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University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies

Spring 2004

Schedule of Classes and Registration Information Registration Dates: November 11, 2003 - January 11, 2004 Classes begin: January 12, 2004


UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION NEW STUDENT INFORMATION FORM I would like to begin courses in: ‰Fall 20__ ‰Spring 20__ ‰Summer 20__

‰Full time

Name:_______________________________________________________ Sex: ‰M

‰F

‰Part time

U.S. Citizen: ‰Yes ‰No

Ethnic Group:

Home Address:______________________________________________________________________________________________ ˆAmerican Indian/ Alaskan Native (1) Street City State Zip ˆAsian/Pacific Islander (2) Permanent Resident of Virginia: City _________________ County __________________ Other ________ __________________ ˆBlack Non-Hispanic (3) Home Phone___________________________________ Email _______________________________________________________ ˆWhite Non-Hispanic (4) Date of Birth________________________________I.D. Number (SS #)_________________________________________________ ˆHispanic (5) ˆMulti-cultural (6) IF EMPLOYED: Name of Firm_____________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________

Business Phone__________________

Have you ever taken courses in any program at the University of Richmond? ‰Yes

‰No

If yes, give dates___________ Division:___________ Your name when you attended:_________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature of Applicant Date

STOP HERE IF YOU ARE NOT PURSUING A DEGREE AT THIS TIME.

Please fax this form to: 804-289-8138 or mail to: University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies University of Richmond, VA 23173

IF YOU ARE APPLYING FOR ADMISSION AS A DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENT, PLEASE ANSWER SECTIONS 1-7. IF YOU ARE APPLYING TO ANY GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM, CONTACT THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES AT 804-289-8133 FOR THE APPROPRIATE APPLICATION. 1. I am applying for:

‰Bachelor’s Degree

‰Associate’s Degree

‰Certificate (Not avail. for Info. Systems)

‰Post-Baccalaureate Certificate

2. Program of Study:

‰Human Resource Mgmt ‰Information Systems ‰Paralegal Studies ‰Liberal Arts ‰Weekend College - (Accelerated) ‰Retail Mgmt (Certificate Only) ‰Leadership (Certificate Only) ‰Emergency Services Mgmt (check degree and concentration) ‰Bachelor’s Degree ‰Associate’s Degree ‰Certificate Emergency Services Mgmt. Major Emergency Services Mgmt. Major (Pre- or Post-Baccalaureate On-line Only) ‰with Emergency Management Minor ‰with Emergency Management Track ‰Emergency Management ‰with Business Continuity Minor ‰with Business Continuity Track ‰Business Continuity ‰with Homeland Defense Minor ‰with Homeland Defense Track ‰Homeland Defense

3. Have you applied for financial aid? ‰Yes ‰No 4. Name of high school attended:_________________________________ 5. Did you graduate?

‰Yes

‰No

Your name when attended:__________________________________________________

If not, do you have a GED certificate?

‰Yes

‰No

If yes, name on certificate:__________________________________________________

6. Name of all colleges attended:

Did you graduate?

Degree:

Your name when you attended:

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. Please have official college/university transcripts mailed directly to the University of Richmond, School of Continuing Studies, University of Richmond, VA 23173. If you have NOT attended any colleges or universities, please request that official high school or GED transcripts be mailed to the School of Continuing Studies.


University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies

GENERAL INFORMATION Grades on BannerWeb Grades are now available online on BannerWeb, giving students faster access than ever before to their grades at the end of each semester. Students can also check grade changes, incomplete make-ups, and posting of transfer credit throughout the year from any location. BannerWeb: https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/ Because of this service, the Registrar’s Office no longer issues grade mailers. Students can now request official transcripts in person, in writing or by fax. There is no charge. Students should include their name, Social Security number, address, telephone number and signature. Requests without a signature cannot be processed. MAIL transcript requests to: Office of the University Registrar University of Richmond, VA 23173 FAX transcript requests to: (804)287-6578 Students Not Attending UR in the Prior Semester In order to register for classes, you must first be readmitted for the upcoming term. Call the School of Continuing Studies at 289-8133 to have your student status reactivated. You should also provide current address information at this time. Once you have been reactivated, you may register for classes through BannerWeb. Continuing University of Richmond Students If you attended the University of Richmond during the previous term, you do not need to contact the School of Continuing Studies office prior to registering for the upcoming term, unless you have moved or changed employment. Simply access BannerWeb online at: https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/ Please note that you will need your student ID number (your Social Security number) and PIN* (your birthdatethe first time you access BannerWeb) to register. (*You MUST change your PIN to a six-character PIN after your initial BannerWeb access.) Address Changes I.D. cards for non-degree seeking students and other correspondence will be mailed to the permanent address currently listed on the system. If you have recently moved, complete the New Student Information form in this publication or call the School of Continuing Studies office at 289-8133 to update your current address. Please call if you changed employment.

Payment PAYMENT IN FULL IS DUE BY THE END OF THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES WHETHER OR NOT AN INVOICE HAS BEEN RECEIVED. Students have the option of paying for classes with a check, cash or credit card (MasterCard, Visa or Discover). If paying by credit card, the student should call PhoneCharge (877) 237-9734. There is a fee for using this credit card service. Payment for tuition and fees is expected by the end of the first week of the term. You will still be responsible to meet all payment deadlines, even if you do not receive a bill. You may also make payments using the AMS (Academic Management Services) plan. For more information regarding payment of fees, contact the Office of Student Accounts at 289-8149. Financial Aid and Scholarships Scholarships—Several scholarships are available for School of Continuing Studies students who are actively pursuing a planned program of study and who have completed at least 15 semester hours in the School of Continuing Studies. Call the School of Continuing Studies at 289-8133 to request an application (leave your name, address, and zip code). Deadline for applications is August 1, 2004 for the 2004-05 school year. Loans—Federal Direct and private loans are available for students who are enrolled in a degree or certificate program on at least a half-time basis (6 credit hours/ term). Contact the Financial Aid office at 289-8438 or finaid@richmond.edu for more information. Applications must be completed at least six weeks prior to the start of the term for funding to be available before classes begin. Pell Grants—Federal Pell Grants are available to needy students enrolled in a degree or certificate program. You must qualify per the federal need analysis formula. Contact the Financial Aid office at 289-8438 or finaid@richmond.edu for more information. Applications must be completed at least six weeks prior to the start of the term for funding to be available before classes begin. Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant (VTAG)—Virginia residents enrolled full-time (12 credit hours/term) in a degree program may apply for VTAG. Contact the Financial Aid office at 289-8438 or finaid@richmond.edu for an application. Deadline is July 31, 2004 for the 2004-05 academic year.

HOW TO REACH US School of Continuing Studies 289-8133 To schedule an advisor appt. To order a catalog Dr. James L. Narduzzi, Dean Dr. Patricia Johnson Brown, Associate Dean Dr. Ned Swartz, Asst. Dean Sandra Kirkland, Dir. of Student Services Diane Retzer Student Advisor Academic Skills Center Boatwright Library Circulation Desk Media Resource Center Public Services Reference Information Bookstore Financial Aid Registrar’s Office Speech Center Student Accounts Office University Police Non-emergency Parking Services Writing Center

289-8133 289-8133 289-8135 289-8136 287-6338 289-8137 287-6378 289-8626 289-8664 289-8876 289-8860 289-8670 289-8669 289-8491 289-8438 289-8639 289-8814 289-8149 289-8715 289-8703 289-8935

Holds Access to web registration is prevented by holds. You may access BannerWeb to query your holds. If you have a question about a hold, please contact the appropriate office. The following holds will prevent students from registering for spring 2004. Bursar’s Office Dean’s Office Registrar’s Office Student Health Perkins Loan in Repayment Student Accounts

Graduation The SCS graduation ceremony will be held May 8, 2004. Students planning to complete bachelor, associate or certificate requirements in May or August 2004 must file a Degree Application form as soon as possible. Forms may be obtained from the SCS office.

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University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies

REGISTRATION INFORMATION General Registration Information Registration begins Tuesday, November 11, 2003 and ends Sunday, January 11, 2004 for spring semester. Late registration is in effect from January 12-16. BannerWeb, the University’s online registration system, is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with the exception of 5 p.m. Friday through 6 a.m. Saturday. From time to time, the system may go down without prior notice due to technical problems. We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your cooperation.

7) Register online using BannerWeb at https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/ 8) Register your vehicle with campus police; 9) Purchase textbooks in UR Bookstore (Check SCS section for required books.) Note: A student who is not eligible to return to another college or university may not be admitted to any SCS program, even with unclassified status, until a minimum of one semester has elapsed. Official transcripts from all institutions previously attended by such a student must be filed in the Office of the Dean.

Advising and Program Planning An academic advisor will help you plan a degree suited to your needs. You are urged to use this service since information about programs and University regulations is important to your academic success. To make an appointment with an advisor, call 289-8133.

Admission Procedures for Non-Degree-Seeking Students Students desiring to take a class or classes in the School of Continuing Studies for college credit, but are not pursuing a degree must: 1) Complete the New Student Information Form and mail, fax, or bring to the School of Continuing Studies. (If you attended previously, but did not attend last semester, call 289-8133 to be reinstated.) 2) Select course(s) to be taken; 3) Register online using BannerWeb at https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/ 4) Register your vehicle with campus police; 5) Purchase textbooks in UR Bookstore.

