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A Citizens’ Guide to

Mixed-Use by Urban Strategies Inc.


This study and the content provided herein are simply for educational purposes and for the benefit of the public. Urban Strategies, Inc. does not own rights to the pictures published in this study. All credits are listed at the end of the booklet. Every effort has been made to ensure that the content provided on this study is accurate and helpful for our readers at the time of publishing. However, if any errors have been found, please notify us via e-mail: mixeduse@urbanstrategies.com


single Lot

-First EditionThe Case Studies

Queen Richmond Centre West Toronto, Canada Sherbourne Common West Toronto, Canada MaRS Discovery District

Toronto, Canada

Thompson Hotel & Residence Toronto, Canada

Urban Block

Avenue de France, 112 Paris, France

Toronto Dominion Centre Toronto, Canada The Eaton Centre Block Toronto, Canada Bikini Berlin Berlin, Germany Iroko Housing Toronto, Canada Brookfield Place Toronto, Canada

Multi Block

Sony Centre Berlin, Germany

Borneo - Sporenburg Amsterdam, Netherlands Canada Water London, UK Chiswick Park London, UK


Each case study page provides a comprehensive look at the development, and outlines in words and graphics all of the characteristics that make the development a good example of density. Here’s what to look for as you read the case studies:

MULTI BLOCK

URBAN BLOCK

SINGLE LOT

Queen Richmond Centre West Toronto, Canada Heritage on Site RETAIL

11.6

OFFICE

EN QUE

30

SINGLE LOT

BUILDING TYPLOGY Indicates the form and massing of the building identified by the corresponding scale of each case study.

55

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

ST W

3,200

m2

198

SITE AREA

21

74

34

37,200

m2

36 41

90

48

55

W

PETE

CONNECTIVITY

R ST

D ST

MON

RICH

15

VE INA A

SPAD

DEVELOPMENT MIX OF USES The coloured bar graph illustrates the proportion of each type of uses.

TOTAL GFA

16

41 PE

AUTHORS: Sweeny &Co Architects YEAR: 2015 (Phase 1) TE

QRCToronto

R ET

11 St.

RE

15

1

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

GFA (m2)

Building Typology Public Space Green Space Context Buildings Private Space Parking

1:3000

QRC Toronto Plan STOREYS

SITE T PLAN ND S HMO RIC Plan view of the case study with the following elements identified where applicable.

ST

75 ADDRESS: 134 Peter St., Toronto SITE AREA: 3,200 m2 PARKING: No

11

T REE

OFFICE

16

34,400

1100

4

RETAIL

1

1,600

1600

5.4

TOTAL

17

37,200

-

-

11 St.

17 St.

2 QRCToronto SECT1: 17 Fl.

4 St. 4 St.

DEVELOPMENT DESCRIPTION Outlines a list of the developer and designers, location, building statistics of each case study. 10

Queen Richmond Centre West AXONOMETRIC VIEW Illustrates the overall form and massing of the development, including all buildings and the surrounding street grid.

6

1:2000

2

QRC Toronto Axo 3

SECTION CUTS Shows the relationship of buildings in the development to neighbouring buildings and to each other. Also identifies different uses within the building.

Residential Retail Office Education Hotel Leisure Atrium Parking Transit

1:2000


How to read the case studies

Typology 1

DEVELOPMENT NAME AND LOCATION Gives you the name of the building or property, and tells you in which municipality it is located.

Queen Richmond Centre West QRCToronto PLAN

City of Toronto

CONTEXT At a total height of 17-storeys, including the retention of the 4-storey heritage buildings at grade, QRC West is situated in a neighbourhood that transitions from the traditional 3-storey historic main street-esque retail of Queen Street West on the north, to the recently completed (and further anticipated) 40+ storey high-rise buildings along Adelaide and King Streets towards the south. As a departure from the vast majority of high-rise residential condominium projects in Toronto, QRC West will consist of commercial office, studio, and retail spaces. A FUSION OF HERITAGE & MODERNITY A fundamental aspect of the success of QRC West’ design is its remarkable combination of the old and the new, resulting in a building that maintains the scale and gritty brick facade of Toronto’s industrial historical past, and blends this with the gleaming modernity of the city’s burgeoning urban renaissance. The retained former industrial warehouse space offers a flexibility in size, form, and function that is unparalleled in newer office construction. At the same time, the building also caters to businesses wanting expansive cityscape views in more contemporary office settings. Resulting from this mix of heritage and modern, the building offers one-of-a-kind spaces, helping to solidify Toronto’s appeal to unique, cuttingedge, and forward-thinking ‘creative class-esque’ businesses.

ISO

CONTEXTUALLY SENSITIVE SCALE TRANSITIONS Conscious of the respective scale differences between Queen and King, QRC West itself sweeps from low to high rise in a similar fashion. With facades set right to the street, the building fits in harmoniously with the long-standing low-rise character of Queen Street West. The height grows as it moves closer to Richmond Street, including the retained 4-storey heritage building along with the addition of a 7-storey mid-rise building. The bulk of the building is contained in the 13-storey tower addition located atop the existing heritage buildings, but set further back from the street in order to maintain a more human scale. This careful mixture of building heights allows the project to both fit seamlessly with its existing character, while pushing the envelope on local physical possibilities.

TION :2000

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS Photos depicting different parts of the development, supporting the written explanation. A list of images is included at the end of this guide. P1 P1, P2, P3: The good relationship between existing heritage built form and the new building. Contrast of materials. Urban intensification in a human scale. P4: Access / Lobby.

P2

P3

P4

11

THE EXPLANATION The written explanation for each development about the context and what makes the development exciting.

DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY STATISTICS Summarizes the size, the density and the connectivity of the development.

