimination of the trampoline also considered it the event in which the greatest number of serious injuries occur. Approximately 74 per cent of those coaches who did not wish to see it eliminated also did not consider the trampoline as the event in which the greatest number of serious injuries occur. Whether or not a coach favors the trampoline as an event in gymnastics appears to be closely related to his opinion of its potential to cause serious injury.

I. G. M. International Gymnastics Materials Uniform Suppliers

The trampoline is considered by the majority (51.2 per cent) of the coaches to be the event in which the greatest number o:f serious injuries occur. However, almost as many coaches ( 40. 0 per cent) are of the opinion that the horizontal bar results in more injuries than the trampoline.

FOR

1964 U.S. OLYMPIC GYMNASTICS TEAMS Write for Free Catalog ro:

I. G. M. 3256 North Avenue Chicago, Illinois 6064 7 U.S.A.

Approximately 62 per cent of the coaches have not had a serious injury to a varsity gymnast performing on the trampoline within the past five years. Of those -22-


The

UNITED STATES

GYMNASTICS FEDERATION

bears clearing up, before any rational decision might be reached. First, let me say that it is obvious to everyone that the trampoline is not now and will not soon be a part of the "all-around" program. ~on­ versely the trampoline is apparently enJOYing a period of rapid growth in numerous other nations and just recently the Soviet Union and Japan have begun agressive programs in trampolining. Those who would eliminate the trampoline from collegiate meets, express concern over their teams not being able to win a championship unless they work with the trampoline since that event figures into the team points.

PENN STATE GYMNAST PERFORMS BEFORE CAPACITY CROWD ON THE TRAMPOLINE THE TRAMPOLINE IN AMERICAN GYMNASTICS By Frank L. Bare, Executive Director United States Gymnastics Federation

Logically, if trampoline is a part of the N.C.A.A. competition it belongs in one of two parts, either a point gathering event among those which make up a team champion, or the alternate, a distinct and sepera te event which crowns a team "Trampoline Champ." The conduct of a meet of that type .... one with a true "International" gymnastics title ..â&#x20AC;˘ and the other with the trampoline title is not too remote a possibility. The technical aspects of such a meet being run jointly with the allaround events, or even in a different geographic location at a different date are

Recently a considerable stir of controversy was aroused concerning the future, or lack of a future, for the trampoline in American gymnastics. As an event which was born in the U .S .A. and has reached a truly magnificent level of performance in recent years, the trampoline is deserving of consideration here and in the future. The great difference that I have detected in my travels is one that certainly -23-

CONTINUED PAGE 24


WEST REPORT (con't) not complicated. Perhaps, at this time I should make a stand as to my beliefs at this time. I base these not at all on personal affection for the trampoline, nor any .experience as a competitor on that event. It has been my good fortune, however, to witness the growth and development of the event since the 1940' sand to watch bouncers and jumpers become truly great performers in the style of the late Frankie Schmitz, Danny Millman and Dale Hardt. What we are speaking about is a beautiful, spectacular and crowd-pleasing event, with performers who demonstrate ultra-difficult tricks with the precision and form of a diver or gymnast. The appeal of the trampoline to spec ta tors is obvious, and its ability to draw crowds as a single event has been clearly demonstrated on several occasions.

ope, rules are qui te different from ours, and trampoline meets are held separately but perhaps even more ofte'n than all-around meets. The progress of the German team is significant. They first learned from the Swiss bouncers a nd soon mastered the te ac hers. Then they worked ei th the English and soon bested that na tion in trampolining a nd now they seek more and more to work with and learn from the U .S .A. I have seen youthful German trampolinists performing triple backs, and triple fulls and many variations of fliffus work, and yet the event in tha t country is perhaps only 10 years old, or less. The one great error in failing to continue to train and develop trampolinists is that within the nex t few years it is almost certain that the trampoline will become more and more an international event in its own right. If we drop the event, then within that same short span of time we will find ourselves as far removed from the victory stand in trampolining as we are today in the true international events. Surely we have more foresight and perseverance than to drop an event in which we are clearly the best in the world only because it does not belong in the all-around. Secondly, most of us are aware that more than anything else we need to emphasize and stress the all-around event as the single most important event in our national programs. It is between those two points ... the need for the utmost emphasise on all-around and ... the need to promote and develop furthur the event of trampoline that we mu.s t arrive at an answer which calls for the survival, development and improvement of both areas.