Parking Permits Parking permits are required for all students. Register online at: http://www.richmond.edu/administration/police/parking/ or call 289-8703. Fee will be billed to your tuition account. Cost: $10.00 through summer ‘04. Attendance A student may be absent no more than 25% of class meetings, including absences due to late enrollment. If a student has more than the maximum number of absences, whether excused or unexcused, a grade of “V” (failure due to excessive absences) will be recorded. The instructor may set a more rigorous attendance policy or, with the approval of the Dean, waive the attendance policy for a student demonstrating sufficient course knowledge and just cause. Admission Procedures for Degree-Seeking Students Students seeking admission to a certificate, associate, or bachelor degree program in the School of Continuing Studies must: 1) Complete the New Student Information Form and mail, fax or bring to the School of Continuing Studies. Special admission may be granted to nonhigh school graduates; (Graduate level students must call 289-8133. Ask for the graduate application form.) 2) Students seeking admission to the Teacher Licensure Program should call 289-8427 for application and information. 3) Submit transcripts from each college or university previously attended; 4) Show evidence of high school graduation by submission of transcripts or the General Education Development (GED) equivalency; 5) If you attended previously, but did not attend last semester, call 289-8133 to be reinstated; 6) Select course(s) to be taken; (You may register for courses while waiting for transcripts)

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Adding and Dropping Classes The two-week Drop period and the one-week Add period (with payment due at the time of registration) begins Tuesday, November 11, 2003. You no longer need to complete an Add/Drop form for each change in registration. Instead, you may add or drop courses by accessing BannerWeb online. In general, BannerWeb is available 24 hours a day with the exception of 5 p.m. Friday through 6 a.m. Saturday. You will need your personal identification number (PIN). If you have not modified it, your PIN is your birth date (MMDDY). •The one week Add period ends at 5:00 p.m. Friday, January 16th. Payment is due at the time of registration. •The two week Drop period ends at 5:00 p.m. Friday, January 23rd. •Withdrawals after January 23rd must be in writing and mailed or delivered to the Office of the Dean. General Fee Refund Students are matriculated by semester. If a student withdraws from classes or is dropped from the University for whatever cause, a refund of fees for a fall or spring semester shall be made in accordance with the University’s refund policy, based on the following schedule. This schedule is adapted for summer terms.

Students who withdraw from the University and who are receiving any financial assistance may be required to return such assistance per Public Law 668.22 and institutional policy. The University of Richmond complies with all federal regulations governing recipients of federal Title IV funds. Information regarding financial aid refund policies is available in the Financial Aid Office. The amount of the refund is based on the date that written withdrawal notification is received in the Office of the Dean. Any special fee is non-refundable after the first day of class. Tuition Fees Refund Withdrawal on or before the first day of class .. 100% Withdrawal during the first week of classes ..... 100% Withdrawal during the second week of classes..70% Withdrawal during third week of classes ............ 50% Withdrawal during the fourth week of classes .... 25% Withdrawal during the fifth week of classes ....... 25% Withdrawal during the sixth week of classes ..... 25% Withdrawal after the sixth week of classes ...... None Appeals Process The University of Richmond has an appeal process for students and parents who believe individual circumstances warrant exceptions from published policy. All appeals must be in writing and directed to Annemarie Weitzel, Bursar, Box R, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173 or bursar@richmond.edu.

Jamie Olivas, SCS ‘99 Bachelor of Liberal Arts Graduate Student


University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies

TUITION, PAYMENTS & FEES TUITION PAYMENT OPTIONS

1. MasterCard, Visa or Discover Call phonecharge at (877) 237-9734 (There is a convenience fee for using this credit card service.) 2. Check payable to the University of Richmond. 3. Cash 4. AMS Payment Plan (see below) Full payment or AMS payment plan is due to the Student Accounts Office by the end of the first week of the term or you will be dropped from the class. Payment is due whether a bill is received or not. Please call 804 289-8149 if you have any questions regarding payment.

PAYMENT PLAN - AMS WHAT IS AMS? AMS (Academic Management Services) is an education financing company that provides families and students with a low cost plan for budgeting tuition and other education expenses. The Tuition Pay Monthly plan is NOT a loan program, therefore no debt is incurred. There is no interest or finance charge assessed by AMS on the unpaid balance due to the college. The only fee to budget payments through AMS is a $35.00 per semester non-refundable enrollment fee. Payments made through AMS are considerably less expensive than the cost of obtaining loans, paying with credit cards, or budgeting through other interest or fee-charging payment plans. There is no credit search or qualifications necessary to use AMS. One of the reasons why the cost to budget with AMS is so affordable is because payments through AMS are made by using automatic payments from your bank. The automatic payment helps you budget tuition payments in a convenient way which ensures that the college will receive dependable and consistent tuition payments. With AMS you never miss a payment and you save the time and expense of writing and mailing checks. HOW DOES THE AUTOMATIC PAYMENT WORK? Automatic payments are simply payments that you authorize your bank to make on your behalf on a specific date each month. The amount paid by your bank is a predetermined amount that you have authorized. Your bank will make these payments from either your checking or savings account, according to the instructions you have provided on your agreement with AMS. Payments will be made until the total amount due to the college is paid in full. Automatic payments are

PAYMENT IS DUE BY THE END OF THE FIRST WEEK OF THE SEMESTER. (THIS INCLUDES COURSES BEGINNING AT ANY TIME IN THE SEMESTER.)

TUITION/FEES FOR SPRING 2004 Tuition per credit hour - $262 (3 credit hour courses = $786) EXCEPTIONS: ŒADED 201U Portfolio Assessment ŒTeacher Licensure Courses TLP 3 credit courses TLP Education Internships & Seminars Student Teaching ŒTeacher Recertification Courses ŒGraduate Certificate Courses Application fee (Non Refundable) Disaster Graduate Certificate courses HRM Graduate Certificate courses ŒLate registration fee ŒLate payment fee ŒParking Permit (thru Summer ‘04)

(Non Refundable) Application fee of $100 Tuition per semester hour granted - $150 $262 per credit $364 per credit $2184 - total cost $165 per credit $50 $300 per credit $300 per credit $15 $30 $10

Auditing Fee: Cost to audit a course is the same as taking the course for credit. The University reserves the right to increase the Fees listed herein if conditions should make such changes necessary or advisable. The changes will be announced as far in advance as feasible.

used to pay mortgages, life insurance premiums, car payments, utilities, and other types of bills. When you use AMS to pay your school tuition, your bank sends your payment on the 5th of the month directly to the bank that AMS uses to collect tuition payments. Before any payment is made, AMS provides evidence of your authorization for tuition payments to your bank. Your bank will usually verify this authorization with you and then set up the payment schedule. It is important to remember that AMS and your college never see your bank account or have any direct access to your account. You never lose any control of your account. The automatic payment process is strictly controlled by state and federal laws. With AMS your payments are made on the 5th of each month. BUDGET PERIOD To qualify for the 3-month payment plan, AMS must receive student applications by August 10th for the fall semester or December 10th for the Spring semester. The budget period is August through October for the fall semester and January through March for the spring semester. The AMS payment plan is not available for courses offered during the summer semester.

HOW TO APPLY FOR AMS To enroll in the Tuition Pay Monthly plan simply go to their website at www.tuitionpay.com and click on “enroll now”. WHAT IF I HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT MY ACCOUNT? There is always an account representative who can answer questions about your AMS account once it has been established. You can call 1-800-556-6684 and speak to your account representative. You may also contact the Student Accounts Office at (804) 289-8149. CAN CHANGES BE MADE TO MY ACCOUNT? Yes: notify the Student Accounts Office at the University of changes resulting from additional Financial Aid, course additions, deletions, etc. Call (804) 289-8149. WHAT IF I HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT MY ACCOUNT? There is always an account representative who can answer questions about your AMS account, once it has been established. You can call 1-800-556-6684 and speak to your account representative. You may also contact the Student Accounts Office at (804) 289-8149.

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University of Richmond School of Continuing Studies

Spring 2004 SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES ACADEMIC CALENDAR (ALL DATES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

Spring Semester 2004 November 11-January 11..Registration for classes using the BannerWeb online system January 8 ............................. New Student Orientation, Tyler Haynes Commons January 12 .......................... Late registration fee in effect January 12, Monday .......... Classes begin January 16 .......................... Last day to ADD; PAYMENT IS DUE BY TODAY January 23 .......................... Last day to DROP; last day for No-Record withdrawal March 2 ............................... Summer ‘04 registration begins March 5 ............................... Begin Spring Break, after last class March 15 ............................ Classes resume April 24 ............................... Last day of spring classes April 26-May 1 .................. Spring Term Exams May 9 .................................. Commencement A complete listing is available online at www.richmond.edu - Click on Academic Calendar

CONFIDENTIALITY University of Richmond procedures and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-380) as amended, prohibit the unauthorized release of confidential information about individual students. However, directory information is not considered to be confidential and may be published or otherwise released. The University of Richmond has designated the following items as directory information: student name; permanent, campus, local (off-campus), email and campus computer network (IP) addresses, and associated telephone numbers; date and place of birth; major and/or minor fields of study; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height of members of athletic teams; dates of attendance; degrees and awards received; previous schools attended; and photographs. Further information on the University‘s policy is available on the Office of the University Registrar‘s web page at www.richmond.edu/academics/registrar/ferpa.html or by contacting the Office of the University Registrar. Students may opt to have their directory information withheld. To exercise this option, the appropriate form must be obtained from the Office the University Registrar, completed and returned to that office. Once filed this form remains in effect until withdrawn in writing by the student to the Office of the University Registrar. For further information, contact the Office of the University Registrar (phone: 804/289-8639, email: registrar@richmond.edu).

RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO EDUCATION RECORDS The Family Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1)

Students should submit to the University Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place the records may be inspected. 2)

Alternative Ways to Earn College Credit You may be eligible to earn additional college credits through portfolio assessment of prior learning. In order to submit a portfolio, a student must enroll in ADED 200 Experiential Learning and Portfolio Preparation, offered this fall. This course serves as an elective and provides students with the necessary information about how to evaluate their experiential learning, match the learning to a course and how to prepare a portfolio. Portfolios have been successfully submitted in leadership, journalism, English, speech and many other disciplines. These portfolios are available for examination in the SCS office. Students become eligible to submit portfolios after completing 12 credit hours at the University of Richmond. For more information, call the SCS at 289-8133 or contact the program coordinator, Jada Banks, at jbanks@richmond.edu.

