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FEATURE STORY CONTINUED | 13

FALL 2017

1215 Hulton Road Oakmont PA 15139-1196 www.SrCare.org 1-877-772-6500

THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

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Benevolence

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Venango

Cameron P7

Advocating for our Residents

Mattie Lawson, a resident at St. Justin Plaza, our affordable housing community in Mt. Washington, is pictured with Senator Bob Casey, who spoke at the Rally and is against the proposed HUD 202 budget cuts. housing for vulnerable, older adults in the Pittsburgh area. Nationally, this would affect more than 128,000 Section 202 units. Of the 4 million older adult households eligible for HUD rental assistance programs, only 1.4 million receive such assistance due to lack of funding. Thanks to the hard work of advocates for affordable housing – including our own residents and team members – a House subcommittee reviewed the proposed cuts and rejected the worst of the requested cuts and the proposed policies. The bill was voted out of subcommittee on July 11. The next step is a full committee review of the bill. At the time of publication, a vote has not been conducted.

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PERSONAL CARE COMMUNITIES

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7

Southminster Place Westminster Place Woodside Place Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens

4

NURSING CARE COMMUNITIES

N1 N2 N3 N4 N5 N6 N7 N8

Southmont The Willows Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Villa St. Joseph* Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens Oakwood Heights

$

CONTINUING CARE COMMUNITIES

C1 C2

W W W

W W W W W W

Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green

3 SENIOR

CONDOMINIUMS

SC1 Redstone Court* SC2 Woodlands at Redstone* SC3 Woodlands Village I & II*

CONTINUING CARE AT HOME Longwood at Home

HOME HEALTH Presbyterian SeniorCare at Home © 2017 Presbyterian SeniorCare Network | 10.17

S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26 S27 S28 S29 S30 S31 S32

Battles Village* Beeson Court Bellmead Apartments Bridge Street Commons Commons at North Aiken Commons of Saxonburg Etna Commons* Fairmont Apartments Fifth Avenue Commons Forward Shady Apartments* Green Diamond Place HaveLoch Commons The Heritage* Heritage House of Houston Mt. Nazareth Commons Negley Commons The Oaks at Center in the Woods Page Place Apartments Park Manor Apartments Plum Creek Acres PlumWood Apartments Poplar Lane Court Riverview Towers* Robinson Manor* St. Justin Plaza* St. Therese Plaza* Silver Lake Commons SpruceWood Commons Sunbury Fields Sweetbriar Place* Timothy Place York Commons

OHIO

44

COMMUNITIES

Clinton

10

Clearfield

LOCATIONS COUNTIES

Clarion

P5|N4|C2

Jefferson

S27

P6|N6 P7|N7

Lawrence NEW YORK

S1

Centre

Crawford

Susquehanna

S18

Warren

Beaver Venango

Mercer

Butler Forest

N5

Tioga

Armstrong Potter

S15

Clarion S24

S18 S32 S30 S25

S29

D

S16

Wyoming

Huntingdon

S20 S31

Montour

Centre

S10

Lackawanna

Luzerne

Clinton Clearfield

P2

S27 Jefferson S8

Sullivan

Indiana Lycoming

P4|N3|S21|C1 P3|N2

S7

Blair

Columbia

Juniata

Monroe

Cambria

Union

Pike

NEW JERSEY

Carbon

S23

S11

Butler

D

S6

N5 S11

Beaver

S8

Westmoreland

Armstrong

Allegheny

S13

D

P1|N1|S3

Washington

S4

S16

S3

Somerset

Fayette Greene

Greene

WEST VIRGINIA

WEST VIRGINIA

Hunterdon

Berks Lebanon

Cumberland

S21 Bedford S2|S13

Dauphin

Perry

Bucks

Cumberland

Montgomery

S17 S22

Lehigh

Juniata

Cambria

Washington Westmoreland

SC1|2|3

Northampton

Northumberland Schuylkill

Blair

S14

Snyder

Mifflin

Huntingdon Indiana

P1|N1|S2

S11

Perry

Warren

S26 S30

Snyder

Mifflin

S5 Elk

Allegheny

S28

Bradford Wayne

Cameron

P5|N4|C2

D

McKean

N8

Lawrence

Union

S28

Erie

AFFORDABLE HOUSING**

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17

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CARING EMPLOY EES

LAKE ERIE

# SUPPORTIVE & W

2,175

SENIORS AND FAMILIES SERVED PER Y EAR

W Denotes communities that offer the Woodside Program, specialized Alzheimer’s and dementia care D Denotes supportive housing for persons with disabilities * Denotes communities which are not owned or sponsored by Presbyterian SeniorCare but are managed by our affiliate, SeniorCare Network ** Denotes income eligibility requirements

WEST VIRGINIA

Presbyterian SeniorCare Network has 32 supportive and affordable housing communities throughout western Pennsylvania, many of those communities funded through HUD or tax credits. The proposed spending cuts would reduce the availability of affordable

6,500

Mercer

OHIO

The Save HUD 202 Rally, hosted by LeadingAge, an association representing nonprofit aging services providers, was part of a multi-month campaign to convince lawmakers to prevent cuts to 202 programs, maintain 100% funding, and expand funding to create new affordable housing for older adults.

OUR COMMUNITIES MAP

WEST VIRGINIA

No matter what community or setting a resident lives in, we advocate for their rights. That is why on the morning of June 27, over 50 of our SeniorCare Network residents and team members boarded a bus destined for our Nation’s capital. We were going to rally to save HUD 202 funding.

Lycoming

Elk

MARYLAND

Lancaster

Fulton

S1|S12

Franklin

Adams

Fayette

Somerset

York

Fulton

Bedford

Philadelphia Chester

Delaware

DELAWARE

VIRGINIA

MARYLAND VIRGINIA

Franklin

Adams


NEWS AND NOTES FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO

IN THIS ISSUE Compassion, Humility and a Deep Sense of Service....................1-3, 10-13 Charitable Giving Starts at Home............................ 4 Transitioning Through the Continuum of Compassion........ 5 Foundation News.................... 6-9

FALL 2017

THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

Benevolence

ABOUT THE COVER Benevolence is more than what we do—it is key to who we are. Every day, our team members throughout the Network give their hands and their hearts to serve every individual with compassion, dignity and respect. As a faith-based nonprofit organization, we believe that our generosity and kindness are the most powerful resources we have to make a difference in the lives of our residents and their families and in our communities. It is part of what being person-centered is all about.

A

t Presbyterian SeniorCare Network, we are guided by a unique calling that is focused on older adults and making aging easier.® This calling is at the heart of our mission. While our mission conveys what we do and guides our everyday work, our values statement highlights what we believe in and how we will behave. Benevolence is one of the key words in our values statement, and it is the focus of this issue of heartlines. Benevolence is a very rich and powerful word. By definition, benevolence means the quality of being well. Benevolence indicates a disposition to do good in regard to others, and to act with genuine compassion and kind considerations of the needs and desires of others. Simply put, it’s about kindness and charity. As a non-profit with a 90-year heritage of benevolence, our charitable works and charitable giving are part of who we are. Benevolence is evident in our programs and our people. In this issue, you will learn more about how we support a variety of vulnerable populations – from persons with disabilities and residents in our care communities who outlive their resources to older adults on fixed, low incomes who deserve affordable housing. You’ll also find “Random Acts of Kindness” sprinkled throughout this issue that highlight the every day good deeds that are being done to generate a smile and bring moments of joy and purpose to someone’s day. These stories unite our Network – our residents and patients as well as family members, volunteers and team members – and demonstrate the heart that we have for one another and all that we do. Paul Winkler

