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Juan Shan, PhD

Gerald Ardito, DPS

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Angela M. Legg, PhD

Focus on Faculty Meet Six of Our Newest Stars

Jason J. Czarnezki

Time flies! Nick Catalano marks 50 years at Pace

Philip G. Cohen

Surprising stories behind our sculptures

Kyeongra Yang, PhD, RN

University receives largest research grant ever

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Put Our Talent to Work for Your Company As a member of the Pace Community, you are familiar with the quality and diversity of our students: the breadth of their experience; their real-world know-how; their initiative, motivation, and desire.

+ 3,000+ regional and global employers work with Career Services annually.

Pace University’s CAREER SERVICES

Your company can be one of thousands of regional and global employers—in a range of industries—that work with Pace University’s Career Services team and tap into outstanding Pace talent for both internships and new hires. For more information, visit

www.pace.edu/careers .


Dear Pace Families, Each fall, a new crop of students (or future alumni, as I think of them) enters our doors and brings a palpable energy and excitement. They are so full of enthusiasm and life. Why shouldn't they be? Working every day with Pace's incredible alumni, I know firsthand what the future can hold for these bright young people. Their optimism and idealism is wholly warranted—the world, as they say, is their oyster. The Pace Community abounds with opportunities for students to learn about themselves, gain practical experience, meet professionals in their field, research with faculty members, and, in short, prepare a strong foundation for the rest of their lives. Each day, I see students partnering with faculty and staff members around the campus to help build our community and create the Pace experience. It seems that as soon as the semester starts, Thanksgiving is at our doorstep, kicking off the holiday season. I am reminded of the beauty of this national ritual when I talk to our international students who are experiencing it for the first time. My heart fills with gratitude for this special community and for the part that you, our families and students, play in it. You are part of a wonderful continuum that is reaffirmed with the rhythms of each new academic year. You are partners in supporting the students, role models, and a network for helping build the future for our students. The following pages will give you a window into the wonderful things that are happening at Pace right now. Come to campus this fall and see for yourself. I promise that you will be warmly welcomed. In gratitude,

Jennifer Bernstein pacealum@pace.edu (877) 825-8664

PACE.EDU

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The Lubin Advantage Attracting today’s top employers and tomorrow’s business leaders.

UNIQUELY ACCREDITED

One of only 2% of business schools worldwide accredited for business and accounting

3,000+

#1

Employers work with Career Services annually

PRESTIGIOUS RECOGNITION For finance programs

Biggest internship placement program in Metro NY

TOP 15%

WHO HIRES LUBIN STUDENTS?

Payscale.com: Best ROI on college investment

86% Job placement overall

DIVERSE COMMUNITY

947 international students from 81 countries

PROGRAMS 23

Graduate

100%

Undergraduate

Job placement of graduates with BBA/MBA

Clubs and organizations

19

115+

Opportunities to study in 22 countries in Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa for two weeks

LOCATION Lubin alumni invite students to visit the New York Stock Exchange, Federal Reserve, and top media and financial companies

Lubin School of Business

Pace University

22

www.pace.edu/lubin


Pace University

| Fall 2014

Departments 05 Letter from the President 07 Keeping Pace • Convocation 2014 • New trustees join Pace Board • Students become latest to win Fulbright awards • Performing Arts enters  a new stage

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• eLab wins grant to help veterans • DiBenedetto receives  faculty award • Schimmel begins new season • NSF grant is Pace's largest ever

32 Research at Pace 36 Bookshelf 38 Class Notes

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Focus on Faculty

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50 Years at Pace

An exemplary faculty has always been at the heart of the Pace experience, and never more so than today. In just the past five years, the University has added 140 new faculty members across its six schools and colleges. Meet some of our latest stars.

43 Upcoming Events 44 Flashback

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Nick Catalano, PhD, professor of English in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, recently celebrated a rare milestone: half a century on the faculty of the same educational institution. We asked him to reflect on some of the highlights.

40

26 The Art of Pace

Many of us rush past them every day and hardly notice, but Pace is home to a diverse collection of 19th, 20th, and 21st century sculptures, all with their own stories to tell. A look at just some of the artworks that grace our campuses.

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First step

Pace Magazine

Vo lu me XXX I N o. 2 Fa ll 2 014

PRESIDENT

Stephen J. Friedman VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS AND CMO

Frederica N. Wald

CHIEF OF CONTENT AND CREATIVE, GENERAL MANAGER

Peter Sikowitz

First job

First gift

DIRECTOR, CONTENT AND EDITORIAL

Greg Daugherty ART DIRECTOR

Do you have a favorite Pace story? Is there a teacher who inspired you? Do you want to suggest an article or feature? If so, we’d love to hear from you. Please send correspondence to: Pace Magazine One Pace Plaza New York, NY 10038 or e-mail us at URnews@pace.edu

Maria Taffera Lewis ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL CONTENT

Tiffany Lopes

MANAGER, SOCIAL MEDIA AND EDITORIAL

Alyssa Cressotti

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

William Caldwell, Sofia Dupi PROOFREADER

Kaitie O’Hare

ART SERVICES

Morgan Jordan, Jeffrey Kurland PRODUCTION

Maria De La Cruz DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED MARKETING/ ACCOUNT SERVICES

Wendy Metzger

Pace Magazine is a publication of the Department of Marketing and Communications, Office of University Relations, published twice a year, and distributed free to alumni and friends of Pace University. The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of its staff or of Pace University.

EDITORIAL OFFICE

Pace Magazine Department of Marketing and Communications One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038 Phone: (212) 346-1218 E-mail: URnews@pace.edu

Consider making a gift to Pace University! Your contribution—no matter its size—helps support the education of current and future students. To learn more, visit www.pace.edu/givetopace or contact annfund@pace.edu.

SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO:

Office of Alumni Relations Pace University One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038 Phone: (212) 346-1489 Fax: (212) 346-1210 E-mail: pacealum@pace.edu Copyright © 2014 Pace University

Pace University is committed to achieving full equal opportunity in all aspects of University life. Pursuant to this commitment, the University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age, ethnicity, marital status, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, disability, or veteran status.


Letter from the

President

Focused on Our Future, Proud of Our Past This issue of Pace Magazine focuses on some of our newer faculty members and their exciting contributions to Pace University and our students. We are also fortunate to hear from Nick Catalano, PhD, one of our longest-tenured faculty members. Professor Catalano joined Pace in Pleasantville about the same time the Beatles first appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show. He has witnessed a half-century worth of thrilling changes and growth at Pace. These two features encapsulate a renewing, evolving University that is as focused on its future as it is proud of its past. Pace has enriched the lives of young men and women for more than a century—helping thousands of thinking professionals forge exciting careers and rewarding lives. But as one generation of students exits, another generation steps forward. Each generation looks to succeed in a unique, increasingly diverse world. Pace stays one, two, and even three steps ahead of these driven young men and women through a process of renewal that focuses on global trends and industry needs, while leveraging a proud heritage of exceptional classroom instruction

and real-world, experiential learning opportunities. Today you see this renewal throughout the University. The professors you’ll meet in this issue of Pace Magazine are just a few of the 140 new faculty members to join our ranks in the last five years. Our curricula also continuously evolve. For example, our College of Health Professions recently announced a new Bachelor of Science in Health Science, while our very successful Performing Arts program led to the creation of our new Pace School of Performing Arts. There were more than 3,000 applications for 160 performing arts places in this fall’s freshman class. The entrepreneurship program is growing and sprouting new offshoots, and there are new management concentrations ranging from sports marketing to health care management. New programs are emerging in all our schools and colleges. Our Westchester and New York City campuses illustrate some of the most vivid signs of Pace’s renewal. After three years of reviewing architects’ renderings, financial projections, and construction plans, we can already see that the reality will match our dream for the Westchester Campus in Pleasantville.

President Friedman addresses the audience at the Spirit of Pace Awards dinner, held at the American Museum of Natural History.

PACE’S PROCESS OF RENEWAL FOCUSES ON GLOBAL TRENDS AND INDUSTRY NEEDS WHILE LEVERAGING A PROUD HERITAGE OF EXCEPTIONAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION AND REAL-WORLD, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES.

The new Environmental Center is beginning to take shape, and before long, two beautiful new residence halls and a redesigned Kessel Student Center will teem with student life. In New York City, we opened a new Performing Arts Center for our performing arts students, installed a technology-driven patient treatment simulation lab for our College of Health Professions students, created new studio space for our art students, and are in the midst of building new state-of-theart laboratories for our science students. We have opened a new residence hall and have another under construction within walking distance of One Pace Plaza in Lower Manhattan— bringing more students closer to the tech companies and financial institutions that are shaping our world’s future. I’m very proud of our ongoing renewal at Pace and grateful to the countless faculty members and professionals from every corner of the University and beyond who have poured their hearts and professional expertise into hard and imaginative work. We share a common goal—to provide a university experience that will propel our students to success in business, government, the arts, and the nonprofit world. Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman President

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MAKE PACE PART OF YOUR LEGACY How can you make a difference? Did you know that leaving part of your estate to Pace can improve the lives of future generations of Pace students? In fact, nearly 300 Pace alumni and friends have already taken the step of including Pace in their long-term planning.

It’s easy to include Pace in your will, trusts, life insurance, or retirement plans—you can even simply open a bank account and name Pace as a future beneficiary. Gifts of this kind will ensure that your legacy is represented at Pace while also providing potential tax benefits to you or your family.