BARRY SLOTTEN, ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPION - 1967

From several points of view, the Europeans have adopted a more liberal and yet a more intensified approach to trampolining than we have in the U .S .A. In central Eur-

DAN MILLMAN (USA) INTERNATIONAL CHAMP

-24-


West By Dan Millman, University of California

California at Berkeley and at Los Angeles, the University of Southern California, the University of Washington, Stanford University, and San Fernando Valley State College. This certainly isn 1 ta complete list for example, some of the most talented gymnasts in the country are developed at Pasa-dena City College, under the skilled tutelage of Jerry Todd. I only have so much time to devote to asking coaches for information by letter. Coaches who are interested in letting the rest of the country know how their teams are doing are urged to write to Dan Millman, care of the U.S. Gymnast Magazine. The information at hand is exciting! The scene at the University of Arizona looks promising. As coach Glenn Wilson puts it, "the team's .. increase in strength is not due to an increase in personnel, but rather to extreme dedication of our people and the hard work that they did over the summer months." Coach Wilson expects an especially powerful ring, floor exercise, and long horse contingent. Some of the outstanding individuals on the team are All-around man Jeff Benn on, ring performers Pat Arnold, Bob Shirk (piked double flyaway from the rings!), and Wes Wendling. Except in the trampoline event, the coach expects the scores to be from 9. 3 to 9. 5 for the top performers. If he can back these scores up with depth, Arizona will be formidable this year. Coach Wilson adds" ... Arizona

'· ,_

This early in the season, if one were to observe the western gymnasts working out, he would probably see the typical preseason phenomena ... most of the gymnasts are still fresh with enthusiasm, dulled occasionally by ripped hands still soft from the summer's swimming. The sun-tans have faded to complexions of workout-room white. Few performers have any polish (save a few year-round warriors like Kanati Allen and Maka to Sakamoto who nuietly, diligently work toward their goals). Thus, it is too early to make any accurate predictions about the approaching season. However, several schools boast individuals which should ensure them recognition in the National Collegiate Meet in April.

top performers. If he can back these scores up with depth, Arizona will be formidable this year. Coach Wilson adds 11 •• Arizona this year will be the host for just about everything. First will be an international judging course by the FIG, then the Western Gymnastics clinic, then the Western Athletic Conference Championships, and finally the NCAA Championahips!"

The University of California at Berkeley is well-coached indeed. Harold Frey has pushed teams to the best dual meet record in the nation. The team has lost 6 dual meets in the last ten years. Hal manages to pull 11 just a little more" talent, effort, and performance from every individual on the team. If he can work the Frey-magic again this year, Cal will have another winning season aui te possibly thru This writer has information on the the NCAA Championships. Listing only those University of Arizona, the University of performers capable of placing in the top CONTINUED PAGE 26 -25-


team will be Yoshi Hayasaki, a sophomore and already nationally known. Coach Hughes believes, " .. we can win the NCAA this year IF Yoshi fully recovers" (from an injury received early this season). Strong support for Hayasaki is assured in the forms of Brent Rule, Bob Baumann, Peterson, and Eadie. "Washington", says the coach, "is about six deep in the all around events." Some of the more outstanding stunts thrown are: Full twisting hecht on the high bar (Hayasaki), Diamidov (Peters), full and one and a half· twisting dive rolls (Peterson), and Eadie works on the side horse with his hands between the pommels! It will be in teresting to watch Washington develop this year.