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The right to request the amendment of education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University of Richmond to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University of Richmond decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

3)

The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University of Richmond has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

Tuition Fees Refund Withdrawal on or before the first day of class ................................................................................... 100% Withdrawal during the first week of classes ...................................................................................... 100% Withdrawal during second week of classes ........................................................................................ 70% Withdrawal during third week of classes ............................................................................................. 50% Withdrawal during the fourth week of classes ..................................................................................... 25% Withdrawal during the fifth week of classes ........................................................................................ 25% Withdrawal during the sixth week of classes ...................................................................................... 25% Withdrawal after the sixth week of classes ........................................................................................ None

The right to inspect and review their records within 45 days of the date the University receives a request for access.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfilled his or her professional responsibility. 4)

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Richmond to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605

The University of Richmond‘s complete FERPA Policy Statement is available as part of the Office of the University Registrar‘s Web page at www.richmond.edu/academics/registrar/ ferpa.html or by contacting the Office of the University Registrar.

New Students! Try our “Getting Started” link on the School of Continuing Studies website. Step-by-step instructions on how to register and decide on a program that meets your needs. Go to: http://oncampus.richmond.edu/ academics/scs/


NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION Learn about campus resources before class starts! Ellen Walk, Director of Information Systems Program (UR SCS) and Don Kellam, SCS Student

Thursday, January 8 • 6:00-7:30 p.m. Tyler Haynes Commons, Alice Haynes Room

If you are a new or current student who would like to know more about the resources on campus, attending the New Student Orientation will make it much easier to find your way on campus. Learn about UR resources and meet representatives from a number of offices and departments including the Libraries/Media Resources Center, Writing Center, Speech Center, Technology Center, Academic Skills Program and the SCS Student Government Association. You will also have the opportunity to register your vehicle and activate your email account. Refreshments will be served. To reserve your seat, call the School of Continuing Studies reservation line at 804-287-1204 or the office at 804-289-8133.

Prior to the first day of class, you need to activate your University of Richmond computer account, if you haven’t already done so. To activate your email account please go to https://wwws.richmond.edu/webpass, these instructions are repeated there along with a link to the account activation web page.  At the bottom of the first page is the link for Account Activation  At the next page please click on the “continue” button.

E-Mail Activation for SCS Students

 At the next page please fill in the requested information - your University ID (SSN) and your birth date and click the submit button. (At this time the system will verify you are an accepted student.)  You will then be asked to pick a password. There is a description of what makes a good password at http://oncampus.richmond.edu/is/account/pickpw.html. Please read this before deciding on your password. You must enter the same password in both spaces for it to register. Then click on the “continue” button. You will be returned to a page that will include your “netid” and your University of Richmond email address. (Please note: We use a secure server so your personal information will be encrypted before being sent over the Internet) At the end of the account activation process, you are given the option to have your University email forwarded to another e-mail address of your choice. If you have another address that you check often, please feel free to do that. All e-mail sent to your Richmond account will then be automatically forwarded. If you have problems with any of these processes, please contact the Help Desk at 804-2876400 or helpdesk@richmond.edu.

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Spring 2004 Schedule of Classes

University of Richmond

School of Continuing Studies

CRN SUBJ CRSE ACCOUNTING 23334 ACCT 300U ADULT EDUCATION 23309 ADED 200U

SEC

TITLE

HRS

DAY

BEGIN

END

BLDG

RM

INSTR

FEE

01

ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTANTS

3

W

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

JPSN

102

Bickford

$786

01

204

Banks

$786

24883 ADED 201U 24709 ADED 350U ANTHROPOLOGY 26539 ANTH 398U ART 26540 ART 208U

01 01

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING/PORTFOLIO PREP 3 S 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. SPB Departmental Approval Required. Special dates: Jan. 10, 17; Feb. 7, 21; Mar. 6, 20; Apr. 17, 2004. PORTFOLIO SUBMISSION/ASSESSMENT 0 TBA TRAINING DESIGN & FACILITATION 3 M 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. SPB

206

Staff Stroman

$100 $786

01

ST: RACE & ETHNICITY IN THE U.S.

K. Thompson $786

01

TECHNIQUES & AESTHTICS/PHOTOG 3 In Class Dates: Jan 17, 31; Feb 14, 28; Mar 20; Apr 3, 17 ART OF THE RENAISSANCE 3 PHILANTHROPY IN THE ARTS 3

26541

ART ART

315U 345U

01 01

ARTS 26542 ARTS 198U 01 ST:ART FOR NON-MAJORS BIOLOGY 25994 BIOL 301U 01 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS TEACHER LICENSURE COURSES (For admitted Teacher Licensure students only) 24752 EDUC 310U 01 CURRICULUM METHODS 24958 EDUC 310U 02 CURRICULUM METHODS 24753 EDUC 315U 01 INTRODUCTORY INTERNSHIP 24757 EDUC 317U 01 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR 26543 EDUC 317U 02 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR 24754 EDUC 324U 01 READING IN THE ELEM SCHOOL 25391 EDUC 324U 02 READING IN THE ELEM SCHOOL 24755 EDUC 330U 01 MIDTERM INTERNSHIP 24930 EDUC 332U 01 ELEMENTARY SEMINAR 24931 EDUC 334U 01 SECONDARY SEMINAR 25903 EDUC 338U 01 INSTRUC TECH INTEGRATION 25905 EDUC 338U 02 INSTRUC TECH INTEGRATION 25906 EDUC 338U 03 INSTRUC TECH INTEGRATION 25907 EDUC 350U 01 CONTENT AREA READING 24778 EDUC 358U 01 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 26130 EDUC 358U 02 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 26547 EDUC 358U 03 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 24758 EDUC 380U 01 GENERAL EDUCATION SEMINAR 26105 EDUC 380U 02 GENERAL EDUCATION SEMINAR 24920 EDUC 460U 01 STUDENT TEACHING TEACHER RECERTIFICATION 25390 EDUC 200U 01R FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 25908 EDUC 310U 03R CURRICULUM METHODS 26544 EDUC 320U 01R READING INSTRUCTION/CLSSRM APPLIC 26545 EDUC 337U 01R TECHNOLOGY IN TODAY’S CLASSROOM 25909 EDUC 345U 01R INSTRUCTIONAL STRAT/CO-TCH/INCLSN 26546 EDUC 347U 01R CHAR/STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 26549 EDUC 348U 01R EMERGENT READING INSTRUCTION 26017 EDUC 349U 01R LEGAL ASPECTS/STUD W/ DISABILITIES 25910 EDUC 350U 01R CONTENT AREA READING 25911 EDUC 358U 01R CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 26548 EDUC 358U 02R CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 26550 EDUC 398U 01R ST: PHONICS/PROPER PERSPECTIVE 26551 EDUC 398U 02R ST: SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS EMERGENCY SERVICES MANAGEMENT 26556 ESM 306U 01B LAW/ETHICS FOR EMERGENCY SRV MGR Online Course 26555 ESM 309U 01B SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF DISASTERS Online Course ESM 314U 01B DEFENDING COMMUNITIES Online Course ESM 317U 01B RISK, HAZARD, IMPACT ANALYSIS Online Course

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3

M

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

JPSN

101

S

9:00 a.m.

2:30 p.m.

JPSN

G20 J. Alley

T T

6:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

9:10 p.m. 8:40 p.m.

MRC 4 WEBB 202

Hanson Panoff

$786 $786

3

T

6:30 p.m.

9:10 p.m.

VAB

310

K. Lane

$786

3

R

6:30 p.m.

9:10 p.m.

RYLH

215

Maurakis

$786

3 3 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 6

M W TBA M T T R TBA M M M W R T T W R M M TBA

7:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. TBA 4:45 p.m. 4:45 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. TBA 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:45 p.m.

9:40 p.m. 7:10 p.m.

B2 B2

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 9:45 p.m.

NRCT NRCT TBA NRCT NRCT NRCT NRCT TBA NRCT NRCT JSPN JPSN JPSN NRCT NRCT NRCT NRCT NRCT NRCT

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

T W M M T W M S R T R S T

4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 11:40 a.m. 9:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 11:40 a.m. 7:10 p.m.

OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM OFFCAM

3

6:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

Winston Staff Moore 202 Stavredes 103 Stavredes B2 Paciocco B2 Paciocco Moore B2 Winston B2 Winston G22 Staff G22 Joyce G22 K. Brown 101 Massie 104 Beaty 104 Franson 104 Franson 103 Hite 103 Hite Moore

$786

$786 $786 $728 $728 $728 $786 $728 $728 $728 $728 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $728 $728 $2,184

Fisher Farwell Massie Cothern Parrott J. Brown Siebers Hulett Siebers Gilliam K. Decker Paciocco K. Decker

$495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495 $495

TBA

M. Decker

$786

3

TBA

Clements

$786

3

TBA

Staff

$786

3

TBA

Staff

$786


Spring 2004 Schedule of Classes

University of Richmond CRN

SUBJ ESM

CRSE 318U

SEC 01B

ESM

355U

01B

25413

ESM

495U

01B

26554

ESM

509U

01B

26091

ESM

595U

01B

TITLE WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION Online Course DECISION BY FACT Online Course HAZARDS/THREATS FOR THE FUTURE Online Course SOC DIMENSIONS OF DISASTERS Graduate-Level Online Course HAZARDS/THREATS FOR THE FUTURE Graduate-Level Online Course