BENEVOLENCE: GOING THE EXTRA MILE

Getting more than you give

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he words volunteer and kindness are synonymous. A kind word, a moment of song or a quick chat – all are selfless acts that our volunteers across Presbyterian SeniorCare Network provide for our residents. Volunteers play such an important role across our Network by serving as a vital extension of our staff. By engaging with our residents in enrichment programs, volunteers contribute to a high quality of life and help free staff members up to concentrate on resident care. Volunteers not only help to provide purpose to daily life for our residents, but we often find our volunteers also benefit from their time on campus – like Marilan Caito. Read Marilan’s story of how kindness shown to her mother-in law inspired her to give back to our organization. And how giving back created special bonds and a heart filled with joy. “For five years, I visited my mother-in-law, Alice, three times a week at The Willows, the skilled nursing community at the Presbyterian SeniorCare Network Oakmont campus. A major stroke had left her unable to walk or speak and in need of full-time skilled nursing services. I watched first-hand the compassionate care she received during a very difficult time for my family. I saw how hard the staff worked and how

Soothing the soul and engaging residents with water features appreciative they were for any extra helping hands. I always knew that when I retired I wanted to repay the kindness shown to Alice.” As the Development Director at a private school for children with special needs for 30 years, I also built lifelong relationships with many of our most loyal and generous donors. They happened to be seniors and I loved their stories, their wisdom and their amazing life experiences. Together those two factors brought me to the Hanna HealthCare Center at the Longwood at Oakmont campus where I having been volunteering every Wednesday for the past year. My one-on-one visits with a small group of ladies bring me such joy. They have become part of my family and I think I have become part of theirs. We laugh and cry together, share family and travel stories and even talk about end of life issues that are difficult for them to share with their own children. Though one of my dear ladies passed recently at age 103, she inspired me to be a better person. I will forever remember her grace and gentleness in the face of so many challenges; and that smile that lit up the room. So when friends and family ask, “How can you volunteer there? Isn’t it too emotional? Too sad? Too hard?” I answer – “are you kidding, it’s the best day of my week!”

President and CEO The MISSION STATEMENT conveys our organization’s purpose and what we do: Presbyterian SeniorCare Network is committed to enriching the aging experience through person-centered service and living options. The VALUES STATEMENT works in tandem with the mission and highlights what we believe in and how we will behave: Grounded in Christ-like values of benevolence and love of neighbor, we pursue excellence, innovation and collaboration to ensure individuals live well and team members have meaningful work.

LAST YEAR, VOLUNTEERS

GAVE OVER

37,000

HOURS TO OUR RESIDENTS

Marilan (middle) poses with two of the residents she visits with every Wednesday, Marion (left) and Ester (right).

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eff McKinley uses his own personal time to build water features that compete with the likes of the fountains at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. Jeff, director of maintenance and environmental services at Elmwood Gardens, brings over 35 years of talent in plumbing and construction. His creations come out of the goodness of his heart and not only bring vibrancy to the community, but help engage our residents. Jeff’s water features, a total of three, are each a focal point around campus, in large part because Elmwood Gardens in Erie is in a city setting and there are not a lot of green spaces. The features incorporate lighting, waterfalls, water jets and beautiful landscaping. The features help to create a connection to the outdoors, and provide a source of relaxation for our residents. As Jeff says, “the water features are soothing and I like to have things like that around me, so why wouldn’t I want the same for our residents?” Kelly Briody, administrator at Elmwood Gardens, says “This project was all Jeff’s idea and an excellent example of his character and commitment to our person-centered culture. As a result of the remodeling of the dining room in our skilled nursing neighborhood, we were able to make a previously obstructed group of windows a focal point in the room. The original plan was to plant some greenery outside the window to give the residents a more pleasing view than the fence at

the edge of the property. But Jeff came to me proposing that he do a water feature to give the residents something they would truly enjoy looking at on a daily basis. From construction to completion the residents loved the projects!” Kelly noticed that not only did Jeff exhibit kindness and thoughtfulness in his work, but the residents reciprocated his actions. She says, “On particularly hot days the residents would ask the team to take water out to him, their concern was quite endearing.” Once Jeff was done with his regular work for the day, he would steal away an hour or two here and there to build the features; he also worked many Saturdays to get the features up and running. Kelly says, “Now that the water features are complete, it is wonderful to witness the residents enjoying the relaxing water wall during the day hours, and then again at night when it is lit up. Jeff’s commitment to our residents and improving their daily lives is an example of what is at the heart of the Elmwood Gardens team.” Jeff enjoys building the water features for the residents to enjoy. He says, “I often receive thanks for the wonderful views. While I have not been able to confirm this, I did hear that some of the residents were fighting over who was going to sit by the window to watch the fountains! Talk about a sense of satisfaction out of your work!”


FEATURE STORY

COMPASSION, HUMILITY AND A DEEP SENSE OF SERVICE Our Unwavering Commitment to Serve Vulnerable Populations

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harlie, he just wanted to take care of everyone,” says Joan Kotz, director of operations at SeniorCare Network, our real estate management affiliate. Joan is referring to Charles Pruitt, our President and CEO from 1979 through 1998. Joan has so many fond memories of Mr. Pruitt who she says, “embodied what it meant to be person-centered.”

Central to our mission is our calling to serve others from all walks of life in a way that provides them with the flexibility and choice to live in the way they desire. The spirit of service and the embodiment of kindness is evident in the work we do to provide affordable and supportive housing. For over 30 of our 90 years, we have been serving the most vulnerable members of our society – low-income seniors and persons with disabilities – with high quality living options. Today, through SeniorCare Network, we manage 32 affordable housing communities across nine counties in Western Pennsylvania.

Charles Pruitt, President and CEO, 1979-1998, embodied what it means to be person-centered Continued on page 2

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FEATURE STORY CONTINUED

Fairmont Apartments, East End, Pittsburgh

What is SeniorCare Network? SeniorCare Network was founded in 1983 on the principal that low-income older adults want the same things as everyone else: a clean home in a safe neighborhood where they may socialize and be around people who care. “We set the bar really high when we opened our first affordable community in the early 1980s. We operated, and continue to operate today, on the fundamental belief that no one should ever walk into one of our communities serving low-income seniors and think that it ‘looks and feels’ low income. Our communities are clean, wellfurnished, have plenty of amenities and offer a sense of security that you do not always find in even market-rate communities,” says James Pieffer, president, SeniorCare Network. As a non-profit real estate management affiliate, SeniorCare Network does not build properties

to profit from its residents; the properties are built so that our most vulnerable citizens may age in place. Funding is secured through Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and other agencies. This funding helps with construction, as well as to subsidize rent to make it affordable for the residents. What a resident would pay in rent depends on the way in which each site is funded. HUD says you are eligible to apply for assistance if your income is very low (generally equal to 50 percent of the area median family income, adjusted for household size). A resident in supportive housing pays 30% of their adjusted gross income toward rent, or a flat fee based on the unit for which they qualify. In a tax credit community, the resident would pay about 60% of what you would pay in the open market for a rental unit. Our supportive housing program is a “best in class” model, as evidenced by the fact that our housing communities

SeniorCare Network is a non-profit real estate management affiliate of Presbyterian SeniorCare Network. SeniorCare Network operates within a nine-county area of Southwestern Pennsylvania, primarily managing subsidized and market rate senior housing. SeniorCare Network also provides management services for assisted living and skilled nursing communities. In addition, SeniorCare Network has a limited consulting practice focusing primarily on dementia specialty services and property development/planning assistance. SeniorCare Network serves more than 2,000 seniors and persons with disabilities.


FEATURE STORY CONTINUED receive recognition for excellence each year from local and regional agencies, such as the Apartment Association of Metropolitan Pittsburgh and the Professional Affordable Housing Management Association, to name a few. While we are most recognized for our support of older adults, we also provide programs and housing options that serve persons with disabilities. Starting in the 1980s, our team began exploring ways to help serve the needs of vulnerable populations – individuals with intellectual, physical and developmental disabilities, as well as persons living with HIV/AIDS. Our research led to opening communities and establishing programs that affirm our commitment to preserving the dignity and health of marginalized and at-risk groups.