f:l ve in the NCAA Championships in one or more events, the list is still lengthy. Free Exercise: Sid Freudenstein; Side Horse: Joel Tepp, Bill Fujimoto; Rings: sophomore Jeff Marcus (who presses crosses for breakfast) and Eric Co~chesne (straight arm giants both ways); Trampoline: Dennis Rowe; Long Horse: Freudenstein and Tom Bruce; Parallels: Freudenstein; Horizontal Bar: Freudenstein. Gary Diamond will also be impressive this year. The author declines to comment on his own performance this year. U .C .L.A. is bursting at the seams with talent this year. One of the most impressive things that could be said about this team is, "··· the U.C.L.A. Gymnastic team should be riui te improved over last season." To quote past Olympian, coach Art Shurlock. Last year 1 s team was powerful; this year 1 s team has top performers Kana ti Allen, Sandy Bassist, LarryBassist, RichardMuff, Steve Lerner, Chris Castner, Don Arthur, Mickey Chaplan, and Ken Sakoda ... all important names in gymnastics. Art Shurlock won 1 t have depth worries in many events. Some impressive U .C .L.A. stunts that will be seen this year: Handspring to front with full twist (L. Bassist), cross change to full twisting double undergrip to immediate hecht with half twist regrasp (K. Allen), and shoot to mal tese (Chaplan). As Art puts it, "We are looking forward to a very competitive and lively season."

·'

Ron Barak, coach at the University of Southern California, declines to make any lofty predictions. But with Makoto Sakamoto on his team he doesn 1 t need to go around predicting too much. Mako to is bound to be a standout in the NCAA meet this year o If he is backed up by hard working team-mates, U.S.C. will be an exciting team to watch this year. The University of Washington, coached by Dr. Eric Hughes, should be a power-house this yearo Coach Hughes just finished hosting the "Kobe-Seattle Goodwill Gymnastics Meet." Obviously, when some excellent Japanese gymnasts come to Seattle to compete, the Washington team will be exposed to some fine gymnastics. If coach Hughes is up to his enthusiastic pace (and he probably is), a great deal of finesse will rub off on his team, traditionally strong. The mainstay of the Washington

KANATI ALLEN - U.C.L.A.

-26-


WEST REPORT (con't) Stanford University has never been a national gymnastic power, but coach John Gilmore is doing a fine job developing a gymnastic tradition at Stanford. Coach Gilmore's team meets some strong contenders in the AAWU conference. The mainstay of the Stanford team will be Craig Dickson, undoubtedly the most talented all-around competitor in Stanford 1 s history. Teaming with Craig in the all-around will be Jim Peterson. The conference will take greater notice of Stanford this year, and with outstanding freshman talent in Steve Rochell (Illinois Rings Champion), Dave Morgan, and Kent Cowdry, Stanford will continue to improve in the years to come. Good luck and a good season, coach Gilmore.

'-

versi ty of California at Berkeley was awarded the "All-University Athlete Award" several weeks ago. Josh, graduate of North Hollywood High, nowmajoring in history at Cal and carrying a high grade point average, was very pleased and surprised to receive this award. The University of California has 10 campuses. On each campus abounds many fine athletes in various sports. J ash, who took time out from his study of classical guitar, his academic pursuits, and a myriad of social activities to cono.uer the rings with his usual intensity, has now returned to his studies. Congratulations, Josh.

Another Southern California school that constantly shines with talent is San Fernando Valley State College. Coach Bill Vincent is confident that his team should be "quite strong 11 Vincent is confident that his team should be "quite strong" this year. Coach Vincent adds, " â&#x20AC;˘.. a lots depends on eligibility, draft status, injuries, etc." Seeing thru Bill Vincent's modesty, S.F. Valley State will be strong. Rich Grigsby, last year 1 s NCAA high bar champion is now a junior. Darrell De Pue, a fine performer will compete in FX, HB, PB, and LH. Everyone else has returned from last year, so Bill's team certainly won't be lacking in depth. Bob Diamond, now a senior, is throwing a back with a full twist from the parallel bars. A graduate of S .F. Valley State College, Rusty Rock, is 'performing a cast front dismount from a stalder shoot. It should be an exciting as well as "profitable" year for Dr. Bill Vincent and the Valley gymnasts.