TO LEARN MORE: Please visit our planned giving website at www.pace.edu/plannedgiving or contact our director of planned giving, Marc Potolsky, at (212) 346-1619 or mpotolsky@pace.edu.


KeepingPace Pace University

CONVOCATION

2014

Pace welcomed the Class of 2018 in September, with Convocation ceremonies on the New York City and Westchester campuses. Melissa Cardon, PhD, professor of management and director of the Business Honors Program at the Lubin School of Business, was the keynote speaker in Westchester, while Joseph F. Ryan, PhD, professor and chair of the MA in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals at the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, spoke in NYC. Both focused on this year’s theme, “Finding and Pursuing Your Passion.” Two excerpts:

“Finding your passion is really about finding

“I will give you two strategies. One, shoot for

yourself. Not who other people want you to be,

the stars. The worst that’s going to happen is

including moms and dads, roommates, friends,

you will end up on top of the mountain. Second,

boyfriends, or girlfriends, but who you are—what

ask questions, don’t be afraid to ask questions.

you most enjoy doing, what you truly believe

Sometimes when you ask questions, you get

about the world around you, and how you define

good answers.”

—Joseph F. Ryan

yourself as an individual.” —Melissa Cardon

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KeepingPace

New Trustees Join Pace Board ≥ Two new members

were elected to the Pace Board of Trustees in May. They are Nancy A. Garvey, PhD, and Joseph R. Ianniello ’90. They join another recent addition to the Board, Susan S. Wallach, who was elected in November of last year. n Garvey is retired from her position as vice president and controller at AlliedSignal. She served as vice president and treasurer and staff vice president for investor relations in her 11-year career at AlliedSignal, from 1986 to 1997. Prior to AlliedSignal, Garvey worked for

Garvey

General Motors Corporation in various financial roles and at the Institute for Demographic and Economic Studies as a senior research associate. She is a member and serves as chairman of the board at the Bronx Preparatory Charter School and is also a trustee for her alma mater, Barnard College. In addition, she is a member of

the Advisory Board of the Museum of Natural History. Garvey earned a PhD in Economics from Columbia University and, while writing her dissertation, served as an economics instructor at Columbia University and Rutgers University. She earned her BA in Economics from Barnard College in 1971. Garvey was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the Bank Street College of Education in 2005. Her son, Zach, is currently a Pace student. n Ianniello serves as chief operating officer for CBS Corporation. Previously, he served as chief financial officer and was responsible for the company’s

financial strategy across all of its operations, including mergers and acquisitions and risk management. Ianniello held other positions at CBS beginning in 2006, including senior vice president, chief development officer, and treasurer.

Ianniello ’90

Ianniello previously held several positions at Viacom, including senior vice president and treasurer, as well as vice president of corporate development, where he oversaw identifying and assessing potential mergers and acquisitions for the company. He also spent

seven years with KPMG in various capacities. In 2013, Ianniello was ranked the #1 chief financial officer by investors and sell-side analysts in Institutional Investor’s annual “All-America Executive Team” survey. He serves on the board of directors of New Alternatives for Children, Inc. as well as Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE). Ianniello earned his BBA from Pace and an MBA from Columbia University. n Wallach served as a member of the Harvard University Board of Overseers from 2005 to 2011 and is currently chair of the dean’s advisory council at the Radcliffe Institute

Pair from Pace Become Latest to Win Fulbright Awards ≥ Two Dyson College of Arts and

Sciences students have been awarded U.S. Student Fulbright awards for 2014–2015. La Reina Lawrence, an art history major on the New York City Campus, is travelling to Spain for an English teaching assistantship and research. Nickesha Chung, an environmental science major on the Westchester Campus, is researching public health in Swaziland.

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Sponsored by the US Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the US Student Fulbright Scholarship Program offers fullyfunded opportunities worldwide to conduct individual research or artistic projects, study at a foreign university, and teach English at multiple levels. Since 2002, Pace has had 41 Fulbright award-winners. Their

projects have included helping victims of sex trafficking in Bangladesh, developing peace parks in Uganda, and researching sustainable fishing policies in Norway. n


KeepingPace

Wallach

for Advanced Study at Harvard. As a trustee of Radcliffe College, she played a central role in the negotiations between Radcliffe College and Harvard University leading to the creation of the Radcliffe Institute in 2000. In 2012, she received the Harvard Medal for extraordinary service to the university. She is currently a trustee of Deerfield Academy and a director of the Harvard Law School Association of New York City, as well as a member of advisory councils or committees at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Columbia University, New York University, and Louisiana State University. She graduated cum laude from both Harvard/ Radcliffe College and Harvard Law School. Wallach retired in 2005 from law practice after 34 years. She spent much of her career at the law firm of Schulte Roth & Zabel in New York. n

A School Is Born: Performing Arts Enters a New Stage

Students in the new School of Performing Arts can train in both classical and commercial dance.

≥ Pace’s new School of Performing Arts made

its debut this past May, becoming Manhattan’s first new performing arts school in nearly 50 years. The Board of Trustees approved transforming the long-established undergraduate performing arts program into a school within the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. As a school, Pace Performing Arts will be competitive with the leading performing arts undergraduate training destinations in the US, making Pace an even more attractive place for young artists. The University’s performing arts program has experienced unprecedented growth in reputation, applications, and enrollment over the past three years. To accommodate the leap in enrollment, it moved into a 50,000 square foot building at 140 William Street in downtown Manhattan in the summer of 2013. In the last two years, Pace established several new or redesigned degree programs that address gaps in performing arts education and better prepare students for successful careers. As of September, the Pace School of Performing Arts has introduced three new performing arts majors: a new Bachelor of Fine Arts in Acting for Film, Television, Voice-overs, and Commercials; a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design and Production for Stage and Film; and a Bachelor of Arts in Stage Management. The new acting major is the first undergraduate program in the US focused entirely on training actors for work in front of the camera and microphone. The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Commercial Dance, established earlier, is the only program of its kind in New York City, offering comprehensive dance training that bridges the gap between classical dance technique and the professional world of commercial dance. n

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KeepingPace

Law School’s Energy and Climate Center Names Executive Director

Pace eLab Wins Grant to Help Vets ≥ Pace University

was awarded one of six $50,000 grants from the Blackstone Charitable Foundation in May to support veterans’ employment and business development. More than 200 organizations submitted proposals for the first annual grants. Other winners included Cornell University and Texas A&M University. The grant will support a series of intensive seven-week Entrepreneurship Boot Camps at Pace’s Entrepreneurship Lab for up to 96 veterans in the TriState area, beginning this fall. Part of the Lubin School of Business, the Entrepreneurship Lab (eLab) offers students a space to collaborate and innovate. All undergraduate and graduate Pace students are welcome to register to access the lab. Veterans who would like additional information about the boot camps are invited to contact the program director, Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, at bbachenheimer@pace.edu. More information is also available at  www.pace.edu/elab. n

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≥ Karl R. Rábago has been

named executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, an interdisciplinary law and policy think tank at the School of Law in White Plains. He has also been appointed a Professor for a Designated Service. Before joining Pace, Rábago ran a consulting practice. He has also served as vice president with Austin Energy, one of the leading electric utilities in the country for promoting Rábago energy efficiency and renewable energy. He was regulatory affairs director for the AES Corporation, a Fortune 200

Professor Makes Waves with Paper on Einstein’s Brain

independent power producer operating in 21 countries; a commissioner with the Texas Public Utility Commission; and a deputy assistant secretary for utility technologies at the U.S. Department of Energy. Rábago earned an LLM degree in Environmental Law at Pace Law School, an LLM in Military Law at the U.S. Army Judge Advocate’s School, a JD with honors at the University of Texas Law School, and a BBA in Business Management from Texas A&M University. He has taught law at the University of Houston Law Center and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. n

≥ Though Albert

Einstein has been dead since 1955, his brain was back in the headlines this past summer, thanks to a provocative paper in the neuroscience journal Brain and Cognition by Terence Hines, PhD, professor of psychology in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Hines’ research challenged earlier studies that claimed Einstein’s

brain, pieces of which were preserved following his autopsy, differed from the average brain in external shape and cellular structure, possibly explaining his intellectual prowess. Hines found no evidence for such claims, news that was reported by media outlets worldwide. n


KeepingPace

Cross Country and Swimming and Diving Get New Head Coaches n Alexander Bean has joined

the Pace Athletics Department as head coach for the men’s and women’s cross country programs. Formerly the assistant cross country coach at SUNY New Paltz, Bean was an All-State and All-American honoree at Somers High School in Westchester County and an All-Big East selection in track and field at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He received his BA in Philosophy from Georgetown in 2011. n Dan Allen has been named head coach for the men’s and women’s swimming and diving programs. Allen comes to Pace after four seasons as the head coach for Buffalo State College’s men’s and women’s swimming and diving programs. Before Buffalo State, he was the head coach at Salem International University in Salem, West Virginia, for one season. Allen is a 2006 graduate of SUNY Geneseo. n

A Tree Grows in Pleasantville ≥ The copper beech tree that

towered over the traffic circle in front of Marks Hall and shaded generations of Pace students finally succumbed to age and disease in the summer of 2013. A new copper beech, shown at right, was planted in its place in a ceremony this past April. The old tree played a central role not only on the Westchester Campus but also in Pace lore. As Marilyn E. Weigold explained in her 1991 book Opportunitas, when Wayne Marks ’28 and his wife, Helen, donated their property to Pace in 1962, “There was only one string attached to the gift: an informal understanding that a gigantic copper beech tree near the house… would remain undisturbed.” The new tree will carry on that tradition. n