7


Sit e on Us es

Fo rm ty Ci

page #

Development Name

10 Queen Richmond Centre West 12 George Brown College

14 MaRS Discovery District

16 Thompson Hotel & Residence

20 Avenue de france, 112

22 Toronto Dominion Centre

24 Toronto Eaton Centre

26 Bikini Berlin

28 Iroko Housing 30 Brookfield Place

32 Sony Centre

34 Borneo - Sporenburg

36 Chiswick Business Park

38 Canada Water

8


ite nS ge o rit a He

I FS

GF A

pm e

re a Sit eA

N

De ve lo

at Lo c

Ye a

ro

fc

ion

on str uc

nt Ty pe

tio

n

The case studies

January

2015 Toronto, CANADA 3,200 m2

37,200 m2

11.6

2012 Toronto, CANADA 5,969 m2

32,144 m2

5.3

296,500 m2

15

40,691 m2

3.6

4,650 m2

5.3

1965-1985 Toronto, CANADA 37,300 m2

403,900 m2

10.8

1977-1981 Toronto, CANADA 37,300 m2

296,453 m2

7.9

2014 Berlin, GERMANY 22,000 m2

69,700 m2

3.1

2004 London, UK 7,300 m2

18,680 m2

2.5

38,700 m2

103,060 m2

3.8

1996-2000 Berlin, GERMANY 26,444 m2

138,500 m2

5.2

300,000 m2

1.2

1999-Ongoing London, UK 13 ha 185,000 m2

1.4

2011 Toronto, CANADA 19,766 m2

2010 Toronto, CANADA 11,079 m2

2004 Paris, FRANCE 875 m2

1990-1992

Toronto, CANADA

1993-1997 Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS 250,000 m2

2009 London, UK 38,700 m2

103,060 m2

3.8

9


SINGLE LOT

Queen Richmond Centre West Toronto, Canada Heritage on Site OFFICE

RETAIL

11.6

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

TW EN S

30

QUE

3,200

m2

198

SITE AREA

21

74

34

37,200

41

90

48

m2

TOTAL GFA

55

PETE

15

CONNECTIVITY

R ST

VE INA A

SPAD

TW ND S

MO RICH

16

PE

AUTHORS: Sweeny &Co Architects YEAR: 2015 (Phase 1) TE

QRCToronto I

R ST RE

75

ET

ADDRESS: 134 Peter St., Toronto SITE AREA: 3,200 m2 PARKING: No

15

1:3000

STOREYS

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

QRC Toronto Plan

OFFICE

16

34,400

1100

4

RETAIL

1

1,600

1600

5.4

TOTAL

17

37,200

-

-

11 St.

2 QRCToronto SECTI 1:2 17 Fl.

4 St.

10


Queen Richmond Centre West

Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT At a total height of 17-storeys, including the retention of the 4-storey heritage buildings at grade, QRC West is situated in a neighbourhood that transitions from the traditional 3-storey historic main street-esque retail of Queen Street West on the north, to the recently completed (and further anticipated) 40+ storey high-rise buildings along Adelaide and King Streets towards the south. As a departure from the vast majority of high-rise residential condominium projects in Toronto, QRC West will consist of commercial office, studio, and retail spaces. A FUSION OF HERITAGE & MODERNITY A fundamental aspect of the success of QRC West’ design is its remarkable combination of the old and the new, resulting in a building that maintains the scale and gritty brick facade of Toronto’s industrial historical past, and blends this with the gleaming modernity of the city’s burgeoning urban renaissance. The retained former industrial warehouse space offers a flexibility in size, form, and function that is unparalleled in newer office construction. At the same time, the building also caters to businesses wanting expansive cityscape views in more contemporary office settings. Resulting from this mix of heritage and modern, the building offers one-of-a-kind spaces, helping to solidify Toronto’s appeal to unique, cuttingedge, and forward-thinking ‘creative class-esque’ businesses. CONTEXTUALLY SENSITIVE SCALE TRANSITIONS Conscious of the respective scale differences between Queen and King, QRC West itself sweeps from low to high rise in a similar fashion. With facades set right to the street, the building fits in harmoniously with the long-standing low-rise character of Queen Street West. The height grows as it moves closer to Richmond Street, including the retained 4-storey heritage building along with the addition of a 7-storey mid-rise building. The bulk of the building is contained in the 13-storey tower addition located atop the existing heritage buildings, but set further back from the street in order to maintain a more human scale. This careful mixture of building heights allows the project to both fit seamlessly with its existing character, while pushing the envelope on local physical possibilities.

P1 P1, P2, P3: The good relationship between existing heritage built form and the new building. Contrast of materials. Urban intensification in a human scale. P4: Access / Lobby.

P2

P3

P4

11


SINGLE LOT

George Brown College Toronto, Canada EDUCATION

RETAIL

5.3

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

5,969

E UAY

Q NS

m2

58 19

32,144

DR

DR

m2

TOTAL GFA

76

C

DO

E

ID KS

SITE AREA

E KSID DOC

EE

QU

19

George Brown Colle

8

47 29

CONNECTIVITY

QU AUTHORS: KPMB - Stantec EE Architecture NS QU YEAR: 2012 A YE AS T

ADDRESS: 51 Dockside Dr, Toronto SITE AREA: 5,969 m2 PARKING: No TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

7

32,144

4,500

5

TOTAL

7

32,144

4,500

5

GFA (m2)

EDUCATION

STOREYS

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

1

GB College

1:3000

4 St. 4 St. 7 St.

12

2 St.


George Brown College

Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT Situated within Toronto’s evolving East Bayfront neighbourhood at Queens Quay East and Jarvis, the George Brown College Waterfront Campus contains 31,500m2 of space and serves approximately 4,000 students and staff. As the home of the college’s Centre for Health Studies, the Waterfront Campus has been designed to foster a collaborative environment of learning amongst multiple healthcare disciplines. A CATALYST FOR WATERFRONT REVITALIZATION The George Brown College Waterfront College embodies many of the principles of Waterfront Toronto’s overall vision of incorporation design excellence, being at the forefront of sustainability and reinforcing the relationship between the city and the water’s edge. Through the accommodation of a wide variety and scale of uses, including major institutional and office uses, a number of mixeduse residential and commercial developments, as well as a network of well-designed public spaces scattered throughout the district, the campus is a major catalytical move in the execution of a larger plan for long-term waterfront revitalization. FOSTERING A NEW MIXED-USE COMMUNITY As one of the first major developments to break ground in the East Bayfront portion of Toronto’s ongoing waterfront revitalization, the George Brown College Waterfront Campus serves as a major anchor that will contribute towards the overall mix of the community once it is complete. Located adjacent to the Corus Quay office and studios, and between the excellent Sugar Beach and Sherbourne Common public spaces, the addition of a large daily influx of students to the regular mix of office workers, tourists, and local residents creates an ideal setting for mixed-use success, ensuring the neighbourhood is active and vibrant year-round, and providing the mass and concentration of people necessary to allow local business to thrive.