Offering Stability and Hope for those with HIV/AIDS Of all Americans living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV, 42% are age 50 and older; 25% are age 55 and older; and 6% are age 65 and older. Source: CDC The SeniorCare Management Assistance Fund (SCMAF) serves 11 counties in western PA and was established in 1997 by SeniorCare Network. Through SCMAF, we provide housing assistance and related support services to help homeless or at-risk low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Supportive housing provides stability, and also increases access to care and improves life outcomes for beneficiaries. Kim Jenkins, program manager, has run the SCMAF program since 1999. She works tirelessly on behalf of her clients, first finding out where they want to live. Kim then does a bit of research for her clients, confidentially negotiating fair market rent leases with landlords who agree to accept tenants with disabilities (HIV/AIDS is considered a physical disability). Kim never discloses the nature of the disability. In addition to the researching and negotiating, each client receives a housing budget plan to ensure a positive outcome. Once a client moves into their house or apartment, they pay 30% of their adjusted income in rent and the program pays the rest.

UNDERSTANDING FINANCING OPTIONS SeniorCare Network communities are largely funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) subsidies. Here are the different classifications that most of our communities fall under and what they mean: • HUD 202: Section 202 program helps expand the supply of affordable housing with supportive services for the elderly. It provides very low-income elderly with options that allow them to live independently but in an environment that provides support activities such as cleaning, cooking, transportation, etc. • HUD 811: Section 811 program allows persons with disabilities to live as independently as possible in the community by subsidizing rental housing opportunities which provide access to appropriate supportive services. • Tax Credit: Here you pay about 60% of what you would pay in the open market for a rental unit. The tax credit program is administered by the IRS, in coordination with state housing finance agencies. Some residents taking advantage of the tax credit program are able to receive a waiver to make their rent affordable.

As with any program that serves an at-risk population, the need for services far exceeds the resources available. Currently, there are more than 250 people on the waiting list to receive services but cannot due to budgetary shortages. While we are not able to reach every person we would like, we are proud to be a lifeline for those benefiting from the program – without it, many of the clients would be homeless. Continued on page 10

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BENEVOLENCE: A HELPING HAND

Charitable Giving Starts at Home

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resbyterian SeniorCare Network understands that sometimes our team members face an unexpected hardship and have nowhere to turn. That is why we established the Presbyterian SeniorCare Employee Emergency Loan (PEEL) Fund in 2006 to help team members in dire need.

A fund like PEEL is not commonplace at all organizations. Lisey feels that such a program really shows the appreciation Presbyterian SeniorCare Network has for their employees. “It not only gives you the availability of an interest free loan, but also the self-worth to pay it back over time.”

When asked what the program means to her, Lisey replied “A fund like PEEL can mean the difference between a utility with a memory. “I had to use the PEEL fund because bill or a rent bill being paid or not. The program is not only my electricity was due to be shut off, and Jackie at our extremely helpful, but relieves a mountain of stress off of Foundation went above and beyond to help me. I had ones shoulders,” says Lisey*, the PEEL check for the light “I had to use the PEEL fund a personal care assistant at company but they were giving Presbyterian SeniorCare Network me issues since they do not because my electricity was who has used the PEEL fund in a accept payments in person, and due to be shut off, and Jackie time of need. at our Foundation went above it wouldn’t arrive in time by mail. Jackie worked with the The PEEL fund provides and beyond to help me.” manager from the light company emergency, interest-free loans ~ Lisey to get them to extend the shut for eligible employees. The loans off notice so that I had time to have an annual maximum of $500, mail in the check. She was the with checks payable to third-party vendors. Team members difference, along with the PEEL loan, between me having need only to fill out the application and submit the electricity or my family sitting in the dark with no power. appropriate documentation/bills that they need assistance This was over a couple of years ago, and I still think about with. A committee then reviews the documents and the it and am forever grateful.” loans are paid back through payroll deduction. Since the PEEL fund was established, Presbyterian Lisey says, “The loans have helped me through challenging SeniorCare Network has issued loans to about 300 team times. Had the fund not been available, I do not know what members across our Network. I would have done.” *To respect the privacy of our team member, her name has been changed.

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS j KEEPING OUR RESIDENTS COZY

Recognizing Catherine Trowery, CNA at The Willows skilled nursing community in Oakmont

 y dear friend of 15 years was at The Willows for rehab. I had asked for him to get a shower. When Catherine M noticed that he was getting ready for the shower, she made sure his bed was freshly made, even though they were short-handed that evening. She said that the residents deserved a nice clean bed, especially after a shower. To top it off, she got him extra blankets and did not leave the room until she made sure that he and I were comfortable.


BENEVOLENCE: PROVIDING COMFORT OVER THE DECADES

Transitioning Through the Continuum of Compassion

W

hen Tressa Roupe moved to Bellmead Apartments in 1996, she could not have known that she would live the last 21 years of her life in a series of Presbyterian SeniorCare Network communities.

But at age 72, a year after losing her husband, Everett, she began to experience episodes of falling. When one fall left her with a broken arm, doctors discovered that her falls were caused by a heart condition and implanted a pacemaker. It was then that her youngest daughter, Sandy Dorsey, helped her move to Bellmead Apartments, the Presbyterian SeniorCare Network supportive housing community in Washington. Tressa lived at Bellmead for six years until she fell again, this time breaking a hip. Following surgery, she spent three months in the rehabilitation neighborhood at Southmont, the skilled nursing community at the Presbyterian SeniorCare Network campus in Washington, which is also right next door to Bellmead. “We realized she shouldn’t live on her own anymore and applied to Southminster Place, the personal care community on the Washington Campus—which was the best move we’ve ever made,” Sandy says. Sandy believes her mother’s smooth transition to personal care was made easier by her familiarity with the Washington campus. “At Southminster Place, my mom saw her primary care doctor right in the same building where she lived and got her therapy in an adjacent building,” she says. “She received excellent care and was able get around and participate in activities for many years using her walker.” In the first few years she lived at Southminster Place, Tressa used her savings to pay for her care, but over the years her funds were depleted and her social security benefits, combined with her husband’s VA benefits, could not cover all the costs. “We knew from the outset that my mother might outlive her funds, but we were told every effort would be made to keep mom there if that happened.” Because she lived for more than 10 years at Southminster Place, Tressa needed help from the SeniorCARE FUND to cover the balance of her costs when her savings were gone. Sandy says that knowing she wouldn’t have to move her mother to a different place was a huge relief for both her and her mother, who was experiencing dementia and mini-strokes. “Having her comfortable in her surroundings and getting the best care—that meant the world to me,” she says. Over the years, Tressa became wheelchair bound and macular degeneration stole her eyesight. In 2012, the changes necessitated a move to the Southmont skilled nursing community where she passed away peacefully, just shy of her 93rd birthday in April 2017. Although the loss is difficult, Sandy takes consolation in knowing her mother passed surrounded by the voices of the compassionate caregivers she’d known for five years. “During my mother’s last week, she told me it was her time,” Sandy says. “She went from the comfort of her caregivers to the comfort of her loved ones in heaven.”

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FROM THE FOUNDATION

Raising Funds for Seniors in Need

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enevolence is at the very heart of who we are. But do you know what “benevolent care” means and how it benefits our residents? Jacqueline Flanagan, CFRE, executive director of Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation, explains just how important raising funds for seniors in need is to Presbyterian SeniorCare Network.

Q:

Benevolent care is not a phrase that most are familiar with. What does benevolent care mean to Presbyterian SeniorCare Network?

A:

Benevolent or charitable care means that we are committed to providing free care to individuals in our care communities who have exhausted their resources and are without the ability to pay. Currently, 1 in 5 of the personal care residents we serve is a beneficiary of benevolent care. This is significant because there is no Medicare or Medicaid program funding available to residents of personal care communities in Pennsylvania.

Q:

So there is no funding available for personal care communities through government programs?