JOSH ROBISON

& COACH

FREY

A COMMENT ON THE TRAMPOLINE: I would like to state a few reasons why I believe the trampoline belongs in the N .C .A .A. Before anyone retorts, "But, Millman is 'a trampolinist' ; naturally he wants it," I would like to mention as a side light that I am also a long horse vaulter, and I'm not especially excited about this particular event. I am trying to be objective in my judgment.

Thus, the West wi:l be loaded with talent this year. It looks as if Cal, Washington, and U .C .L.A. are the teams to watch this year. This isn 1 t really news. Let's wait until the N .C .A .A. prelims to make any other predictions. JOSH ROBISON HONORED

Here are the facts: The trampoline, without doubt, is a gymnastic apparatus; that is, it enables a performer to do decidedly gymnastic moves. It is also a uniaue event

Josh Rob is on, N .C .A .A. champion and three-time AAWU ring champion from the Uni-

CONTINUED PAGE 28 -27-


WEST REPORT (con't) incorporating, balance, speed, strength, courage, and kinesthetic ability. All of these abilities must be developed. An individual may be born with some predeliction towards a strong body or fast reflexes, but these abilities must be cultivated. The above statement is relevant in the following sense: Trampoline is dangerous in one sense, and only one sense: it enables even beginners to bounce high into the air and do somersaults (of sorts). These beginners may learn many stunts, but never fully cultivate the reflexes of "airmindedness or mechahics with which to control themselves properly. I contend that the major dangers of the trampoline are several in number; first, too many individuals throw stunts before they are ready. Second, too few coaches are knowledgeable enough to prepare the individuals or if necessary, selectively discourage, wild bouncers. Without going on ad nauseum

it should be apparent that if the trampoline is "dangerous 11 we should work constructively to train gymnasts and coaches to minimize this danger, rather than sweep the trampoline under the rug. Even though this criterion isn 1 t the major decidera tum in keeping the trampoline, it remains one of the largest audience pleasers in gymnastics. This cannot be discounted, for many beginning gymnasts started on the trampoline. Frank Schmitz, Dave Jacobs, Dave Thor, myself, and many more gymnasts began the sport on the trampoline. If we are so afraid to lead the world in a sport, if we must always follow the Japanese, the Russians, and the FIG, then we will never be leaders in the sport of gymnastics. We have an exciting. worthwhile event in the trampoline; let's keep it, let's develop it, andlet's riuit sriuabbling.

FROM THE EDITOR (con't) features have der to present single issue. to our regular

U.S. GYMNAST

been cut this month in orall of this material in a Next month we will return format.

Box 53 IOWA CITY, IOWA

FROM THE STAFF AND EDITORS OF THE U.S. GYMNAST WE WISH YOU ALL A HAPPY NEW YEAR ..•• MAKE GYMNASTICS GREAT IN 1968 ! ••••

12 Issues - $4.50 Jackie Uphues was the director of the women ' s di vidion. Mrs. Sharon Pirkl, a gymnastics coach from Moline, Illinois, assisted Mrs. Uphues and Sarah Brumgart, a high school girl from Chicago, was the demonstrator for the girl's program.

GYMNASTICS CLINIC Report By: Larry Fie American Athletic Equipment Company

On October 7, American Athletic Equipment Co. sponsored a gymnastics clinic at Whitewater University, Whitewater, Wisc. There were over 150 gymnastics coaches and physical education instructors in attendance. The clinic equipment was provided by American and the facilities of Whitewa ter University, Mr. John Rabe, Gymnastics Coach.

The attendance at this clinic was very good and the enthusiasm and interest displayed by those in attendance was very gratifying. This is the second such clinic that we have held in the State of Wisconsin in the last 7 months. It appears as though the interest in competitive gymnastics programs and gymnastics in physical education classes is growing very rapidly in that particular state.