Athletics Kicks Off New Website for Setters Fans The Pace University Athletics Department has a new website: www.PaceUAthletics.com. The highly interactive platform allows Setters fans to easily access game schedules, player stats, video highlights, and information on all 14 varsity sports. Visitors can also watch games and events live in high definition throughout the school year, through the site’s video portal, “Watch Pace Live.” A mobile version of the new website can be accessed by visiting www.PaceUAthletics.com on your smart phone. n

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KeepingPace

Kevin Spacey Foundation Funds New Scholarships

DiBenedetto Receives Faculty Award ≥ Joseph C. DiBenedetto,

a professor of accounting in the Lubin School of Business who has taught Pace students for more than 40 years, received the 2014 Homer and Charles Pace Faculty Award at the Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner this past June at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The prize is given to a faculty member whose commitment to education has had a transformative effect

on generations of talented and successful students, setting them on the path to achievement and selffulfillment. Last fall, Pace alumni nominated faculty members for this honor. The judges said DiBenedetto stood out as having played such an important role in the lives of so many. As one alumnus put it, “Professor DiBenedetto has dedicated his career and life to teaching and guiding

Pace students. After all the years I have known him, he still mentors his students with great enthusiasm and personal attention. I am eternally grateful for all he has done for me.” In presenting the award, Pace President Stephen J. Friedman said, “Joe lives and breathes Pace’s historic mission of Opportunitas.” n

≥ The Kevin Spacey Foundation announced in September that it would provide one-year scholarships to five students working toward BA and BFA degrees at the Pace School of Performing Arts. It will also support travel expenses for 10 students in the school’s International Performance Ensemble program. In announcing the scholarships, Spacey credited his mentor Jack Lemmon as an inspiration. “Jack had a phrase that he used all the time that I’ve now adopted as my own,” he said. “He believed that if you’ve been successful in your chosen path, if you’ve been able to realize your ambition, then you are obligated to ‘send the elevator back down.’” n

Pace Receives $5 Million NSF Grant, Its Largest Ever ≥ The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Pace

a three-year, $5 million grant, the largest research grant in the University’s history. Lauren Birney, EdD, assistant clinical professor at the School of Education, is the principal investigator on the NSFfunded grant. She will lead the multi-institutional collaboration for the project, which is called “Curriculum and Community Enterprise for New York Harbor Restoration in New York City Public Schools.”

The project builds on the success of the STEM Center Collaboratory at Pace, created by Birney and Jonathan Hill, DPS, associate dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Among its goals, the project will create an accredited teacher training and curriculum development program in environmental science at the School of Education, as well as conduct research on innovative methods of teaching STEM-C (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, including Computing) in urban public schools. Other organizations involved in the collaboration include the New York Harbor Foundation, New York City Department of Education, Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Billion Oyster Project (BOP) consortium, an initiative to restore one billion live oysters to the harbor over a 20-year period and to educate young people in New York City about the ecology and economy of their local marine environment. n Former President Bill Clinton, here with Pace’s Lauren Birney, spoke at ceremonies in September announcing the grant. The Clinton Global Initiative is a partner in the Billion Oyster Project.

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KeepingPace

Schimmel Center Begins a New Season The Schimmel Center on Pace’s New York City Campus opened its

!

Pace alumni receive 20% off all Schimmel Center shows.

2014–2015 season in September. Among the events still upcoming in 2014: Great Masters Series: Marc Chagall

October 22, 12:15 p.m.

Janetta Rebold Benton, PhD, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences distinguished professor, continues her popular illustrated lecture series with the Russian-born artist Marc Chagall (1887–1985) and Expressionism in Russia.

Mailander, celebrate the world of nature with original Americana folk music, written especially for young audiences. The brothers’ Can You Canoe? won a Grammy Award for Best Children’s Album in 2012.

New York City, who has created and performed several hundred live scores for silent films on piano and theater organ over the past three decades. Coming in February: The Mark of Zorro, with Douglas Fairbanks.

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger, with Live Accompaniment by Ben Model

October 26, 2:00 p.m.

Okee Dokee Brothers Family Show

October 25, 2:00 p.m. The Okee Dokee Brothers, Justin Lansing and Joe

Sound of Music. Lyrics will be shown on the screen, and audience members are encouraged to dress up as their favorite Grease characters.

This 1927 silent film, directed by a 26-year-old Alfred Hitchcock, stars Ivor Novello as an innocent man suspected of being a serial killer. Recreating the experience of movie audiences of the day, it will be accompanied by Ben Model, resident film accompanist at the Museum of Modern Art in

The Nutcracker

December 11–21

Sing-a-long-a Grease

November 1, 7:30 p.m. The brand new “singalonga” version of the popular 1978 movie musical starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, from the producers of Sing-a-long-a

The Gelsey Kirkland Ballet brings its version of Tchaikovsky’s holiday classic to the Schimmel’s stage for 10 performances.

For more information and to see the full Schimmel calendar for 2014–2015, visit schimmel.pace.edu or call (212) 346-1715. n

Lubin Co-Brands Social Media Program with Major Agency ≥ The Lubin School of Business is collaborating with major independent media agency Media Storm on the first-ever co-branded program between an AACSB-accredited school and a business: the Media Storm MS in Social Media and Mobile Marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. The deal breaks new ground in addressing the gap between what higher education is providing and what employers need. Lubin has developed and will control the curriculum for using social media and mobile marketing strategically, while Media Storm brings real-world, handson experience to the student experience: 100 hours of guest lectures, 50 internships, and project work for classes. Media Storm sees this arrangement as feeding a pipeline of qualified candidates to its expanding client base.

The collaboration is being announced at an October 21 event on the New York City Campus, featuring singer/ songwriter Daria Musk, who built a worldwide fan base of more than 3 million people using social media. The event will be a concert and TED-type talk by Musk. Based in New York City, Media Storm (http://mediastorm. biz) is a strategic media and marketing agency with clients in entertainment, health care, energy, and retail. Through its innovative model redefining the media industry, it has been named one of Inc.’s “500 most successful companies” and “the fastest growing media company in America” by Entrepreneur magazine. n

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Feature Feature ­— ­— Focus Focus onon Faculty Faculty

A

FOCUS

FACU

By Bill Caldwell

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u

Photography by Jayne Wexler


ON

LTY

A

n exemplary faculty has always been at the heart of the Pace experience, and never more so than today. In just the past five years, the University has added 140 new faculty members across its

six schools and colleges. On the pages that follow, we’ll introduce you to some of our latest stars.

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Feature ­— Focus on Faculty

A

ngela M. Legg joined the Dyson faculty this past January. She teaches undergraduate courses in social psychology and experimental psychology and has also led an interdisciplinary course called “On the Good Life,” which combines philosophical and psychological approaches to happiness and well-being. Assistant Professor of Psychology “The faculty and staff at Pace have welcomed me into the community and offered so much support to a new faculty member Dyson College of Arts and Sciences learning the ropes of the University,” she says. As an undergraduate at Georgia State University, Legg gained early research experience in a clinical neuropsychology lab working with pediatric brain tumor survivors. Later, she was a research intern at Zoo Atlanta, observing the social behavior of gorillas and other primates and teaching orangutans cognitive tasks on computers (think massive touchscreen monitors that looked like supersized iPads). Her current research focuses on how people navigate threatening circumstances. “Specifically, I study how people give and get bad news and how good news plays a role during bad news delivery,” she says. “This research has health implications and overlaps with my interests in doctor-patient communication and genetic testing. I also study how professors develop and maintain rapport with their students and how that rapport predicts academic success and well-being for students.” During her first semester at Pace, Legg created the SHARPP (Social, Health, and Relational Positive Psychology) Lab to conduct research and provide students with research opportunities. Legg says she came to Pace because she wanted to be a part of a growing university with a friendly community that prioritizes the student experience. When she was being interviewed for her new position, she walked around campus to chat with students. “Each one of them had a story about how Pace had enriched their lives, and they expressed such enthusiasm for the Pace Community,” she says. “I was struck that the students were so passionate about their university, even in front of a complete stranger! I knew then that Pace was the right home for me.” Legg received her BA in Psychology from Georgia State University, an MS in Experimental Psychology from Georgia Southern University, and a PhD in Social/ Personality Psychology from University of California, Riverside. An enthusiastic equestrian, she spends her free time riding and competing in horse shows. She also loves running, hanging out with her husband and dog, reading, and taking pictures around the Hudson Valley.

Angela M. Legg, PhD

“I was struck that the

students were so passionate about their university...

I knew then that Pace was the right home for me.”

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hen Philip G. Cohen joined the full-time faculty at the Lubin School of Business in September 2012, after retiring as vice president-tax and general tax counsel for Unilever United States, he already knew his way ar ound. He had served as an adjunct professor for 23 years. “My colleagues have been incredibly supportive,” he says of the transition, adding that he believes, “Pace’s president and provost and Lubin’s dean are taking the University and the school in the right direction.” Today Cohen mainly teaches tax courses, including International Taxation I and II, and Taxation of Entities, along with some law courses, including Employment Law, on both the New York City and Westchester campuses. His research interests include corporate taxation, international taxation, and capital gains and losses. “My students, especially my graduate tax students, are very eager to learn,” he says, “and some who have worked as tax practitioners are very knowledgeable. I have learned from my students!” Cohen has written numerous journal articles on taxation and is also a frequent contributor to The Hill, the influential Washington, DC-based newspaper and website for policymakers. His topics have included tax inversions, territorial taxation, tax reform, sequestration, and questionable tax planning. He received his BA in Political Science from New York University, a JD from Duke University School of Law, LLMs in Labor Law and in Taxation from New York University School of Law, and an MBA in Accounting from George Washington University. After graduating from law school, he served as a lieutenant in the US Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Cohen’s outside interests include golf (“Not very good, but getting a little better”), swimming, reading, and Atlanta Braves baseball (“I’ve been a loyal Braves fan since I was seven”).

