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l. jec er Schoo ar of pro m e y m g u n S lo in en a ents It has be ,000 stud it, extend your 1 r l? e o v o o h d c d S re s enrolle earn cre Summer ie to d y n in a mo tu it S fu n g e tu in r m u o o n p s ti p d have of Con great o e year an e School ool offers you a th th r , r e a v e o y Last issed r Sch , Summe n courses you m is ical t c fa e Th y econom up o r e h v tc d a n c a , ge ing knowled osphere. a reward ow competitively nd is it t u b h a tm , a e relaxed surprised Richmond credit ive o mistak n e b e l k il a w m tens enge, f-state sity of a more in ll Univer is a chall dents from out-o n l fu o o n o s r h u a c c e S Summer more credit. Stu d remember, you an ideal way to fo ! rn an in us hool way to ea rses are priced, mmer Sc pus. Come and jo u S d n u fi o t try l c . Why no dents wil ce of life on cam summer ls tu a s o e g m ic ti artrien d cadem grades. P d enjoy the expe to your a ersity is short an r e s lo n c a , move g Univ program e time to ur time attendin th e s U ! nity ? Yo e opportu anted to explore th ive te s a w w estions, g ays ies. u it Don’t lw q il a y ib u n s a o s y o e bject the p u hav a new su ke advantage of eds. If yo e n r u o y a .T eets precious rse that m u o c e th find help you to e r e h e . We ar 33 .D., E.G.S s t 289-81 h a P ll . a n c e h a c us David Kit Summer Program of r Directo

CONTENTS Information Inside about Registration ...... Front Cover

Schedule of Classes by Term ........................... 9

Room and Board Application ............... 27, 28

Calendar ........................................ 2

Summer Study Abroad Programs .......... 13

Graduate School Information Form .......... 29

Course Descriptions ...... 15

New Student Application/ RegistrationForm .......... 31

General Information ..................... 3 Housing for Summer School ............................ 6 Expenses for Summer School ............................ 7

Registration Instructions .................... 25

Campus Inside Map .................. Back Cover


U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

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S U M M E R Registration CLASSES BEGIN Begin Late Registration Late Registration: in Summer School Office. End Add/Late Registration 5 pm End No-Record Drops 5 pm End P/F Audit Option 5 pm Last Day to Withdraw Memorial Day, Monday, May 27 File For August Degree By Fourth of July, Thursday, July 4 Final Examination Period

2002

C A L E N D A R

MAY 4 WK

8 WEEK I

JUNE 4 WK

JULY 4 WK

T-T FEB 26-MAY 14 M MAY 13 M MAY 13 M-T MAY 13-14 T MAY 14 W MAY 15 W MAY 15 F MAY 24

T-R FEB 26-MAY 16 M MAY 13 M MAY 13 M-R MAY 13-16 R MAY 16 R MAY 23 R MAY 23 F JUN 7

T-T* FEB 26-JUL 9 M JUL 8 M JUL 8 M-T JUL 8-9 T JUL 9 W JUL 10 W JUL 10 F JUL 19

R-F

LAST

T-T* FEB 26-JUN 11 M JUN 10 M JUN 10 M-T JUN 10-11 T JUN 11 W JUN 12 W JUN 12 F JUN 21 NO CLASS F JUN 7 NO CLASS W-F JUN 6-7

W-F CLASS

JUL 3-5

JUL 31-AUG 2 END TERM AT CLOSE OF DAY F JUN 7 W JUL 3 F JUL 5 R AUG 2 Grades To Registrar by 3 pm T JUN 11 T JUL 9 T JUL 9 T AUG 6 Grad School Theses Due for R AUG 1 August Degree Candidates Summer Diploma Date W AUG 14 UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR The Summer School offers selected courses which are scheduled individually and are not noted in the Summer Schedule.

FEB 26-JUN 13 CLASSES BEGIN Begin Late Registration Late Registration: in Summer School Office. End Add/Late Registration 5 pm End No-Record Drops 5 pm End P/F Audit Option 5 pm Last Day to Withdraw Memorial Day, Monday, May 28 File For August Degree By Fourth of July, Thursday, July 4 Final Examination Period

8 WEEK II T-F* FEB 26-JUN 28 M JUN 10 M JUN 10 M-R JUN 10-13 R JUN 13 R JUN 20 R JUN 20 F JUL 5

SUMMER I TERM SUMMER II TERM T-F* M-F* JUL 3-AUG 2 M MAY 13 M JUL 3 M MAY 13 M JUL 3

F JUN 28 F JUN 28 F JUN 28 F JUN 28

F AUG 2 F AUG 2 F AUG 2 R AUG 2 NO CLASS F JUN 7 NO CLASS

LAST CLASS F AUG 2 T AUG 6

END TERM AT CLOSE OF DAY F JUN 28 R AUG 2 Grades To Registrar by 3 pm F JUL 5 T AUG 6 Grad School Theses Due for R AUG 1 August Degree Candidates Summer Diploma Date W AUG 14 UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR The Summer School offers selected courses which are scheduled individually and are not noted in the Summer Schedule.

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Summer School 2002


GENERAL Statement of Purpose The University of Richmond is an independent, privately endowed institution of higher education that provides a comprehensive academic program for men and women. It offers the intimacy of a small university and the diverse educational opportunities that derive from undergraduate degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, and leadership studies, as well as graduate and professional programs in law, business, and selected areas of the arts and sciences. The University also provides a variety of credit and continuing education programs as well as cultural events to the larger community. The educational objectives of the University are: • to cultivate in students the interest, capacity, and skills necessary for independent intellectual inquiry and life-long learning; • to convey to students a representative portion of that body of knowledge that has accumulated and endured through the history of world cultures; • to encourage and aid students in the development of basic beliefs, values, and attitudes, including those of cooperation and tolerance; • to assist students in selecting and preparing for careers and for study in graduate and professional schools; • to foster in students personal habits that contribute to health and physical fitness. Cool.

INFORMATION

In order to achieve these objectives, the University is committed to: • an educational environment conducive to the development of the whole person— intellectually, socially, spiritually, physically, and morally; • an academic setting that guarantees and encourages freedom of thought, expression, and association; • an undergraduate curriculum that requires mastery of essential intellectual tools, awareness of the diversity of human cultural experiences, extensive knowledge of at least one area of study, and opportunities for interdisciplinary and integrative inquiry; • a faculty dedicated to excellent teaching and dialogue with students, and active engagement in scholarship, scientific inquiry, and artistic creativity; • a diverse, largely full-time and residential student body that participates in a broad range of University activities including opportunities for research, leadership, and the development of civic responsibility; • the essential resources for learning, such as libraries, laboratories, studios, information and communications technology, and media resources; • opportunities for internships, social commitment and public service, and other domestic and international learning experiences;

• a program of varied social, spiritual, and physical activities that provide occasions for growth, fun, and fellowship; • an administration and staff that preserve and enhance the University’s environment and resources, and that represent the institution to the broader community it serves.

Academic Programs Our Summer School serves a variety of students: • High school students who graduate in June and wish to begin their college studies before the fall term • College students who wish to accelerate their programs • Pre-professional students who want to meet entrance requirements to medical, law and other professional and technical schools • Students who wish to take day or evening classes, or both • Teachers needing to renew licenses or broaden their teaching fields • Graduate students desiring work toward master’s degrees • Students interested in traveling abroad to enrich their learning experiences • Qualified high school students who have completed their junior year

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U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

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Accreditation

Libraries

The University of Richmond is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097; telephone: 404/679-4501) to award the associate, baccalaureate and master degrees. The several colleges and schools of the University award no degrees individually. All degrees for work done in any one of the schools are conferred by the University of Richmond.

The University of Richmond libraries consist of the Central Library, Business Information Center, and Media Resource Center in the Boatwright Memorial Library; the Science Library in the Gottwald Science Center; and the Music Library, located in the George M. Modlin Center for the Arts. The University of Richmond School of Law Library is administered through the Law School.

Admissions Admission to the Summer School does not imply admission to any other school of the University. Should a student wish to attend another school of the University, application should be made to the Dean of Admission of that school. A student wishing to receive graduate credit for summer coursework must have credentials on file in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for admission as a special student.

Faculty Approximately 95 percent of our summer faculty hold doctorates, and most teach in the regular session of the University. Outstanding visiting lecturers also participate in the Summer School.

Location The University of Richmond is located within the western limits of the city. The campus is one of serene natural beauty—350 acres of woods, lawn and lake with handsome gothic buildings. It is this aura of tranquillity and tradition that prompted a campus visitor to exclaim, “This is how I’ve always thought a university ought to look.”

Classrooms

Recreational Facilities The Spider Sports Center, the hub of the Campus Recreation program, is located in the lower level of the Robins Center. The facility includes more than 9,000 square feet of recreational space for aerobics and conditioning. The recreational equipment available includes Nautilus, Stairmasters, Lifecycles, Ergometers, treadmills, free weights and more. Robins Center recreational facilities also include a sixlane swimming pool, two squash courts, seven racquetball courts and a gymnasium. Also available for recreational use when not scheduled for academic classes, intramurals, intercollegiate athletics or special events are the 13 tennis courts (eight on Richmond College campus and five on Westhampton College campus), a 400-meter track, and cross country trails. Visit our web site at: www.richmond.edu/~recreat for additional information and schedules.

University Forest Apartments Summer housing is in well-furnished, airconditioned townhouse units convenient to dining facilities. A separate application for housing must be completed for the session(s) you wish to be housed. Application forms for summer housing are in this bulletin. Please note: The housing form

SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS Boatwright Library Monday-Thursday ........ 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Friday ............................ 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday ................................ 1:00-5:00 p.m. Sunday .................................. 1:00-9:00 p.m. Science Library Monday-Friday ............... 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday ........................... closed Music Library Monday-Friday ............... 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday ........................... closed (Additional hours during July)

School of Law Library Hours will be posted at the law school.

must be sent to Student Accounts Office with payment to ensure housing placement.

Parking Parking permits are required and may be obtained free of charge from the University Parking Services located on the ground floor of the Special Programs Building. The current year parking permit is in effect throughout the summer. Students are restricted to student lots. The parking lots are lighted and patrolled by University Police.

Honor System When a student registers for Summer School, it is done with the understanding that the student will abide by the Honor Code of the University of Richmond. A copy of the Honor Code is available in the Dean’s Office, School of Continuing Studies.

Classes are held in air-conditioned classrooms, conveniently located to the parking area, and scheduled with the student in mind.

Bookstore The UR Bookstore, centrally located in the Tyler Haynes Commons, stocks all required texts and supplies requested by the instructors for Summer School classes. Non-required books, supplies, insignia gifts and clothing, and sundry items also are available for personal shopping. Bookstore hours: 8:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Monday-Friday; exceptions: Saturday, May 4, 10-2; Sunday, May 5, 10:30-1:30; Monday, May 6, Monday, May 13, Monday, June 10, Monday, June 24, Monday, July 8, 8:45-6:00, and Friday August 2, 8:45-11:45. The Bookstore will be closed June 28 for fiscal year inventory count, and May 27 and July 4.

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Summer School 2002


G E N E R A L

Examination Schedule DAY CLASSES—examinations are given on the final Friday (in the case of July term, on the final Thursday) of each session according to class beginning time: Begin Time Exam Time 8:00 a.m. class 8:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m. class 12:00 noon 12:45 p.m. class 4:00 p.m. 2:45 -4:45 p.m. 4:00 p.m. EVENING CLASSES—(beginning after 4:45 p.m.) examinations are given on the last regularly scheduled meeting of the class with the following exceptions: Classes which would normally meet on Memorial Day or the 4th of July will have their examinations from 6:00-9:00 p.m. on the last Friday of the session.

Registration Procedures and Limits Students may enroll in no more than six credit hours in one session of summer school and no more than 18 credit hours total during the entire Summer Term without Dean’s approval. To register: Log on to BannerWeb at https:// www.bannerweb.richmond.edu. For complete directions on registering, see page 25. Payment can be made using a credit card by calling (877) 237-9734. There is a fee for using this credit card service. Payment is due by the first day of the term.

Audit, Pass/Fail, Independent Study, Practicums

period are not shown on the Academic record; withdrawals after that date carry the grade of W on the academic record. Students who stop attending class without notifying the School of Continuing Studies Office will receive the grade of V (failure due to excessive absences) regardless of the last date of attendance.