P1

P1, P2: Exterior views of the facade architectural details P3: Interior view of the lake from the study space P4: View from the Sherbourne Common

P2

P3 13


SINGLE LOT

MaRS Discovery District Toronto, Canada Heritage on Site RETAIL

RESEARCH

15

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

19,766

m2

7

SITE AREA

16 7

296,500

8

28

H ST ABET ELIZ 1

ST

14

EGE

COLL

12

m2

23

TOTAL GFA

34

UNIV

32

47

81

CONNECTIVITY

226

E

T Y AV

ERSI

215 62

PARKING SPOTS

3

AUTHORS: B+H ADDRESS: 101 College St, Toronto YEAR: 2011

MAR

GFA: 72,500 m2 TYPICAL FLOOR PLATE AREA: 3,625 m2 TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR: 3.15 m STOREYS: 20 PARKING: Shared with the mall

STOREYS

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

Mars

6

160,000

2,836

4

BUILDING 2

17

28,056

2,538

4

BUILDING 3

35

66,558

2,012

4

BUILDING 4

29

41,839

1,776

4

BUILDING 1

1:3000

33 St.

16 St.

25 St.

3 St.

14


MaRS Discovery District Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT It is located on the corner of College Street and University Avenue in the city of Toronto’s Discovery District, adjacent to the University of Toronto and its affiliated research hospitals at the University Health Network. The MaRS development consists of two phases: Phase 1 MaRS Discovery District Phase 1 was designed by Adamson Associates Architects and includes: Inside the Heritage Building’s four-storey brick façade (preserved) are tenant spaces occupied by professional services, industry associations, pharmaceutical companies and offices of Canadian universities and the Province of Ontario. In 2006, the MaRS Centre received the Heritage Toronto Award of Excellence for Architectural Conservation and Craftsmanship. The building was designed by Pearson and Darling and opened in 1911. The Atrium The MaRS atrium is a glass-roofed public thoroughfare that provides walkway access to Heritage Building tenants and retail vendors, as well as access to the South and Medical Discovery Towers. Its bottom level features a sub-dividable conference area that hosts public and private events. MaRS encourages events from across Toronto’s arts, culture and broader urban community. The Atrium’s lower level also features a media centre, video conferencing rooms and a public food court.

P1

P1: The Retail Galaria P2: View from College St\ P3: Interior view of the atrium

P2

The South Tower This eight-storey structure houses incubator programs and shared laboratory and research facilities. The 200,000-square-foot (19,000 m2), wet-lab-capable building spans eight floors in the MaRS Centre. The tower boasts advanced mechanical and electrical systems, floors with enhanced load bearing capabilities and 15-foot (4.6 m) slab-to-slab clearances.

P3 15


SINGLE LOT

Hotel Thompso

Toronto, Canada RETAIL

HOTEL

HOUSING

3.6

11.16FLOOR SPACE INDEX 48.95

11,079

18.66 58

20

11 18

34.47

16.89

34

11

18

17

BATH

18

ARA

34

40,691

ST

20

m2

TOTAL GFA

195 49 188

CONNECTIVITY

17

URST ST

NIAG

19 38.00

45

18

W

11

7

188

58

50.00

ST LAND PORT 1 1

ST W TON G N I ELL

195 49

m2

SITE AREA 32.00

45

19

7

3

Thompson Hotel &Thompson Residence

3

PARKING LEVELS

AUTHORS: architectsalliance YEAR: 2010

Thompson Plan

1:3000

ADDRESS: 550 Wellington St W, Toronto SITE AREA: 11,079 m2 PARKING: Yes TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

TOTAL

GFA (m2)

RETAIL

STOREYS

HOTEL & HOUSING

Thompson Plan

12

38000

7,200

3.3

2

2800

1,400

6 St. 10

15

40,690m²

10 St.

10 St.

15 St. 10 St.

3 St.

15 St.

3 St.

16

1

Thompson Hotel 2

1:3000


Thompson Hotel & Residence

Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT Located just west of the city’s Entertainment District and steps away from the vibrant King West area, the area surrounding the Thompson Hotel & Residences building is characterized by several other mixed-use mid-rise and high-rise buildings along Bathurst Street, along with the older converted warehouse retail/ commercial uses and low-rise residential uses along Wellington Street. These buildings are home to a number of the city’s most well-known restaurants, bars, and lounges, and are a popular destination for nightlife and entertainment. A MAJOR ANCHOR FOR THE KING WEST SCENE The entire Thompson complex consists of a combination of a 95 boutique hotel rooms and 326 private residential condominiums cohesively stitched together by a number of restaurants, lounges, and nightclubs located directly inside the building. Akin to the Drake Hotel that anchors West Queen West, the Thompson is a high profile and large scaled anchor that both adds to and seamlessly fits in with the finer-grained vibrancy of King West and the Entertainment District scene. Residents and hotel patrons enjoy access to an exclusive rooftop lounge that offer expansive views of the city’s skyline, while the building’s ground floor features two restaurants, a lobby lounge, and a popular basement level nightclub. INTEGRATING VIBRANT ENTERTAINMENT WITH PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL USES One of the longest standing discords within Toronto’s mixed use neighbourhoods are between private residential uses located next to bars, clubs, and other nightlife establishments. The Thompson’s solution is to combine these uses, offering units for owners who have decidedly embraced the vibrancy of downtown living. Despite being located within one of the city’s most vibrant (and at times admittedly rambunctious) neighourhoods, the Thompson’s private residences have been designed to both connect with the liveliness and dynamism of the complex, but also remain one step removed from the bustle of King Street West. The residential quarters feature a chic and dimly lit reflecting pool placed within an outdoor garden that clearly demarcates where the complex’s private uses begin. The outdoor gardens adjacent to the private residences establish a sense of intimacy that quietly embraces Victoria Memorial Park located just south of the complex.