Philip G. Cohen Associate Professor of Taxation Lubin School of Business

“My colleagues have been incredibly supportive. Pace’s president and provost and Lubin’s dean are taking the University and the school in the right direction.”

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Feature ­— Focus on Faculty

A

Jason J. Czarnezki Gilbert and Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law and Executive Director of Environmental Law Programs Pace Law School

“I came to the University to help to continue to build and strengthen the world-class and top-ranked Pace Environmental Law program.”

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noted environmental law scholar, Jason J. Czarnezki was invested as Kerlin Chair in 2013 and appointed executive director of environmental law programs earlier this year. Czarnezki says he came to the University for several reasons: “To help to continue to build and strengthen the world-class and top-ranked Pace Environmental Law program, to be surrounded by exceptional environmental law faculty like Nick Robinson, John Nolon, David Cassuto, and Karl Coplan, and to live in the intellectual and cultural hub that is New York City.” In his executive director role, Czarnezki coordinates the work of programs such as the Global Center for Environmental Legal Studies, the Energy and Climate Center, the Land Use Center for Sustainable Development, the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic, the Brazil-American Institute for Law and Environment, and the China Program. He also works with the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and the Environmental Studies Department and oversees several of the University’s degree and certificate programs. As a teacher, Czarnezki’s courses include Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law, and Property Law, among others. Before joining the Pace faculty, Czarnezki was a professor in the Environmental Law Center at Vermont Law School, faculty director of the US-China Partnership for Environmental Law, and a faculty fellow in the Vermont Law Center for Agriculture and Food Systems. He has also held academic appointments at Marquette University Law School and the DePaul University College of Law. He received his BA from the University of Chicago and his JD from the University of Chicago Law School. Czarnezki’s articles have been published in the law journals of Boston College, Boston University, Stanford University, the University of Chicago, University of Colorado, University of Maryland, and University of Virginia. He has also written books, including Everyday Environmentalism: Law, Nature and Individual Behavior and Food, Agriculture and Environmental Law. His outside interests include music, travel, food, and politics.


“M

y favorite thing about Pace,” says Gerald Ardito ’07, ’10, “is the wide range of life experiences and interests in both the student body and the faculty.” Ardito himself is a good example of that. He was a middle school science teacher in the Croton-Harmon School District in Crotonon-the-Hudson, New York, for eight years. Earlier, he had a career as a manager and project manager in a variety of settings. In September 2013, he joined the School of Education as an assistant professor, having served for three years as an adjunct faculty member. Today, Ardito teaches the courses General Methods, Middle School Methods, Science Methods, and Inventing and Making in the Classroom, among others. As a researcher, he is interested in designing and implementing educational environments that support, promote, and foster self-directed learners. At the Global 2013 STEMx Education Conference, coordinated by the International Society for Technology in Education, he gave a presentation on a selfdirected curriculum for middle school biology students. Ardito received his BA in Biopsychology from Vassar College, an MA in Cinema Studies from New York University, and both an MST in Adolescent Education and a DPS in Educational Technology from Pace. “As a student at Pace, I was impressed by the University’s balance of theory and practice,” he says. “This focus prepared me enormously well for the middle school classroom. And this is what inspired me to want to teach at Pace.” When he isn’t in the classroom or developing new teaching techniques to use in classrooms, Ardito enjoys reading, movies, computer programming, and robotics.

Gerald Ardito, DPS Assistant Professor of STEM-D Education School of Education

“As a student at Pace, I was impressed by the University’s balance of theory and practice. This focus prepared me enormously well for the middle school classroom. And this is what inspired me to want to teach at Pace.”

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Feature ­— Focus on Faculty

Juan Shan, PhD Assistant Professor of Computer Science Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

“What has impressed me most is that the entire University is at a rising period. . . the Pace Community puts the students and faculty first.”

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 an Shan joined the faculty of the Seidenberg School u of Computer Science and Information Systems in September 2013 after teaching at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas. At Pace, Shan teaches Introduction to Computing, Mathematics Structures, Computer Programming, and Fundamental Computer Science. “I have found the Pace Community to be very openminded and friendly,” she says. “What has impressed me most is that the entire University is at a rising period. From the president and provost, to the dean and department chair, the Pace Community puts the students and faculty first and makes every effort to create the best environment in which to study and conduct research.” Shan’s major research interests are in the areas of automatic diagnosis for breast cancer, medical image processing, and machine learning. At Pace, she developed an evaluation scheme to measure the accuracy of “knowledge representation” for automatic breast cancer diagnosis. “Precise knowledge representation is the foundation for any successful artificial intelligence system, including automatic breast cancer diagnosis,” she explains. “It is crucial to be able to evaluate how well the digital features are actually representing experts’ knowledge.” She is now collaborating with New York Medical College on a medical image processing project and working on proposals for interdisciplinary research that would involve radiologists and medical students. Shan received her PhD in Computer Science from Utah State University in 2011 and a BS in Computer Science in 2004 from Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China.


K

yeongra Yang was an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Nursing before joining the faculty of the Lienhard School of Nursing in September 2013. She also has experience as an assistant instructor at Inha University’s Department of Nursing in Korea and as a staff nurse in the operating room at Seoul National University Hospital. An expert in community health nursing, Yang received her PhD in Nursing from the University of Texas at Austin, her MPH from Seoul National University, and a BS in Nursing from Chonbuk National University, also in Korea. At Pace, Yang teaches the courses Community Health Nursing, Professional and Therapeutic Communication, and EBP (Evidence-Based Practice) Nursing Research. Her research interests include physical activity, mindbody intervention, and the prevention and management of diabetes. She is the author or co-author of numerous papers on those and related topics. “During my first year at Pace, I met many wonderful students,” she says. “They are enthusiastic and motivated learners, and the faculty are devoted to their students and their teaching.” Her principal outside interest, Yang says, is travel. She returns to Korea in the summer to see her family and especially enjoys visits to “small towns and rural areas with unspoiled scenery.”

“During my first year at Pace, I met many wonderful students. They are enthusiastic and

Kyeongra Yang, PhD, RN Assistant Professor Lienhard School of Nursing in the College of Health Professions

motivated learners, and the faculty are devoted to their students and their teaching.”

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Feature — Fifty Years at Pace

50 YEARS AT PACE Nicholas Catalano, PhD, professor of English in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, re cently celebrated a rare milestone: half a centur y on the fa cult y of the s a m e e d u c a t i o n a l i n s t i t u t i o n . We a s k e d h i m t o r e f l e c t o n s o m e o f t h e h i g h l i g h t s .

BY N I C K CATALAN O

I

began my career at Pace College in New York in September 1964, teaching a writing course (ENG 405AG) and spending time between classes in the sumptuous Faculty Lounge at 41 Park Row. I recall a colleague, Rae Dalven, PhD, who was a modern Greek lit scholar, extolling the virtues of the Pace accounting program and its national reputation. Strange as it seems, college teaching jobs were quite obtainable then and, after fielding a few offers, I chose Pace because its president, Edward J. Mortola, PhD, interviewed me personally and had impressive things to say about his plans for the future of the school. His comments proved to be a huge understatement because his achievements in the years following were astonishing.

At his urging, and because I wanted to be involved in a variety of student activities, I transferred to the fledgling campus in Pleasantville in February 1965 and founded the first drama group (we dubbed it the Wig and Mask Society). Our first production that semester was Karel Capek’s R.U.R., which I directed with Ed Kenny, EdD, who would later become vice president of Pace White Plains. The following semester, with the aid of a marvelous student activities director Ed Zanato and dozens of high-spirited students, I launched a student newspaper (The Pace Profile) and a student talent show (The Pace Follies), which still runs. In the spring of 1966, pressed by a relentless nursing student, I began directing the Pace College Glee Club. Within a few years, we had recorded an album, made concert tours to the Caribbean, and performed at the dedication of the new New York City

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Feature — Fifty Years at Pace

Campus. For this event, we received a congratulatory letter from the keynote speaker, United States Vice President Hubert Humphrey. In 1968, once again beseeched by eager students, I began coaching and directing the first Pace football team. Because of dedicated students, brilliant athletes (two players, Dennis Carpenter and Tom Grega, have recently been inducted into the Pace Hall of Fame), and some personal financial support from President Mortola (a check for $3,500 to purchase helmets and shoulder pads), we managed to win the club football championship the following year. The game, held at Memorial Field in New Rochelle, was attended by some 6,000 people who saw Pace defeat Iona College 16–7. Later, working with President Mortola and Athletic Director Peter X. Finnerty, we brought the New York Giants to Pleasantville for pre-season training, and publicity for athletics at Pace was assured for a decade. Much has been written about college campuses in the late ’60s. The student protests, the civil rights struggle, the war in Vietnam, the experiments with drugs all seem so distant now. But being around college kids whose main interests were “peace and love,” antipathy towards materialism, criticism of government hypocrisy and falsehoods, and hatred of war was a very sobering experience for a young teacher. Trying to instill the importance of correct writing skills or urging immersion in the glories of Shakespeare to students who would shortly be fighting the Viet Cong was quite a challenge. I was close to many students who I would see after classes in a drama rehearsal or at football

practice. My saddest memory in 50 years was hearing the news that some of my kids who were sent overseas would not be coming home again. And many of those who did would suffer a lifetime of psychological struggle.