School of Continuing Studies HRS 3

DAY TBA

3

BEGIN

END

BLDG

RM

INSTR Staff

FEE $786

TBA

Staff

$786

3

TBA

Green

$786

3

TBA

Clements

$900

3

TBA

Green

$900

ENGLISH 24765 ENGL 100U 01 THE RESEARCH PROCESS 1 T 5:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m. BLIB B26 Stevens/Schmitz $262 22167 ENGL 101U 01 COMPOSITION 3 T 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. PURH 110 Schmitz $786 24766 ENGL 100U 02 THE RESEARCH PROCESS 1 W 5:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m. BLIB B26 Campbell/Edmonds$262 23103 ENGL 101U 02 COMPOSITION 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. PURH 110 Edmonds $786 24771 ENGL 100U 03 THE RESEARCH PROCESS 1 R 5:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m. BLIB B26 Hocutt/Weimer $262 24273 ENGL 101U 03 COMPOSITION 3 R 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. PURH 110 Hocutt $786 25888 ENGL 112U 01 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. BUS 212 Hillgrove $786 25889 ENGL 112U 02 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS 3 R 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. BUS 212 Schmitz $786 ENGL 326U 01 SHAKESPEARE AND FILM I 3 R 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. THCX 102 Reilly $786 26553 ENGL 331U 01 TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN LIT 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN 101 Wright $786 26552 ENGL 340U 01 BLACK WOMEN WRITERS 3 T 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. THCX 102 Herweyer/Scott, E $786 GEOGRAPHY 26557 GEOG 201U 01 WORLD GEOGRAPHY 3 M 6:00 p.m. 8:40 p.m. RYLH 210 Freundt $786 HISTORY 26558 HIST 316U 01 THE NEW SOUTH 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. RYLH 213 Wray $786 26559 HIST 398U 01 ST: GREAT DISASTERS/IMPACT HIST US 3 T 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. RYLH 213 Wray/Alley, J $786 25921 HIST 398U 02 ST: THE GAELIC DIASPORA 3 R 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. MRC 1 Staff $786 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 22664 HRM 343U 01 HR/PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 3 S 8:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m. BUS 103 Kelley $786 In Class Dates: Jan 17, 24; Feb 7, 14, 28; Mar 20, 27, 2004 23946 HRM 348U 01 APPLICATIONS/CRITICAL HR ISSUES 3 R 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. WSTN 307 Tennent $786 23947 HRM 350U 01 TRAINING DESIGN & FACILITATION 3 M 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. SPB 206 Stroman $786 21307 HRM 352U 01 QUALITY MGT/PROCESS IMPROVEMENT 3 R 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. RYLH 213 Harsh $786 21760 HRM 354U 01 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS 3 W 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. BUS 120 Carey $786 24780 HRM 360U 01 HR IN AN IT WORLD 3 R 6:00 p.m. 8:40 p.m. JPSN G20 Witter/Shumate $786 26134 HRM 388U 01 INTERNSHIP 3 TBA $786 Departmental Approval Required 25299 HRM 398U 01 ST: APPLIED HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT 3 M 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. RYLH 215 Staff $786 24725 HRM 495U 01 CAPSTONE SEM IN HR 3 W 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. WSTN 307 Turpin $786 26122 HRM 533U 01 RESEARCH IN HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT 3 M 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. TBA Staff $900 Graduate-Level Course HUMANITIES 26561 HUM 212U 01 APPLIED ETHICS 3 T 6:00 p.m. 9:10 p.m. JPSN 231 Duffee $786 23949 HUM 310U 01 HUMANITIES II 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. THCX 102 Scott/Reilly/Koebler $786 26538 HUM 313U 01 CAREER AND LIFE DEVELOPMENT 3 T 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. PURH 203 Banks $786 26560 HUM 335U 01 ASPECTS OF SOUTHERN CULTURE 3 M 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. SPB 204 Edmonds $786 25932 HUM 345U 01B THE HISTORY OF IDEAS 6 F 6:30 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN 102 Roberts $1,572 Special Dates: Jan 16-Mar 5, 2004. WEEKEND COLLEGE students or special permission required. and S 9:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. JPSN 102 and T Online TBA INFORMATION SYSTEMS ISYS 101U 01B ONLINE LEARNING AND TEACHING 1 TBA TBA McGinnis $786 Online Class: Dates: Jan 12-Feb 12, 2004 22796 ISYS 201U 01B SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR COMM/RESRCH 3 T 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN G23 Matthews $786 Online Class: Optional lab help available between class meetings. In Class Dates: Jan 20; Feb 3, 17; Mar 2, 23; Apr 6, 20 22797 ISYS 202U 01B SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR DATA MGT/ANL 3 T 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN G23 Holley $786 Online Class: Optional lab help available between class meetings. In Class Dates: Jan 13, 27; Feb 10, 24; Mar 16, 30; Apr 13, 27 ISYS 203U 01B INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 TBA TBA Walk $786 Online Class. 23106 ISYS 203U 02 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN G23 Petrohovich $786 25368 ISYS 203U 03B INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 S 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. JPSN G21 O’Brien $786 Online Course. In Class Dates: Jan 17, 31; Feb 14, 28; Mar 6, 20; Apr 3, 17; May 1, 2004 page 7


Spring 2004 Schedule of Classes

University of Richmond CRN 24773 25370 23951 25301 25997 24825 25937 25939

SUBJ ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS

CRSE 204U 204U 205U 222U 302U 306U 308U 351U 353U 388U

SEC 01 02 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

ISYS 398U 01 ISYS 398U 02 ISYS 450U 01 INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 26563 ISTY 249U 01 PARALEGAL STUDIES 22819 LA 301U 01 24738 LA 302U 01 24971 LA 303U 01 23318 LA 304U 01 20024 LA 311U 01 22176 LA 312U 01 20026 LA 313U 01 20027 LA 315U 01 24739 LA 316U 01 21761 LA 321U 01 26564 LA 398U 01 26565 LA 24775 LA LAW 25311 LAW 25940 LAW 25941 LAW 26566 LAW LEADERSHIP 24248 LDSP 23338 LDSP 24382 LDSP 25312 LDSP MATH 20030 MATH 25956 MATH MANAGEMENT 20031 MGMT 25958 MGMT

School of Continuing Studies

TITLE HARDWARE & OPERATING SYSTEMS HARDWARE & OPERATING SYSTEMS INTRO/PROB-SOLVING W/PROGRAMMING DISCRETE STRUCTURES FOR COMPUTING LOCAL AREA NETWORK SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN MANAGING IN AN INFORMATION AGE WEB DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT WEB DESIGN/DEVELP ADV DATABASE INTERNSHIP IN INFO SYSTEMS Departmental Approval Required. ST: SQL DATABASE PROGRAMMING ST: FLASH FOR WEB DESIGN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

HRS 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

DAY S M S W S T W R T TBA

BEGIN 9:00 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

END 12:00 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

BLDG BUS BUS JPSN RYLH JPSN JPSN BUS JPSN JPSN

RM 211 211

FEE $786 $786 $1,048 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786

3 3 3

MW TR M

5:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

6:20 p.m. 6:20 p.m. 9:10 p.m.

JPSN JPSN JPSN

G23 Prior $786 G21 Hoerter $786 G21 Petrohovich $786

INT’L STUDIES/GLOBAL ECON

3

M

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

JPSN

108

Hiller

$786

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

T W M R W R T R M R S

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 8:30 a.m.

9:10 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 11:10 a.m.

BUS BUS BUS PURH WSTN WSTN PURH PURH WSTN PURH BUS

203 203 124 111 205 205 202 G12 205 G11 212

Taylor Taylor Turner McFarlane G. Foreman Cook McFarlane Champlin G. Foreman Herndon Turner

$786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786 $786

3 3

M T

7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

WSTN 209 JPSN 108

Champlin $786 G. Foreman $786

398U 495U

02 01

INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGALISM THE JUDICIAL SYSTEM LEGAL RESEARCH & LIBRARY USE LEGAL WRITING REAL ESTATE II DOMESTIC RELATIONS LITIGATION II TORTS CONTRACT LAW CRIMINAL LAW ST: ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH Prerequisite: LA 303U ST: TRIAL PRACTICE/TECH PARALEGAL STUDIES SR SEM

322U 398U 398U 398U

01 01 02 03

SURVEY OF PERSONNEL LAW ST: CYBERCRIMES ST: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ST: CONSUMER LAW

3 3 3 3

T T M T

7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:10 p.m.

BUS BUS JPSN PURH

120 211 102 G12

Schneider R. Campbell Geiger Leonard

$786 $786 $786 $786

200U 303U 305U 495U

01 01 01 01

INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP SKILLS FOR LEADING INDIVIDUALS LEADERSHIP IN A TIME OF CHANGE CAPST SEM:PHIL PROFESSIONAL LDSP

3 3 3 3

T W R M

6:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

8:40 p.m. 8:40 p.m. 9:10 p.m. 9:10 p.m.

WSTN BUS JPSN RYLH

221 102 102 205

Lemacks Cluverius Wriston Tucker

$786 $786 $786 $786

103U 104U

01 01

FINITE MATHEMATICS ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY & STATS

3 3

M-W T-R

5:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

6:40 p.m. 6:40 p.m.

JPSN JPSN

102 109

Dobbs Childers

$786 $786

341U 345U

01 01B

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3 M 6:30 p.m. 9:10 p.m. RYLH 213 Irvin $786 BUSINESS LITERACY 6 F 6:30 p.m. 8:40 p.m. JPSN 101 Mutchnick $1,572 Special Dates: Mar 19 - Apr 24. WEEKEND COLLEGE students or special permission required. Registration ends January 11. and S 9:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. JPSN 101 Mutchnick and T TBA Online

01 02

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 3

M W

6:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

9:10 p.m. 8:10 p.m.

BUS JPSN

203 109

P. Thompson $786 P. Thompson $786

01

ST: PHYSICS OF LIGHT & GRAVITY

3

T

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

RYLH

212

Waterman

01

VIRGINIA GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

3

F

6:00 p.m.

8:40 p.m.

JPSN

G23 Morgan

MARKETING 20032 MKT 321U 26567 MKT 321U PHYSICS 26014 PHYS 198U POLITICAL SCIENCE 23333 PLSC 207U

Visit the School of Continuing Studies website for information at: www.richmond.edu Click on Continuing Studies page 8

INSTR Davis Davis G24-A Dertinger 212 Steely G23 Dalton 109 Ashford 101 Bowling G21 Hoerter G21 Hoerter Bowling

$786 $786


Spring 2004 Schedule of Classes

University of Richmond

School of Continuing Studies

CRN SUBJ CRSE PSYCHOLOGY 25959 PSYC 101U 25960 PSYC 190U RETAIL MANAGEMENT 26568 RTMT 320U SOCIAL ANALYSIS 25964 SA 300U

SEC

TITLE

HRS

DAY

BEGIN

END

BLDG

RM

INSTR

FEE

01 01

INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

3 3

M W

7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

PURH PURH

202 202

Angster Coulbourn

$786 $786

01

RELATIONSHIP MARKETING

3

R

6:30 p.m.