A:

There is not, and that is why we developed the SeniorCARE FUND, a fund specifically for benevolent care. The SeniorCARE FUND serves a critical need. In addition to what monies we raise specifically for the SeniorCARE FUND, we also deliberately budget each year to provide charitable care. In 2017, Presbyterian SeniorCare Network and its affiliates provided more than $20 million in benevolent care and uncompensated care and services. That includes $2.3 million in benevolent care, as well as $18.1 million in unreimbursed costs.

Q:

Can a resident, regardless of how financially sound they were when they entered into one of our care communities, run out of resources and utilize benevolent care?

A:

Yes that does happen. It would be really great if we all had a crystal ball that showed us our future – but we really do not know what is going to happen or what obstacles we may face. Anyone could enter into one of our care communities, have solid plans for their financial future and hit a bump in the road through no fault of their own. We work with them so they can avoid leaving the place they call home, a place where they have friends and the support of our team. That’s where benevolent or charitable care comes in.

Q:

Do you see the need for benevolent care growing in the future, or do you think the need will remain steady?

A:

In Pennsylvania, our over 85 population is increasing at 10 times the rate of the rest of the population. We also know that approximately 50% of seniors 85 years of age and older are afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Given these types of trends, we anticipate a greater need for residential care and expect the need for benevolent care to increase. For Presbyterian SeniorCare Network, it means we must balance our commitment to providing charitable care with our commitment to being around to serve the next generation of seniors. It’s also why we are so appreciative of donors who support the SeniorCARE FUND, which specifically is designated for benevolent care.

Q:

We are right in the heart of the season of giving. If someone is interested in donating, would you encourage them to give to the SeniorCARE FUND?

A:

Absolutely. Many of our readers recently received an appeal from us in the mail. We know that you have been asked to give generously to many organizations and charities this year. As the year comes to an end, we hope you will consider making a


FROM THE FOUNDATION

tax-deductible gift to the SeniorCARE FUND. If you make your gift by December 31, 2017, you will be able to take advantage of the charitable income tax deduction for this year. The funds have different names: the SeniorCARE FUND at Oakmont, New Wilmington and Washington; the LifeCare Fund at Longwood; and the Caring for Life Fund at Erie and Oil City, but they all function the same – they provide charitable care for our residents.

Q:

Presbyterian SeniorCare Network is a large organization serving seniors from Pittsburgh to Washington to Erie and beyond. How can a donor be sure that their donation is going to the campus, community and fund that they designated?

A:

While the Foundation centralizes the fundraising and processing of gifts for tax purposes for the

entire Network, let me emphasize that all funds specifically designated (even funds beyond the benevolent care fund) for a specific community or affiliate will go directly for the support of that specific community or affiliate.

Q: A:

Any closing remarks?

I just want to thank our donors for their past generosity, which has helped to fund our annual cost of benevolent care as well as capital projects and other resources that help to enhance the quality of life for our residents. Thank you for your ongoing support.

WAYS TO GIVE Your gift to Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation can support the SeniorCARE FUND as well as capital improvements and program enhancements. There are many ways to give: • Donate online by visiting www.SrCare.org/give-now. Once on our website, you may donate using our Donate Now form. •M  ake a tribute gift: remember the life of a loved one or honor someone on a special occasion. •G  ifts of stock or appreciated securities: these gifts might ease your capital gains tax burden (consult your tax professional for additional information). Please contact the Foundation before making your gift of stock, as privacy laws prohibit us from knowing who transferred the stock. •M  atching gifts: double your support! Please contact the Human Resources Department at your or your spouse's employer to see if they offer this service and to obtain a matching gift form.

•P  lanned giving: an opportunity for you to create a legacy with a deferred gift to Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation through a bequest, retirement plan, life insurance plan, charitable gift annuity, charitable remainder trust, or a charitable lead trust. Visit plannedgiving.srcare.org for more information. •U  nited Way and other workplace giving campaigns: designate your United Way or government campaign contribution to Presbyterian SeniorCare Network. • United Way of Allegheny County: • #1032 Presbyterian SeniorCare – Oakmont • #2872 Presbyterian SeniorCare – Washington • #9874 Presbyterian SeniorCare – Woodside Place • United Way of Washington County: #42135 • Pennsylvania State Employees Combined Appeal (SECA): #4601-0037

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FROM THE FOUNDATION

PLANNED GIVING CORNER

I

t is that time of year again, bustling around getting ready for family and friends to visit, sending off holiday greetings and making your year-end contributions to the charities you care about.

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS j SOMETHING SWEET FOR A SMILE

Recognizing Marie Conrad, LPN at Manchester Commons of Erie

Please keep in mind that if you are 70½ or older you can donate up to $100,000 of your required minimum distribution from your Individual Retirement Account (IRA) directly to a charity such as Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation.

 resident asked for apple pie, which we did A not have that day. Marie took the time to make him an apple pie from scratch with what we had on hand. Marie will do whatever she can to make anyone’s life just a little easier, even if that means taking on more work for herself.

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS j

There are a few easy steps to make a gift from your IRA: 1. C ontact your IRA administrator to make your gift. Remember that your gift can count as your required minimum distribution from your IRA.

2. D esignate the charity you want to receive your gift. Your gift needs to go directly from your IRA to the charity of your choice.

3. Send in your gift by year-end! If you have any questions, I am happy to talk with you. Be sure to have your IRA gift to Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation by December 31, 2017 to take advantage of tax deductions for this year!

DEMONSTRATING WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A TEAM PLAYER

Recognizing Donna Brown, administrative assistant at Woodside Place of Oakmont

 onna’s heart is so big. Her title is D administrative assistant at Woodside Place of Oakmont, but she does so much more for our team. One example that sticks out is that Donna volunteers to work Thanksgiving and Christmas to not only be there as extra support, but so that team members with young children can stay home with their families. She understands how sacred these times are. She is always there to help and for that we are grateful.

WCCF Gives Nancy Hart Director, Planned Giving Phone: 412-826-6087 Email: nhart@srcare.org

Want to learn more about the planned giving options at Presbyterian SeniorCare Network? Visit our new web site: plannedgiving.srcare.org.

Thank you to all of our donors who gave during the annual WCCF Gives Day! We raised over $3,200 for the SeniorCARE FUND in Washington. The SeniorCARE FUND benefits our care community residents who have exhausted their resources and no longer have the ability to pay for their care.


FROM THE FOUNDATION

Fundraising Enhances the Heart of the Longwood Campus

T

he Ballroom is the heart of the Longwood at Oakmont campus. It is used for everything from speakers, musical entertainment, continuing education, Saturday night movies, resident-driven shows and more. So it is imperative that equipment be in top working condition – which had not been the case lately.

In September, Longwood at Oakmont team members and residents gathered together to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the opening of the independent living community. As a way to honor the legacy of all who have resided at Longwood over the years, residents, led by resident council members Verne Koch and Margot Woodwell, teamed up with Presbyterian SeniorCare Foundation to raise funds for a special anniversary gift that benefits not only current residents, but future residents, as well. The gift is an audio/visual system for the Ballroom in The Commons. Fundraising for the A/V fund started in September, and in just over a month, Longwood residents came together and made the campaign a success. The necessary funds have been raised, and a vendor has been selected for the equipment. Installation is scheduled for the first week of January 2018. Any additional funds raised will be kept in the A/V Fund for repair and replacement needs in the future. Verne and Margot extend a special thank you to the Longwood residents for coming together to recognize a need in their community, saying that, “together we make Longwood at Oakmont a stimulating and enjoyable place to call home!” Longwood at Oakmont residents and team members, as well as jugglers, dancers, those on stilts and ladies who were actually tables (yes – tables!) came together to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the independent living community in Plum. The party, a Silver Soiree, was held on September 23, and featured Cirque du Soleil type entertainment that had the crowd “oohing” and “awing” all night. The evening captured the vibrancy of the Longwood community, and so many memories were made that will surely live on for another 25 years.

|9


10 |

FEATURE STORY CONTINUED

Providing independence to those with disabilities According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 54 million Americans have a disability. Armed with a strong understanding of HUD financing and programs, the SeniorCare Network team branched out in the 1990s with the aspiration to serve those with intellectual, physical and developmental disabilities. The HUD Section 811 programs offer these populations affordable housing options where they can maintain a level of independence, something everyone desires. We became familiar with the HUD 811 financing in the late-1980s when those living with HIV/AIDS were seeking housing. HIV/AIDS is classified as a physical disability, therefore qualifies under the HUD 811 program. From there, our teams did a bit of research to find where the most need for housing was for those with disabilities, and we found the answer was east of the City of Pittsburgh. In response to the research, we opened Negley Commons in East Liberty and Page Place in Manchester; both communities were designed for those living with physical disabilities. SeniorCare Network also opened PlumWood Apartments in Plum for those living with chronic mental illness, which a diagnosis of dementia qualifies.