In 1973,

President Mortola appointed me University director of performing arts. With my background as a jazz musician and work as a TV producer, he was convinced that I might bring Pace University (the new status had just been achieved) an increased cultural presence. Because of the theatrical ambience of the Schimmel Center on the New York City Campus, and with the help of director Jess Adkins and later Jillian Panfel, we were able to produce recitals by leading dance companies. And so the names Alvin Ailey, Martha Graham, Robert Joffrey, and the St. Petersburg Ballet appeared, and New York Times dance critic Anna Kisselgoff was always there, giving Pace important publicity. Critic John Wilson would also be there for my jazz concerts (we had Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Buddy Rich, Lionel Hampton, Woody Herman, Dizzy Gillespie, and many others) and wrote at length for The Times about Stan Kenton’s last New York concert. We needed some programming to keep Westchester students on campus for weekends, so I scoured comedy clubs in the city—The Improv and Catch a Rising Star—for talent. Young performers practicing the new “observation” comedy were appearing, and soon the Pace Comedy Series was born, with four shows a semester on each campus. The series lasted 25 years and our costs were minimal because the comics were unknown. They are not unknown now: Jerry Seinfeld, Bill Maher, Larry David, Richard Lewis,

“If it wasn’t for Nick, I never would have had the great opportunity of performing in and learning to love some wonderful Broadway musicals. That opportunity brought new and lasting friendships which endure to this day. He gave tirelessly of himself to putting on these shows, fostering the football team, and just being a great friend to the students who had the opportunity to learn and work with him.” —Kathleen Kettles ’74, ’87

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“Nick, you are the heart, the soul, and the voice of Pace! Devoted teacher, promoter extraordinaire, and the consummate home game announcer. You have made a visible difference in perpetuating the Pace experience! It is an honor and privilege to call you a trusted teacher and friend. God bless!” —Peter and Patricia Giammarinaro ’73

Ray Romano, Robert Klein, Brett Butler, and Larry Miller, among others, performed dozens of times in the series. Performing arts also produced a lecture series featuring figures such as Muhammad Ali, Ralph Nader, David Eisenhower, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti; a cabaret series co-hosted by Julie Wilson and starring performers such as Linda Eder, John Pizzarelli, Margaret Whiting, and Johnny Hartman; and Jazz at Noon, a series where I could play my saxophone with all-star rhythm sections and local jazz musicians could sit in. Imagine having a job for 50 years and enjoying it just as much now as when you started. Such has been my experience teaching literature and music at Pace. Although there have, of course, been many changes at the University, walking into a class of wide-eyed 18-yearolds itching to be stimulated has always been constantly exhilarating for me. I’ve been teaching an ancient Greece travel seminar for 32 years and people ask how I can do the exact same trip each year. I answer that it is the students who are always engaging and supplying the class with fresh energy, provocative opinions, and questioning minds. I’ve sailed around the world, produced award-winning TV shows, appeared on many book tours, and been invited to the Oval Office, but nothing in my life has been as rewarding as teaching Shakespeare, Sophocles, and Miles Davis at Pace. n Share your memories of Nick at alumni.pace.edu/Catalano.

“I have met few people who enjoy life more than Nick. His zest for life is infectious. His passion, love, and dedication to his family, friends, and profession are inspiring. During my years at Pace I had the distinct pleasure to have known Nick as a maestro, director, faculty adviser, and professor.  However, the most meaningful title I can bestow on him is friend. My daughter Amanda—Pace Pleasantville Class of 2002—was a student of Dr. Catalano’s, and she and her classmates assert that Nick was the original Dos Equis Most Interesting Man in the World.  I am certain there are many who would agree. ” —Bill Schultz ’74, ’82

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Feature ­— The Art of Pace

Art The

of

Photographs by Monet Lucki

PACE

u

Captions by Greg Daugherty

MANY OF US RUSH PAST THEM EVERY DAY AND HARDLY NOTICE, BUT PACE IS HOME TO A DIVERSE COLLECTION OF 19TH, 20TH, AND 21ST CENTURY SCULPTURES, ALL WITH THEIR OWN STORIES TO TELL. HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF THE ARTWORKS THAT GRACE OUR CAMPUSES.

The 25 vertical panels on the façade of One Pace Plaza form a 30- by 60-foot sculpture titled “Brotherhood of Man,” created by the prominent Israeli sculptor Nechemia Azaz (19232008). The hammered and welded copper panels range in length from 12 to 24 feet and contain some 200 stylized figures, which Azaz said represent the people served by Pace. Azaz, who devoted a year to the Pace project, has other major works in Chicago and London, as well as at the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.

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Feature ­— The Art of Pace “Code of Life or Three Piece Cube” is a four-foot granite sculpture by the Boston-based artist David Bakalar, near the entrance to One Pace Plaza. Trained as a physical metallurgist at MIT, Bakalar works in stone, aluminum, and stainless steel. His many other permanent outdoor installations include sculptures at Columbia University Law School, MIT, and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. As its inscription indicates, this piece was donated in 1996 and dedicated to Charles H. Dyson ’30 on the occasion of his 87th birthday. It was a gift from Henry C. Beinstein ’64.

Chaim Gross’ 1973 bronze “Young Performers,” far left, and his 1968 bronze “Heaven and Earth,” near left, were moved from their former Gold Street location to the newly-renovated Edward J. Mortola Courtyard at One Pace Plaza in 2012. One of the best-known sculptors of the 20th century, the Austrian-born Gross (1904–1991) worked primarily in wood and bronze, often choosing as his subjects circus performers, dancers, and mothers with children. His works are also represented at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, as well as several other universities.

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Though not part of Pace’s collection, the bronze statue of Benjamin Franklin at the intersection of Park Row and Spruce Street, is one of the New York City Campus’ most recognizable landmarks. Dedicated in 1872, it is the work of sculptor Ernst Plassman (sometimes spelled “Plassmann”) and shows Franklin with a copy of his newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette. At the time of the installation, Park Row was a hub of New York City’s thriving newspaper industry. One Pace Plaza sits on the former site of the New York Tribune, and our nearby 41 Park Row building was an early home of The New York Times.

“Education,” by Pleasantville sculptor Ralph J. Menconi (1915–1972), is now on the Frankfort Street side of One Pace Plaza. Its curling aluminum blades represent “education, feeding on itself, nurturing ideas, and uplifting growing minds,” Menconi explained at the time of its installation in 1970. Menconi was best known for his commemorative medals, including a popular series of 36 US Presidents that earned him the nickname “Sculptor of Presidents.” His works are also in the Smithsonian American Art Museum and other collections.

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Feature ­— The Art of Pace

“Awakening Mountain II,” by the American sculptor and painter Peter Chinni, is a nine-foot-tall bronze sculpture dating to 1964. Chinni, who was born in Mt. Kisco, New York, in 1928, is also represented in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, among many others.

Pleasantville is the home to another of Peter Chinni’s sculptures, “St. George.” Created in 1968, it currently resides outside of Lienhard Hall.

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The marble bust in Dyson Hall in Pleasantville, titled “Head of Woman,” is the work of the American artist Attilio Piccirilli (1866–1945). Piccirilli was both a sculptor and, working with his brothers, a stone carver for other prominent sculptors. Among the Piccirilli Brothers’ many well-known works are the seated statue of Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, and the iconic lions in front of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue. “Head of Woman” was a gift to Pace from Edward J. Hurley, the architect of Dyson Hall, and his wife, Jeanne.

Three copies of the “Book of Remembrance” were created for Pace’s New York City, Pleasantville (shown here), and White Plains locations to honor the four students and 43 alumni who died on September 11, 2001. It was designed by then-University Architect Daniel Okoli and dedicated in 2002, a year to the day after the tragedy.