Bill Meade of Southern Illinois University and three of his gymnasts were the instructors for the men 1 s section and Mrs. -28-


OLYMPIC REPORT (can't) the programs in which they participate.

enuipment, with the appropriate lenses, film, tape, etc. (Our problem is one of making a great improvement in a short time. This can only be achieved if "the powers that be" wish to do it. It is actually within our capacity. We don 1 t need the usual TALK, we need action!) Note: The Russians, Cuba and Japan had crews taking pictures for them of all of the competition.

One to three opportunities for international competition between now and August must be developed, whether for individuals or for the team in order to measure our progress. Training eauipment must be made available, such as video tape, motion picture

STILL RINGS NAME 1. 2. 3. 16. 18. 24. 24. 30. 31.

Nakayama Japan Haya ta Japan Lisitsky Russia Roethlisberger U.S oA. Lynn U.SoA Amerine U.S oA. Tucker U.S .A. Loyd U.S oA. Hug U.S .A.

COMP.

OPT.

TOTAL

9.80

9.75

19.55

9.65

9.80

19.45

9.70

9.75

19.45

9.10

9.20

18.30

9.05

9.10

18.15

8.80

9.15

17.95

9.05

8.90

17.95

8.50

8095

17.45

8.55

8.85

17.40

WOMEN'S RESULTS JOYCE TANAC-USA

TEAM SCORES

1. 2. 3. 4.

COUNTRY

SCORE

Czechloslovakia Russia Japan Hungary

375.70 375.50 369.15 356.20

ALL-AROUND NAME & COUNTRY 1. 2. 3. 25. 28. 29.

Kutchinskaya, Russia Krajcirova, Czech. Petrik, Russia Joyce Tanac, USA Debbie Bailey, USA Joanne Hashimoto, USA

SCORE 77.10 76.65 75.80 69.15 67.45 63.15 -29-


Letters to the Editor

FINNISH GYMNAST WANTS COMPETITION Dear Sam: Mauno Nissinen, one of Finland's top gyI!inasts has enrolled at the University of Washington. He would like to compete in as many invitational meets as possible during the 1967-68 school year. Those who wish to include him must be prepared to pay most, and possibly all, his expenses. In my opinion, he is one of the top three gymnasts in the U.S. and would be an excellent "drawing card" for any meet. He placed sixth in the World Student Games in Tokyo and was beaten by only one American (Sakamoto),

If you know of anyone interested we would appreciate it if you would pass the word along. Four boys received scholarships to four year ins ti tut ions this year. Ed Navarro and Sonny Corne celli are at Ind. St. U. and Ray Octaviano is at W.Va. St. We are interested in boys who need a start in college. The entrance requirements are low and if a boy works hard academically and gymnastically, he may get a scholarship to a four year institution. Any boys or coaches interested in our college or our team members can write to me in care of the college address. We receive most of our gymnasts from the Dade County League, There are 10 teams in the league. Chic Cicio, Don Holder, and Pat Signorelli are among the most distinguished gymnastically. I hope this gives you an idea as to Dade County setup. Sincerely, Bruce A. Davis Miami-Dade Junior College Miami, Florida

If anyone is interested, they should contact Mr. Nissinen through me.

COACH SEEKS POSITION

Sincerely, Dr. Eric Hughes Gymnastics Coach University of Washington

Dear Mr. Bailie: At the present time I am actively engaged in securing a full time high school or college instructional position for the coming 1968-1969 school year. If possible would you publish this notice in your magazine.

Dear Sam:

I have had seven competitive years of varsity gymnastics and four years of coaching junior high school and high school varsity teams. I havebeenactively involved In Oregon Gymnastics Association for four years and am presently the Vice President of the Oregon Gymnastics Association. The varsity team I coactied for four years came up second in the Northern District Championships, and third in the Oregon State Gymnastics Championships during the 19661967 school year.