P1

P2

P3

P4 17


SINGLE LOT

Avenue de France, 112 Paris, France

112AvFrance Axono 5.3 38

67

RETAIL

OFFICE

42

9

IAC

VE

EN AV

LB TO

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

875

m2

SITE AREA

4,650

38

N RA EF

D UE

E RU

U NE

71

67

CE

m2

TOTAL GFA

42

E RU

CONNECTIVITY 112 AvFrance PLAN

ER

IVI

4

8 St.

OL

71

9

1:3000

N

IAE

SS

ME

AUTHORS: Foster + Partners YEAR: 2004 ADDRESS: 112 Avenue de France, Paris SITE AREA: 875 m2 PARKING: 1:3000 Yes

3

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

3,980

580

4.0

1

500

500

5.5

8

4,650

-

-

STOREYS

GFA (m2)

Axonometry

OFFICE

7

RETAIL TOTAL

112 AvFrance PLAN

1:3000

8 St.

18

1:2000

3


112 Avenue de France Paris, France

CONTEXT France Avenue project provides some key features relating to a new generation of inner city office buildings: an easily accessible central location in an attractive urban environment, an energy efficient building with modern and flexible office space combined with attractive social spaces for meeting and relaxation: The location in the Rive Gauche development area gives the building well connected central position in Paris, not only for cars and pedestrians, but more importantly its position over the major Francois Mitterand Metro and RER station gives it excellent public transport connections.

P1

The building occupies an entire new city block, surrounded by streets on four sides, and located on the corner of the major roads: France Avenue and Rue Neuve Tolbiac. The site forms part of a larger masterplan for the redevelopment of these former railway lands into a new and modern city district. The massing of the building is broken down into four smaller blocks, linked by glazed gardens that allow diagonal views right through the block.

P2 P1: Dealing with a corner building with intense retail P2, P3: Facade treatment details. Individually adjustable motorized glass louvres P4, P5, P6: Interior views of the covered central atrium garden from where all the distribution is organized

INNOVATIVE SITE PLANNING DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURE STRENGTHS

P3

P4 19


URBAN BLOCK

Toronto Dominion Centre Toronto, Canada Heritage on Site RETAIL

OFFICE

10.8

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

46 51

SITE AREA

57

ET STRE

77

39

66 25

403,900

m2

22

TOTAL GFA

35 56 St.

38

YORK

74

TD

m2

BAY

ST

37,300

22

46

16

KING

REET

46 St.

81

26

47

T

E STRE

38

N

NGTO

13

LI WEL

36 St.

CONNECTIVITY

ET STRE

3,659

2 St.

PARKING SPOTS

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

1

YEAR: 1967 - 1985 ADDRESS: 6 Wellington Street West, Toronto SITE AREA: 37,300m2 PARKING: Yes

STOREYS

AUTHORS: Bregman + Hamann Architects & John B. Parkin Associates with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

56

158,820

2,836

4

TD2Tower BUILDING 46 Plan 116,750

2,538

4

BUILDING 3

32

64,390

2,012

4

BUILDING 4

36

63,940

1,776

4

-

-

BUILDING 1

TOTAL

-

403,900

1 2

1:3000

TD T T

3 56 St.

1

2

46 St. 56 St.

4

36 St.

2

1

4

56 St. 46 St.

36 St.

46 St.

3

56 St. 46 St.

36 St. 32 St.

2 St.

2 St.

20

32 St.

36 St.


Toronto Dominion Centre Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT With an architectural style that once divided residents due to its substantial scale and dominance over the city’s skyline, today the Toronto Dominion Centre has come to be a respected contribution to Toronto’s Financial District that is admired for its timeless and elegant design. The site consists of three towers (222m, 182m, and 128m), with frontage on King, Bay and Wellington Streets. Each of the towers is joined by an underground retail concourse that houses 14,000 square metres of retail amongst 58 stores, and connects to other surrounding buildings via Toronto’s PATH system. As part of the city’s Financial District, AN EARLY PIONEER OF MIXED USE IN THE CORE The TD Centre represents one of the pioneering examples of successful mixed-use development in the City of Toronto. The complex creates a hyperlocal market amongst three towers full of office employees situated overtop a retail concourse containing a selection of fast-food and fine-dining, fashion apparel, coffee shops, dry cleaning, health and personal services, and other such retailers. Part of architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s design was to incorporate these amenities into the base of the building providing for the daily needs of the 20,000 people who work in the TD Centre, as well as the 50,000 who pass through via the PATH system. In addition to the vibrant retail concourse, office workers often inhabit the outdoor plaza which serves to coalesce together the towers that enclose the open space and creates mid-block connections between King, Bay, Wellington, and York Streets. A popular and well-used lunch time destination, the numerous food trucks that line the streets surrounding the plaza contribute to the vibrancy experience here during the summer months. SUCCEEDING IN THE WORLD OF 9-TO-5 In a survey of Canada’s top retail destinations, the TD Centre ranks #19 with annual sales of $819 per square foot, ahead of Bayview Village at $810 per square foot, and behind Fairview Mall at $843 per square foot. This significant volume of sales is remarkable when considering that the TD Centre caters to the 9 to 5 crowd, and does not operate on weekends or holidays. By focusing on retail shopping specializing in the delivery of fast, efficient, and convenient service, the TD Centre addresses the needs of the countless office workers that walk through the retail concourse Monday to Friday, eliminating the necessity for them to make additional shopping trips before or after work.