Changing Course Levels Designated courses are available for students to take at either the undergraduate or graduate level. As explained below, accreditation standards require that students at the graduate level complete more work, often additional papers or projects, and achieve at a higher level. The requirements for each level are clearly defined on the course syllabus. Students can change the level of a course they are registered for through the Add/Late Registration date as specified on the Summer Calendar. (See page 3.) For special short classes, no level changes can be made after the second day of the course. Requirements for students who wish to take a course at the graduate level are outlined below. Students who change the course level will be refunded or charged the tuition difference.

I N F O R M A T I O N

Graduate-Level Courses All 500-level courses are open only to graduate students. Undergraduate courses offered for graduate credit are designated in the schedule. Graduate students taking these courses are expected to complete more work and achieve at a higher level than undergraduate students. A student registering for a graduate course who has not previously taken a course for graduate credit at the University of Richmond should complete and return the Graduate School Information Form (found on page 32) to the Summer School office. Please attach this form to the Summer School Application/Registration form.

Grading Policies The level of students’ performance in classwork and examinations is indicated by letters. A (excellent), B (good), C (average), and D (poor) indicate that the work has been passed. The foregoing grades may be accompanied by a plus (+) or minus (-) to indicate a relative position within the grade category. P shows credit has been earned in a Pass/Fail course, and Z shows that a

Refunds If a student withdraws from classes or is dropped from the University for whatever cause, a refund of fees shall be made in accordance with the following schedule. Refunds are made first to any financial program the student may be receiving, then to any University unsettled account, and then to the student.

For classes that meet for 4 weeks:

To audit or take a course on a pass/fail basis, a special form must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar by the date specified in the Summer School calendar. Check your school to see if Audit or Pass/Fail grading is acceptable. To register for an independent study or a practicum, a special form requiring prior approval of the departmental chair and the supervising instructor must be completed and attached to your Application/Registration form. The special forms are available in the Summer School Office.

Withdrawal on or before the first day of class..................................................................... 100% Withdrawal during the first week of class ............................................................................ 50% Withdrawal during the second week of class ....................................................................... 25% Withdrawal after the second week of class ........................................................................ None

Changes (Add/Drop), Withdrawals

Withdrawal on or before the first day of class..................................................................... 100% Withdrawal during the first week of class ............................................................................ 50% Withdrawal during the second week of class ....................................................................... 50% Withdrawal during the third week of class ........................................................................... 25% Withdrawal during the fourth week of class ......................................................................... 25% Withdrawal after the fourth week of class ........................................................................... None

Students register for a full session. However, in the event that a student finds it necessary to withdraw from classes, or is dismissed from the University, the student will receive a percentage refund. Changes in registration must be initiated in the School of Continuing Studies Office within the deadlines specified in the Summer calendar (see page 2.) Withdrawals during the No-Record Drop Cool.

For classes that meet for 6 weeks: Withdrawal on or before the first day of class..................................................................... 100% Withdrawal during the first week of class ............................................................................ 50% Withdrawal during the second week of class ....................................................................... 50% Withdrawal during the third week of class ........................................................................... 25% Withdrawal after the third week of class ........................................................................... None

For classes that meet for 8 weeks:

Any appeals to this policy must be in writing and directed to: Annemarie Weitzel, Bursar, Box R, Univ. of Richmond, VA 23173 or aweitzel@richmond.edu. 5


U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

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course was audited. S and U indicate satisfactory or unsatisfactory performance in non-academic courses or in a Pass/No-credit course. W indicates that the student withdrew from a course with a passing average. Marks indicating failure and included as such in the grade point average are F, M (withdrew from a course with a failing average), and V (failure because of excessive absences). The X indicates that the grade has not been received from the instructor. I and Y mean that coursework has not been completed by the end of the term. The I, which provisionally counts as a failing grade, is given when the reasons for incomplete work are deemed unjustifiable by the instructor. The work is to be made up by the date the instructor specifies, but no later than 45 calendar days from the last class day of the term in which the I was given. If the work is not made up during the grace period, the I will be converted to F. The Y, which does not count as a failing grade, is given when the reasons for incomplete work are deemed justifiable by the instructor, or at the end of the first term of a course that continues into a succeeding term. There is no deadline for completion of the work unless the instructor so specifies. In the case of an I or Y, once the make-up grade is received, it appears to the right of the incomplete grade on the permanent record. In all cases, it is the student’s responsibility to make arrangements for and progress to the completion of an incomplete course.

H O U S I N G Housing: Applications for summer school housing follow. Return the form along with your payment to Student Accounts (Sarah Brunet Hall) no later than April 15th. Please note that housing is available for students enrolled in the four week May and/or June Term session only. July Term housing will not be available. Roommates: Roommate preferences will be granted ONLY if paperwork and payment is received from both roommates by April 15, 2002. After this date, rooms will be assigned on a first come, first serve basis. Singles: Due to space limitations during the summer months, single rooms are not permitted. There will be four residents assigned to each unit. Meal Plan: Students who are enrolled for academic credit, including internships where credit is received in the summer, are required to be on the meal plan. This payment is included in the price quoted on the application. 6

Credit and Grade Point Average

Grade Availability

The credit hours are shown at the end of the course description. Tuition and instructor information is shown along with the class schedule. The University of Richmond uses the semester hour value. A semester hour is the value of one 50-minute class-hour of work a week through a nominal 14-week semester. The grade point average is based on two factors: GPA Hours – The accumulation of academic semester hours that have grades to which grade point values are assigned; and Grade Points – Given for each semester hour’s grade according to this scale: A+ 4.0 B+ 3.3 C+ 2.3 D+ 1.3 A 4.0 B 3.0 C 2.0 D 1.0 A- 3.7 B- 2.7 C- 1.7 D- 0.7 F 0.0 I 0.0 M 0.0 V 0.0

Grades are due to the Registrar’s Office from instructors as specified on the Summer Calendar (see page 2). They will be available to students as soon as possible after they have been received by the Registrar’s Office. Students may access grades via internet by using BannerWeb (https://bannerweb. richmond.edu). Students will need their Student ID and Student PIN. Grades are deemed correct unless notification to the contrary is received by the University Registrar within three (3) months after the close of the term specified.

Summer School Office Information The Summer School is located on the second floor of the Special Programs Building and is open from 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Telephone (804) 289-8133.

Calculation - The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of GPA hours. The accumulations and average are shown each term on the permanent academic record and on the student grade report. Also shown on these reports is the accumulation of Earned Semester Hours. Earned hours are the academic semester hours in which the student has earned passing grades, plus semester hours credit, if any, for accepted transfer work.

F O R

S U M M E R

Check In: Check in will be held the Sunday prior to the beginning of each summer term. To receive a room key, students should report to the Richmond College Dean’s Office in the Whitehurst building between 12:00-4:00 and the University Forest Apartments (UFA) 600 from 6:00-9:00 for May Term. For June Term, please check in at the UFA 600 from 1:00-5:00. May Term (Whitehurst) (UFA 600)

May 12, 2002

June Term (UFA 600)

June 9, 2002

12:00-4:00 6:00-9:00 1:00-5:00

You must pick up your key during these dates and times. Plan ahead! There will be NO exceptions.

S C H O O L Mail: You may pick up your mail during summer school at the post office. Your mailing address will be: Your name Box 1838 28 Westhampton Way University of Richmond, VA 23173 Questions: Please direct questions about summer school housing to: Buzz Lambert Richmond College Dean’s Office (804) 289-8062 clambert@richmond.edu A late housing fee of $50 will be charged to applications not received by April 15, 2002, for the May Term and May 20, 2002, for the June Term.

Summer School 2002


H O U S I N G

E X P E N S E S

F O R

S U M M E R

This schedule does not include the MBA program or the University of Richmond School of Law.

A N D

E X P E N S E S

S C H O O L

Ways To Pay • Cash or Check — Make checks payable to University of Richmond. • MASTERCARD or VISA — Call (877) 237-9734. There is a fee for using this credit card service. Payment is due by the first day of the term.

Tuition (per credit hour): Undergraduate............................................................ $270 Graduate ...................................................................... $286 Late Payment .................................................................. $15 Late Housing Registration Fee .................................... $50

Residence Fees (Room) Include:

Laboratory Fees: (Per session - Sciences) .................... $60 Courses carrying materials or laboratory fees are highlighted in schedule of classes.

Telephone: Local telephone service is included in the housing fee. Students must provide their own phone. Long distance calls will require a prepaid phone card or a long distance credit card. Call Waiting service will be provided at no charge.

Auditing Fee: Cost to audit a course is the same as taking a course for credit.

Residence Fees: Sessions and Dates May Four-Week (May 13 - June 7) June Four-Week (June 10 - July 5)

Board only (Meals) $ 415 415

Room and Board $ 645 645

Cable Television: Basic cable television service is included in the housing fee (46 basic channels and 7 University of Richmond channels). It does not include any premium or movie channels. Students must provide their own television set.

GE COLLE

CREDIT

l Juniors o o h c S h ig ed H y for Qualifi it n u t r o p p Special O their academic

BANK

YOUR

rate and enrich high school juniors to accele ol ho sc gh hi e open to those ar ed s ifi se al ur qu co ly r gh ea hi -y s ll credit. All first Richmond invite work. vel courses for fu The University of edness for such -le ar ge ep lle pr co te in ca g di in at in y Richmond ip rl ic rt ea cl pa e the University of and aptitud of t ns background by en tio em la ev gu hi re ac she is les and scholastic program if he or subject to all ru ee ts gr students whose en de ud t’s st ol en ho ud Sc ge if to the st roll as Summer d to another colle de e to be applied ar fil rw on fo pt be Students will en ke ill be w will n, or a transcript . Credit earned d upon graduatio Summer School on m ch Ri of ty p fifth of the Universi 1) rank in the to g: accepted to the in w llo fo e th e 3) evidence of clud e student. llege-level study; this program in co in r requested by th ts fo en ty ci ud st pa r ca fo te dica e high school on requirements es that clearly in mendation of th or m sc co st te re t Special admissi 4) en d em an hiev llege-level work; aptitude and ac e challenge of co junior class; 2) th t ee m to n io 1, and RHCS 105. rminat unselor. 201, Sociology 10 interest and dete co n io ce lig an Re id 2, gu 20 or 1/ uctory classes. ory 20 master, and other introd summer are Hist principal, head e is es th e th r bl la fo ai on av s iti tach a and tu ductory course of this catalog; at for times, dates, g ck lo ba ta e A few of the intro ca th e at th rm in to n/registration fo e listings shown ance counselor master, or guid Please refer to th ete the applicatio ad pl m he l, co , pa m ci ra in og pr hool sted in this pr est your high sc If you are intere ation; then requ rm transcript to: fo in ur yo rd ca ith it ed d it along w ar rw fo check or give cr d an n recommendatio write a letter of rduzzi, Dean Dr. James L. Na uing Studies School of Contin 3 mond, VA 2317 University of Rich

Cool.

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H O W Search by… Terms • If you know that you are free to study only during a specific period of the summer, turn to page 9 for a complete schedule of classes by term.

T O

U S E

Guide to Abbreviations Used Classroom Building Codes (see campus map, inside back cover) BKR .................. Booker Hall of Music BUS .................. The E. Claiborne Robins School of Business Building

Subject

JPSN ................ Jepson Hall

• If you are looking for a specific subject, turn to the course descriptions on page 15. These are listed alphabetically.

BLIB ................. Boatwright Library Building

Apply

PURH ................ Puryear Hall

• Once you have found the classes you want, the information you need is found in the “Schedule of Classes by Term” which begins on page 9 followed by the course descriptions. The CRN (course reference number), subject, course, title, hours, days and times, building and room number, instructors, and tuition fee is the specific information one needs for class. If you know the subject you want, it is easy to look in the course descriptions and find out what term the course is in (term is listed behind every course description). Then simply go to the schedule to find out class information.

PS ..................... Political Science Building

8

MRC ................. Media Resource Center (in LIB) NRCT ................ North Court

RCHM ............... Richmond Hall ROBC ................ Robins Center RYLH ................. Ryland Hall SCI .................... Gottwald Science Center SPB .................. Special Programs Building (Summer School Office) THCX ................ Theater Complex CRN SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE GEN

= = = = = =

Course Reference Number Subject Course Section Title General Education Requirements for Undergraduate Arts & Science Students HRS = Hours DAYS = Days TIME = Time BLDG = Building RM = Room INSTRUCTOR = Instructor FEE = Tuition

Class Meeting Key: M = Monday T = Tuesday W = Wednesday R = Thursday F = Friday S = Saturday U = Sunday

+ Laboratory and/or materials fee included.