For the record, I will give the histQry of Miami gymnastics. The Junior College .has had. six years of competitive gymnastics. Dick Gutting and Frank Seco De Lucena were coaches here before me. We are the only Junior College in the state that has gymnastics. We compete strictly against four year colleges. Last year we were 4-1 having beaten, U. of Fla., U. of Lousiville, DeKalb College, Dade County All-Stars. We were 2nd in the Georgia Collegiate Championship against seven other f?ur year schools. we have difficulty getting meets because of our junior college status. I look forward to a NJCAA championship in gymnastics. We cannot enter SIGL's. We must travel great distances to compete. We would like to meet a team who may be travelling to the Lauderdale or Sarasota Clinic prior to the clinic. We can provide free overnight lodging.

If a ~osi tion opens, I would appreany information concerning qualifications necessary to apply. .

cia~e

Thank you for the time and space.

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Sincerely Yours, Rodney P. Ostboe Box 149 B, Lorane Route Cottage G~ove, Oregon


U.S.A.'s Top 25 KEN - LIST

#

NAME

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 1 2. 13 14 . 15 . 16 . 17. 18 . 19 . 20. 21. 22. 23 . 24 . 25. 0

6

SCHOOL

Makoto Sa kam.oto Fre d Roethlisbe rger Mark Cohn Da ve Thor Kana ti All e n. Sid Freude nstein. Arno Lascari Steve Hug Richard Loyd. Jim Amerine Bob Lynn Fred Dennis Rick Tucker Bob Hall Neil Schnii t t Bob Dicks on Richard Swet:man Abie Gros s f'e ld Paul Mayer Mike Flansaas Richard Grigsby Gary Diamond. Joe Fedorch ek Joe Li tow Rich Scorza

u. s. c. Mil. Turners Philadelphia Mich . Sta te U. C. L. A. Ca lifornia Wi s cons in Los Angeles N.W. La. Ne w York L. A. Turners So. Illinois So. Illinois Washington Iowa Iowa Penn Sta te So . Conn. So. I llinois Washington Sa n . Fe rn. V. Ca lifornia Mich. State Penn Sta te Iowa

MAKOTO SAKAMOTO (U.S.C. ) America 's Top Gymnast

J=,.,ank f; ndo 12200 SOU TH BERENDO AV ENUE LOS ANGE LES, CALIF ORNI A 90044

WOMEN - LIST 1. 2o 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 . 11 . 12 . 13 . 14 . 15 â&#x20AC;¢

Linda Methen.y Joyce Tan a c Ka thy Gleason Carolyn Hacker Donna Sch a e n. z e r Debbie Ba iley J oAnne Hash i:rnoto Marie Walther Karen LivelyKaren Galloiray Mary Toth Sue Roger s Ka thy Carroll Sally Espe Mary Ann Wo olner

#

5

u. of Illinois Seattle YMCA Buf. Turners So. Conn. So. Illinois Okla h oma So. Illinois Ohio Cent . Coll ege Va da s G. C. So. Ill inois So . I llinois Oklahoma Owego, N.Y. Cent. College

LADIES' GYMNASTIC SHOE Size s :

2 - 9

$2.00 pr. ppd .

MEN GYMNASTIC SHOE Sizes:

- 31-

1 - 12

$2.50 pr.

ppd .


What makes an All-American GO For ~~~~~~~~~o~~~~~~? Top coaches, gymnastic and physical education instructors want the safest, best performing and most stable equipment. That's what you get from American! Parallel Bars complete with hickory rails, reinforced with a steel core, uni-weld construction, stable design and safety locks . . . that really hold. You get the highest quality products Rusty Mitch e ll , Ex-Olympian , one of American 's Gymnastic Consultants

plus unmatched service. Write for details on :

Gymnasium Planning Service Gymnastic Consultant Staff For your Free Catalog write: American Athletic Equipment Company Box 111, Jefferson, Iowa, U.S.A. 50129

and

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Profile for USA Gymnastics

The U.S. Gymnast Magazine - December 1967  

The U.S. Gymnast Magazine - December 1967  

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