P1

P2

P1: Inviting transparency of the hall from the street P2: Interior of the hall P3: The complex today

P3 21


Eaton Centre URBAN BLOCK

The Eaton Centre Block Toronto, Canada RETAIL

7.9

OFFICE

46

TW AS S UND

D

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

89

37,300

102

m2

97

SITE AREA

105

296,453

m2

TOTAL GFA

427

77

69

CONNECTIVITY

100

574

E ST

G YON

PARKING SPOTS

BAY ST

TW EN S

QUE

AUTHORS: Eberhard Zeidler and Bregman + Hamann Architects

USI Base

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

RETAIL

6

160,000

2,836

4

OFFICE

17

28,056

2,538

4

OFFICE

35

66,558

2,012

4

OFFICE

29

41,839

1,776

4

TOTAL

-

296,450

-

-

22

1:3000

39 St.

STOREYS

YEAR: 1977 ADDRESS: 220 Yonge Street, Toronto SITE AREA: 37,300m2 PARKING: Yes

48 St.

12 St. 45 St. 3 St.

7 St.


CONTEXT Located on the east side of Toronto City Hall, Eaton Centre Complex occupies most of the 9.5 hectares land bounded by the city’s primary shopping streets: Yonge, Queen, Bay and Dundas. It is the only shopping mall and a major tourist attraction in Downtown Toronto. Despite the early intention of taking over all the whole area except for the former Eaton’s Annex - current Bell Trinity Square site, the final scheme of Eaton Centre preserved two heritage properties on site: the Old City Hall on the south west corner and the Trinity Church and Square in the middle of the block. There are two subway stations providing direct access to Eaton Centre: Dundas Station on the north and Queen Station on the south. The complex also accommodates 3 office towers, one hotel and Ryerson University’s Faculty of Business. A FINER GRAIN SUPER BLOCK: The preservation of Old City Hall and Trinity Church as well as the related public access and open space gave the block a much finer public space network than a typical super block of this size. James Street and Albert Street provide not only the access to the Old City Hall, but also service access to Eaton Centre hidden away from the primary shopping streets. The Shopping Mall preserves a 24/7 indoor pedestrian right of way east west through the mall at the location of the original east section of Albert Street. The Trinity Square provides green open space in the centre of the block with public pedestrian access from Bay Street on the west. The design of the Eaton Complex ensured that the new buildings would not block all sunlight to the Church and the Square.

The Eaton Centre Toronto, Canada

P1

P2

P2: Interior view of Eaton Centre atrium P3: Eaton Centre North entrance at Dundas Street

The Shopping Mall itself features a dramatic 900-foot long, five-level shopping galleria which contains over 300 stores. The lower level of the galleria connects directly to the two subway stations and serves as part of the city’s underground PATH system. The second level of the galleria connects to Hudson Bay Department Store on the south of Queen Street through a sky bridge. RESPONDING TO THE STREET: In early 2000s, the Eaton Centre’s owners have redesigned the mall’s Yonge Street façade, bringing it closer to the street and making it more closely resemble an urban shopping district, with stores opening directly onto the street, and presenting a variety of façades to create the perception of an urban streetscape.

P1: Street view of Dundas St looking west with Eaton Centre on the south

P3

23


URBAN BLOCK

Bikini Berlin

15.46

Berlin, Germany Heritage on Site LEISURE

OFFICE

KANTSTRASS

RETAIL

HOTEL

E

3.1

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

22,000

17

208.12

77

m2

SITE AREA

14

40

16

TOTAL GFA

E

SS

57

m2

RA ST

58

EN TZI EN TAU

69,700 170

BUDAPE

47

STER ST R

CONNECTIVITY

223

PARKING SPOTS

ADDRESS: Budapester Str. 38-50, Berlin SITE AREA: 22,000 m2 ORIGINAL BUILDING AUTHORS: Paul Schwebes & Hans Schoszberger YEAR: 1957

B

REVITALISATION OF THE COMPLEX AUTHORS: SAQ Architects YEAR: 2014 PARKING: Yes

1:3000

STOREYS

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

Bikini Berlin Plan

OFFICE (1)

16

18,900

1,200

3.35

OFFICE (2)

5

11,700

2,700

3.35

RETAIL

2

20,000

12,000

-

HOTEL

10

9,000

820

3.00

CINEMA

-

2,100

2,100

-

PARKING

4

8,000

2,000

3.00

TOTAL

-

69,700

-

-

15 St.

3 St.

7 St. 2 St.

24


Bikini Berlin Berlin, Germany

CONTEXT Located opposite the bomb-damaged Memorial Church (Gedachniskirche), backing on to the Zoological Garden in Charlottenburg, Bikini Berlin is a new urban complex converted from Berlin’s post-war landmark building complex “Zentrum am Zoo”, with shopping mall, office, hotel, cinema and a parking structure integrated within an over 400m long, less than 80m wide urban block. A SENSITIVE RENEWAL The design focused on both the restoration of the original modernism land mark and the injection of new life into this half century old structure. The facades of the buildings were carefully articulated to bring back the features and details of the original style. The top floor additions were set back to preserve the original building profile. The two plaza spaces on the east and west were redesigned to open up the main entrances to the buildings. The whole building complex is being awarded the GOLD certificate from the LEED building classification programme. One of the major additions to the original structure is a green roof built on the former delivery yard at the back of the site facing the Zoological Garden. The silk scarf like roof structure does not only provide an open and bright retail hall underneath, but also morphs between the existing and new buildings and provides a common roof terrace with open view towards the Zoological Garden. FOCUS ON INNOVATIVE USES The construction and real-estate activities of the project are coordinated by Bayerische Hausbau – a real estate portfolio management company. “Innovative” has been a key word throughout Bikini Berlin’s portfolio. The BIKINI BERLIN Concept Mall, is a compilation of carefully curated boutiques, concept and flagship stores which are a first or rarely to be found elsewhere in Berlin and the rest of Germany. The office offers various sized units from 20 sqm to 250 sqm catering towards different creative professions. The hotel is operated by 25 Hours Hotel Group – a well know design hotel operator, with uniquely designed rooms and amenities. The Cinema hosts many premieres as Berlin’s biggest movie theatre and served as a venue of the Berlinale film festival.