9:10 p.m.

WSTN 204

Heaney

$786

01

9:00 a.m.

2:30 p.m.

RYLH

Freundt

$786

26047

SA

301U

01

CURRENT DOMESTIC & INTL ISSUES 3 S Special Dates: Jan 17, 31; Feb. 14, 28; Mar 20; Apr. 3, 17, 2004. SOCIAL ANALYSIS I 3 T

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

Thompson/

$786

26569

SA

310U

01B

JPSN 102 McLaughlin THE EXAMINED LIFE 6 F 6:30 p.m. 9:40 p.m. JPSN 109 Special Dates: Jan 16-Mar 5, 2004. WEEKEND COLLEGE students or special permission required. and S 9:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. JPSN 109 and T TBA Online

Angster

$1,572

DEVIANCE SOCIAL PROBLEMS

3 3

T R

6:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

8:40 p.m. 8:40 p.m.

SPB SPB

204 204

Moorefield Moorefield

$786 $786

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION GROUP COMMUNICATION BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL SPEECH

3 3 3

M T R

7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

JPSN JPSN JPSN

103 103 120

Helms Helms Helms

$786 $786 $786

EXPORT/IMPORT MANAGEMENT 3 W 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. Online Class. In-class dates: Jan. 14, 28; Feb. 11, 25; Mar. 17, 31; Apr. 14, 28, 2004.

JPSN

108

Selby

$786

WOMEN IN TV:REPR/IMAGES/STEREOTYPES

MRC

4

Alley, R

$786

SOCIOLOGY 20034 SOC 305U 01 26570 SOC 309U 01 SPEECH COMMUNICATION 20093 SPCH 105U 01 26048 SPCH 206U 01 24317 SPCH 222U 01 TRANSPORTATION 26571 TRAN 358U 01B WOMEN’S STUDIES 25986 WMST 303U

01

3

M

7:00 p.m.

9:40 p.m.

212

ONLINE COURSES

WEEKEND COLLEGE

Online courses ISYS 201 or ISYS 202 may be taken concurrently with ISYS 203. Internet access required.

WEEKEND COLLEGE students or special permission required.

ESM ESM ESM ESM ESM ESM ESM ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS TRAN

306U 309U 314U 317U 318U 355U 495U 101U 201U 202U 203U 358U

01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 01B 03B 01B

LAW/ETHICS FOR EMRGNCY SRV MGR SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF DISASTERS DEFENDING COMMUNITIES RISK, HAZARD, IMPACT ANALYSIS WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION DECISION BY FACT HAZARDS/THREATS FOR THE FUTURE ONLINE LEARNING AND TEACHING SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR COMM/RESEARCH SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR DATA MGT/ANL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EXPORT/IMPORT MANAGEMENT

25932 25958 26569

HUM 345U MGMT 345U SA 310U

01B 01B 01B

THE HISTORY OF IDEAS BUSINESS LITERACY THE EXAMINED LIFE

REFER TO PAGES 6-9 FOR DETAILS ON THESE COURSES.

Graduate-Level Online Courses: ESM 509U 01B SOC DIMENSIONS OF DISASTERS ESM 595U 01B HAZARDS/THREATS FOR THE FUTURE

Note: Dates, times and room assignments are subject to change. Please review your schedule on BannerWeb before classes begin.

BUILDING ABBREVIATIONS BKR BUS JPSN LAW BLIB MRC

Building Name ........................ Bldg#

Building Name ........................ Bldg#

Booker Hall of Music ................ 38 Business School ....................... 1 Jepson Hall ............................. 17 Law School ............................ 19 Boatwright Library .................... 5 Media Resource Center 5

Millhiser Gym ............................. 16 North Court ............................... 40 Puryear Hall .............................. 3c Poli. Science Bldg ......................... 8 Richmond Hall ............................ 3b Robins Center ........................... 23

MILH NRCT PURH PS RCHM ROBC

Building Name ........................ Bldg# RYLH SCI SPB THCX VAB WSTN

Ryland Hall .................................. 2 Gottwald Science Ctr 35 Special Programs Bldg 31 Theatre Complex ....................... 38 Visual Arts Bldg ......................... 43 Weinstein Hall ............................ 8

page 9


Course Descriptions ACCOUNTING (ACCT) 300U Accounting for Non-Accountants. Analytical and interpretative approach to study of basic accounting. User’s approach rather than preparer’s approach used, emphasizing effects of transactions on financial statements; interrelationships among financial statements; and interpretation and use of financial statement information. Emphasizes underlying objective of accounting: to assist in making business and economic decisions. 3 sem. hrs. ADULT EDUCATION (ADED) 200U Experiential Learning and Portfolio Preparation. Exploration of experiential learning, portfolio assessment and other alternative methods of earning college credit. Helps students gain confidence in critical thinking, organizing, and writing and a clearer sense of educational goals. In preparation for submitting a portfolio, demonstrates how to identify and assess learning that has occurred outside of the classroom, develop a narrative, and document their learning. This class is required for students planning to request credit by portfolio assessment. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 sem. hrs. completed in the School of Continuing Studies. 3 sem. hrs. 201U Portfolio Submission/Assessment. For students who wish to seek credit for prior learning through the Portfolio program. Prerequisite: Adult Education 200U. Requires $100.00 nonrefundable portfolio review fee. 0 sem. hrs. 350U Training Design and Facilitation. (See HRM 350U) 3 sem. hrs. ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) ANTH 398U ST: Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. Students will explore the concepts of race and ethnicity: how their meanings have evolved, what they mean today, and their place in modern discourse; how concepts of race, class, and ethnicity intersect. 3 sem. hrs. ART (ART) 208U Techniques and Aesthetics of Photography. Hands-on explanation of technical process involved with black and white photography from exposure to finished print with detailed instruction of processing and printing, classroom critique of students’ and other professional work, and introduction to different types of photography. Students encouraged to express desires, emotions, and intentions visually through photographic medium. 3 sem. hrs. 315U Art of the Renaissance. Italian and Northern Renaissance Art. 3 sem. hrs. 345U Philanthropy in the Arts. Survey of strategies, tools and techniques involved in generating contributed income for arts organizations from private individuals, foundations, corporations, businesses and government agencies. Central issues addressed include the underlying psychological and practical bases of fundraising in the arts and exposure to the research methods involved in developing donor prospects. Students will learn a variety of techniques for soliciting contributions, including direct mail, telemarketing, grant writing, personal appeals, major gift solicitations, special events, capital campaigns, endowment campaigns, sponsorships and planning. Prerequisite: MUS 310U or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. STUDIO ART (ARTS) 198U ST: Art for Non-Majors. This course will introduce students to the study of two dimensional design, three dimensional design, and drawing. 3 sem. hrs. BIOLOGY 301U Environmental Ethics. Examination of complexities of environmental relationships and issues including scientific knowledge, economic, political, social, and moral values within the U.S. and between countries of the world. Will explore alternative solutions to environmental problems from multiple perspectives through various value/moral systems. 3 sem. hrs.

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EDUCATION (EDUC) Teacher Licensure/Recert. Courses 200U Foundations of Education. Social and philosophical foundations of education from historical and contemporary perspectives; overview of roles and responsibilities of teachers and schools of present and future. Meets the criteria for a licensure class and is provided for current K-12 teachers and teacher with expired teaching licenses to renew their Virginia Teaching License. 3 sem. hrs. 310U Curriculum Methods. Comprehensive introduction to pedagogy to include principles of learning; application of skills in discipline and grade-specific methodology; selection and use of materials; Virginia SOLs and national curriculum standards; and evaluation of student performance. 3 sem. hrs. 315U Introductory Internship. Involves extended observation experiences of teachers and students in the classroom. (Graded pass/fail). 2 sem. hrs. 317U Introductory Seminar. Series of forums for discussion and examination of critical issues related to teaching profession. Topics include Orientation to the Profession; Microteaching (using the Speech Center); Child Development; Teaching Diverse Learners; Legal Issues in Education; and Special Education. 2 sem. hrs. 320U Reading Instruction and Classroom Applications. Focus on practical teaching strategies that will accelerate a student’s progress in reading. Phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension will be emphasized with the teacher using, in part, his/her own curricular materials to develop lessons that can be used in the classroom the next day. Needs of the reader will be explored with a comprehensive review of skills needed as student moves from primary grades to upper grades and how instruction changes to meet needs of a diverse student population. 3 sem hrs. 324U Reading in the Elementary School. In-depth examination of developmental nature of language and reading ability and its link to literacy development. Study of methods and materials associated with reading instruction. 3 sem. hrs. 330U Midterm Internship. Involves practical experience in interacting with teachers and students in the classroom. (Graded pass/fail.) 2 sem. hrs. 332U Elementary Seminar. Series of forums for discussion and examination of critical issues related to the teaching and learning of elementary mathematics, science, social studies and language arts. 2 sem. hrs. 334U Secondary Seminar. Series of forums for discussion and examination of critical issues related to the teaching and learning of secondary English, social studies, mathematics, science, foreign languages, or computer science. 2 sem. hrs. 337U Technology in Today’s Classroom. Focuses on appropriate integration into K-12 curriculum. Project-based learning and class activities will focus on utilization of various technologies to positively affect teaching and learning. Participants will produce numerous items including SOL-focused lesson plans for use in their own classrooms. Topics will include evaluating web resources, creating web pages and Webquests, using various online resources including Blackboard and Beyond Books, using digital cameras, scanned images, and digital authoring software, and research and defining best practices in technology integration. 3 sem. hrs. 338U Instructional Technology Integration. Theory and pedagogy of integrating common and practical instructional technologies within the teaching and learning environment and across the curriculum. Includes current practice, skill building and exploration of resources to better prepare educators to fully understand the potential, the consequences and future uses of instructional technology to address the needs of all learners. Pre- or Corequisite: EDUC 310U, Curriculum Methods. 3 sem. hrs. 345U Instructional Strategies for Co-Teaching and Inclusion. Will include material on resources and knowledge needed to work with teachers in inclusive settings. Objectives include developing knowledge base for teaching exceptionalities in inclusive classrooms and describing different techniques for modifying instruction and assignments for all grade levels (K-12). In addition, will attempt to cover areas of assessment, grade reporting, and support services. Meets the criteria for a licensure class and is provided for current K-12 teachers and teachers with expired teaching licenses to renew their Virginia Teaching License. 3 sem hrs.