Understanding that we would be serving those living with dementia, we drew on our expertise in the field and constructed the property with secure courtyards and a wandering area. PlumWood also features the availability for two-bedroom apartments so that caregivers may live with the residents. Finally, we began to conceptualize a community for those with developmental disabilities. A developmental disability is a diverse group of chronic conditions that are due to mental or physical impairments, the most common forms being autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and brain injuries. In 2002, Timothy Place opened in Plum Borough and featured community living for people who are able to live independently with some support. All of the communities for persons with disabilities do not serve only seniors, they meet the needs of those 18 years of age and older who want to live as independently as possible in their own home.

Connecting Seniors with Needed Resources Supportive housing also provides wraparound supportive services with onsite Service Coordinators who support residents as their needs change; service coordination is mainly for our residents 62 years of age and older. The service coordinator will work individually with residents to determine their needs and make recommendations when necessary for health services, and education and activities to promote well-being. Service coordinators meet with


FEATURE STORY CONTINUED | 11 residents annually, at move-in and then once per year, to evaluate/re-evaluate needs. Here are a few examples of the support that is provided via the service coordinators:

•E  ducational Support: Service coordinators may schedule regular programs about relevant topics, such as wellness, medication management, insurance, etc.

•H  ome Management: residents may be linked with Meals-on-Wheels, the local Food Bank, housecleaning services, grocery shopping services, etc.

Senior living communities with Service Coordinators have found that residents are able to remain at home for a longer period than those living in communities without Service Coordinators. A study released in November 2015 funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation found that the availability of an on-site service coordinator at federally subsidized senior housing communities reduced the odds of having a hospital admission among residents by 18%.

• Bill Management: Service coordinators may act as advocates regarding billing errors, assist residents with understanding medical bills or enroll residents in benefit programs, such as utility discount programs. • Healthcare Planning: Service coordinators may arrange for home health services, home medical equipment or medical appointments.

Timothy Place: A Community with Heart “Timothy Place. It’s just a place that makes my soul smile,” says Tibby Kuchta, accountant at Presbyterian SeniorCare Network. Tibby has kept the books for Timothy Place for almost 17 years, but her bond to the community is so much more than the numbers. It’s the sense of family that takes her back to the community a few times a year to volunteer at annual parties and get-togethers. Timothy Place in rural Plum Borough features 12 bungalow style apartments and is a SeniorCare Network managed supportive and affordable housing community for individuals 18 years of age and older who are living with developmental disabilities. To qualify for residency at Timothy Place, prospects must have a verifiable developmental disability and be able to live independently with some in-home supports. Rent is based on income and subsidized by HUD. Johanna Murock is the community manager at Timothy Place and says, “Timothy Place is a needs based community and most of our residents come to us via referrals from case managers who work on their behalf. Qualified applicants are placed on a waiting list. With only 12 apartments, we often do not

Timothy Place, Plum Borough have availability for years – we find that our residents want to stay once they move-in; when someone comes to Timothy Place, they are instantly part of the family.” Each apartment has a private entrance with a patio and a bit of green space. Most of the apartments are one-bedroom, but there are five twobedroom apartments that are used by residents who require live-in caregivers. The two bedroom apartments often accommodate a resident with a family member, keeping families together in a supportive environment. (continued)


12 |

FEATURE STORY CONTINUED Johanna says, “A majority of our residents are in their mid-20s and enjoy the perks of the community.“ One benefit is the guarantee that a member of the SeniorCare Network maintenance team will take care of repairs, landscaping and snow removal, which maintenance technician John Kurtz has been doing at Timothy Place for 11 years. Johanna says, “John is such an important part of our team. He cares deeply for the safety of our residents.” Another perk is the community room. The community room is used for gatherings, which are often the highlight of the year for residents – and Tibby. She says, “I have a bit of a green thumb, so I really enjoy the annual planting party held each May. The residents all have planter boxes on their patios, so Johanna buys the flats of flowers, the dirt

and other needed items. The residents pick their favorite colors and flowers and bring their planting creations to life. It’s just a great day together – and everyone participates.” The neighborly feel of Timothy Place really makes it special and a desirable place to live. “I think our community really gives the residents a sense of worth and a sense that they truly can live on their own,” says Johanna. While funding shortages and cuts to the HUD 811 programs have stopped the creation of more communities like Timothy Place, we take great pride in knowing that our efforts are helping a small group of people live their lives to the fullest.

TIMOTHY PLACE RESIDENT FEATURE: JOSH HUGHES Josh Hughes has a quiet demeanor, but the first thing you notice about him is his fierce independence. Josh, who is 28 years old, lives with a developmental disability and is proud that he has found independence at Timothy Place where he has lived with some in-home support for just under two years. “I chose to apply [for residency] at Timothy Place because it is not far from where I grew up and I am familiar with the area. I was happy when I found out that there was an opening and I was the first on the waiting list. I really like my neighbors and I think it is nice that we all do activities together at the community. My neighbors feel like my family,” he says.

L to R: Johanna Murock, Josh Hughes and John Kurtz take a moment to proudly pose at the entrance of Timothy Place in Plum Borough.

Keeping a busy schedule, Josh holds a part-time job at the local Office Max store where he serves as a merchandising stock associate. His work is in close proximity to Timothy Place so he is able to use Access Transit to get to and from his job. Right now, his Office Max job is helping Josh to fulfill a specific dream – buying a car. He recently received his driver’s license and is saving money to purchase a set of wheels.

In addition to working and attending activities at the community, Josh volunteers at his church, designing and writing the weekly announcement presentations, and sometimes helping with their newsletter. When asked what he likes most about Timothy Place, his answer is that it is in a rural setting without a lot of hustle and bustle. “When I am outside sitting on my front porch, I enjoy the scenery and the wildlife that I see on the property. I also like that there is no light pollution. At night, I can go outside and look at the night sky.”


FEATURE STORY CONTINUED | 13

FALL 2017

1215 Hulton Road Oakmont PA 15139-1196 www.SrCare.org 1-877-772-6500

THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

On the Go? Want to Save Paper?

Benevolence

If you’d like to receive future newsletters in your inbox, visit our web site, www.SrCare.org, to sign up for E-news. jjj

Venango

Cameron P7

Advocating for our Residents

Mattie Lawson, a resident at St. Justin Plaza, our affordable housing community in Mt. Washington, is pictured with Senator Bob Casey, who spoke at the Rally and is against the proposed HUD 202 budget cuts. housing for vulnerable, older adults in the Pittsburgh area. Nationally, this would affect more than 128,000 Section 202 units. Of the 4 million older adult households eligible for HUD rental assistance programs, only 1.4 million receive such assistance due to lack of funding. Thanks to the hard work of advocates for affordable housing – including our own residents and team members – a House subcommittee reviewed the proposed cuts and rejected the worst of the requested cuts and the proposed policies. The bill was voted out of subcommittee on July 11. The next step is a full committee review of the bill. At the time of publication, a vote has not been conducted.