P1

P2

P3

P4

25


CO

RN

LR

Iroko Housing

URBAN BLOCK

W AL

OA

D

17.42

London, UK 80 RETAIL

2.5

HOUSING

45

65

43 FLOOR SPACE INDEX

11 7 80

45

18,680

m2

TOTAL GFA

19

CORNWALL RD

11 7

ST STAMFORD

CONNECTIVITY

Iroko200 Housing

1

PARKING SPOTS

AUTHORS: Haworth Tompkins Architects YEAR: 2004

Iroko Housing

1:3000

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

ADDRESS: Coin Street, South Bank, London SITE AREA: 7,300 m2

STOREYS

1

m2

SITE AREA

65

43

7,300 19

UPPER GROUND

OFFICE

7

11,880

580

4.0

RETAIL

1

6,800

500

5.5

5 St. 5 St.

TOTAL

8

4,650

-

4 St.

5 St. 5 St. 4 St.

26

2

Axonometry

1:3000


Iroko Housing London, UK

CONTEXT The site occupied two very different worlds the nationally important cultural and tourist centre of the South Bank, and the residential neighbourhood of Coin Street and This project represents one of a series of brown field developments on London’s South Bank by Coin Street Community Builders. The site is an urban block located behind the National Theatre on London’s South Bank. Haworth Tompkins won a limited competition to develop a master plan to develop proposals for the first phase of development to provide 59 new dwellings, including 32 family houses and a mix of smaller flats and maisonettes over a 200-place car park. DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURE The challenge for all inner-city housing is to reconcile the civic presence demanded by the urban setting with the privacy demanded but the domestic function. In response to this the dwellings are arranged as terraces onto the streets forming an open courtyard in the centre of the site which provides a secure communal landscaped garden for the residents.

P1

P2

The scheme embodied many principles of sustainability, both in spatial planning and solar access. Each dwelling was given roofmounted solar panels to produce domestic hot water. Insulation levels, ventilation systems and building materials were all specified for minimum environmental impact.

P1: Exterior views of the complex P2, P3: Views of the courtyard P4: Interior facade with balconies looking to the central courtyard

P3

P4

P5: Exterior brick facade

27


URBAN BLOCK

Brookfield Place Toronto, Canada Heritage on Site OFFICE

3.8Brookf

RETAIL

23

Wellington St W

YONGE ST

14 30

TOTAL GFA

20

Bay St

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

OFFICE Brookfield 47

127,495

2415

4

OFFICE

14

12,630

1020

4

OFFICE

3

550

160

4

RETAIL

1

9476

2,800

4

STOREYS

PARKING SPOTS

1:3000

Wellin gton 276,110 St W

41

Yo ng eS t

17 TOTAL

W

2,140

23

Ba yS t 57

St E

14

Front

Front St

35

ADDRESS: 161 and 181 Bay Street,Toronto SITE AREA: 23,884 m² PARKING: Yes

CONNECTIVITY 32

Yonge St

BAY ST

m2

35

230

103,060

FRO

30

192

SITE AREA

TW NT S

32

A

m2

Yonge St

20

AUTHORS: Bregman + Hamann Architects, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill YEAR: 1990-1992

38,700 Brookfield

WELLINGTON ST W

172

41

A

23

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

30

49 St.

35

53 St.

3 St.

15 St.

49 St.

28

1


Brookfield Place Toronto, Canada

CONTEXT Brookfield Place is always an interesting place to visit as there are often fascinating works of art suspended from its vaulted ceiling. However, even if there are no sculptures on display, the architecture alone is worthwhile viewing, particularly the sixstory Allan Lamport Galleria. Designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, it connects the Bay Street entrance with Sam Pollack Square, which opens on to Yonge Street. Brookfield Place is a 5.2 acres complex in downtown Toronto, bounded by Bay Street on the west, Yonge on the east, Wellington Street on the north, and Front Street on the south. The Galleria has sometimes been called a “crystal cathedral of commerce.� In this analogy, the floor space below the arches is the nave. Others have referred to it as an architectural creation of a forest grove, the soaring support pillars representing gigantic trees that soars high into the heavens. No matter how a visitor views this masterful work of architecture, it produces a feeling of awe as one gazes upward toward the skies above the glass panels. The view from the escalator, when one is ascending from the basement level, is particularly inspiring.

P1: Allen Lambert Galleria, designed by Santiago Calatrava P2, ...?

P1

There are other reasons to visit Brookfield Place, as it also includes the Hockey Hall of Fame, and the facade of an 1845 bank building that was once located on Wellington Street.