347U Characteristics of Students with Disabilities. Focuses on nature and educational implications of serving students with disabilities. Participants will study various categories of disabilities covered under the federal law, the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Emphasis will be on providing participants skills necessary to understand eligibility criteria for special education and related services, function as members of eligibility committees, and compose the implement effective Individualized Education Programs (IEP’s) for students with special needs in grades K-12. In addition, will address interaction of the IDEA, Virginia state regulations, and local policy and procedure. 3 sem. hrs. 348U Emergent Reading Instruction. This course is designed for teachers who want to learn how best to nurture the emerging reading and writing abilities of young learners, and how crucial early intervention of at-risk readers is for children who demonstrate need. The course looks at the developmental process and assessment of early reading and writing in children, examining the phonics vs. whole language debate, discussion of the best educational practices for teachers of beginning readers and writers, intervention techniques for children who need more support, and what research says about the developmental nature of reading and writing. Meets the criteria for a licensure class for current K-12 teachers and teachers with expired Virginia teaching licenses. 3 sem. hrs. 349U Legal Aspects of Students with Disabilities. Focus on legal aspects of special education at national and state levels. Classroom teachers will be exposed to theory and application of regulatory requirements associated with the identification, education and evaluation of students with disabilities. 3 sem. hrs. 350U Content Area Reading. Reading and critical thinking in secondary school content areas. Specific strategies are explored that enhance comprehension, concept development, and vocabulary knowledge. Effects of text organization and relationship between reading and writing are examined for all content areas. 3 sem. hrs. 358U Classroom Management. Behavioral principles and procedures for reducing classroom problems, increasing motivation, and strengthening desired classroom behavior. 3 sem. hrs. 380U General Education Seminar. Series of forums for discussion and examination of critical issues related to teaching and learning. Topics may include: Using Cooperative Learning in the Classroom; Promoting Higher-Level Thinking; Alternative Assessment; Working with ESL Students; Working with Gifted and Talented Children; Learning Styles; IEP Planning; Multiculturalism; Writing Across the Curriculum; Advanced Technology; and Standardized Testing. 2 sem. hrs. 398 ST: Phonics in Proper Prospective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to examine the most current theories and instructional strategies of teaching phonics. Emphasis will be on relationships between letters, sounds, spelling, reading, writing, and speech. The role of the teacher in formulating strategies of phonics instruction will be explored. This course meets the criteria for a re-licensure class and is provided for current K-5 teachers and teachers with expired teaching licenses to renew their Virginia Teaching License. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Science Instructional Methods. Theories, research, methods, and materials relevant to teaching elementary science will be introduced. Students will work cooperatively with instructor and peers to discuss science and science teaching. Existing knowledge of science content will be strengthened through hands-on investigations, reading, writing, and communicating. Strategies to help the learner become scientifically literate, think critically and creatively, and see relationships among science, technology and society will be developed. A repertoire of effective science instructional methods will be built. 3 sem. hrs. 460U Student Teaching. Involves working directly with students in classroom on full-time basis under direction of cooperating teacher and University supervisor; student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities. Graded pass/fail; however, a comprehensive evaluation is completed for each student teacher. Prerequisites: Cumulative grade point average of at least 2.70 and formal application to student teach must be submitted to Field Placement Director. 6 sem. hrs.


Course Descriptions EMERGENCY SERVICES MANAGEMENT (ESM) 306U Law and Ethics for the Emergency Services Manager. Current legal principles and ethical issues which impact emergency services, including both provision of care and services and management of service. 3 sem. hrs. 309U/509U Social Dimensions of Disaster. Examines how populations respond to disasters including such areas as response to warnings, evacuation reactions, and looting. Suggests strategies for management of formal and emergent organizations and disaster stressors on individuals, organizations, and groups. Discusses development of effective programs for management of community change to increase disaster resistance. 3 sem. hrs. 314U Defending Communities – Integrating Mitigation, Preparedness and Recovery. The integration of mitigation, preparedness and recovery activities is critical to protecting communities from disaster impacts. Addresses value of each phase of emergency management and discusses strategies for effective plans and linkages in building community disaster resistance. 3 sem. hrs. 317U Risk, Hazard and Impact Analysis. Identification of the impacts of disaster events is critical to understanding how an organization can survive the impact and continue to operate. Examines the business impact analysis process, how to manage it, and how to use the analysis as the first step in continuity plan development. 3 sem. hrs. 318U Weapons of Mass Destruction. Nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons offer both terrorists and rogue states a powerful selection of tools to swing the correlation of forces in their direction. Understanding range and characteristics of these weapons, how they are most effectively employed, and potential impacts are critical to defending communities against them. Provides detailed look at history, capabilities, and tactics and explores options available to both attacker and defender. 3 sem. hrs. 355U Management by Fact. When faced with a critical decision how do you separate fact from fantasy, determine what is relevant to your problem, and decide when you have enough information to make a choice? Examines the critical analysis of information and its use as the basis for administrative and operational decision making. 3 sem. hrs. 495U/595U Hazards and Threats for the Future. Examines the future of disasters and their management in the context of longterm political, environmental, technological, economic and social change. Identifies current methods for futures analysis and provides a framework for developing tools and resources to design future missions and strategies for professionals in both emergency management and business continuity and their organizations. Develops an understanding of the relationships of vision to the future and relates that to the department of programs to protect lives, property and the environment at any level. Prerequisite: For undergraduates, completion of required core and focus courses. 3 sem. hrs. ENGLISH (ENGL) Note: To promote academic success in all courses through writing proficiency, a passing grade of C or better is required for ENGL 100U/101U and ENGL 112U. 100U The Research Process. Introduction to modern on-line library skills and research techniques needed for a successful academic experience. Includes work with online library catalogs, indexes, and Internet research, and requires a directed research paper. Corequisite: English 101U. 1 sem. hr. 101U Composition. Elements of composition, grammar, rhetorical strategy, and reading. Particular emphasis on actual practice in writing, with one documented research paper. Corequisite: English 100U. 3 sem. hrs. 112U Professional Communication. Communication for professional world, with emphasis on memorandum, report, and business letter. Prerequisites: English 100U and 101U. 3 sem. hrs. 326U Shakespeare and Film I. Students will read Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream and analyze alternative film versions of the plays. 3 sem. hrs. 331U Twentieth-Century American Literature. Development of literary form and thought from American experience. 3 sem. hrs.

340U Black Women Writers. Exploration of literary careers of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker and Toni Morrison. 3 sem. hrs. GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) 201U World Geography. Study of world by regions, with emphasis on cultural differences among nations. 3 sem. hrs. HISTORY (HIST) 316U The New South. Growth of New South from Reconstruction to present. Examines life in South under Reconstruction, economic, social, and political developments that created New South. Race relations, Jim Crow laws, segregation, civil rights and integration examined historically as well as the changing role of women. Works of Southern writers examined as sources of norms and values and as agents for changing them. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S. Periodically, over the past century and a half, the United States has been struck by a variety of terrible disaster. Some have been the result of forces of nature; some the work of enemies of the United States; some in part the result of our own action or inaction. Selected disasters and how they were presented to the nation through media, art, literature, and government action and their impact on the nation will be examined. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: The Gaelic Diaspora. Broad view of the history of Diaspora of Celtic Ireland and Scotland, from collapse of Gaelic civilization in Scotland and Ireland through emigration to North America to assimilation to whiteness. 3 sem hrs. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (HRM) 343U HR/Personnel Management. Survey of traditional human resources functions and their relation to effective personnel and organizational results. Examines recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, collective bargaining, labor relations, training, human resource and management development, salary administration, and promotions and their relationship to communication, motivation, and leadership in organization. 3 sem. hrs. 348U Application of Critical Human Resource Issues. Study of current critical human resource issues in today’s business with focus on how to comply with legal requirements and how to apply best practices toward implementation of real-world solutions. Students’ actual needs are considered as class explores role of HR in issues such as mergers and acquisitions, today’s unions, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issues, The Family Medical Leave Act, performance management, diversity, harassment, and more. Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 343U or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 350U Training Design and Facilitation. Design, implementation, and evaluation of adult training programs, with emphasis on increasing individual and organizational effectiveness. Includes adult learning theory, presentation methods, and techniques to measure trainer’s effectiveness. 3 sem. hrs. (Same as ADED 350U) 352U Quality Management and Process Improvement. History and origin of quality movement explored, along with basic tools and hands-on techniques necessary for successful quality and process improvement. 3 sem. hrs. 354U Compensation and Benefits. Provides thorough grounding in theory and working knowledge of employment compensation and benefits. 3 sem. hrs. 360U HR in an IT World. Overview of integration of human resource management with information technology. Provides insight and hands-on experience in evaluation, design, and implementation of use of automation with major functional areas of HR. Additionally, exploration of various resources such as software, platforms, intranet, and Internet will be included. Will use a practical versus theoretical approach. Prerequisite: HRM 343U. 3 sem. hrs.