Summer School 2002


S C H E D U L E

S C H E D U L E

O F

C L A S S E S

B Y

O F

C L A S S E S

T E R M

MAY TERM (May 13-June 7) CRN 30078 30079 30080 30083 30087 30091 30081 30084 30088 30092 30085 30089 30093 30086 30090 30094 30095 30096 30097 30098 30099 30100 30101 30102 30103 30222 30104 30105 30106 30135

SUBJ CRSE ACCT 201 ADED 398U AMST 398 ARTS 101 ARTS 101 ARTS 105 ARTS 110 ARTS 201 ARTS 201 ARTS 205 ARTS 301 ARTS 301 ARTS 305 ARTS 401 ARTS 401 ARTS 405 BIOL 108 BUAD 201 BUAD 203 BUAD 301 BUAD 301 DANC 260 ECON 101 ECON 200 EDUC 310U EDUC 338U EDUC 339U ENGL 217 ENGL 220 ENGL 398U

SEC 01 01 01 01 02 01 01 01 02 01 01 02 01 01 02 01 01 01 01 01 02 01 01 01 01 01 02 01 01 02

30107 30108 30109 30228 30111 30112 30113 30114 30136

FIN FIN FREN GEOG HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST

360 360 221 201U 202 206 280 398 398

01 02 01 01 01 01 01 02 03

30043 30115 30116 30117 30118 30119 30227 30120 30121 30122 30209 30123

HUM MATH MATH MKT MKT MLA MSYS PHYS PLSC PLSC PSYC RELG

205U 102 211 320 325 500 340 125 240 250 299 266

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

TITLE FUND OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING ST:EMPLOYEE WELLNESS FOR BUS ST:CIVIL WAR IN FILM/LITA DRAWING I DRAWING I PAINTING I PHOTOGRAPHY I DRAWING II DRAWING II PAINTING II DRAWING III DRAWING III PAINTING III DRAWING IV DRAWING IV PAINTING IV ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY BUSINESS STATISTICS SOFTWARE TOOLS & APPLICATIONS QUANT ANALYSIS FOR BUS/ECON QUANT ANALYSIS FOR BUS/ECON BEGINNING MODERN DANCE PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS ECON OF MONEY/BANK/FIN MRKTS CURRICULUM METHODS INTEG TECH ACROSS CURRICULUM INTEGRTNG TECH ACRS CURR II THE BIBLE AND LITERATURE FILM STUDIES ST:LOCAL COLOR WRTERS/POP ICON (Off Campus Dates: June 2-10) PRIN OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PRIN OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT INTENSIVE INTER FRENCH W/DRILL WORLD GEOGRAPHY IDEAS & INST/WESTERN CIV II THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877 PEOPLE/CUSTOMS OF MIDDLE EAST ST:CIVIL WAR IN FILM/LIT ST:CIVIL RIGHTS FIELD TRIP (Off Campus/Field Trip) TRAVEL THROUGH LITERATURE PRBL SOLVING USING FINITE MATH CALCULUS I MARKETING MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL MARKETING METHODS/THEMES/LIBERAL STUDIES OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS W/LAB INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL RELATNS INTEGRATED TOPICS:DARWIN/PSYC TELEVISION: ETHICS FOR HIRE?

GEN * * * FSVP FSVP FSVP * * * * * * * * * * FSNB * * * * FSVP FSSA * * * * FSLT * *

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

DAYS MTWRF TWR TWR MTWRF TWR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF TWR MTWRF MTWRF TWR MTWRF MTWRF TWR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTR MW TR MTWRF TWR M

TIME 0800-1000am 0615-0935pm 0615-0935pm 1245-0245pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 1245-0245pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 1245-0245pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 1245-0245pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 0900-0115pm 0800-1000am 1015-1115am 0800-1000am 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 0615-0935pm 0615-0935pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 0615-0935pm 0600-0900pm

BLDG RM BUS 102 ROBC 245 RYLH 216 VAB 310 VAB 310 VAB 308 VAB 210 VAB 310 VAB 310 VAB 308 VAB 310 VAB 310 VAB 308 VAB 310 VAB 310 VAB 308 SCI-E 111 BUS 201 BUS 216 BUS 103 BUS 103 THCX 117 BUS 203 BUS 202 NRCT 202 JPSN G22 JPSN G22 RYLH 210 MRC AUD SPB 217

INSTRUCTOR Fagan M Johnson C Kenzer R Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Azhderian-Kel A Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Reiner M Pasternak J Fagan M Nicholson R Nicholson R Hodal R Taylor T Raines J Winston D Kozlowski Wormley K Givens T Brown I Edmonds M

FEE 810 810 810 820 + 820 + 820 + 845 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 1140 + 810 270 810 810 810 810 810 678 660 660 810 810 1850

* * COM2 * FSHT FSHT FSHT * *

3.00 3.00 6.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF TWR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF TWR TBA

0800-1000am 1015-1215pm 0830-1230pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 0315-0515pm 1015-1215pm 0615-0935pm TBA

BUS 120 BUS 120 PURH G13 RYLH 215 RYLH 215 RYLH 212 RYLH 213 RYLH 216

Staff Staff Doucet J Freundt R Treadway J Kenzer R Bogle E Kenzer R Landphair J

810 810 1620 810 810 810 810 810 2510

* FSSR FSSR * * * * FSNP FSSA FSSA * *

3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.00

MTR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTR MTWRF MTRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF

0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 1245-0245pm 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 0615-0935pm 1015-1215pm 0900-1200pm 0800-1000am 1015-1215pm 1015-1215pm 0800-1000am

BUS JPSN JPSN BUS BUS RYLH BUS SCI-N PS PS RCHM MRC

Wright S Hoke K Hoke K Myers T Lascu D Givens T Altay N McClelland J Wang V Wang V Leary D Alley R

810 810 810 810 810 858 810 1140 + 810 810 1080 810

212 109 109 201 101 210 102 103 206 206 101 4

May term continued on page 10 + Laboratory and/or materials fee included.

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MAY TERM (May 13-June 7) CRN 30124 30125 30126 30140 30127

SUBJ RHCS RHCS SOC SOC SOC

CRSE 105 201 101 305U 309

SEC 01 01 01 01 01

30138

SOC

313

01

30128

SOC

342

01

30129 30130 30131 30224 30132

SPAN SPAN SPAN THTR WELL

221 221 221 115 085

01 02 03 01 01

30133

WELL 090

01

30134

WELL 090

02

30137

WMST 379

01

continued from page 9

TITLE GEN HRS DAYS TIME INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION FSSA 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm ARGUMENTATION & DEBATE * 3.00 MTWRF 1245-0245pm INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY FSSA 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am DEVIANCE * 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm SOCIAL PROBLEMS * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm (Available for Graduate Credit at $858) FLD INVESTGTN-JUV/ADULT CJ SYS * 3.00 MTWRF 0830-1230pm (Available for Graduate Credit at $878+, Special Dates: May 13-31) DYING, DEATH, AND GRIEF * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm (Available for Graduate Credit at $858) INTENSIVE INTERM SPAN W/DRILL COM2 6.00 MTWRF 0900-0100pm INTENSIVE INTERM SPAN W/DRILL COM2 6.00 MTWRF 0900-0100pm INTENSIVE INTERM SPAN W/DRILL COM2 6.00 MTWRF 0900-0100pm THEATRE APPRECIATION FSVP 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am URAWARE:ALCOHOL AWARENESS PROG WEL 10.00 MTWRF 1015-1145am (This section must be take concurrently with WELL 090 Sec. 01 AND 02) EATING AND WORKING OUT WEL2 0.00 MTWRF 1015-1145am (This section must be taken concurrently with WELL 085 AND WELL 090 Sec. 02) HIV/AIDS/SOCIETY WEL2 0.00 MTWRF 1015-1145am (This section must be take concurrently with WELL 085 AND WELL 090 Sec. 01) ST:CIVIL RIGHTS FIELD TRIP * 3.00 TBA TBA (Off Campus/Field Trip)

BLDG BKR BKR PURH JPSN PURH

RM 217 216 112 102 110

INSTRUCTOR Johnson S Kuswa K Obi J Moorefield J Obi J

FEE 810 810 810 810 810

PURH

110

Neff J

830 +

PURH

111

Wingrove C

810

PURH PURH PURH THCX ROBC

203 202 201 102 246

Dean A Belliard M Peebles E Holland D Johnson C

1620 1620 1620 810 270

ROBC

245

Johnson C

270

ROBC

245

Johnson C

270

Landphair J

2510

EIGHT WEEK TERM I (May 13-July 3) CRN 30233 30001 30002 30004 30003 30005 30006 30007 30008 30009 30010 30011 30221

SUBJ ADED ARCH DANC EDUC EDUC ENGL ENGL ENGL ESM HRM HRM HUM HUM

CRSE SEC 398U 01 398U 01 256 01 324U 01 324U 02R 100U 01 101U 01 102U 01 307U 01 343U 01 533U 01 208U 01 346U 01

30012 30013

ISYS ISYS

203U 01 205U 01

30205 30014 30015 30016 30017 30018 30019 30206 30232

ISYS ISYS ISYS ISYS LA LAW LDSP MATH MDLG

306U 308U 351U 398U 306U 398U 302U 103U 200

30020 30147

MKT 321U 01 MGMT 398U 03

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

TITLE ST:ADULT LEARNERS & COL SUCCESS ST:ANCT ROME ARCH, HIST/ART BEGINNING JAZZ DANCE READING IN THE ELEM SCHOOL READING IN THE ELEM SCHOOL THE RESEARCH PROCESS COMPOSITION PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION MANAGING EMERGENCY OPERATIONS HR/PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN HRM CAREER AND LIFE DEVELOPMENT THE HISTORY OF HUMAN EXPRESSION

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 6.00

DAYS TIME BLDG RM TR 0615-0900pm JPSN G20 TR 0615-0900pm RYLH 213 TR 0615-0900pm THCX 117 MW 0615-0900pm NRCT 201 MW 0615-0900pm MW 0545-0645pm BLIB B26 MW 0700-0940pm JPSN G20 MW 0615-0900pm PURH G12 TBA TBA On-line Course TR 0615-0900pm SPB 206 MW 0615-0900pm BUS 124 TR 0615-0900pm SPB 216 S 0900-0230pm BUS 102 F 0600-0830pm BUS 102 (Open only to special, pre-registered students. 5 spaces open to regular SCS students.) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm JPSN G23 INTRO/PROB-SOLVING W/PROGRMMNG 3.00 W 0615-0900pm JPSN 102 (Half of class is On-line course) SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN 3.00 MW 0615-0900pm JPSN 106 Off Campus MANAGING IN AN INFORMATION AGE 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm WEB DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm JPSN G21 ST:ADV PROG VISUAL BASIC 3.00 MW 0615-0900pm JPSN G21 LITIGATION I 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm JPSN 103 ST:FIRST AMENDMENT LAW 3.00 MW 0615-0900pm BUS 101 LEADERSHP/ETHICAL ACTN/THE LAW 3.00 S 0900-0230pm JPSN 102 FINITE MATHEMATICS 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm BUS 124 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 2.00 TR 1015-1215pm PURH 111 (Open only to ELI students) PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.00 TR 0615-0900pm BUS 120 ST:LIBERAL ARTS IN BUSINESS 3.0 TBA TBA TBA (Special Dates: May 19-June 28)

INSTRUCTOR Dolson T Thompson K Hodal R Paciocco P Staff Essid J Essid J Alvarado A Staff Meinhard C Sloboda B Banks J Scott E Scott E

FEE 810 810 810 678 810 270 810 810 810 810 1350 810 1620 1620

Davis M Dertinger T

810 810

Tucci J Conner R Hoerter S Munson A McFarlane W Foreman G Wright D Staff Staff

810 810 810 810 810 810 810 810

Myers T Newman

810

+ Laboratory and/or materials fee included.