P2 29


63 15 8

100

URBAN BLOCK

Sony Center

106

Berlin, Germany

LEISURE

TRANSIT

47

HOUSING

OFFICE

RETAIL

5.2

TRASSE LENNES

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

1

Sony Center

26,444

93

m2

63

SITE AREA

BEN-GUR

138,500

m2

TOTAL GFA

93

100

61

CONNECTIVITY

26

SSE

ION-STRA

15 8

823

106 47

SE

ER STRAS

POTSDAM

PARKING SPOTS

AUTHORS: Murphy Jahn Architects YEAR: 1996-2000

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

1

STOREYS

ADDRESS: 10785 Potsdamer Platz, Berlin SITE AREA: 26, 444 m² PARKING: Yes

OFFICE 1

26

23,000

880

4

OFFICE 2

11

14,000

1,270

4

OFFICE 3

11

21,000

-

4

OFFICE 4

12

12,850

-

4

Apartments

-

18,200

-

4

Leisure

-

29,100

-

4

Retail

-

9,800

-

4

TOTAL

-

-

-

Sony Center

1:3000

4

3

11 St.

Sony Center 2(1)12 St. 1

30

26 St.

1:2000 127,950


Sony Center

Berlin, Germany

CONTEXT The Sony Center is located in Berlin at the Potsdamer Platz. Historically Potsdamer Platz has been an important public square and traffic intersection in the Center of Berlin. In the 1920s and 30s, Potsdamer Platz was a major public transport hub and a popular entertainment district. However, by the mid 1940s Potsdamer Platz was reduced to ruins by allied bombing. After the Second World War, the square was located between the American, British and Russian sectors and became a no-man’s land. The area was completely flattened with the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 when the remaining buildings on the east side of the wall were pulled down. After the fall of the Berlin Wall it was decided to rebuild the area. Construction started in 1994 and for many years Potsdamer Platz was the largest construction site in Europe. THE SONY CENTER Designed by architect Helmut Jahn, the Sony Center features a 4,000 sqm elliptical public space, the Forum, covered by a tentlike glass roof.The complex is comprised of seven buildings which accommodate offices, apartments, retail, cinemas, bars and restaurants. The complex also houses the Filmhaus Museum, TV Museum, and Legoland.

P1 P1: Aerial View of the dome covering the central plaza of the Sony Center P2: Interior central public space, the “Forum” is occupied by cafes and restaurants. P3: The “Forum” connects to the surrounding streets through walkways.

P2

The tallest building of the Sony Center complex is the Bahn Tower, a 26 storeys semicircular glass tower which houses the corporate headquarters of Deutsche Bahn AG, the German state railway system.

P3

P4

31


MULTI BLOCK

Borneo - Sporenburg Amsterdam, Netherlands

Education

HOUSING

1.2

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

247

34

19

250,000

m2

SITE AREA

9

49

35

23 11

6 10 80

300,000

m2

177 24

TOTAL GFA

16

10

98 8

60

29

24

46

216 12

22

CONNECTIVITY

130

50

14

39

23

10 31

C VAN EESTERENLAAN

260

150

12

43 43 14

180

AUTHORS: West 8 YEAR: 1993 - 1997

Borneo Sporenburg

STOREYS

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

ADDRESS: Borneo-Sporenburg, Amsterdam SITE AREA: 28,400 m2 UNITS: 2500 PARKING: No

HOUSING

3-4

237,400

87.8

4

HOUSING

10

44,054

3,380

3.3

RETAIL

1

6,760

3,380

3.8

EDUCATION

1

8,670

2,890

3

TOTAL

-

296,900

-

3 St.

9 St. 4 St.

3 St.

3 St. 13 St.

32


Borneo - Sporenburg Amsterdam, Netherlands

CONTEXT Two peninsulas in the eastern part of the Amsterdam docks, were to be exploited for water-related activities, as well as 2500 low-rise dwelling units, with a density of 100 units per hectare. For a new interpretation of the traditional Dutch canal house, West 8 suggested new types of three-storey, ground-accessed houses deviating from the usual terraced house in being strongly oriented to the private realm by incorporating patios and roof gardens. By repeating this type in a great variety of dwelling modes and with maximum architectural variation, an animated street elevation emerges with a focus on the individual. At a larger scale, a delicately balanced relationship exists between the repetition of the individual dwellings, the roofscape and the great scale of the docks. Three immense sculptural blocks take their place as landmarks in the vast expanse of houses.

P1

P2

P1: Aerial view of the Borneo-Sporenburg neighbourhood P2, P3, P4: Variety of typologies in the neighbourhood

P3

P4 33


MULTI BLOCK

Chiswick Business Park London, UK

RETAIL

OFFICE

LL O

48

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

LN

13

HA SITE AREA

17

67

18

1.38

BO

25

73

185,000

m2

19

TOTAL GFA

CONNECTIVITY

20

73

1:85

m2 PARKING RATIO

57 22

50

SILVE

46

27

ES

R CR 32

AUTHORS: Richard Rogers Partnership, West 8 Chiswick Park YEAR: 1999 - ongoing

1:4000

4 Fl.

OFFICE & RETAIL 4LEISURE Fl.

TOTAL

4, 5, 9, 12

182,000 3,355

-

3,900

-

185,000

12 St. 6 St. 5 St.

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

.

GFA (m2)

STOREYS

ADDRESS: 566 Chiswick High Rd, London SITE AREA: 13 Hectares PARKING: Yes, 1:915 NET Sq ft

3& 6 -

-

-

5 St.

5 St.

5 St.

4 St. 4 St. 4 St.

4 St. 4 St.

4 Fl. 4 St.

34


Chiswick Business Park

London, UK

CONTEXT Chiswick Park is located five miles from central London and eight miles from Heathrow airport. It is built on the site of a former London bus overhaul facility. The triangular site is bounded by railways and highway on north and east, a low-rise residential neighbourhood on the west. A small stretch of its southern edge faces Chiswick High Road, which provides the main access to the Park. EMPHASIS ON PEOPLE RATHER THAN CARS With 4 different transit stations located within walkable distance, the layout of Chiswick Business Park focuses on pedestrian’s experience rather than cars. Twelve office buildings were arranged around and facing the Park’s ‘inner garden’ with a featured two-tier lake, waterfall, decked boardwalk, pathways and a variety of tree planting. All the vehicular movement are routed behind the buildings and the central communal areas. The general office car parking ratio is only at 1:915sqf. ACHIEVING HIGH QUALITY USING THE STANDARDISED The buildings at Chiswick are standardised, using off-site construction technology, securing economies of time and cost. The office buildings contain highly flexible space that can be configured in open plan or cellular form. Central atria give views out into the landscaped park and bring light into the centre of each building. Around 90 per cent of external building surfaces are shaded, using a combination of aluminium louvres and external blinds activated by light sensors. These measures replace the need for traditional air conditioning systems. Facades facing south, east and west have additional canopy shading to protect them from direct solar gain. FOCUS ON LIFESTYLE AND WORKING EXPERIENCE Chiswick Park provides office space together with ancillary uses including retail and leisure facilities. The park’s management team “Enjoy-Work” provides an extensive programme of events, clubs and evening classes that offers something for everyone at any stage in their carrier. The team also plays a key role in ensuring that the environmentally friendly features incorporated into the design of the site continue to function as intended. Chiswick Park has been listed each year since 2007 year in the UK’s 50 Best Workplaces.