1

PERSONAL CARE COMMUNITIES

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7

Southminster Place Westminster Place Woodside Place Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens

4

NURSING CARE COMMUNITIES

N1 N2 N3 N4 N5 N6 N7 N8

Southmont The Willows Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Villa St. Joseph* Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens Oakwood Heights

$

CONTINUING CARE COMMUNITIES

C1 C2

W W W

W W W W W W

Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green

3 SENIOR

CONDOMINIUMS

SC1 Redstone Court* SC2 Woodlands at Redstone* SC3 Woodlands Village I & II*

CONTINUING CARE AT HOME Longwood at Home

HOME HEALTH Presbyterian SeniorCare at Home © 2017 Presbyterian SeniorCare Network | 10.17

S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26 S27 S28 S29 S30 S31 S32

Battles Village* Beeson Court Bellmead Apartments Bridge Street Commons Commons at North Aiken Commons of Saxonburg Etna Commons* Fairmont Apartments Fifth Avenue Commons Forward Shady Apartments* Green Diamond Place HaveLoch Commons The Heritage* Heritage House of Houston Mt. Nazareth Commons Negley Commons The Oaks at Center in the Woods Page Place Apartments Park Manor Apartments Plum Creek Acres PlumWood Apartments Poplar Lane Court Riverview Towers* Robinson Manor* St. Justin Plaza* St. Therese Plaza* Silver Lake Commons SpruceWood Commons Sunbury Fields Sweetbriar Place* Timothy Place York Commons

OHIO

44

COMMUNITIES

Clinton

10

Clearfield

LOCATIONS COUNTIES

Clarion

P5|N4|C2

Jefferson

S27

P6|N6 P7|N7

Lawrence NEW YORK

S1

Centre

Crawford

Susquehanna

S18

Warren

Beaver Venango

Mercer

Butler Forest

N5

Tioga

Armstrong Potter

S15

Clarion S24

S18 S32 S30 S25

S29

D

S16

Wyoming

Huntingdon

S20 S31

Montour

Centre

S10

Lackawanna

Luzerne

Clinton Clearfield

P2

S27 Jefferson S8

Sullivan

Indiana Lycoming

P4|N3|S21|C1 P3|N2

S7

Blair

Columbia

Juniata

Monroe

Cambria

Union

Pike

NEW JERSEY

Carbon

S23

S11

Butler

D

S6

N5 S11

Beaver

S8

Westmoreland

Armstrong

Allegheny

S13

D

P1|N1|S3

Washington

S4

S16

S3

Somerset

Fayette Greene

Greene

WEST VIRGINIA

WEST VIRGINIA

Hunterdon

Berks Lebanon

Cumberland

S21 Bedford S2|S13

Dauphin

Perry

Bucks

Cumberland

Montgomery

S17 S22

Lehigh

Juniata

Cambria

Washington Westmoreland

SC1|2|3

Northampton

Northumberland Schuylkill

Blair

S14

Snyder

Mifflin

Huntingdon Indiana

P1|N1|S2

S11

Perry

Warren

S26 S30

Snyder

Mifflin

S5 Elk

Allegheny

S28

Bradford Wayne

Cameron

P5|N4|C2

D

McKean

N8

Lawrence

Union

S28

Erie

AFFORDABLE HOUSING**

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17

53

CARING EMPLOY EES

LAKE ERIE

# SUPPORTIVE & W

2,175

SENIORS AND FAMILIES SERVED PER Y EAR

W Denotes communities that offer the Woodside Program, specialized Alzheimer’s and dementia care D Denotes supportive housing for persons with disabilities * Denotes communities which are not owned or sponsored by Presbyterian SeniorCare but are managed by our affiliate, SeniorCare Network ** Denotes income eligibility requirements

WEST VIRGINIA

Presbyterian SeniorCare Network has 32 supportive and affordable housing communities throughout western Pennsylvania, many of those communities funded through HUD or tax credits. The proposed spending cuts would reduce the availability of affordable

6,500

Mercer

OHIO

The Save HUD 202 Rally, hosted by LeadingAge, an association representing nonprofit aging services providers, was part of a multi-month campaign to convince lawmakers to prevent cuts to 202 programs, maintain 100% funding, and expand funding to create new affordable housing for older adults.

OUR COMMUNITIES MAP

WEST VIRGINIA

No matter what community or setting a resident lives in, we advocate for their rights. That is why on the morning of June 27, over 50 of our SeniorCare Network residents and team members boarded a bus destined for our Nation’s capital. We were going to rally to save HUD 202 funding.

Lycoming

Elk

MARYLAND

Lancaster

Fulton

S1|S12

Franklin

Adams

Fayette

Somerset

York

Fulton

Bedford

Philadelphia Chester

Delaware

DELAWARE

VIRGINIA

MARYLAND VIRGINIA

Franklin

Adams


NEWS AND NOTES FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO

IN THIS ISSUE Compassion, Humility and a Deep Sense of Service....................1-3, 10-13 Charitable Giving Starts at Home............................ 4 Transitioning Through the Continuum of Compassion........ 5 Foundation News.................... 6-9

FALL 2017

THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

Benevolence

ABOUT THE COVER Benevolence is more than what we do—it is key to who we are. Every day, our team members throughout the Network give their hands and their hearts to serve every individual with compassion, dignity and respect. As a faith-based nonprofit organization, we believe that our generosity and kindness are the most powerful resources we have to make a difference in the lives of our residents and their families and in our communities. It is part of what being person-centered is all about.

A

t Presbyterian SeniorCare Network, we are guided by a unique calling that is focused on older adults and making aging easier.® This calling is at the heart of our mission. While our mission conveys what we do and guides our everyday work, our values statement highlights what we believe in and how we will behave. Benevolence is one of the key words in our values statement, and it is the focus of this issue of heartlines. Benevolence is a very rich and powerful word. By definition, benevolence means the quality of being well. Benevolence indicates a disposition to do good in regard to others, and to act with genuine compassion and kind considerations of the needs and desires of others. Simply put, it’s about kindness and charity. As a non-profit with a 90-year heritage of benevolence, our charitable works and charitable giving are part of who we are. Benevolence is evident in our programs and our people. In this issue, you will learn more about how we support a variety of vulnerable populations – from persons with disabilities and residents in our care communities who outlive their resources to older adults on fixed, low incomes who deserve affordable housing. You’ll also find “Random Acts of Kindness” sprinkled throughout this issue that highlight the every day good deeds that are being done to generate a smile and bring moments of joy and purpose to someone’s day. These stories unite our Network – our residents and patients as well as family members, volunteers and team members – and demonstrate the heart that we have for one another and all that we do. Paul Winkler

BENEVOLENCE: GOING THE EXTRA MILE

Getting more than you give

T

he words volunteer and kindness are synonymous. A kind word, a moment of song or a quick chat – all are selfless acts that our volunteers across Presbyterian SeniorCare Network provide for our residents. Volunteers play such an important role across our Network by serving as a vital extension of our staff. By engaging with our residents in enrichment programs, volunteers contribute to a high quality of life and help free staff members up to concentrate on resident care. Volunteers not only help to provide purpose to daily life for our residents, but we often find our volunteers also benefit from their time on campus – like Marilan Caito. Read Marilan’s story of how kindness shown to her mother-in law inspired her to give back to our organization. And how giving back created special bonds and a heart filled with joy. “For five years, I visited my mother-in-law, Alice, three times a week at The Willows, the skilled nursing community at the Presbyterian SeniorCare Network Oakmont campus. A major stroke had left her unable to walk or speak and in need of full-time skilled nursing services. I watched first-hand the compassionate care she received during a very difficult time for my family. I saw how hard the staff worked and how

Soothing the soul and engaging residents with water features appreciative they were for any extra helping hands. I always knew that when I retired I wanted to repay the kindness shown to Alice.” As the Development Director at a private school for children with special needs for 30 years, I also built lifelong relationships with many of our most loyal and generous donors. They happened to be seniors and I loved their stories, their wisdom and their amazing life experiences. Together those two factors brought me to the Hanna HealthCare Center at the Longwood at Oakmont campus where I having been volunteering every Wednesday for the past year. My one-on-one visits with a small group of ladies bring me such joy. They have become part of my family and I think I have become part of theirs. We laugh and cry together, share family and travel stories and even talk about end of life issues that are difficult for them to share with their own children. Though one of my dear ladies passed recently at age 103, she inspired me to be a better person. I will forever remember her grace and gentleness in the face of so many challenges; and that smile that lit up the room. So when friends and family ask, “How can you volunteer there? Isn’t it too emotional? Too sad? Too hard?” I answer – “are you kidding, it’s the best day of my week!”