10

Summer School 2002


S C H E D U L E

O F

C L A S S E S

JUNE TERM (June 10-July 5) CRN 30047 30048 30053 30049 30057 30144 30054 30050 30058 30055 30051 30059 30056 30052 30060 30061 30062 30149

SUBJ ACCT ART ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS ARTS BIOL ECON ECON

CRSE 202 212U 101 101 105 122 201 201 205 301 301 305 401 401 405 301U 102 387U

SEC 01 01 03 04 02 01 03 04 02 03 04 02 03 04 02 01 01 01

30063 30065 30064 30229

EDUC EDUC EDUC ENGL

200U 02R 339U 01 398U 02R 100A 01

30066 30067

ENGL 206 ENGL 424

30068 30069 30070

HIST HIST HUM

201 01 300U 01 398U 01

30071 30072

MLA MLA

510 598

01 01

30142

PLSC 379

01

30143

PLSC 379

02

30073 30074

RELG 201 WMST 303

01 01

01 01

TITLE GEN HRS DAYS TIME BLDG RM FUND OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING * 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am BUS 216 ART APPRECIATION * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm MRC 4 DRAWING I FSVP 3.00 MTWRF 1215-0245pm VAB 310 DRAWING I FSVP 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm VAB 310 PAINTING I FSVP 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm VAB 308 DESIGN I * 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am VAB 212 DRAWING II * 3.00 MTWRF 1215-0245pm VAB 310 DRAWING II * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm VAB 310 PAINTING II * 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm VAB 308 DRAWING III * 3.00 MTWRF 1215-0245pm VAB 310 DRAWING III * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm VAB 310 PAINTING III * 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm VAB 308 DRAWING IV * 3.00 MTWRF 1215-0245pm VAB 310 DRAWING IV * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm VAB 310 PAINTING IV * 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm VAB 308 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS * 3.00 MTR 0615-0935pm RYLH 215 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS * 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am BUS 203 MICROECONOMICS FOR TEACHERS * 3.00 MTWRF 0830-0500pm JPSN 103 (Open only to pre-registered special students. Available for graduate credit. Special Dates: June 24-28) FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION * 3.00 MTR 0615-0935pm Off Campus INTEGRTNG TECH ACRS CURR II * 2.00 TR 0615-0935pm JPSN G22 ST:CURRICULUM METHODS * 3.00 MTR 0615-0935pm Off Campus INTERDIS WRITING * 1.00 MWF 0130-0330pm JPSN G20 (Limited to Summer College and ELI students SEL RDINGS AMER LIT:17-20 CEN FSLT 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm RYLH 215 TOPICS IN FILM:AMER CRIME FILM * 3.00 TWR 0615-0935pm MRC AUD (Available for Graduate Credit at $858) IDEAS & INST/WESTERN CIV I FSHT 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm RYLH 213 WOMEN & THE AMERCN EXPERIENCE * 3.00 MTWRF 0800-1000am RYLH 213 ST:PARTNERS IN THE ARTS * 3.00 MTWRF 0900-0500pm THCX 102 (Open only to special pre-registered students. Special Dates: June 24-28) JEWSH/CHRISTN BAS/WESTRN CIV * 3.00 MTR 0200-0500pm RYLH 205 ST:PARTNERS IN THE ARTS * 3.00 MTWRF 0900-0500pm THCX 102 (Open only to special pre-registered students. Special Dates: June 24-28) ST:VA CITIZENSHIP INSTITUTE * 3.00 TBA TBA (Open only to special pre-registered students) ST:VA CITIZENSHIP INSTITUTE * 3.00 TBA TBA (Open only to special pre-registered students.) THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE FSLT 3.00 MTWRF 1015-1215pm RYLH 205 WOMEN IN TV/IMAGES-STEREOTYPES * 3.00 MTR 0615-0935pm JPSN 107

INSTRUCTOR Fagan M Hanson D Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Lane K Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Whitman G Brown J Pasternak J Swanson G

FEE 810 810 820 + 820 + 820 + 810 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 820 + 810 810 540

Pruden E Wormley K Gilliam L Staff

810 660 810

Dickerson L 810 Brown I, Porterfield P 810 Wray E Wray E Eakin F

810 810 810

Eakin F Eakin F

858 540

Gunlicks A Gunlicks A Eakin F Alley R

810 810

FEE 810 810 660

JULY TERM (July 8-August 2) CRN 30141 30234 30223 30230

SUBJ ARTS DANC EDUC ENGL

CRSE 279 256 338U 100B

30231

ENGL 100B 01

30042 30044 30045 30046

HIST MLA RELG RHCS

30225

THTR 115

398 599 230 101

SEC 01 02 02 01

01 01 01 01

TITLE GEN ST:LANDSCAPE PAINTING * FUND OF BEGINNING JAZZ * INTEG TECH ACROSS CURRICULUM * INTERDIS WRITING * (Limited to Summer College and ELI students) INTERDIS WRITING * (Limited to Summer College and ELI students) ST:KILLING IN THE NAME OF GOD * SEMINAR IN LIBERAL STUDIES * THE HISTORY OF ISRAEL FSHT RHETORIC & PUBLIC ADDRESS *

02 THEATRE APPRECIATION

FSVP

HRS 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00

DAYS TWR MTWRF TR MWF

TIME 0615-0935pm 1245-0245pm 0615-0935pm 0130-0330pm

BLDG RM VAB 308 THXC 117 JPSN G22 JPSN G20

INSTRUCTOR Sjovold E Hodal R Kozlowski E Staff

1.00

TR

0130-0330pm

JPSN G20

Staff

3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00

MTWRF MTR MTWRF MTWRF MW MTR

1015-1215pm 0200-0500pm 1015-1215pm 0800-1000am 1015-1130am 0615-0935pm

RYLH RYLH RYLH BKR BKR THCX

Catherwood C Eakin F Eakin F Thomas D Thomas D Holland D

3.00

215 205 205 216 216 102

810 858 810 1080 810

+ Laboratory and/or materials fee included.

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EIGHT-WEEK II TERM (June 10-August 2) CRN 30021 30039 30040 30022 30023 30024 30025 30026 30028 30218 30029 30030 30031 30032 30033

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE ACCT 300U 01 ACCOUNTING FOR NONACCOUNTANTS EDUC 315U 01 INTRODUCTORY INTERNSHIP (Special Dates TBA) EDUC 330U 01 MIDTERM INTERNSHIP (Special Dates TBA) ENGL 398U 01 ST:SEL PLAYS TENN WILLIAMS ESM 301U 01 TECHNOL FOR EMERGENCY MGNT ESM 542U 01 ECON IMPACTS OF DISASTERS HRM 345U 01 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT HRM 534U 01 STRATEGIC HR DEVELOPMENT ISYS 398U 03 ST:WEB DES/DREAMWEAVER LA 398U 01 ST:LEGAL DOCUMENTS/FORMS LAW 398U 02 ST:CONSUMER LAW LAW 398U 03 ST:TERRORISM LAW MGMT 341U 01 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT MLA 570 01 DIRECTED STUDY SPCH 105U 01 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

HRS 3.00 2.00

DAYS TR TBA

TIME 0615-0900pm TBA

2.00

TBA

TBA

3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

MW TBA TBA MW TR MW TR MW TR TR TBA MW

0615-0900pm TBA TBA 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm 0615-0900pm TBA 0615-0900pm

BLDG RM BUS 101

SPB 216 On-line Course On-line Course BUS 103 BUS 103 JPSN G22 BUS 102 BUS 120 JPSN 109 JPSN 102 PS

206

INSTRUCTOR Fishel F Moore D

FEE 810 660

Moore D

660

Edmonds M Staff Staff Wriston M Kelley R Hoerter S Lemacks J Leonard J Sanders E Powell J Eakin F Helms J

810 810 858 810 1350 810 810 810 810 810 858 810

SUMMER TERM II (July 3-August 2) DIRECTED STUDIES, INTERNSHIPS AND INDEPENDENT STUDIES CRN 30201 30202 30203 30204

12

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE ISYS 388U 01 INTERNSHIP IN INFO SYSTEMS (Special Dates: May 13 - August 6) LDSP 488 01 INTERNSHIP: SEMINAR LDSP 488 02 INTERNSHIP:PRACTICUM PLSC 379 04 ST:WASHNGTON DC INTERN/NAT POL

HRS 3.00

TIME TBA

BLDG TBA

INSTRUCTOR Bowling K

FEE 810

3.00 3.00 4.00

TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA

Hicks D Hicks D Palazzolo D

810 810

Summer School 2002


S C H E D U L E

S U M M E R ARGENTINA CRN 30150 30151 30152 30153 30154 30155

SUBJ SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN

CHINA CRN 30158 30159 30160 30161

S T U D Y

May 19-july 1

CRSE SEC 301 01 305 01 312 01 402 01 497 01 498 01

A B R O A D

CRSE SEC 302 01 312 01 497 01 498 01

TITLE SPANISH CONVERSATION SPANISH GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION CULTURES/NATIONS OF LATIN AMER ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION ST: ARGENTINE SHORT STORY ST:LATIN AMER CITY PAST/PRES

June 3-July 27

P R O G R A M S

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Ferman C Ferman C Ferman C Ferman C Ferman C Ferman C

Director: Rose Lee Yong Tan (289-8765)

TITLE CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE INSIGHTS INTO CHINESE CULTURE SELECTED TOPICS IN CHINESE SELECTED TOPICS IN CHINESE

DUBLIN INTERNSHIPS

C L A S S E S

Director: Claudia Ferman (289-8114)

June 29-August 11

SUBJ CHIN CHIN CHIN CHIN

O F

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Tan L Tan L Tan L Tan L

Director: Krittika Onsanit (287-6499)

For information about the individual internships in Dublin, contact the director.

EUROPEAN UNION CRN 30163 30164

May 12-June 9

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE PLSC 379 03 ST:THE EU 2002 AND BEYOND PLSC 390 01 INDEPENDENT STUDY

FRANCE, LA ROCHELLE CRN 30165 30166 30167 30168 30169 30170

SUBJ FREN FREN FREN FREN FREN FREN

CRSE SEC 221 02 301 01 311 01 402 01 487 01 495 01

GERMANY CRN 30171 30172 30173 30174 30175 30176

CRN 30156 30157

CRN 30179 30180

July 1-August 9

TITLE INTENSIVE INTER FRENCH W/DRILL FRENCH CONVERSATION LIFE/ISSUES IN FREN-SPKNG WRLD ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION CONTEMPORARY IDEAS INDEPENDENT STUDY

CRSE SEC 201 01 202 01 301 01 302 01 402 01 404 01

TITLE INTERMEDIATE GERMAN WITH DRILL INTERMEDIATE GERMAN GERMAN CONVERSATION/COMPOSITN GERMAN CONVERSATION/COMPOSITN ADVANCED GERMAN CONVERSATION ADVANCED COMPOSITION & SYNTAX

TIME TBA TBA

HRS 6.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

INSTRUCTOR Gunlicks A Gunlicks A

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Ross A Ross A Ross A Ross A Ross A Ross A

Director: Dr. Katherine Bower (289-8099) GEN * COM2 * * * *

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

HRS 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA

HRS 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Bower K Bower K Bower K Bower K Bower K Bower K

Director: Dr. Richard Wright (287-6643)

May 18-June 16

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE CLSC 312 01 LAND OF HELLAS:ANC TOP/MOD LEG CLSC 499 01 IS: INDEPEN STUDY IN GREECE

BLDG TBA TBA

Director: Dr. Andrew Ross (287-6838) GEN COM2 * * * * *

May 17-June 7

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE IBUS 390 01 IBS:EURO ECON/BUS MGMT MSYS 347 01 ENTREPRENEURSHIP

GREECE

HRS 3.00 1.00

June 7-July 13

SUBJ GERM GERM GERM GERM GERM GERM

GREECE

Director: Dr. Arthur Gunlicks (289-8532)

BLDG TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Wright R Wright R

Director: Stuart Wheeler (289-8426) BLDG TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Wheeler S Wheeler S

Summer Study Abroad Programs continued on page 14

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SUMMER STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS ITALY CRN 30181 30182

May 27-June 28 SUBJ ITAL ITAL

JAPAN CRN 30183 30184 30185 30186 30187 30188 30189 30190

Directors: Lorenza Marcin (287-6809), Anthony Russell (289-8294)

CRSE SEC TITLE 301 01 ITALIAN CONVERSATION 497 01 ST:ITALIAN RENAISSANCE

HRS 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA

GEN

HRS 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

May 8-July 1

SUBJ JAPN JAPN JAPN JAPN JAPN JAPN JAPN JAPN

LONDON CRN 30191 30192

continued from page 13

CRSE SEC 101 01 102 01 201 01 202 01 301 01 302 01 495 01 496 01

INSTRUCTOR Marcin L Russell Marcin L Russell

Director: Akira Suzuki (289-8293)

TITLE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE JAPANESE CONVERSATION JAPANESE CONVERSATION INDEPENDENT STUDY INDEPENDENT STUDY

May 8-May 30

COM2

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A Suzuki A

Director: Walter Schoen (289-8266) Richard Waller (287-6614)

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE ART 322 01 SEMINAR IN MUSEUM STUDIES THTR 312 01 ST:THTR PROD/GREAT BRITAIN

LONDON INTERNSHIPS

BLDG TBA TBA

May 9-July 5

HRS 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Waller R Schoen W

Director: Krittika Onsanit (287-6499)

For information about the individual internships in London, contact the director.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS SEMINAR (LONDON) May 12-June 5 Director: Carol Lawrence (289-8553) For information about the International Business Seminar in London, contact the director.