388U Internship. Applied experience in Human Resource Management in an organizational setting for students enrolled in the HRM certificate program of the AAS/BAS degree programs. Working closely with an assigned faculty member and a site supervisor, student will be assigned projects or duties that are outside of his or her normal job. Intent is to offer the student opportunities to gain new knowledge or skills in the field of HRM. Students may receive credit for only one (1) internship while enrolled in the School of Continuing Studies. At the discretion of the student, this course may be credited as a focus course or as an elective. Prerequisite: Student must have completed the HRM Core Courses (12 credits) prior to being considered for this course. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Applied Human Resource Management. This course is designed as a review and preparation for the Professional in Human Resources Management (PHR) certification test and will cover the same body of knowledge. Topics include a review of: management practices; general employment practices; staffing; human resource development; compensation and benefits; employee and labor relations; and health, safety and security. This course is recommended for those students who have already completed the core HRM courses or who have HRM work experience. 3 sem. hrs. 495U Capstone Seminar in Human Resource Mgmt. (PHR Review Course) Designed as a review and preparation for the Professional in Human Resource Management (PHR) certification exam and will cover the test specifications set forth by the Human Resource Certification Institute. Topics include review of strategic management, workforce planning and employment, human resource development, compensation and benefits, employee and labor relations and health, safety, and security. Prerequisites: HRM 343U and all required HRM focus courses, or, a minimum of 2 years HRM work experience. HRM 495U can be taken as a co-prerequisite with any of the required focus courses. 3 sem. hrs. 533U Research in Human Resource Management. Human Resource professionals must be able to gather appropriate data, analyze it, and present it to line managers in a convincing way if they are to be strategic partners in the organization. This course includes an overview of the design, delivery, and analysis of employee and client satisfaction surveys; use of market analysis and benchmarking data; and understanding the statistical profile of the workforce. 3 sem. hrs. HUMANITIES (HUM) 212U Applied Ethics. Study of ethics and ethical decision making in professional world. Examination of current ethical issues such as privacy and information systems, workplace ethics, responsible journalism, and trends in corporate and governmental ethics. Particular emphasis on how individual decision making can have broad ethical consequences, both positive and negative. 3 sem. hrs. 310U Survey of the Western Traditions in the Humanities I-II. Interdisciplinary course designed to introduce student to panorama of Western civilization. Literature, art, music and history combined to present “Man’s great adventure” from Stone Age to Jet Age. (Must be taken in sequence.) Prerequisites: ENGL 100U and 101U. 3-3 sem. hrs. 313U Career and Life Development. Exploration of adult development and career topics to help students better understand how to successfully plan their lives. Focuses on stages of adulthood and transitions, skills assessments, career management strategies, lifebalance, and goal setting. 3 sem. hrs. 335U Aspects of Southern Culture. Focus on exploring various perspectives on Southern society, its development, social strata, and ethnic groups through the study of literature, food, art, architecture, and music. Prerequisite: ENGL 101U. 3 sem. hrs. 345U The History of Ideas. Exploring the intellectual development within the western tradition. Required for accelerated BLA. Limited space available for non-Weekend College students. 6 sem. hrs.

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Course Descriptions INFORMATION SYSTEMS (ISYS) 101U Online Learning and Teaching. Intensive short course that explains in depth the software and technology used in the university’s online courses. Discusses how changes in learning methods and styles relate to changes in the way we work, addresses intellectual property issues, and examines the future of online learning. Strongly recommended for students with no previous online course experience. 1 sem. hr. 201U Software Tools for Communication and Research. Helps develop oral and written communication skills, using technology tools commonly required in the classroom and workplace. Use e-mail and online conferencing software for classroom communications. Comprehensive coverage of Microsoft Word and Power Point for writing papers and developing presentations. Use Internet browsers, search engines, and online library databases for research. Build simple Web sites presenting information in an accessible format. Computer assignments required. 3 sem. hrs. 202U Software Tools for Data Management and Analysis. For experienced personal computer users. Helps develop skills in data organization, analysis, and reporting, using spreadsheet and database software. Use Microsoft Excel to format data, use calculations and functions, perform basic statistics, and produce customized graphs and charts for reports. Use Microsoft Access to build multi-table databases with input forms, queries, and reports. Prerequisite: ISYS 201 or equivalent proficiency is recommended. Computer assignments required. 3 sem. hrs. 203U Information Technology. Studies use of information technology in organizations to facilitate decision-making and achieve competitive advantage. Overview of computer hardware, operating systems, application software, networks, and combinations of these components into common computer “architectures.” Technological trends will be covered, impacting business and personal purchasing decisions. Communicate clear user requirements for development and enhancement of effective information systems. Computer assignments required. 3 sem. hrs 204U Hardware and Operating Systems. Study of computer systems hardware and operating systems. Includes overview of digital logic, basics of large-scale and very large-scale integration, and components necessary to create a functioning computer. Operating systems reviewed from primitive functions and inter-process communications through basic program loading, task control, and input/output operations. Computer assignments required. Prerequisites: ISYS 203U, MATH 103U or equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 205U Problem Solving with Programming. Computer programming concepts applicable to any programming language. Development of analytical and problem-solving skills for programming. Includes top-down design and building blocks of structured programming. Introduces the Java programming language and object-oriented concepts. Lecture, lab, and online assignments. 4 sem. hrs. 222U Discrete Structures for Computing. Helps develop abstract reasoning skills for computer programming. Sets, functions, elementary prepositional and predicate logic, Boolean algebra, elementary graph theory, matrices, proof techniques, random numbers, with applications to computing. Strong algebra background recommended. Prerequisite: college algebra or satisfactory score on the math placement test. 3 sem. hrs. 302U Local Area Networks. Concepts of shared media local area networking including Ethernet, Token Ring, and Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI). Topics include LAN definition, use, topology, media, standards, network interface cards (NIC), protocols (layer 2, 3, 4), repeaters, hubs, bridges, switches, and routers. Discussions include network design, design rules, administration, management and TCP/IP. Students present research projects on various networking topics. (Internet access required for current technology research.) Prerequisite: Information Systems 204U. 3 sem. hrs.

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306U Systems Analysis and Design. Methods and techniques necessary for conducting systems project from preliminary investigation of project through system implementation and evaluation. Includes participation in one or more systems design projects. Prerequisites: Information Systems 203U. 3 sem. hrs. 308U Managing in an Information Age. Capstone course. Indepth look at how organizations are coping with challenges of managing in an information age, using the case study method. Management issues related to the Internet, electronic commerce, information for competitive advantage, designing and managing IT architecture, and approaches to IT implementation. Prerequisite: All business and all other Information Systems courses required in the major. Departmental permission. 3 sem. hrs. 351U Web Design and Development. Focus on planning and development of Web sites using proper design techniques, with design elements such as page layouts, graphics, color, lists, tables, frames, formatting, links, simple CSS styles, templates, and basic forms. Topics include graphics techniques and editing modification of digital pictures. HTML coding, Dreamweaver MX, and Java applets will be used to develop a website. Prerequisites: ISYS 201U or 202U, or equivalent proficiency. 3 sem. hrs. 353U Web Design and Development with Advanced Database Connectivity. Program client/server Web-based database applications for e-commerce and other uses with VBScript, JavaScript and SQL. Topics include advanced database connection concepts using ASP to view, add, delete, query and edit database records from a Web site. Pass values with cookies, hidden form fields, query strings, and session variables. Dreamweaver MX, Microsoft FrontPage and Access are used; Oracle database connectivity will be discussed. Prerequisites: ISYS 203U, ISYS 311U, and ISYS 352U, or equivalent preparation in both web design and database. 3 sem. hrs. Note: ISYS courses numbered 355U and higher require completion of all math requirements for the major, as well as all business and ISYS core courses in the major. 388U Internship in Information Systems: Applied Experiences in Information Systems in a Company Setting. For ISYS majors or minors; must have 12 credit hours completed in Information Systems course at ISYS 202U or higher, including at least six credits in 300-level ISYS courses; GPA 3.0 in Information Systems major, 2.75 overall. Students may receive credit for only one internship while enrolled in the School of Continuing Studies. Departmental permission required. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: SQL Database Programming. Structured Query Language programming in an Oracle environment. Create unique tables; perform selects, inserts, updates and deletes. Use current reporting tools for extracting data and creating reports from Oracle tables. Use Oracle functions and program using PL/SQL. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Flash for Web Design. Use Flash MX to create highimpact, vector-based animation and interactivity for web sites. Work with graphics, layers and frames for artwork and animation. Use sound and video, ActionScript commands for interactivity, and control communication flow with text boxes and other methods. Optimize file sizes and site performance. 3 sem. hrs. 450U Project Management. Practical and theoretical foundation for IT project management. Concepts and techniques for evaluating project proposals as well as managing technical and behavioral aspects of systems development projects. Project planning and estimation, scheduling, staffing and teamwork, costing and budgeting, managing change. Use of computerized tools (Microsoft Project and Excel) for project management, resource tracking, and reporting. Prerequisite: ISYS 306U. 3 sem. hrs. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (ISTY) 249U International Studies/Global Economics. Introduces student to world of international studies and global economics. Covers such factors as U.S. and foreign trade policies, sociocultural factors, international marketing, and impact of international trade on domestic economy. 3 sem. hrs.