Special thanks to University Archivist Ellen Sowchek; Kim de Beaumont, PhD, consulting curator of the Pace University Art Collection; and student Chrystal A. Marte. W WW.PACE .E DU

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A glimpse at some of the fascinating projects

in progress at Pace

Adam Klein, PhD

CASTING LIGHT ON THE SHADOWY WORLD OF ANONYMOUS Dyson Professor Adam Klein examines how the vigilante hacktivist group Anonymous explains its actions and how the news media portray them. IN RECENT YEARS, ANONYMOUS, an informally associated group of online activists called “hacktivists,” has received worldwide attention for its activities, including denialof-service attacks on government, religious, and corporate websites—essentially making the targeted websites unavailable to their intended users. While some view Anonymous’ work as a form of activism little different from that of the peaceful protest groups of the 1960s or the more recent Occupy Wall Street movement, others liken it to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and Edward Snowden, the controversial figure at the center of the recent NSA surveillance scandal, whose actions have led to criminal investigations. To Dyson Professor of Communication Studies Adam Klein, PhD, a key question is: Should what Anonymous does be treated as a legitimate protest? Or is it disruption for the sake of disruption? “They leave messages in the wake of a crash,” Klein says. “We collect the messages and use them to determine if the crash was political or simply malicious, then we have to weigh it against how the media chose to frame the event, which doesn’t always match with Anonymous’ message about what they were actually trying to accomplish.” Klein examined 200 news reports from 10 countries where 56 Anonymous hacks have occurred. The hacks ranged from crashing a website and rendering it useless to hijacking Burger King’s Twitter account to announce, facetiously, that the chain was being sold to McDonald’s. “Ninety-five percent of the hacks I looked at were done for stated political reasons, in defense of free speech or anti government surveillance,” Klein says. “In juxtaposition to that, the other main finding of my research is that, regardless of the hack’s stated purpose, the news media use language in their reporting that treats the group as pranksters and vandals, more so than anything else.” Klein divided the media’s characterizations of Anonymous into four main archetypes: legitimate activists, global threats, vigilante heroes, and malicious pranksters. Using his sample of 200 news reports, he looked for descriptive terms like “vandals,” “anarchists,” or “Robin Hood” and counted how frequently each characterization appeared. Of the four 32

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archetypes, Anonymous was most often characterized as malicious pranksters, he found, followed by global threats. That generally negative depiction of Anonymous in the news media, Klein believes, is due in large part to the fear felt by individuals and governments, a valid concern given Anonymous’ ability to disrupt the online world that has become so integral to our lives. “There’s something a little dangerous about a group that can do something that is essentially the same as throwing a brick through a storefront window and running away,” he says. “They are all for free speech, and yet at the same time, they deny the free speech of those who they target by taking down their websites or stopping them from functioning,” he adds. “I think there’s an irony in what Anonymous does.” –Alyssa Cressotti ’08


Research at Pace

Keystrokes of Genius Pace doctoral candidate Vinnie Monaco ’12, ’14, ’16 is verifying computer users through behavioral biometrics research.

was able to write an algorithm that classified more of the unlabeled data than his competitors. His first-place prize? An eye tracker. “It’s a special kind of camera that’s designed to track eye movements looking at a computer screen. Right now I’m using the eye tracker to test an application and look at more data. I’ll bring it to the conference,” he says. After six years of studying at Pace, Monaco says his interest in behavioral biometrics has been strongly supported by Pace faculty like Computer Science Professor Charles Tappert, PhD, who’s been working with pattern recognition for nearly 30 years. Tappert has collaborated with Monaco on a variety of research papers and conferences and even served as his master’s thesis adviser, which he says is an option for only the best MS in Computer Science students. “He’s the best student that we’ve had in Seidenberg School, certainly as long as I’ve been here,” Tappert says. And the respect goes both ways. “What keeps me here is definitely the faculty. Early on, I developed a good working relationship with the faculty at Pace and, on top of that, got a good scholarship,” says Monaco. –Kaitie O’Hare

Vinnie Monaco

DARRYL ESTRINE

Since arriving at Pace in 2008, John Vincent “Vinnie” Monaco ’12, ’14, ’16 has become a familiar face at the University and in the surrounding community. His accomplishments and research have been featured in Pace Magazine; the local newspaper, The Journal News; and even on the cover of Westchester Magazine. The PhD in Computer Science student made news again as he headed to the 2014 International Joint Conference on Biometrics (IJCB) in Clearwater, Florida, this September. Monaco, who earned both his BS in Computer Science and Mathematics and his MS in Computer Science from Pace, recently had his research paper “Classification and Authentication of One-dimensional Behavior Biometrics” accepted by the conference, which combines two major annual biometrics meetings—the Biometrics Theory, Applications, and Systems conference and the International Conference on Biometrics. His paper describes an algorithm that can identify or authenticate a person based on timestamps of an event occurring, like a specific keystroke, for example. “One of the primary applications that we’ve been

targeting is online test-takers,” he says. That could be useful in helping instructors verify the identities of their students and guard against plagiarism and cheating. Of the 261 papers submitted to the 2014 IJCB, only 80 were accepted for publication in the conference journal. While this will be his first time attending the conference, it is his third time being published by it. In conjunction with the 2014 IJCB, the organization hosted five biometrics competitions leading up to the conference, one of which Monaco took first place in last spring. The Second Eye Movement Verification and Identification Competition challenged Monaco and other contestants to create a classification model that could identify people based on their eye movements. Given a dataset of partially unlabeled data, Monaco

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Research at Pace

The Amazing World of Bacteria Biology student Raheem Lawrence ’15 and Biology Professor Marcy Kelly, PhD, study bacteria and tuberculosis as part of a prestigious 2014 American Society for Microbiology Undergraduate Research Fellowship. Three years ago, when Raheem Lawrence ’15 left his hometown in Jamaica and took his seat in his first class at Pace, he didn’t know it would set the tone for the rest of his time at the University. Dyson Biology Professor Marcy Kelly, PhD, stood at the front of the room with Lawrence’s full attention. “You could see instantly, firsthand, that she loved bacteria,” he says. Yes, bacteria. Fast forward three years to the present, where the biology student has just received a prestigious American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Undergraduate Research Fellowship grant, allowing him and Kelly to collaborate on research involving—you guessed it—bacteria. “Bacteria is the simplest living form of organism, but they’re so resilient,” says Lawrence. “They constantly find ways to evade human attempt to stop them through antimicrobials—they

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Marcy Kelly, PhD, and Raheem Lawrence ’15

constantly evolve and change, and we can never have the upper hand with them. Basically, they’re kind of like the perfect organisms, even though they’re the simplest.” Lawrence came to Pace with the idea of becoming a physician, something he says isn’t as easily attainable in Jamaica. Given the opportunity to participate in the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship, he is one step closer to achieving his goal. “When students apply for med school, one of the things committees look for are unique experiences and things that help them stand out. More and more, students are participating in original research,” says Kelly. “He got this fellowship to support his work, so that makes him stand out a little bit more.” With Kelly as his mentor, Lawrence’s research will focus on using glutathione, a thiol-based molecule produced by the human immune response that has been identified as an anti-mycobacterial agent to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), to help fight tuberculosis. According to the World Health Organization, TB is second only to AIDS/HIV as the world’s leading killer due to a single infectious agent. “It’s a huge global problem,” says

Kelly, who’s been studying tuberculosis since the mid-’90s. Lawrence is the third Pace student that Kelly has mentored for this fellowship during her time at the University. He will present his findings at the ASM General Meeting in the spring of 2015. In addition to the fellowship, Lawrence and Kelly are collaborating on a project as part of the Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research program at Pace. The results from their work could aid in the development of new vaccines to prevent tuberculosis. As he prepares for a busy senior year, Lawrence reflects back on those first moments at Pace that got him where he is today. “I don’t see myself as a success story yet,” he says. “I’m more of a rough draft of what I expect myself to do later in life.” –Kaitie O’Hare

For More visit www.pace.edu/ ugresearch


Research at Pace

CAN APP S HELP TEACH MATH? School of Education professors Shobana Musti-Rao and Tom Lynch work with a local elementary school to see whether a popular technology can aid learning.   IN THE FALL OF 2013, two School of Education professors began a research project to gauge the value of computer tablets and “apps” in a third grade classroom. “There’s immense interest and funding for the use of tablets and technologies in schools, and what is interesting about this is that, despite all of the funding, there is very little research that says, ‘This is what makes a certain technology more or less effective,’” says Assistant Professor Tom Liam Lynch, EdD, who collaborated on the project with Associate Professor Shobana Musti-Rao, PhD. For their study, the pair worked with an inclusive classroom in a local elementary school, in which students with and without learning differences or disabilities shared a class led by two co-teachers. Along with traditional approaches to teaching math, including memorization and “manipulatives” that help students learn broader math concepts, students were given iPads for 10-minute periods and directed to an app for learning facts about math. Students were tested to gauge their retention of math facts

appropriate to their grade level both before and after their time with the tablet. The researchers used multimodal analytical techniques, Lynch says, explaining that “multimodal analysis allows us to dive more deeply into the actual interaction between the students, the device, the user interface, and the software on the backend. We’re able to try to improve our understanding of why or why not the app is working.” As it turned out, the iPad not only contributed to faster learning rates across students, but also resulted in higher response rates in comparison to the traditional method. That is, students were able to practice and answer about eighteen math facts per minute using the iPad, as opposed to eight per minute using the traditional method. The teachers in the classroom study cited positive results from the experiment and said they planned to use the math app again in the future, despite some initial skepticism. “Leveraging the use of this type

of technology will also help take care of the resource management that is lacking in so many schools,” says Musti-Rao. “Teachers know that some students need the extra help, but there just aren’t enough hands to help them. If students can be trained to use this technology, it will promote their independent learning.” As for the students, Musti-Rao says, “they took ownership of their learning. They could track their progress and say what they did, like, ‘It helped me learn my multiplication facts.’” An article related to the study is slated for publication in Intervention in School and Clinic, a special education journal. –Sofia Dupi

Shobana Musti-Rao, PhD, and Tom Liam Lynch, EdD

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Take Advantage of Your Research at Pace

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Pace offers our alumni a range of lifetime benefits and opportunities after graduation. As part of the alumni family you are eligible to access:

Fat Gay Men: Girth, Mirth, and the Politics of Stigma

Special Offers/ Discounts Take advantage of lifelong learning opportunities with classes to audit. Help keep your CV fresh and get tips on interviewing at Career Services. Plus, the Schimmel Center at Pace University, Print Services, campus gym memberships, Kaplan, and Dell are just a few examples of the many services and merchandise offered to our alumni at discounted rates.