President and CEO The MISSION STATEMENT conveys our organization’s purpose and what we do: Presbyterian SeniorCare Network is committed to enriching the aging experience through person-centered service and living options. The VALUES STATEMENT works in tandem with the mission and highlights what we believe in and how we will behave: Grounded in Christ-like values of benevolence and love of neighbor, we pursue excellence, innovation and collaboration to ensure individuals live well and team members have meaningful work.

LAST YEAR, VOLUNTEERS

GAVE OVER

37,000

HOURS TO OUR RESIDENTS

Marilan (middle) poses with two of the residents she visits with every Wednesday, Marion (left) and Ester (right).

J

eff McKinley uses his own personal time to build water features that compete with the likes of the fountains at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. Jeff, director of maintenance and environmental services at Elmwood Gardens, brings over 35 years of talent in plumbing and construction. His creations come out of the goodness of his heart and not only bring vibrancy to the community, but help engage our residents. Jeff’s water features, a total of three, are each a focal point around campus, in large part because Elmwood Gardens in Erie is in a city setting and there are not a lot of green spaces. The features incorporate lighting, waterfalls, water jets and beautiful landscaping. The features help to create a connection to the outdoors, and provide a source of relaxation for our residents. As Jeff says, “the water features are soothing and I like to have things like that around me, so why wouldn’t I want the same for our residents?” Kelly Briody, administrator at Elmwood Gardens, says “This project was all Jeff’s idea and an excellent example of his character and commitment to our person-centered culture. As a result of the remodeling of the dining room in our skilled nursing neighborhood, we were able to make a previously obstructed group of windows a focal point in the room. The original plan was to plant some greenery outside the window to give the residents a more pleasing view than the fence at

the edge of the property. But Jeff came to me proposing that he do a water feature to give the residents something they would truly enjoy looking at on a daily basis. From construction to completion the residents loved the projects!” Kelly noticed that not only did Jeff exhibit kindness and thoughtfulness in his work, but the residents reciprocated his actions. She says, “On particularly hot days the residents would ask the team to take water out to him, their concern was quite endearing.” Once Jeff was done with his regular work for the day, he would steal away an hour or two here and there to build the features; he also worked many Saturdays to get the features up and running. Kelly says, “Now that the water features are complete, it is wonderful to witness the residents enjoying the relaxing water wall during the day hours, and then again at night when it is lit up. Jeff’s commitment to our residents and improving their daily lives is an example of what is at the heart of the Elmwood Gardens team.” Jeff enjoys building the water features for the residents to enjoy. He says, “I often receive thanks for the wonderful views. While I have not been able to confirm this, I did hear that some of the residents were fighting over who was going to sit by the window to watch the fountains! Talk about a sense of satisfaction out of your work!”


NEWS AND NOTES FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO

IN THIS ISSUE Compassion, Humility and a Deep Sense of Service....................1-3, 10-13 Charitable Giving Starts at Home............................ 4 Transitioning Through the Continuum of Compassion........ 5 Foundation News.................... 6-9

FALL 2017

THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

Benevolence

ABOUT THE COVER Benevolence is more than what we do—it is key to who we are. Every day, our team members throughout the Network give their hands and their hearts to serve every individual with compassion, dignity and respect. As a faith-based nonprofit organization, we believe that our generosity and kindness are the most powerful resources we have to make a difference in the lives of our residents and their families and in our communities. It is part of what being person-centered is all about.

A

t Presbyterian SeniorCare Network, we are guided by a unique calling that is focused on older adults and making aging easier.® This calling is at the heart of our mission. While our mission conveys what we do and guides our everyday work, our values statement highlights what we believe in and how we will behave. Benevolence is one of the key words in our values statement, and it is the focus of this issue of heartlines. Benevolence is a very rich and powerful word. By definition, benevolence means the quality of being well. Benevolence indicates a disposition to do good in regard to others, and to act with genuine compassion and kind considerations of the needs and desires of others. Simply put, it’s about kindness and charity. As a non-profit with a 90-year heritage of benevolence, our charitable works and charitable giving are part of who we are. Benevolence is evident in our programs and our people. In this issue, you will learn more about how we support a variety of vulnerable populations – from persons with disabilities and residents in our care communities who outlive their resources to older adults on fixed, low incomes who deserve affordable housing. You’ll also find “Random Acts of Kindness” sprinkled throughout this issue that highlight the every day good deeds that are being done to generate a smile and bring moments of joy and purpose to someone’s day. These stories unite our Network – our residents and patients as well as family members, volunteers and team members – and demonstrate the heart that we have for one another and all that we do. Paul Winkler

BENEVOLENCE: GOING THE EXTRA MILE

Getting more than you give

T

he words volunteer and kindness are synonymous. A kind word, a moment of song or a quick chat – all are selfless acts that our volunteers across Presbyterian SeniorCare Network provide for our residents. Volunteers play such an important role across our Network by serving as a vital extension of our staff. By engaging with our residents in enrichment programs, volunteers contribute to a high quality of life and help free staff members up to concentrate on resident care. Volunteers not only help to provide purpose to daily life for our residents, but we often find our volunteers also benefit from their time on campus – like Marilan Caito. Read Marilan’s story of how kindness shown to her mother-in law inspired her to give back to our organization. And how giving back created special bonds and a heart filled with joy. “For five years, I visited my mother-in-law, Alice, three times a week at The Willows, the skilled nursing community at the Presbyterian SeniorCare Network Oakmont campus. A major stroke had left her unable to walk or speak and in need of full-time skilled nursing services. I watched first-hand the compassionate care she received during a very difficult time for my family. I saw how hard the staff worked and how

Soothing the soul and engaging residents with water features appreciative they were for any extra helping hands. I always knew that when I retired I wanted to repay the kindness shown to Alice.” As the Development Director at a private school for children with special needs for 30 years, I also built lifelong relationships with many of our most loyal and generous donors. They happened to be seniors and I loved their stories, their wisdom and their amazing life experiences. Together those two factors brought me to the Hanna HealthCare Center at the Longwood at Oakmont campus where I having been volunteering every Wednesday for the past year. My one-on-one visits with a small group of ladies bring me such joy. They have become part of my family and I think I have become part of theirs. We laugh and cry together, share family and travel stories and even talk about end of life issues that are difficult for them to share with their own children. Though one of my dear ladies passed recently at age 103, she inspired me to be a better person. I will forever remember her grace and gentleness in the face of so many challenges; and that smile that lit up the room. So when friends and family ask, “How can you volunteer there? Isn’t it too emotional? Too sad? Too hard?” I answer – “are you kidding, it’s the best day of my week!”

President and CEO The MISSION STATEMENT conveys our organization’s purpose and what we do: Presbyterian SeniorCare Network is committed to enriching the aging experience through person-centered service and living options. The VALUES STATEMENT works in tandem with the mission and highlights what we believe in and how we will behave: Grounded in Christ-like values of benevolence and love of neighbor, we pursue excellence, innovation and collaboration to ensure individuals live well and team members have meaningful work.

LAST YEAR, VOLUNTEERS

GAVE OVER

37,000

HOURS TO OUR RESIDENTS

Marilan (middle) poses with two of the residents she visits with every Wednesday, Marion (left) and Ester (right).