LAW (LAW) 322U Survey of Personnel Law. Survey of federal and state statutes and laws which govern the employment relationship. Covers topics such as establishing the employment relationship, discharge of employees, employee discrim-ination, wages, hours, and benefits, conditions of employment, occupational safety and health, and other topics. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Cybercrimes. Computers can be used in virtually any type of criminal activity including cyber-stalking, child exploitation, Internet fraud, identity theft, infrastructure security breaches and terrorism. This course provides an overview of cybercrimes, computer-related crime, computer security, and law enforcement’s response to cybercrimes. The course will also include a study of the evolving aspects of cyber laws including search and seizure of digital evidence and the enactment of post-September 11 laws and policies. (This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies or Information Systems majors.) 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Intellectual Property. Intellectual property is what it sounds like the end result of our mind’s work. In order to foster a society in which inventors will invent, and writers will write, we have developed various systems to define and protect intellectual property. This course will focus on building an understanding of trademarks, copyrights, patents and trade secrets. Specifically, how do you get them, and how do you keep them? (This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies majors.) 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Consumer Law. An overview of consumer protection, privacy and credit and banking laws. Special focus on Internet/ E-commerce issues and the elderly, disabled and military as the “special classes of consumers.” (This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies majors.) 3 sem. hrs LEADERSHIP STUDIES (LDSP) 200U Introduction to Leadership Studies. Introduction to history and theory of leadership, to critical thinking and methods of inquiry as they bear on subject of leadership, to ethics of leadership, to basic leadership competencies, to relevant leadership contexts, and to leading groups and individuals. 3 sem. hrs. 303U Skills for Leading Individuals. Applied course designed to assist students in making transition from theory to application. Focus on what a leader does when leading individuals in the work environment. Emphasis on leader/employee interactions and effective leader behavior in that interaction. 3 sem. hrs. 305U Leadership in a Time of Change. Focuses on leaders as change agents as they initiate change, guide those who are affected by change, and use change to attain personal and corporate goals, strategies, systems, standards, and values. Will analyze planned change process and identify change strategies and tactics. Will identify techniques used by leaders to help their organizations manage change. Course is intended to be a learning laboratory in change. 3 sem. hrs. 495U Philosophy of Professional Leadership. Integrating seminar giving students opportunity to explore various philosophical/ applied leadership orientations, select one, and then integrate previous coursework taken in that orientation. Affords opportunity to integrate current theory and practice with own leadership approach while also expanding knowledge through a thorough examination of selected leadership topics. Offers a reevaluation and recon-ceptualization of areas of interest and concern. Prerequisites: All Leadership Core Courses, and required Focus Courses. LDSP 495U may be taken concurrently with any Focus Course. 3 sem. hrs. LEGAL ASSISTANT (LA)/PARALEGAL STUDIES 301U Introduction to Paralegalism. Orientation and introduction to corporations, estate planning and administration of decedents’ estates, real property, domestic relations, criminal law, and role of paralegal. 3 sem. hrs. 302U The Judicial System. Structure and meaning of courts and their jurisdiction, procedure, and appeal; history and introduction to judicial process. 3 sem. hrs. 303U Legal Research and Library Use. Law libraries and basic legal research methods; where and how to gather information. 3 sem. hrs.


Course Descriptions 304U Legal Writing. Legal terminology and writing styles, development of analytical skills, exercises in legal composition and drafting. 3 sem. hrs. 311U Real Estate. Land and its elements; law of fixtures; types of easements and how they are created; acquisition of title and other interest in real estate property by deed, will, inheritance and adverse possession; co-ownership and marital rights; the legal and practical matters of real estate contracts for residential, commercial and construction transactions; plats of survey and legal descriptions; form and substance of deeds; recording priorities; title examination and title insurance; mortgage financing for residential, commercial and construction closings; the secondary mortgage market; foreclosure, settlements and actual closing exercises; condominium; property law with other areas of law, such as domestic relations, corporate, partnership, limited liability company, tax, will and estates, equity remedies, litigation, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: Legal Assistant 310U is prerequisite to 311U. NOTE: Both courses must be completed to count in the “Focus Courses” requirement for certificate, associate or bachelor degree. 3 sem. hrs. 312U Domestic Relations. Domestic problems requiring legal assistance: marriage, divorce, separation agreements, child custody, and financial obligations; ramifications of legal action. 3 sem. hrs. 313U Evidence. In-depth study of selected Rules of Evidence and overview of Code of Professional Responsibility (Ethics). Prerequisite: Legal Assistant 306U. 3 sem. hrs. 315U Torts. Survey of three traditional categories of torts: intentional, negligence, and strict liability. 3 sem. hrs. 316U Contract Law. Law of formation, legal construction, execution, and enforcement of and remedies under contracts. 3 sem. hrs. 321U Criminal Law. Addresses substantive knowledge, practical skills and competencies and ethical guidelines needed to work in criminal law area. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Advanced Legal Research. Advanced library research in federal case and statutory law, federal and state regulatory law, and international law. Students will continue to build upon their research skills developed in Legal Research and Library Use by researching more in-depth and complex legal issues. Prerequisite: LA 303U. 3 sem. hrs. 398U ST: Trial Practice and Techniques. An intensive, handson trial practices and techniques course using case-simulation teaching for both bench and jury trials. Students will learn, strategize and practice winning methods in voir dire, motions practice, direct and cross examination, oral arguments and jury instructions. 3 sem. hrs. 495U Paralegal Studies Senior Seminar. Provides Paralegal Studies majors the opportunity to integrate the wide spectrum of course work they have completed through individual or group research projects that will result in written and oral presentations. “Real world” focus with students playing a major role in directing their own learning. 3 sem. hrs.

Lewis (SCS ‘98) and Lois (SCS ‘01) Willis BAS Human Resource Management

MANAGEMENT (MGMT) 341U Principles of Management. Fundamentals of management emphasizing application of scientific methods to solution of business problems; illustrations from various types of organizations, including manufacturing and service industries, government, charitable, and other social institutions. 3 sem. hrs. 345U Business Literacy. Providing an overview of the issues facing those involved in domestic and international commerce. Required for accelerated BLA. Limited space available for nonWeekend College students. 6 sem. hrs. MARKETING (MKT) 321U Principles of Marketing. Institutions involved, functions performed, and problems encountered in getting goods and services from producers to consumers. 3 sem. hrs. MATHEMATICS (MATH) 103U Finite Mathematics. Topics in finite mathematics designed to demonstrate the power of mathematical reasoning. 3 sem. hrs. 104U Elementary Probability and Statistics. Probability sufficient to provide introduction to statistics, descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distributions, and hypothesis testing.3 sem. hrs. PHYSICS 198U ST: Physics of Light and Gravity. Why are sunsets red and the sky blue? How does your cell phone work? Starting with Galileo’s contributions, course will highlight work of Newton, Maxwell, and Einstein. Core themes of physics: light and gravity. A survey that requires only basic arithmetic skills. 3 sem. hrs. POLITICAL SCIENCE (PLSC) 207U Virginia Government and Politics. A multimedia, high-tech approach to the study of Virginia government at state, county, municipal, and special district levels emphasizing legislative, executive, and judicial organization; and state politics and intergovernmental relations. 3 sem. hrs. PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC) 101U Introductory Psychology. Scientific principles of behavior. Survey emphasizing psychological methods and research involved in understanding human behavior. Research participation or equivalent required. 3 sem. hrs. 190U Child Psychology. Introduction to biological, social, cognitive, and emotional processes of development during prenatal to preadolescent developmental periods. 3 sem. hrs. RETAIL MANAGEMENT (RTMT) 320U Relationship Marketing. Focus on techniques used to build long-lasting relationships with customers. Managing and measuring customers’ shopping experiences, analyzing shopping behavior, establishing points of differentiation, goodwill marketing, and methods of customer communication will be reviewed. 3 sem. hrs.

SOCIAL ANALYSIS (SA) 300U Current Domestic and International Issues. Survey covering issues of greatest concern to American public and its decision makers. Topics include: new world order, crime, welfare, education, social problems, workplace and other topics chosen by students. 3 sem. hrs. 301U Social Analysis I. Systematic study of individual and group behavior involving conscious examination of assumptions underlying nature of social life. Necessarily multidisciplinary in focus, drawing on variety of theoretical and empirical approaches to discover patterns of meaning in human life. 3 sem. hrs. 310U The Examined Life – What We Know about the Human Condition. Exploring human behavior and the uniqueness of the human condition. Required for accelerated BLA. Limited space available for non-Weekend College students. 6 sem. hrs. SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 305U Deviance. Social deviance at microsociological level, sociological explanations for and current methods of dealing with such behavior. Drug and alcohol abuse, sexual deviance, suicide, mental illness, and child and spouse abuse. 3 sem. hrs. 309U Social Problems. Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment: physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; programs and methods of social treatment and control. Prerequisite: Sociology 101. 3 sem. hrs. SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPCH) 105U Interpersonal Communication. Analysis of complex and interacting factors that contribute to effective transmission of ideas; emphasis on understanding underlying principles. 3 sem. hrs. 206U Group Communication. Modern theory and methodology; student participation in group discussion relating theory to specific communication problems. 3 sem. hrs. 222U Business and Professional Speech. Making business presentation and giving corporate advocacy speech. Application to workplace of skills in listening, problem solving, interviewing, conducting meetings. 3 sem hrs. TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (TRAN) 358U Export/Import Management. Mechanics of exporting and importing in international trade including roles of exporter, importer, carriers, freight forwarders, and customs house brokers. Covers all aspects of international documentation, trade terms, tariffs, transportation, export licenses, insurance, financing, and customs requirements. 3 sem. hrs. WOMEN’S STUDIES (WMST) 303U Women in Television: Representations, Images and Stereotypes. 3 sem. hrs.

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BannerWeb Online Registration Benefits of Online Registration •Convenient - Access from any internet connection •Flexible - Select classes by time of day, subject, or faculty •Simple - Use online worksheet to plan your schedule •Practical - View classes by time, location, subject or faculty •Tangible - Print a copy of your schedule, transcripts or current grades •Real Time - Check up-to-the-minute class closings, faculty and room changes •Access - Check your personal records, view and print your transcript and grades

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NEW STUDENTS! DON’T FORGET TO REGISTER YOUR CAR! Register online at: http://oncampus.richmond.edu/ administration/police/parking/ The cost of the permit ($10) will be charged to your tuition account. All vehicles must be registered with Parking Services to park on the UR campus.

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 23173

Degree and Certificate Programs Bachelor and associate degree programs include: Paralegal Studies Information Systems Human Resource Management Emergency Services Management Liberal Arts Certificates are available in: All of the above (except ISYS), plus: Leadership Retail Management Teacher Licensure Program and Recertification Classes Graduate Certificates in: Disaster Science Human Resource Management

Spring 2004 Registration Schedule


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