Alumni Online Community Promote your work or business and let other alumni know what you’re up to with our FREE and SECURE online service. Connect and network with other Pace graduates from around the corner or around the globe! Visit: www.pace.edu/alumnicommunity to learn more!

Continuing and Professional Education Whether you are looking to enhance your skills in your current position or contemplating a career change, Pace’s Continuing and Professional Education has the courses that will fit your needs and help you achieve your goals. Better yet, Pace alumni receive 10% off the cost of any course!

Access your alumni benefits and more by reaching us at:

alumni.pace.edu 1 (877) 8ALUMNI • pacealum@pace.edu

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BY JASON WHITESEL, PHD

In Fat Gay Men (NYU Press) Whitesel, an assistant professor in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, examines what it means “to be fat in a thin-obsessed gay culture,” based on “ethnographic interviews and in-depth field notes from more than 100 events at bar nights, café klatches, restaurants, potlucks, holiday bashes, pool parties, movie nights, and weekend retreats.”

The Tenor BY PETER DANISH ’85 The Tenor (Pegasus Books) is a historical novel centering on the relationship between the young opera diva Marie Callas and a young Italian soldier during the Greek occupation of World War II and in the years that followed. Danish is also the classical music editor-in-chief for the website BroadwayWorldClassical.com.

Education Is Special for Everyone BY JANET MULVEY, PHD; BRUCE S. COOPER, PHD; KATHRYN F. ACCURSO, EDD; AND KAREN GAGLIARDI, EDD Education Is Special for Everyone (Rowman & Littlefield) examines the history, evolution, and current state of special education in the United States and offers recommendations on how, in the words of its subtitle, “schools can best serve all students.” Lead author and editor Mulvey is the educational director of the Ongoing Academic and Social Instructional Support (OASIS) Program at Pace’s School of Education.


What do you think of Pace Magazine?

Dear Reader, As part of our continuing effort to make Pace Magazine more interesting and valuable, we’d appreciate your opinion. Please take a moment to fill out this quick survey and return it to us at: Pace Magazine One Pace Plaza New York, NY 10038 You can also fax it to (212) 346-1092, scan and e-mail it to URnews@pace.edu, or fill it out online at pace.edu/ magsurvey. Thanks for your help! Greg Daugherty Director of Content and Editorial

Are you likely to share an article with someone else? m Yes m No If yes, which article? _________________________________ __________________________________________________ How does the magazine make you think about Pace University? m More highly m About the same m Less highly How would you prefer to receive Pace Magazine? m Online m Both

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Please tell us what you thought of the articles in this issue: Very Somewhat Not at all interesting interesting interesting

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Letter from the President

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Keeping Pace (news section)

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“A Focus on Faculty”

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“50 Years at Pace: Nick Catalano”

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“The Art of Pace”

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Research

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Bookshelf

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Class Notes

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Calendar

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Flashback

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Name _____________________________________________ Relationship to Pace: m Alumnus or alumna m Parent/family of a current or former student m Faculty, staff, or administration m Current student m Other If a Pace alumnus or alumna: Degree(s) __________________________________________ Graduation Year(s) __________________________________ Thanks again! W WW.PACE .E DU

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Stay connected to your Pace classmates

1972

1977

RICHARD CARMICHAEL, MBA, published Economics

DAVID KRIETZBERG, BBA, MBA ’84, has been named

for Everyone 2014 Edition (R. Carmichael Company) in August.

1975

FROM MBA TO FBI Carla D’Andre, MBA ’82, graduated from the FBI Citizens Academy in Miami in May. Special Agent in Charge George L. Piro, right, awarded her certificate. The FBI conducts Citizens Academies at each of its 56 field offices for local business, civic, and religious leaders interested in learning more about the agency and its work. In September, D’Andre was also appointed Chairman of the National Society of Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriters (CPCU) Risk Management Interest Group.

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BOB HOBERMAN, MBA, a longtime executive search partner and professional writer, has announced the expansion of his copywriting company, Blue Chip Writers LLC, to include a specialty subsidiary, BCW Executive Employment Services. Blue Chip Writers is based in Aberdeen, New Jersey.

1976 KEVIN H. ROCHE, BA, has

been appointed to Board of Directors of Uroplasty, Inc., a medical device company. He will chair the Nominating Committee and also serve as a member of Uroplasty’s Audit Committee.

Chief Financial Officer at Vertical Communications, a leading provider of business communications software and solutions, in Santa Clara, California.

1980 KAREN ANGOTTI, BA, of Monmouth, Illinois, was named 2014 Citizen of the Year at the Monmouth Area Chamber of Commerce’s 95th annual dinner. Angotti is the founder and director of Rainbow Riders Therapeutic Horseback Riding Center in Monmouth. JEFF SOULE, BBA, MS ’97, was appointed Vice

President of Business Development at Redline Trading Solutions in Woburn, Massachusetts.

1981 JANIE ROSMAN, BA,

freelance writer and editor, covered President Barack Obama’s speech at the Tappan Zee Bridge in May.


Class Notes

L et u s h ear from you ! S har e you r n ews an d j o i n t h e con ver sati on

www.pace.edu/alumnicommunity. At our website you’ll find a set of free and secure online services that allow Pace alumni from around the world to reconnect, exchange ideas, and network.

1982

1984

1986

1990

DAVID M. WEINSTEIN, BA, MBA ’91, was appointed to

MICHAEL J. MCGOVERN, BBA,

RICHARD FULCO, BA, has

the Keltic Financial Services credit team as Senior Vice President and Senior Underwriter.

VICKI HOLT, MBA, was named CEO of Proto Labs Inc., a leading online and technology-enabled quickturn manufacturer, in Maple Plain, Minnesota.

1983

1985

ANDREW ALCID, BBA/MBA,

NICK FLORIO, BBA, CPA,

was named President of Philippine Realty & Holdings Corporation.

ROBERT CHERSI, BBA,

became the Executive Director of the Center for Global Governance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

and Partner at Citrin Cooperman & Company, LLP, has been appointed an independent director at Staffing 360 Solutions, Inc.

joined JetPay Corporation in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer.

1988 JOSÉ LUIS CASTRO, BA,

was confirmed as Executive Director of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.

JEANNE LYNCH, BBA, has joined Richfield Hospitality, a leading hotel management company in Denver, Colorado, as Vice President of Human Resources.

BILL PEASE, MPA, former Rye Police Commissioner has returned to Rye, New York, as Transitional Police Commissioner.

1991 SALVATORE RENZO, BBA,

joined ParenteBeard as a partner in the business advisory practice based out of the firm’s New York City office.

NEIL CRAIG, MBA, joined

Rockefeller & Co., headquartered in New York City, as a Senior Vice President representing Rockefeller’s investment products and services to institutional clients and investment consultants.

published his first novel, There Is No End to This Slope (Wampus Multimedia). He is also a playwright and founder of the online music magazine Riffraf.

MARRIAGES ABIGAIL ILANA TEITELBAUM, BBA ’07, and Jason Christopher Sheridan were married on May 16 at the Housing Works Bookstore in New York City. JENNY CHAMOUN, BA ’99, and Marco Guanilo, were

married on May 24 at St. Vartan Armenian Cathedral in New York City.

DANIELLE CATHERINE VEILLEUX, MST ’10, and Lt. Ryan Christopher Holland were married on May 25 at the Church of St. Joseph in Newport, Rhode Island.

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Class Notes — Profile

A MAN WITH A MISSION When Hurricane Sandy slammed Staten Island in October 2012, Joe Tirone Jr. ’79 lost a house but gained a calling. Tirone’s property, a singlestory bungalow in Fox Beach that he rented out to tenants, was submerged in 11 feet of water, its interior totally destroyed. After assessing the damage, he decided it would be folly to rebuild on the same site but wasn’t sure what other options he had. Then, in a conversation with a representative of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), he learned about FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, which provides funds to buy out homes in danger zones and convert the property to open space.

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representing Staten Island’s 63rd District. The election is in November.

BUCK ENNIS

LEARNING EXPERIENCE That was the beginning of a crash course Tirone describes as “like being back in college again.” He spent hours on the phone with residents and officials in Nashville, Tennessee, and upstate Jay, New York, who had successfully applied for buyouts following devastating floods several years earlier. “They were my professors, and they gave me a lot of homework,” he says. Rather than go it alone, Tirone decided to share what he’d learned with his fellow homeowners in the Fox Beach area. At a community meeting

in a local church, he explained how the buyout program worked and asked how many of those in attendance might be interested in participating. “I was surprised by the number of people who raised their hands,” he says. “I said to myself, ‘This is what I’m supposed to do.’” A committee was formed, consisting of Tirone and seven other homeowners. Over the ensuing weeks, they conducted further research, drew maps, and enlisted the

have signed up for the program. A second program, called Oakwood Beach 2, involving another 150 homes, has also seen nearly unanimous participation. Tirone successfully advocated for two additional Staten Island neighborhoods, bringing the total to more than 500 homes currently in line for a buyout. “It is an incredibly fair program,” Tirone says. Participating homeowners receive 100 percent of the preSandy value of their property, plus a 10 percent incentive

Joe Tirone Jr. ’79 on a Staten Island rooftop where one of his neighbors spent eight hours waiting for the floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy to recede.