RUSSIAN STUDIES CRN 30193 30194

SPAIN CRN 30195 30200 30196 30197 30198 30199

14

May 9-June 22

SUBJ CRSE SEC TITLE RUSN 496 01 IS:RUSN INTENSIVE LANG/CULT RUSN 497 01 ST:RUSSIAN CULTURE

June 22-August 4

SUBJ SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN

Director: Dr. Joseph Troncale (289-8118) HRS 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Troncale J Troncale J

Directors: Rosa Matorras (287-6042), Guiomar Fages (287-6043)

CRSE SEC TITLE 301 02 SPANISH CONVERSATION 305 02 SPANISH GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION 311 01 PEOPLES/CULTURES OF SPAIN 402 02 ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION 481 01 THE ARTS IN SPAIN 497 02 ST:CONTEMP SPANISH NARRATIVE

HRS 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

TIME TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

BLDG TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

INSTRUCTOR Matorras R Fages Matorras R Fages Matorras R Fages Matorras R Fages Matorras R Fages Matorras R Fages

Summer School 2002


C O U R S E

C O U R S E Accounting (ACCT) 201 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting. Basic theory, concepts and procedures necessary to develop and interpret financial (external) accounting data. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 202 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting. Basic theory, concepts and procedures necessary to develop and interpret managerial (internal) accounting data. Prerequisite: Accounting 201. 3 sem. hrs. June Term 300U Accounting for Non-Accountants. Analytical and interpretative approach to study of basic accounting. User’s approach rather than preparer’s approach used, emphasizing effects of transactions on financial statements; interrelationships among financial statements; and interpretation and use of financial statement information. Emphasizes underlying objective of accounting: to assist in making business and economic decisions. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term

Adult Education (ADED) 398U Selected Topics. ST: Employee Wellness for Business. 3 sem. hrs. May Term ST: Adult Learners and College Success. This course will prepare adult students to succeed in their chosen courses of study by introducing them to the demands of post-secondary education Cool.

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while strengthening their basic language/writing skills. We will focus on three areas: Reading and Writing Skills, Study Skills and Learning with Technology. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term

American Studies (AMST) 398 Selected Topics: Civil War in Film and Literature. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Archaeology (ARCH) 398U Selected Topics: Ancient Rome: Archaeology, History and Art. This class will explore the rise of civilization in Italy and the spread of Roman civilization through a study of Roman archaeology, history and art. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term

Art (ART) 212U Art Appreciation. Introduction to the arts, designed to broaden students’ background. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

105 Painting I. One-semester studio introduction to practice of painting. Will help student develop working understanding of methods and materials of oil painting while investigating basic of visual perception. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP) May Term, June Term 110 Photography I. Introduction to fundamental, technical, and aesthetic issues of black and white photography with emphasis on using medium for personal expression. Includes series of problems designed to increase understanding of basic camera operation, darkroom techniques, and artmaking strategies. History of photography will be included through study of past and contemporary photography. Adjustable camera required. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 122 Design I. Color theory, perception and interaction used in painting, collage and computer design to study basic principles of two-dimensional abstract design, composition and computer art. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

322 Seminar in Museum Studies. History, philosophy, functions and future of museums; collection research, evaluation, publications, and museum procedures and education. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

201 Drawing II. Continuation of Studio Art 101. Prerequisite: Studio Art 101. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term

Studio Art (ARTS)

205 Painting II. Continuation of Studio Art 105. Prerequisite: Studio Art 105. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term

101 Drawing I. One-semester studio course that explores fundamentals of representational drawing and visual perception, using pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and pastel. 3 sem. hrs. (FSVP) May Term, June Term

279 Selected Topics: Landscape Painting. Explores the techniques and concepts associated with landscape painting. Paintings will be created on location (in the field) and in the studio. The course 15


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examines landscape painting practices throughout art history. The course will pay special attention to “open air” practices, such as those of the Impressionists and Hudson River School, as well as to landscape painting’s evolution into 20th century conceptions of space and nature. This class is designed with flexibility to allow beginning and advanced students alike. 3 sem. hrs. July Term

301U Environmental Ethics. Examination of complexities of environmental relationships and issues including scientific knowledge, economical, political, social, and moral values within the United States and between countries of the world. Will explore alternative solutions to environmental problems from multiple perspectives through various value/moral systems. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

301 Drawing III. Continuation of Studio Art 201. Emphasis on advanced problems in drawing. Prerequisite: Studio Art 201. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term

Business Administration (BUAD)

305 Painting III. Continuation of Studio Art 205. Emphasis on advanced problems in painting. Prerequisite: Studio Art 205. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term 401 Drawing IV. Continuation of Studio Art 301. Emphasis on personal expression in drawing. Prerequisite: Studio Art 301. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term 405 Painting IV. Continuation of Studio Art 305. Emphasis on personal expression in painting. Prerequisite: Studio Art 305. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term

Biology (BIOL) 108 Environmental Biology. Basic ecological principles and selected topics in environmental science, including worldwide impact of growing human population, patterns of energy consumption, and issues of water quality, water management, land use, food production, and biological resources. Application of the scientific method will be incorporated in laboratory component. For nonscience majors. Will not serve as basis of further work in science nor meet entrance requirements for any health profession. Prerequisite: High school biology. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNB) May Term

201 Business Statistics. Theory, methodology, and applications of statistics to contemporary business problems. Includes Bernoulli and Poisson processes, sampling distributions, statistical inference, analysis in variance, regression, and correlation. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 203 Software Tools and Applications. Laboratory course that provides introduction to software packages with applications for business decision making. Emphasis on understanding spreadsheet applications, but includes sessions on word processing and graphics software and database searches. Open to first and second-year students only. 1 sem. hr. May Term 301 Quantitative Analysis for Business and Economics. Mathematical and statistical techniques and their applications to business decisions. Exposure to variety of useful quantitative techniques commonly used in various business disciplines. Prerequisites: Economics 101-102 and Business Administration 201 or Economics 270. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Chinese (CHIN) 302 Conversational Chinese. Development of competent aural, oral communication, and writing skills in Chinese, with stress on vocabulary extension, pronunciation, and grammatical and communicative accuracy. Materials in relation to business documents and transactions commonly used in China will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Chinese 202. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 312 Insights into Chinese Culture. Introduction to major current issues and influential figures on political, social, and in particular, cultural scenes of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with reference to relevant historical background. Prerequisites: Chinese 202. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 497-498 Selected Topics. Special interest topics offered at department’s discretion. Recent topics include Contemporary Readings in Culture, Literature, and History; and Romance. Prerequisite: Chinese 301 or permission of instructor. 3-3 sem. hrs. Abroad

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Classical Studies (CLSC) 312 Land of Hellas: Ancient TopographyModern Legacy. (Summer only.) Study of ancient remains of Bronze Age and Classical Greece and their role as a binding force for the ethnic and national identity of the modern country. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 499 Independent Study in Greece. Content adapted to the requirements and interests of participant. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Dance (DNCE) 256 Beginning Jazz Dance. Introduction to jazz dance as an eclectic form of artistic expression with emphasis on rhythm and technique. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term, July Term 260 Beginning Modern Dance. Introduction to modern dance as a diverse form of expression with development of language of movement. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Economics (ECON) 101-102 Principles of Economics. Microeconomics (101) provides students with the analytical perspective to think critically about the market system and the social objectives it may serve. Topics include supply and demand, market structure, production, market failure (e.g., pollution), and the benefits and costs of government intervention. Macroeconomics (102) is the study of national income determination within a global economy. Topics include inflation, unemployment, GDP determination, money supply, balance of payments, currency markets, and the role of fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisite: Economics 101 is prerequisite for 102. 3-3 sem. hrs. (101 only, FSSA) May Term -June Term 200 Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets. Role and functions of money; operation of financial institutions; structure and influence of Federal Reserve System; effects of money and credit on economic activity. Prerequisite: Economics 101 and 102. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 387U Macroeconomics for Teachers/ Demystifying the Market Place. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

Education (EDUC) 200U Foundations of Education. Social and philosophical foundations of education from historical and contemporary perspectives; overview of roles and responsibilities of teachers and schools of present and future. Introductory course for teacher education program. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

Summer School 2002


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310U Curriculum Methods. Comprehensive introduction to pedogoy to include principles of learning: application of skills in discipline and grade-specific methodology; selection and use of materials; Virginia SOLs and national curriculum standards; and evaluation of student performance. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 315U Introductory Internship. Involves extended observation experiences of teachers and students in the classroom. (Graded pass/fail). 2 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term 324U Reading in the Elementary School. Indepth examination of developmental nature of language and reading ability and its link to literacy development. Study of methods and materials associated with reading instruction. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term 330U Midterm Internship. Involves practical experience in interacting with teachers and students in the classroom. (Graded pass/fail) 2 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term 338U Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum I. Introduction to basic computer skills, e-mail, telecommunications, and Internet skills and appropriate use in the classroom. Exploration of issues and ethical factors that guide availability and effective use of instructional technologies. Integration of common and practical instructional technologies within the teaching and learning environment and across the curriculum. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the TLP Program. 2 sem. hrs. May Term, July Term 339U Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum II. Introduction to advanced instructional technology skills and software applications for use in the classroom. Study and research of theory and pedagogy related to use of instructional technology in all areas of curriculum. Integration of advanced instructional technologies and methods for appropriate use in teaching and learning environment. Prerequisite: Education 338U. 2 sem. hrs. May Term, June Term 398U Selected Topics: Curriculum Methods. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

Emergency Services Management (ESM) 301U Computers in Emergency Services. For emergency services managers. Demonstrates how to select, implement, manage, and employ technology systems (including Internet applications) to increase the effectiveness of incident detection and location, response management, and recovery. Prerequisite: Informations Systems 203U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term Cool.

307U Managing Emergency Operations. Covers management of complex emergency operations in field using incident management systems and role of emergency operations centers in directing disaster response. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 542U Economic Impact of Disaster. Will examine impact of disasters on economy of impacted areas and relative costs and benefits of various strategies for disaster mitigation, response, and recovery. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term

English (ENGL) 100A-100B Interdisciplinary Writing. (Summer only). Provides students with critical writing/reading skills within interactive computer classroom. Focus on frames of inquiry which inform various academic disciplines. Part I (100A) includes introduction to computer technology and critical reading and writing with emphasis on personal responses to individual texts (visual and print) drawn from across disciplines along with a short research-based assignment. Part II (100B) includes continuation of critical reading and writing with emphasis on cross-disciplinary texts, library skills orientation, research-based assignment, oral presentations and collaboration on creating a website. (Limited to Summer College students). 11 sem. hrs. June Term-July Term 100U The Research Process. Introduction to modern online library skills and research techniques needed for a successful academic experience. Includes work with online library catalogs, indexes, and internet research, and requires a directed research paper. Corequisite: English 101U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term

101U Composition. Elements of composition, grammar, rhetorical strategy, and reading. Particular emphasis on actual practice in writing, with one documented research paper. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 102U Professional Communication. Communication for professional world, with emphasis on memorandum, report and business letter. Prerequisite: ENGL 100U and 101U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 206 Selected Readings in American Literature. Selected works reflecting one or more major patterns in American literature. Specific emphasis may change from term to term and will be announced each term. 3 sem. hrs. June Term 217 The Bible and Literature. Study of representative texts from Hebrew bible and New Testament, and examination of their relationships to later works of drama, poetry, short stories, and the novel. 3 sem. hrs. (FSLT) May Term (Note: No 200level English course may be taken more than once for credit.) 220 Film Studies. History and aesthetics of the documentary film, from 1895 to present, with attention to the language of film and techniques of production. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 398U Selected Topics. ST: Selected Plays of Tennessee Williams. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term ST: Local Color Southern Writers and Popular Icons. Emphasis on writers who reflect language, customs, and the environs of the South, along with pop cultural figures in music, politics, and society. The class will travel to Tennessee, Mississippi, and 17


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New Orleans, Louisiana, to visit and study sites of writers, musicians, and cultural local color figures. Trip includes lectures and tours with local guides in each area. Two classes will meet before the trip for distribution of reading lists and academic preparation. The classes are: May 13 and 20. The trip is from June 2 to June 10. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 424 Topics in Film: American Crime Film. History and aesthetics of the American crime film, including silents, gangster, film noir, and contemporary suspense thrillers. Attention will be given to both film content (plot, themes, characters) and film style (cinematography, editing, music). Prerequisites: English 299 and one 300-level literature course or English 370 with grades of C (2.0) or better. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

Finance (FIN) 360 Principles of Financial Management. Analysis and examination of financing, investment and dividend decision of business organizations. Financial management in the global environment. Prerequisites: Accounting 201-202, Economics 101102, and Business Administration 201. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

French (FREN) 221 Intensive Intermediate French. Reinforcement of communicative language skills. Increased emphasis on reading, writing, and culture. Prerequisite: French 121 or permission of department. 6 sem. hrs. (COM2) May Term, Abroad 301 French Conversation. Development of competent speaking ability in French, with stress upon vocabulary expansion, pronunciation, and communicative accuracy, through representations of French culture in film and other media. Prerequisite: French 221 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 311 Life and Issues in the French-Speaking World. Exploration of significant themes and issues in contemporary French and Francophone culture set in the context of French history and cultural traditions. Prerequisite: French 221 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 402 Advanced French Conversation. Development of advanced speaking skills beyond 301 level. Prerequisite: French 301 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad Prerequisite to 400-level French literature courses are two of the following: French 321, 322, 323, 324, the equivalent, or permission of department.