J

eff McKinley uses his own personal time to build water features that compete with the likes of the fountains at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. Jeff, director of maintenance and environmental services at Elmwood Gardens, brings over 35 years of talent in plumbing and construction. His creations come out of the goodness of his heart and not only bring vibrancy to the community, but help engage our residents. Jeff’s water features, a total of three, are each a focal point around campus, in large part because Elmwood Gardens in Erie is in a city setting and there are not a lot of green spaces. The features incorporate lighting, waterfalls, water jets and beautiful landscaping. The features help to create a connection to the outdoors, and provide a source of relaxation for our residents. As Jeff says, “the water features are soothing and I like to have things like that around me, so why wouldn’t I want the same for our residents?” Kelly Briody, administrator at Elmwood Gardens, says “This project was all Jeff’s idea and an excellent example of his character and commitment to our person-centered culture. As a result of the remodeling of the dining room in our skilled nursing neighborhood, we were able to make a previously obstructed group of windows a focal point in the room. The original plan was to plant some greenery outside the window to give the residents a more pleasing view than the fence at

the edge of the property. But Jeff came to me proposing that he do a water feature to give the residents something they would truly enjoy looking at on a daily basis. From construction to completion the residents loved the projects!” Kelly noticed that not only did Jeff exhibit kindness and thoughtfulness in his work, but the residents reciprocated his actions. She says, “On particularly hot days the residents would ask the team to take water out to him, their concern was quite endearing.” Once Jeff was done with his regular work for the day, he would steal away an hour or two here and there to build the features; he also worked many Saturdays to get the features up and running. Kelly says, “Now that the water features are complete, it is wonderful to witness the residents enjoying the relaxing water wall during the day hours, and then again at night when it is lit up. Jeff’s commitment to our residents and improving their daily lives is an example of what is at the heart of the Elmwood Gardens team.” Jeff enjoys building the water features for the residents to enjoy. He says, “I often receive thanks for the wonderful views. While I have not been able to confirm this, I did hear that some of the residents were fighting over who was going to sit by the window to watch the fountains! Talk about a sense of satisfaction out of your work!”


FEATURE STORY CONTINUED | 13

FALL 2017

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THE STORIES THAT UNITE US

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Venango

Cameron P7

Advocating for our Residents

Mattie Lawson, a resident at St. Justin Plaza, our affordable housing community in Mt. Washington, is pictured with Senator Bob Casey, who spoke at the Rally and is against the proposed HUD 202 budget cuts. housing for vulnerable, older adults in the Pittsburgh area. Nationally, this would affect more than 128,000 Section 202 units. Of the 4 million older adult households eligible for HUD rental assistance programs, only 1.4 million receive such assistance due to lack of funding. Thanks to the hard work of advocates for affordable housing – including our own residents and team members – a House subcommittee reviewed the proposed cuts and rejected the worst of the requested cuts and the proposed policies. The bill was voted out of subcommittee on July 11. The next step is a full committee review of the bill. At the time of publication, a vote has not been conducted.

1

PERSONAL CARE COMMUNITIES

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7

Southminster Place Westminster Place Woodside Place Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens

4

NURSING CARE COMMUNITIES

N1 N2 N3 N4 N5 N6 N7 N8

Southmont The Willows Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green Villa St. Joseph* Manchester Commons Elmwood Gardens Oakwood Heights

$

CONTINUING CARE COMMUNITIES

C1 C2

W W W

W W W W W W

Longwood at Oakmont Shenango on the Green

3 SENIOR

CONDOMINIUMS

SC1 Redstone Court* SC2 Woodlands at Redstone* SC3 Woodlands Village I & II*

CONTINUING CARE AT HOME Longwood at Home

HOME HEALTH Presbyterian SeniorCare at Home © 2017 Presbyterian SeniorCare Network | 10.17

S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26 S27 S28 S29 S30 S31 S32

Battles Village* Beeson Court Bellmead Apartments Bridge Street Commons Commons at North Aiken Commons of Saxonburg Etna Commons* Fairmont Apartments Fifth Avenue Commons Forward Shady Apartments* Green Diamond Place HaveLoch Commons The Heritage* Heritage House of Houston Mt. Nazareth Commons Negley Commons The Oaks at Center in the Woods Page Place Apartments Park Manor Apartments Plum Creek Acres PlumWood Apartments Poplar Lane Court Riverview Towers* Robinson Manor* St. Justin Plaza* St. Therese Plaza* Silver Lake Commons SpruceWood Commons Sunbury Fields Sweetbriar Place* Timothy Place York Commons

OHIO

44

COMMUNITIES

Clinton

10

Clearfield

LOCATIONS COUNTIES

Clarion

P5|N4|C2

Jefferson

S27

P6|N6 P7|N7

Lawrence NEW YORK

S1

Centre

Crawford

Susquehanna

S18

Warren

Beaver Venango

Mercer

Butler Forest

N5

Tioga

Armstrong Potter

S15

Clarion S24

S18 S32 S30 S25

S29

D

S16

Wyoming

Huntingdon

S20 S31

Montour

Centre

S10

Lackawanna

Luzerne

Clinton Clearfield

P2

S27 Jefferson S8

Sullivan

Indiana Lycoming

P4|N3|S21|C1 P3|N2

S7

Blair

Columbia

Juniata

Monroe

Cambria

Union

Pike

NEW JERSEY

Carbon

S23

S11

Butler

D

S6

N5 S11

Beaver

S8

Westmoreland

Armstrong

Allegheny

S13

D

P1|N1|S3

Washington

S4

S16

S3

Somerset

Fayette Greene

Greene

WEST VIRGINIA

WEST VIRGINIA

Hunterdon

Berks Lebanon

Cumberland

S21 Bedford S2|S13

Dauphin

Perry

Bucks

Cumberland

Montgomery

S17 S22

Lehigh

Juniata

Cambria

Washington Westmoreland

SC1|2|3

Northampton

Northumberland Schuylkill

Blair

S14

Snyder

Mifflin

Huntingdon Indiana

P1|N1|S2

S11

Perry

Warren

S26 S30

Snyder

Mifflin

S5 Elk

Allegheny

S28

Bradford Wayne

Cameron

P5|N4|C2

D

McKean

N8

Lawrence

Union

S28

Erie

AFFORDABLE HOUSING**

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S10 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17

53

CARING EMPLOY EES

LAKE ERIE

# SUPPORTIVE & W

2,175

SENIORS AND FAMILIES SERVED PER Y EAR

W Denotes communities that offer the Woodside Program, specialized Alzheimer’s and dementia care D Denotes supportive housing for persons with disabilities * Denotes communities which are not owned or sponsored by Presbyterian SeniorCare but are managed by our affiliate, SeniorCare Network ** Denotes income eligibility requirements

WEST VIRGINIA

Presbyterian SeniorCare Network has 32 supportive and affordable housing communities throughout western Pennsylvania, many of those communities funded through HUD or tax credits. The proposed spending cuts would reduce the availability of affordable

6,500

Mercer

OHIO

The Save HUD 202 Rally, hosted by LeadingAge, an association representing nonprofit aging services providers, was part of a multi-month campaign to convince lawmakers to prevent cuts to 202 programs, maintain 100% funding, and expand funding to create new affordable housing for older adults.

OUR COMMUNITIES MAP

WEST VIRGINIA

No matter what community or setting a resident lives in, we advocate for their rights. That is why on the morning of June 27, over 50 of our SeniorCare Network residents and team members boarded a bus destined for our Nation’s capital. We were going to rally to save HUD 202 funding.

Lycoming

Elk

MARYLAND

Lancaster

Fulton

S1|S12

Franklin

Adams

Fayette

Somerset

York

Fulton

Bedford

Philadelphia Chester

Delaware

DELAWARE

VIRGINIA

MARYLAND VIRGINIA

Franklin

Adams

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