aid of government officials. Ultimately, the group’s proposal would make its way to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. He not only backed the plan but, drawing on his past experience as US Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, found a way to expedite the process. To date, 184 of the 185 homeowners in Fox Beach

and another 5 percent if they relocate within New York City. After the homes are demolished, the land will be allowed to return to nature, creating a buffer against future storms for homes farther inland. Tirone is not done yet, however. He decided that his next step would be to run for the New York State Assembly,

MEMORIES OF PACE This will not be Tirone’s first run for office. At Pace in the late 1970s, he made a successful bid for student council. He still remembers his campaign slogan—“Let your voice be known, vote for Joe Tirone.” Tirone came to Pace to study accounting, saying that its program was “head and shoulders over any other college I looked at.” He earned his BBA from the Lubin School of Business in 1979. “It was a wonderful experience, and it helped me tremendously,” he recalls. After an earlier career as an investment banker, he is currently in the real-estate business as a broker, investor, consultant, and portfolio manager. When Pace Magazine interviewed him in late August, Tirone had just returned from the Travis Roy Foundation’s annual wiffle ball tournament in Vermont, which has raised close to $3 million to treat spinal cord injuries. Tirone helped create the tournament 13 years ago and pitches for the Staten Island “Wiffle Ball” Yankees, one of 28 teams from around the East Coast. His Yankees took the title this year, beating the Braintree, Massachusetts, Jackhammers 6 to 4, and returning the championship to Staten Island. –Greg Daugherty


Class Notes

1992 NORMA CORIO, MBA, was named Chief Financial Officer at American Express Global Business Travel in New York City.

GABRIELLA DESANTIS, MBA,

has been promoted to Vice President of Marketing at the OurPet’s Company in Fairport Harbor, Ohio.

IN MEMORIAM ROBERT S. ABRAMS ’51

WARREN R. LEVITT ’74

EDWARD P. ADAM JR. ’71

RALPH J. LICK ’49 KENNETH A. LOEFFLER ’54

1994

2003

ANTHONY R. AIELLO ’52

JOSEPH SQUERI, MBA, Chief

DOROTHY MINKUS-MCKENNA, DPS, has been appointed

FREDERICK G. ALBERS ’49

RAYMOND P. LUTOMSKI ’72

GEORGE G. ANTHOS ’52

PATRICK S. MCCANN ’69

DEBORAH BAILEY-BROWNE ’87

EVELYN (MADDOX) MCCONNELL

ANTHONY BIGOS ’51

WILLIAM A. MCCONNELL ’86

EDWARD F. BORSILLI ’64

THOMAS S. MCCORMICK ’53

ROGER B. BOWERS ’71

TERENCE MCGOWAN ’58

YVONNE BRANDAU ’91

BRESLIN W. MCKNIGHT ’56

JOHN P. BUTLER ’62

FRANK MILANO ’54

ERNEST X. CERAMI ’51 ROBERT B. CHANDLER ’49

DONNA E. (SHULTZ) MORAN ’79

DAVID J. COLE ’82

TIMOTHY P. MULVEY ’83

THOMAS M. COLE ’59

ROBERT J. MURPHY ’64

JASON D. COOPER ’14

LISA MARIE NELSON ’90

LINDA S. (MILLS) COOPER ’65

LOUISE D. NESLADEK ’87

JAMES H. CRISSON ’67

CATHERINE T. O’CONNELL ’86

ELLEN D. (DUNN) CUNNIFF ’50

RALPH B. OSTERMANN ’63

Information Officer of Citadel in Chicago, has joined the governing board of the Creating IT Futures Foundation in Downers Grove, Illinois, as a director.

1996 VICTORIA FLEARY, BA,

Director of Interactive at WBLS/WLIB-Emmis Communications Corporation in New York City, was named to The Network Journal’s 17th class of 40 Under Forty Achievers Award recipients.

1999 BRADLEY MAIORINO, BS, was

named Chief Information Security Officer at Target.

2000 GIUSEPPE (JOE) TULUMELLO, BBA, was promoted to business

Director of the Center for Global Studies at Berkeley College, which has a campus in White Plains, New York.

2004 CHRISTOPHER CHU, MS, joined

Taylor Rafferty, the world’s leading cross border investor relations agency, as Director, based in the firm’s New York City office. MARINA RAYDUN, BA, has

published a new novel, Joe After Maya (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform).

2006 TERESA TATEOSSIAN, BA,

founder of the digital marketing agency Socialfix Media, has joined the advisory board for Leading Women Entrepreneurs.

unit leader of Gannett Fleming’s New York City office.

2011

2001

promoted to Senior Vice President at Asta Funding, Inc.

CRISTINA ALESCI, BS, joined

CNN and the new CNNMoney team as a correspondent.

2002 MICHELLE M. ARBITRIO, JD,

a partner in the White Plains, New York, office of the national law firm Wilson Elser, has been selected as a Rising Star of Westchester’s 40 Under 40 by the Business Council of Westchester.

RICKY STERN, MBA, has been

2012 BERNARD MCSHERRY, DPS, a

33-year Wall Street veteran and long-time member of the New York Stock Exchange who has served as an Assistant Professor of Finance at New Jersey City University since 2011, has been appointed Dean of the university’s School of Business.

CARL DE LUCIA ’59 CATHY A. DICASTRO ’84 JAMES S. DUFFY ’83 WILLIAM E. FITZPATRICK ’58 EDWARD R. FLANAGAN ’48 MICHAEL J. FOLEY ’74 JOHN L. GATZKE ’74 JOAN C. GOLDBERG ’72, ’76 H. TURNER GRAHAM ’50 JOHN F. GRAY ’64, ’71

BERNARD NEWMAN JR. ’58

DENNIS D. PARKER ’80 NANCY J. PETERSEN ’80 MARY B. PIERCE ’80 WILLIAM R. PODGORSKI ’88 WILLIAM G. POPE ’01 CAROL L. PUCEK ’91 CHRISTOPHER E. RAO ’96 JANINE M. REISERT ’00 ROBERT N. SANTUCCI ’88 HOWARD R. SHUTE JR. ’63

GUSTAVE GRECSEK ’62

JOHN J. SOFILKANICH JR. ’82

MERVYN L. HAFT ’61

MARYANN SPELMAN ’82

EDWARD HAGGERTY ’72, ’74 MARGARET T. HARNETT ’88 EDWARD JOST ’82 JAMES J. KENNY JR. ’59 CLIFFORD N. KUHN JR. ’59 ROSE S. LEON ’82

EVERETT STRASSER ’47 SUSAN TAGLIENTE ’08 EILEEN TRACY ’74 CECELIA A. VARDEN ’92 RAYMOND R. WANAMAKER ’54

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Class Notes

S PI RI T O F PACE AWA RD S D INNER

L E ADERSHI P A ND SERVIC E IN T EC H NO LO GY AWA R D R E CE PTI ON

N YC REU NI ON

W ESTCHESTER REUNIO N

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UPCOMING EVENTS

October 20

Summit on Resilience II (NYC)

October 23

21st Annual Edward J. Mortola Heritage Society Luncheon (NYC) Homecoming Concert (NYC)

October 24

Celebrate Lubin!

High Technology Crime Investigation Association Cybersecurity Workshop (NYC)

November 1–2

Executive MBA Open House (NYC)

December 10

Annual Alumni Holiday Party (NYC)

December 11–21

Celebrate Lubin! to Honor Charles Mak

The Nutcracker, with the Gelsey Kirkland Ballet (NYC)

Charles Mak ’77, ’80 will receive the Alumni Achievement Award at Celebrate Lubin! on December 4 at the Harmonie Club in New York City. Mak, who was profiled in our spring issue, is senior adviser to Morgan Stanley Asia’s Investment Banking Division in Hong Kong, and a longtime supporter of the University.

Architectural Masterpieces: Italy (NYC)

March 4

20th Annual Law Leadership Awards Dinner (WP)

March 6

American Showstoppers: Irving Berlin (NYC)

March 13

American Ballet Theatre Studio Company (NYC)

March 21

Peking Acrobats (NYC)

April 23–25

Westchester Reunion

April 23

Hall of Fame (NYC)

February 4

May 1–2

February 6–7

May 9

Koresh Dance Company (NYC)

February 11

Architectural Masterpieces: France (NYC)

February 18

Architectural Masterpieces: England (NYC)

February 25

Architectural Masterpieces: Extreme Architecture (NYC)

February 27–28

NYC Reunion Weekend (NYC)

Patti LuPone: Far Away Places (NYC)

May 14–16

Don Quixote, with the Gelsey Kirkland Ballet (NYC)

May 30

Ben Vereen in Concert (NYC)

June 10

Spirit of Pace Awards Dinner (NYC)

Backhausdance (NYC)

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Flashback HONOR ROLL

At our New York City and Westchester Commencement ceremonies this past May, Pace conferred honorary degrees on Michael Dezer ’68, Lawrence Otis Graham, Robert A. Katzmann, Emily Kernan Rafferty, and George Rupp. They joined a long list of other notable people honored in previous years, including the familiar faces shown here.

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Clockwise from top left: Bob Hope (1970), Michael Bloomberg and Sam Waterston (1999), J. Edgar Hoover (1954), Terry Jones (2008), Christopher Reeve (1998), Ellen Burstyn (2008), Sonia Sotomayor (2003). Center: Cab Calloway (1992).


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Celebrate your Reunion with familiar faces in familiar places! Westchester: April 23–25 New York City: May 1–2 www.pace.edu/reunion

Profile for Pace University

Pace Magazine Fall 2014  

Pace Magazine Fall 2014