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487 Contemporary Ideas. Readings and discussion of recent works which have provoked political or intellectual debate in France and the French-speaking world. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 495 Independent Study. Special projects individually pursued under supervision of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Geography (GEOG) 201U World Geography. Study of world by regions, with emphasis on cultural differences among nations. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

German (GERM) 201-202 Intermediate German. Active practice and reinforcement of language skills and study of culture. Prerequisite: German 102 or permission of department. German 201 is prerequisite to 202. 3-3 sem. hrs. (202 only, COM2) Abroad 301-302 German Conversation and Composition. Development of fluency through conversation on topics selected for learning most common idiomatic expressions. Practice in composition. German 321 or 322 may be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: German 202 or permission of department. 3-3 sem. hrs. Abroad 402 Advanced German Conversation. Discussion at advanced level of fundamental themes in development of German thought or production of German play. Prerequisite: German 301-302 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 404 Advanced Composition and Syntax. Advanced grammar, syntax, and stylistics. Prerequisite: German 301-302 or 305 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

History (HIST) 201 Ideas and Institutions of Western Civilization I. Topical study of western heritage from Classical Greece through Reformation. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT) June Term 202 Ideas and Institutions of Western Civilization II. Topical study of western heritage from rise of modern political concepts in seventeenth century to present. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT) May Term

280 People and Customs of the Middle East. Study of traditional ways of and newer influences on Islamic and other Middle Eastern people. Emphasis on cultural and religious beliefs and everyday life as revealed in first-hand accounts, literature, religious writing, and other texts. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT) May Term 300U Women and the American Experience. Survey of unique experience of women in history of U.S. from colonial times to present; attitudes held by and toward them; varied roles they have played in the nation’s development. 3 sem. hrs. June Term 398 Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs. ST: Killing in the Name of God. Every day people seem to be killing each other and all too often it is in the name of God. What is the reality behind the newspaper headlines? The history behind the conflict? Hear popular Cambridge (England)-based expert, Christopher Catherwood, make the complex simple. Be taught by someone who has written the books himself. 3 sem. hrs. July Term ST: Civil War in Film and Literature. 3 sem. hrs. May Term ST: Civil Rights Field Trip. This course combines traditional academic study of civil rights movement with visitation to significant sites in the South, interviews with local movement participants, and lectures/discussions with scholars of the movement. It will concentrate geographically on the Southeast: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Sea Islands, Georgia, and Tennessee. Although we will visit sites and individuals associated with the mass-based phase of the movement, ca. 1955-1964, the actual focus of the class will be the less studied, but critically important pre-1960 foundations. Students will visit with black participants of the labor based movements in Virginia and North Carolina, interracial voting rights activists from the Southern Conference movement, and organizers of the citizenship schools in South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. We have scheduled times for reflection at the Highlander Folk School, and in Cincinnati we will take the insights gained during the course and apply them to contemporary issues. We will travel by chartered bus and stay in hotels and university facilities at various locations. In addition to the tuition fee, there is a significant fee for travel, food and lodging. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

206 The United States since 1877. Analysis of American history through post-Reconstruction nineteenth century, Progressive, interwar, World War II, and post-World War II periods. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT) May Term

Summer School 2002


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Human Resource Management (HRM) 343U HR/Personnel Management. Survey of traditional human resources functions and their relation to effective personnel and organizational results. Examines recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, collective bargaining, labor relations, training, human resource and management development, salary administration, and promotions and their relationship to communication, motivation, and leadership in organization. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 345U Organizational Development. Organization’s purpose and effectiveness; identifies influencing variables, diagnostic techniques, strategies for planned change, and development of supportive systems; explores large and small group processes. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term 533U Research in HRM. HR professionals must be able to gather appropriate data, analyze it, and present it to line managers in a convincing way if they are to be strategic partners in the organization. Includes an overview of the design, delivery, and analysis of employee and client satisfaction surveys; use of market analysis and benchmarking data; and understanding the statistical profile of the workforce. Students with no background in basic statistics will be offered a self-paced tutorial prior to this course. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 534U Strategic Human Resource Development. Capstone Course. Includes an overview of business strategy and emphasizes the role of human resource management and development for effective strategy implementation. Models of organizational diagnosis and change, transformational leadership, reengineering, divesting, merging, acquiring, and downsizing are examined from a strategic and operational HR perspective. Students will examine project management skills and integrate their course work by undertaking a major company-based project. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term

Humanities (HUM) 205U Travel Through Literature. Vicarious travel through famous descriptions of journeys, explorations, and voyages, with writings from Marco Polo to Rudyard Kipling, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, and Paul Theroux. Lectures supplemented by slide presentations and films. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 208U Career and Life Development. Exploration of adult development and career topics to help students better understand how to successfully plan their lives. Focuses on stages of adulthood and transitions, skills assessments, career management strategies, lifebalance, and goal setting. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 346U History of Human Experience. Throughout human history men and women have sought refuge from a life that was nasty, brutish and short by ascending to the plain of creative expression. During the weeks of this course, students will examine the various ways in mankind has vetted this impulse. Through lecture, research and demonstration, the course will evince the human capacity to describe the surrounding world in visual, literary, plastic, and melodic articulation.3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 398U Selected Topics: Partners in the Arts. 3 sem. hrs. June Term (Limited to pre-registered special students) Special Date: June 24-28

Information Systems (ISYS) 203U Information Technology. Study of use of information technology in organizations to facilitate decision-making and to achieve competitive advantage. Specification of user requirements for development and enhancement of effective information systems. Computer assignments required. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term

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205U Introduction to Problem-Solving with Programming. Introduction to computer programming concepts applicable to any programming language. Development of analytical and problemsolving skills for programming in Windows environment. Includes top-down design and building blocks of structured programming. Computer assignments required. Prerequisite: ISYS 201U or ISYS 202U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 306U Systems Analysis and Design. Methods and techniques necessary for conducting systems project from preliminary investigation of project through system implementation and evaluation. Includes participation in one or more systems design projects. Prerequisites: ISYS 201U or 202U, and 203U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 308U Managing in an Information Age. Indepth look at how organizations are coping with challenges of managing in information age. Using case study method, management issues related to the Internet, electronic commerce, information for competitive advantage, designing and managing IT architecture, and approaches to IT implementation. Prerequisites: ISYS 203U. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 351U Web Design and Development. Planning and development of Web sites. Design elements including page layouts, graphics, color, hyperlinks, lists, tables, frames, formatting, and forms. HTML coding and use of Java scripts and Java applets. Study of fundamental elements used in e-commerce sites. Use of Microsoft Front Page. Computer assignments required. Prerequisite: Information Systems 201U and 203U, or equivalent proficiency. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term 388U Internship. 3 sem. hrs. Summer II TermSpecial Dates: May 13-August 6 398U Selected Topics. 3 sem. hrs. ST: Advanced Programming in Visual Basic. Advanced techniques for software development using Visual Basic. Windows environment. Prerequisite: ISYS 303U or permission of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term ST: Web Design and Dreamweaver. Plan, develop and manage Web sites using Dreamweaver basics, graphics, links, tables, forms and user interactivity. Learn more advanced features including libraries, templates, layers, CSS styles, pop-up windows, complex mouse rollovers, and animation using timelines. Extend Dreamweaver to check links, and generate reports. Prerequisites: ISYS 351U or equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term

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International Business (IBUS) 390 Selected Topics. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Italian (ITAL) 301 Italian Conversation. Development of competence in speaking and comprehension of Italian. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary expansion, pronunciation, and grammatical and communicative accuracy. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or 221. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 497 Selected Topics: Italian Renaissance. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Japanese (JAPN) 101-102 Elementary Japanese. Basic speaking, reading, and writing (hiragana, katakana, and simple kanji) with emphasis on oral performance in class. Prerequisite: Japanese 101 is prerequisite to 102. 4-4 sem. hrs. Abroad 201-202 Intermediate Japanese. Further development of skills in speaking, reading, and writing (approx. 250 kanji), continued emphasis on oral performance. Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or permission of department. Japanese 201 is prerequisite to 202. 4-4 sem. hrs. (COM2, 202 only) Abroad 301-302 Japanese Conversation. Continued development of speaking, reading, and writing (with concentration of joyo kanji list). Strong emphasis on contemporary oral language of Japan. Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or permission of department. Japanese 301 is prerequisite to 302. 3-3 sem. hrs. Abroad 495-496 Independent Study. Special projects individually pursued under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 33 sem. hrs. Abroad

Law (LAW) 398U Selected Topics. ST: First Amendment Law. An overview and analysis of the law on freedom of speech, religion, the press and privacy. (This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies.) 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term ST: Consumer Law. An overview of consumer protection, privacy and credit and banking laws. Special focus on Internet/E-commerce issues and the elderly, disabled and military as the “special classes of consumers.” (This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies.) 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term ST: Terrorism Law. An examination of the appellate court system and its litigation procedures. 20

(This class may be used as a focus course for Paralegal Studies.) 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week II Term

Leadership (LDSP) 302U Leadership and Ethical Action and the Law. Examines current ethical issues such as privacy, legal dilemmas, work place ethics, and trends in corporate and governmental ethics. Applied ethics course where students will attempt to resolve ethical dilemmas faced by leaders in specific situations common to various work place environments. Focus on understanding ethical meanings, contexts, paradigms, and models associated with executive decision making. Emphasizes critical thinking and oral and written communication skills as students read, analyze, debate in small groups, and make formal presentations. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term The following courses are restricted to leadership studies majors only. 488 Internship: Practicum. Applied experience in field of leadership studies. Observations of leaders in governmental, corporate, or non-profit settings. Graded pass/fail only. May not be taken prior to Spring semester of third year. Corequisite: Internship Seminar. 3 sem. hrs. Summer II Term 488 Internship: Seminar. Weekly seminar which accompanies Internship Practicum. May not be taken prior to Spring semester of third year. Corequisite: Internship Practicum. 3 sem. hrs. Summer II Term

Legal Assistant (LA) 306U Litigation. Basic elements of substantive law; investigation of facts, discovery and preparation for trial, commencement of law suit and trial, decision and settlement, file maintenance, and docket control. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term 398U Selected Topics: Legal Documents and Forms. Identifying and preparing the appropriate legal documents and forms for particular paralegal tasks in different areas of the law. Virginia documents and forms will be included. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term

Management (MGT) 341U Principles of Management. Fundamentals of management emphasizing application of scientific methods to the solution of business problems; illustrations from various types of organizations, including manufacturing and service industries, government, charitable, and other social institutions. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term 398U Selected Topics: Liberal Arts in Business. A fundamental business course designed specifically for liberal arts students. Topics include key concepts and principles in Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Economics, and Management. The course

will involve intensive classroom instruction, team projects, and a series of guest lectures by various business executives. In addition, students will learn how to develop and deliver business presentations competently and confidently. Ideally, students will develop an understanding of how they can leverage their liberal arts education in preparation for a future business career. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term

Management Systems (MSYS) 340 Operations Management. Variables and structure of business operations. Introduction to quantitative decision techniques in solving basic operating problems. Prerequisite: BUAD 201 or equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 347 Entrepreneurship. Process of new venture formation from idea generation to start-up. Emphasis on small business strategies, business plan mechanics, venture capitalization, and role of the independent entrepreneur in today’s society. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Marketing (MKT) 320 Marketing Management. Activities by which the planning and exchange of ideas, goods, and services are explained from inception to final consumption. Analysis of markets and their environment, development of marketing strategy, evaluation and control of marketing programs. Prerequisites: Accounting 201, 202 and Economics 101-102. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 321U Principles of Marketing. Institutions involved, functions performed, and problems encountered in getting goods and services from producers to consumers. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term 325 International Marketing. Global market and its influence on domestic as well as international marketing including cultural, political, and economic factors. Analysis includes screening of foreign markets for entry of U.S. products and subsequent development of market plans as well as strategic responses to effect of international trade on U.S. market. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) 500 Methods and Themes in Liberal Studies. This core course will provide an overview of modes of inquiry, analysis, and research particular to at least two of the following fields of study: Historical Studies, Literary Studies, Social Analysis, and the Visual and Performing Arts. A special theme (which will vary from term to term) will provide focus for the practical application of these methodologies. The course will also emphasize writing skills, Summer School 2002


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relevant computer technologies, and library use. To be offered in Fall and June summer semesters. Course must be taken no later than the second course credited toward the student’s program. 3 sem hrs. May Term

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milieu. Prerequisites: Admission to the University of Richmond with a TOEFL score of at least 530, but less than 630, or permission of instructor. 2 sem. hrs. 8 Week I Term

Physics (PHYS) 510 Jewish and Christian Basis of Western Civilization. Jewish and Christian religious experience as the preponderant expression in Western culture, emphasizing issues such as the Biblical bases undergirding and guiding the faith communities, Jewish and Christian relationships, the correlation of religious experience with individual and corporate values, and various cultural manifestations of faith’s commitments, as in art, literature, and architecture. 3 sem. hrs. June Term 570 Directed Study. Requires prior approval of the Coordinator. 1-3 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term 598 Selected Topics: Partners in the Arts. 3 sem. hrs. June Term (Limited to preregistered special educators.) Special Dates: June 24-28 599 Seminar in Liberal Studies. Discussion of selected readings designed to assist student’s drawing meaningful closure to the MLA program. Each student will develop a final project growing out of theme, interest, or topic that has served to integrate student’s program. Sharing of preparation and results of the projects will be essential component of the course. Course to be offered both Spring semester and July summer term each year and to be taken as final course in student’s program. 3 sem. hrs. July Term

Mathematics (MATH) 102 Problem Solving Using Finite Mathematics. Topics to demonstrate power of mathematical reasoning. Applications will be emphasized. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR) May Term 103U Finite Mathematics. Topics in finite mathematics designed to demonstrate the power of mathematical reasoning. 3 sem. hrs. 8-Week I Term 211 Calculus I. Derivative and integral; derivatives of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions; applications of curve sketching; applications to physical, life, and social sciences; Mean Value Theorem and its applications; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: High School pre-calculus. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSR) May Term

Modern Languages (MDLG) 200 English as a Second Language. Intensive work on advanced oral, reading, and composition skills for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis on reading comprehension, composition, and speaking skills appropriate for American college work, and on understanding of American cultural Cool.

125 Elements of Physics. Principles and applications of physics. Topics selected from mechanics, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, heat, and modern physics. For non-science majors. Includes laboratory. 4 sem. hrs. (FSNP) May Term

Political Science (PLSC) 240 Introduction to Comparative Politics. Concepts, approaches, classifications, and models useful in comparing political structures and processes. Political systems characteristic of countries with different cultures and levels of economic development. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA) May Term 250 Introduction to International Relations. Framework for analyzing contemporary international system: goals of nation-states and other actors: how such actors attempt to achieve their goals; and some forces which help or hinder attainment of goals. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA) May Term 379 Selected Topics. ST: VA Citizenship Institute. 3 sem. hrs. June Term ST: The EU, 2002 and Beyond. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad ST: Washington D.C. Summer Internship & National Policy Seminar. 4 sem. hrs. Summer II Term 390 Independent Study. 1 sem. hrs. Abroad

Psychology (PSYC) 299 Integrated Topics: Darwin and Psychology. Psychology is tied closely to biology, especially through common concerns about the nature and development of mental capacities, emotions, instincts, and behavior. This course will explore the development of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution and the subsequent impact of evolutionary theory on psychology, particularly in the work of William James, Sigmund Freud, and B.F. Skinner. 4 sem. hrs. May Term

Religion (RELG) 201 The Bible as Literature. Literary analysis of selected Biblical passages, with text viewed as autonomous entity. Attention to both intention of author(s) and message understood by recipient(s). Emphasis on student’s direct involvement in textual analysis. 3 sem hrs. (FSLT) June Term

School of Continuing Studies Students! Earn six credits this summer by taking this weekend course. Seating is limited! Class starts May 17th THE HISTORY OF HUMAN EXPRESSION Throughout human history men and women have sought refuge from a life that was nasty, brutish and short by ascending to the plain of creative expression. During the weeks of this course, students will examine the various ways in mankind has vetted this impulse. Through lecture, research and demonstration, the course will evince the human capacity to describe the surrounding world in visual, literary, plastic, and melodic articulation.

30221 HUM 346U 01 6.00 Semester hours Friday 6:00-8:30pm Saturday 9:00am-2:30pm

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230 The History of Israel. Israel’s historical development through collaborative study of Israel’s ideas and institutions within context of Ancient Near East. 3 sem. hrs. (FSHT) July Term 266 Television: Ethics for Hire? TV comedy and drama to determine ethical structures. To ask, does TV have a responsibility to say something and if so, who will decide about content? How is high culture related to popular culture in the area of ethical claims? Enrollment limited to a specified number of students of a given class standing and other criteria. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Rhetoric and Communication (RHCS) 101 Rhetoric and Public Address. Introduction to rhetoric as an idea and a practice. Emphasizes theories of rhetorical design processes, in particular, theories of invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery. 3 sem. hrs. July Term 105 Interpersonal Communication. Understanding of communication as transactional process and ecological system as part of our environment and as instrument for social action. Orientation toward communication contributing to effective interpersonal communication transactions. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA) May Term 201 Argumentation and Debate. In-depth introduction to principles of public advocacy. Skills-oriented course emphasizing casewriting, presentation, analysis, refutation, cross-examination and logical fallacies. Classroom practice. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Russian (RUSN) 496 Independent Study: Russian Intensive Language and Culture. Special projects individually pursued under supervision of faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

illness, and child and spouse abuse. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 309 Social Problems. Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment: physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; programs and methods of social treatment and control. Prerequisite: Sociology 101. 3 sem. hrs. May Term 313 Field Investigation of the Juvenile and Adult Criminal Justice Systems. Steps in adult and juvenile criminal justice processes from arrest through court procedures, incarceration. Innovative rehabilitative treatments. Students participate in a series of field experiences. Readings from sociological literature. Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or permission of instructor. 3 sem. hrs. May Term-Special Dates May 13-31 342 Dying, Death, and Grief. Analysis of current American attitudes toward death and dying. Social/ emotional responses of dying patient’s relatives, friends, and various helping professionals. Meaning and function of grief. Cross-cultural data included where possible. (Same as Health and Sport Science 342). 3 sem. hrs. May Term

Spanish (SPAN) 221 Intensive Intermediate Spanish. Reinforcement of communicative language skills. Increased emphasis on reading, writing, and culture. Prerequisite: Spanish 121 or permission of department. 6 sem. hrs. (COM2) May Term 301 Spanish Conversation. Further developing aural and oral communication skills and reviewing aspects of grammar problematic to nonnative speaker. Prerequisite: Spanish 221 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 305 Spanish Grammar and Composition. Grammar review with objective of developing writing skills. It is recommended that Spanish 301 be taken concurrently. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Prerequisites to Spanish courses above 410: Spanish 321 or 322 or 331 or 332 or permission of department. 481 The Arts in Spain. Emphasis on architecture, sculpture, painting, music; some attention to applied arts. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 497 Selected Topics: Argentine Short Story. Study of representative Argentine short stories from nineteenth to twentieth centuries. Attention given to technical aspects of literary narrative as well as cultural contexts within which each work was created. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad 498 Selected Topics. ST: The Latin American City: Past and Present. Study of representative Argentine short stories from nineteenth to twentieth centuries. Attention given to technical aspects of literary narrative as well as cultural contexts within which each work was created. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Speech (SPCH) 105U Interpersonal Communication. Survey of theory and practice relating to one-to-one communication. Exploration of role of communication and meaning in development of self, perceptions, and relationships. Introduction to social scientific study of communication. 3 sem. hrs. 8 Week II Term

Theatre Arts (THTR) 115 Theatre Appreciation. Theatre as collaborative art from perspective of audience member as critic. Observation and evaluation of theatre work in progress and performance with accent on field study and interaction with theatre professionals. Lab component: 8 hours, to be arranged. 3 sem. hrs. May Term, July Term 312 Selected Topics: Theatre Prod/Great Britain. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

497 Selected Topics: Russian Culture. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

311 Perspectives on Peoples and Cultures of Spain. Study of society, arts, history, and ideas of Spain. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Wellness (WELL)

Sociology (SOC)

312 Perspectives on Cultures and Nations of Latin America. Study of society, arts, history, and ideas of Latin America, particular attention will be given to Latin America. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

085 URAWARE: Alcohol Awareness Program. An alcohol prevention/education program designed to assist students in making positive decisions regarding alcohol issues. Students must satisfactorily complete this component of the wellness requirement their first semester on campus. Each session is a fourhour special date offering that includes activities, discussion, and personal assessment. Students are required to purchase a study guide from the bookstore prior to their session. 0 sem. hrs. (WEL1) May Term

101 Introductory Sociology. Fundamental concepts and principles of sociology. Culture, socialization, social structure, stratification, social control, institutions, population, and social change. 3 sem. hrs. (FSSA) May Term 305U Deviance. Social deviance at microsociological level, sociological explanations for and current methods of dealing with such behavior. Drug and alcohol abuse, sexual deviance, suicide, mental 22

402 Advanced Spanish Conversation. Development of advanced speaking skills to participate effectively in both formal and informal conversations, social and abstract topics. Prerequisites: Spanish 301 and 305 or permission of department. 3 sem. hrs. Abroad

Wellness 085 and both sections of Wellness 090 MUST be taken concurrently.

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090 PLUS2: Wellness Topics. The wellness topic component of the wellness requirement. Students will be offered a choice of health and wellness topics every semester. Sample topics include nutrition, sexual health, complementary medicine, and fitness. Students are required to satisfactorily complete two topics for graduation. Topic sessions run for six weeks, 90 minuets each week. Students are encouraged to complete this component of the wellness requirement before or during their junior year. 0 sem. hrs. (WEL2) May Term ST: Eating and Working Out. May Term ST: HIV/AIDS and Society. May Term (Beginning Summer 2000, the wellness topics carry no credit, but to cover cost of instruction are billed at tuition rate equivalent to .5 hours of credit for each.)

Women’s Studies (WMST) 303 Women in Television: Representations, Images, and Stereotypes. Examination of female roles in television drama, comedy, and advertising. Content analysis of selected programs and ads reflecting television history to reveal patterns of representation of women against a background of social attitudes and political actions. 3 sem. hrs. June Term

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379 Selected Topics. ST: Civil Rights Field Trip. This course combines traditional academic study of civil rights movement with visitation to significant sites in the South, interviews with local movement participants, and lectures/discussions with scholars of the movement. It will concentrate geographically on the Southeast: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Sea Islands, Georgia, and Tennessee. Although we will visit sites and individuals associated with the mass-based phase of the movement, ca. 1955-1964, the actual focus of the class will be the less studied, but critically important pre-1960 foundations. Students will visit with black participants of the labor based movements in Virginia and North Carolina, interracial voting rights activists from the Southern Conference movement, and organizers of the citizenship schools in South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. We have scheduled times for reflection at the Highlander Folk School, and in Cincinnati we will take the insights gained during the course and apply them to contemporary issues. We will travel by chartered bus and stay in hotels and university facilities at various locations. In addition to the tuition fee, there is a significant fee for travel, food, and lodging. 3 sem. hrs. May Term

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CONFIDENTIALITY University of Richmond procedures and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-380) as amended, prohibit the unauthorized release of confidential information about individual students. However, directory information is not considered to be confidential and may be published or otherwise released. The University of Richmond has designated the following items as directory information: student name; permanent, campus, local (off-campus), e-mail and campus computer network (IP) addresses, and associated telephone numbers; date and place of birth; major and/or minor fields of study; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height of members of athletic teams; dates of attendance; degrees and awards received; previous schools attended; and photographs. Further information on the University‘s policy is available on the Office of the University Registrar‘s web page at www.richmond.edu/ academics/registrar/ferpa.html or by contacting the Office of the University Registrar. A students may opt to have their directory information withheld. To exercise this option, the appropriate form must be obtained from the Office the University Registrar, completed and returned to that office. Once filed this form remains in effect until withdrawn in writing by the student to the Office of the University Registrar. For further information, contact the Office of the University Registrar (phone: 804/289-8400, e-mail: registrar@richmond.edu).

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act The security of all members of the campus community is of vital concern to the University of Richmond. Information regarding crime prevention advice, the law enforcement authority of the University Police, policies concerning the reporting of any crimes which may occur on the campus, and crime statistics for the most recent 3-year period may be requested from the University of Richmond Police Department, P.O. Box 296, University of Richmond, VA 23173.

RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO EDUCATION RECORDS The Family Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1) The right to inspect and review their records within 45 days of the date the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the University Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place the records may be inspected. 2) The right to request the amendment of education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University of Richmond to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University of Richmond decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University of Richmond has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfilled his or her professional responsibility. 4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Richmond to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605 The University of Richmond‘s complete FERPA Policy Statement is available as part of the Office of the University Registrar‘s Web page at www.richmond.edu/academics/registrar/ferpa.html or by contacting the Office of the University Registrar.

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INSTRUCTIONS

FOR

F O R

R E G I S T R A T I O N

REGISTRATION

The University of Richmond is pleased to bring you Web Registration via BannerWeb. If you encounter any problems or anomalies, please contact the Registrar’s Office immediately at registrar@richmond.edu or (804) 289-8639.

Registration Worksheet - Failure to follow these steps may result in registration errors. LOGGING INTO BANNERWEB 1. Log into BannerWeb directly from any computer with Internet access https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/. 2. Enter your University ID. This is usually your Social Security Number.

❏❏❏ ❏❏ ❏❏❏❏

3. Enter your PIN. If your PIN is your birthdate, you will be prompted to change it to a unique number. If you have forgotten your PIN, you must come to the Office of the University Registrar with a valid University ID to have it reset. 4. Re-enter your PIN. 5. Read and accept “Terms of Usage” by clicking CONTINUE. (You will only need to do this once per term.) 6. Click on STUDENT.

ADD/DROP CLASSES 1. To Add or Drop Classes, click on REGISTRATION. Click on ADD/DROP CLASSES. 2. Select the TERM that you wish to use. 3. Enter the TERM PIN that you received from your advisor. (Returning students who have been previously advised and registered will not need their TERM PIN.) TERM PINs are not applicable to Law and SCS students. 4. Enter the CRNs (Course Request Numbers) for the classes you wish to ADD to your schedule in the ADD CLASS boxes at the bottom of the page. 5. Use the ACTION pull-down boxes to DROP classes from your current schedule. 6. When finished, click on SUBMIT CHANGES to submit your requests. Always scroll to the right to check the registration status of your courses. You are registered in the class if the status reads “Registered” or “Web Registered.” Errors, if any, will be displayed at the bottom of the page. 7. To CONFIRM and PRINT your schedule, return to the STUDENT menu (button at top right) and click STUDENT DETAIL SCHEDULE. 8. EXIT BannerWeb by clicking on EXIT at the top right of the page. For maximum security, always close your browser.

LOOK UP CLASSES TO ADD and COURSE AVAILABILITY 1. From the REGISTRATION menu, click LOOK-UP CLASSES TO ADD. (If you have not already done so, select the TERM you wish to use.) 2. Select the critieria that you want to use in your search. You must select at least one SUBJECT. Click on GET CLASSES to execute your search. 3. Classes returned with a CHECKBOX on the left column are open for registration. To register, click the CHECKBOX and click the REGISTER button at the bottom of the page. If prompted, enter the TERM PIN that you received from your advisor. Errors, if any, will be displayed at the bottom of the page. 4. Classes returned with the letter “C” in the left column are CLOSED. 5. If classes are returned without a CHECKBOX, then you are not allowed to register at the present time. However, you can still check COURSE AVAILABILITY by scrolling completely to the RIGHT of the page. A “C” will always display when a course is closed even when it is not your time to register. 6. To CONFIRM and PRINT your schedule, return to the STUDENT menu (button at top right) and click STUDENT DETAIL SCHEDULE. 7. EXIT BannerWeb by clicking on EXIT at the top right of the page. For maximum security, always close your browser.

BE SURE TO PRINT YOUR SCHEDULE BEFORE EXITING BANNERWEB! Cool.

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Additional Information Through BannerWeb, you can register for classes, drop classes, view your schedule, view your grades for a specific term, and view your unofficial University of Richmond transcript. You are responsible for all activity on your BannerWeb account including PIN maintenance, registration, and security. If you have questions or need assistance with any aspect of BannerWeb, please contact the Office of the University Registrar at registrar@richmond.edu or (804) 289-8639.

Important Notes about Security • It is strongly recommended that you change your PIN number frequently. See instructions below. If you forget your PIN and wish to have it temporarily reset back to your birth date, you must come to the Office of the University Registrar during normal business hours and present your student ID. PIN reset requests will only be accepted in person. • To protect your privacy, BannerWeb will automatically terminate a session if there are more than five minutes of inactivity. Should this occur, you will need to repeat the login process and start your session again. • You should always close your browser after exiting your BannerWeb session. • BannerWeb will not allow you to be logged in from different computers at the same time. If this occurs, your session will be terminated.

Logging In BannerWeb is a secured web site that may be accessed over the Internet through the Registrar’s homepage: http://www.richmond.edu/~registr/ Or, via the following link: https://bannerweb.richmond.edu/ A valid University ID number (usually your Social Security number) and PIN are required to access BannerWeb. Your PIN number always starts as your date of birth without dashes or slashes in the MMDDYY format. You will be prompted to change your PIN when you first log into BannerWeb. You may change your PIN at any time by accessing the Personal Information Menu. See the “Change PIN” section below for more information.

Personal Information Menu • Change PIN: It is highly recommended that you change your PIN number frequently. PIN numbers must be numeric and contain 6 digits. Key in the new PIN carefully. • View Address and Phone: Verify your active addresses and phone numbers that are currently in Banner. To make changes, contact the Office of the University Registrar. • Name Change Information: Learn how to officially change your name. • Social Security Number Change Information: Learn how to officially change or update your Social Security records. • View E-mail Addresses: View your active University e-mail addresses that are currently in Banner.

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A N D

B O A R D

A P P L I C A T I O N

A P P L I C AT I O N

2002 Summer Session: University of Richmond Summer School NAME ________________________________________________________ SOCIAL SECURITY # ______________________________ ❒ MALE

❒ FEMALE

E-MAIL ADDRESS ________________________________________________ DAYTIME PHONE ________________________________ PERMANENT ADDRESS __________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP ________________________________________________ HOME PHONE __________________________________ CLASS YEAR AT END OF SPRING 2002 ❒ SOPHOMORE ❒ JUNIOR

❒ SENIOR

❒ GRADUATED

INDICATE SESSION APPLYING FOR: SESSION

DATES

COST

APPLICATION DUE

❒ MAY TERM

MAY 12-JUNE 8, 2002

$645

APRIL 15, 2002

❒ JUNE TERM

JUNE 9-JULY 6, 2002

$645

MAY 20, 2002

I ANTICIPATE TAKING 4-WEEK JUNE TERM BUT AM NOT YET ENROLLED:

❒ YES

❒NO

ROOMATE PREFERENCE: There is no guarantee you will receive the roommate you request. Students will be housed together according to the length of time they need housing for the summer. We are not accepting requests for roommates for the entire apartment, but you may request a particular roommate for your bedroom. The requested roommate must submit his/her application and pay all fees by the due date in order for the request to be considered. Name of Requested Roommate ____________________________________________________

PAYMENT METHOD: ❒ CHECK ATTACHED (made payable to “University of Richmond”) ❒ IF PAYING BY CREDIT CARD, PLEASE CALL (877) 237-9734. (There is a fee for using this credit card service.)

IMPORTANT: Students must be enrolled in a course before room and board will be approved. Roommate preferences must complete and pay for their housing no later than April 15, 2002 (for May Term housing) and May 20, 2002 (for June Term housing) in order to be considered to live together. A late fee of $50 will be charged to applications not received by April 15, 2002 (for May Term housing) and May 20, 2002 (for June Term housing). I understand that the cost of Room & Board includes the required 19-meal plan for credit bearing classes during May and June Terms. ________________________________________________________ Signature

CHECK-IN INFORMATION TERM

CHECK-IN DATE

CHECK-IN TIME

LOCATION

MAY TERM

MAY 12, 2002

12:00-4:00 p.m. 6:00-9:00 p.m.

WHITEHUST UFA 600

JUNE TERM

JUNE 9, 2002

1:00-5:00 p.m.

UFA 600

You must pick up your key during these dates and times. There will be no check-in available outside these dates and times. If you arrive late, you must come to Whitehurst the following business day. There will be NO exceptions. Plan ahead!

RETURN COMPLETED FORM WITH PAYMENT TO: STUDENT ACCOUNTS, SARAH BRUNET HALL

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R O O M

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A P P L I C AT I O N

2002 Summer Session: University of Richmond Summer School NAME ________________________________________________________ SOCIAL SECURITY # ______________________________ ❒ MALE

❒ FEMALE

E-MAIL ADDRESS ________________________________________________ DAYTIME PHONE ________________________________ PERMANENT ADDRESS __________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP ________________________________________________ HOME PHONE __________________________________ CLASS YEAR AT END OF SPRING 2002 ❒ SOPHOMORE ❒ JUNIOR

❒ SENIOR

❒ GRADUATED

INDICATE SESSION APPLYING FOR: SESSION

DATES

COST

APPLICATION DUE

❒ MAY TERM

MAY 12-JUNE 8, 2002

$645

APRIL 15, 2002

❒ JUNE TERM

JUNE 9-JULY 6, 2002

$645

MAY 20, 2002

I ANTICIPATE TAKING 4-WEEK JUNE TERM BUT AM NOT YET ENROLLED:

❒ YES

❒NO

ROOMATE PREFERENCE: There is no guarantee you will receive the roommate you request. Students will be housed together according to the length of time they need housing for the summer. We are not accepting requests for roommates for the entire apartment, but you may request a particular roommate for your bedroom. The requested roommate must submit his/her application and pay all fees by the due date in order for the request to be considered. Name of Requested Roommate ____________________________________________________

PAYMENT METHOD: ❒ CHECK ATTACHED (made payable to “University of Richmond”) ❒ IF PAYING BY CREDIT CARD, PLEASE CALL (877) 237-9734. (There is a fee for using this credit card service.)

IMPORTANT: Students must be enrolled in a course before room and board will be approved. Roommate preferences must complete and pay for their housing no later than April 15, 2002 (for May Term housing) and May 20, 2002 (for June Term housing) in order to be considered to live together. A late fee of $50 will be charged to applications not received by April 15, 2002 (for May Term housing) and May 20, 2002 (for June Term housing). I understand that the cost of Room & Board includes the required 19-meal plan for credit bearing classes during May and June Terms. ________________________________________________________ Signature

CHECK-IN INFORMATION TERM

CHECK-IN DATE

CHECK-IN TIME

LOCATION

MAY TERM

MAY 12, 2002

12:00-4:00 p.m. 6:00-9:00 p.m.

WHITEHUST UFA 600

JUNE TERM

JUNE 9, 2002

1:00-5:00 p.m.

UFA 600

You must pick up your key during these dates and times. There will be no check-in available outside these dates and times. If you arrive late, you must come to Whitehurst the following business day. There will be NO exceptions. Plan ahead!

RETURN COMPLETED FORM WITH PAYMENT TO: STUDENT ACCOUNTS, SARAH BRUNET HALL

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I N F O R M A T I O N

I N F O R M AT I O N

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F O R M

F O R M

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N E W

S T U D E N T

A P P L I C A T I O N

This form should be used only by new students. Others should register via BannerWeb.

If you need housing (May and/or June Terms), please fill out Room and Board Application on page 27. Send completed form with your payment to: School of Continuing Studies, Summer School Office, University of Richmond, VA 23173. Cool.

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