P1

P2 P1: Aerial view of the business park complex P2, P3: Inner open space. Intricate garden, a multifunctional event space P4: Chiswick Park Sketch P5: Architecture of one of the twelve office buildings

P3

P4 35


MULTI BLOCK

Canada Water London, UK

TRANSIT

LIBRARY

RETAIL

3.8

HOUSING

FLOOR SPACE INDEX

38,700

m2

SITE AREA

D

18

R AYS SURREY QU 52

42

103,060

36

m2

TOTAL GFA

NEEDLEMAN ST 14

34

51

16

28PRO VIN

51

25

CE DR 1

8

42

16

CONNECTIVITY

1300

PARKING SPOTS

AUTHORS: CO Architects, Urban Strategies, Inc. Canada Water Plan YEAR: 2009

1:4000

ADDRESS: London, UK SITE AREA: 38,700 m2 PARKING: Yes

GFA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR AREA (m2)

TYPICAL FLOOR TO FLOOR (m)

6 St.

STOREYS

1

STATION

1

-

2700

8

LIBRARY

5

8000

800

4

HOUSING

5-8

71500

500

3

HOUSING

25

16560

660

3

RETAIL

1

7000

600

4

TOTAL

36

103060

6 St.

7 St.

26 St. 8 St. 8 St. 8 St.

Can


Canada Water

London, England

CONTEXT Canada Water area is located on the Rotherhithe peninsula in south east London. Historically, the area was home to the Surrey Docks, which was closed by 1969 and filled for redevelopment in 1980s. At the centre of the area is Canada Water – a fresh water lake and wildlife refuge converted from former Canada Dock. Canada Water tube, Overground and bus station lies immediately to the north of the lake a long with Canada water Library and Deal Porter Square. The surrounding area includes a shopping centre on the south of the lake built in 1988 following the fill of the Docks.

P1

INFRASTRUCTURE LED BOOMING The extension of the Jubilee Line in 1999 and London Overground service in 2010 gave the area rapid connection to the rest of London. Since 1999, area around Canada water has been a focus for development. The recently development – Maple Quays is a key regeneration project following the Canada Water Station. Located adjacent to the station and the lake, the project delivers 900 mixed-tenure apartments, 28,500 sq.ft of retail and community facilities and £9.5m of community and public realm benefits. FOCUS ON HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC REALM Deal Port Square is part of Maple Quays development. It creates a central focal space for residents, incorporating a striking new public library overhanging the lake. The development also delivers a new children’s playground, new cycle routes and establishes new connections in an area that was characterized by dead ends; opening up the area along with a series of linked waterways creating a new canal-side community. Communal roof terraces and courtyards with water features act as a tranquil focal point for residents to enjoy. THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS The future developments will be guided by the Canada Water area action plan (AAP). Looking forward to 2026, the plan sets out a vision which transforms Canada Water into a town centre. It looks at strengthening Canada Water’s role as a shopping destination, expanding the amount of retail space and providing a much more diverse range of shops than at present, including a new department store and independent shops. In addition to new shops, complementary uses including higher education facilities, offices suitable for a range of occupiers, cafes, restaurants and leisure facilities will help broaden the appeal of the town centre, diversify and strengthen the local economy

P2

P3

37


List of Images Project Queen Richmond Centre West

George Brown College

MaRS Discovery District

Thompson Hotel & Residence Avenue de France, 112 Toronto Dominion Centre Toronto Eaton Centre

Bikini Berlin

Iroko Housing

Brookfield Place

Sony Center

Borneo-Sporenburg

Chiswick Business Park

Canada Water

38

# of picture 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 all 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3

Source http://urbantoronto.ca/database/projects/qrc-west-queen-richmond-centre-west http://www.acoustical-consultants.com/portfolio-category/conversion-restoration/ http://urbantoronto.ca/news/2011/04/queen-richmond-centre-west-brings-more-office-space-toronto http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?p=120053069 http://renewcanada.net/2013/george-brown-college-waterfront-campus/ http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2014/01/16/website_allows_ontario_students_to_transfer_credits_with_ease.html http://www.waterfrontoronto.ca/image_galleries/george_brown_college/?13555#13549 https://www.marsdd.com/facilities/office-and-lab-space/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MaRS_Discovery_District http://susandrysdale.com/doors-open-toronto-2015/ http://juliekinnear.com/toronto-condos-lofts/55-stewart-street-501/ http://www.getwhatyouwant.ca/toronto-loft/thompson-hotel-residences-55-stewart-street-west http://juliekinnear.com/toronto-condos-lofts/55-stewart-street-501/ http://urbantoronto.ca/database/projects/550-wellington-west-and-thompson-hotel http://www.fosterandpartners.com/projects/france-avenue/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottnorsworthy/2302506686 https://www.bisnow.com/archives/newsletter/toronto/triovest-wants-into-the-us http://www.regus.ca/locations/business-centre/toronto-eaton-centre https://www.cfshopcard.ca/Public/Where-To-Use-Gift-Card-Detail.aspx?property=TECOP03 http://www.retail-insider.com/retail-insider/tail-insider.com/2014/01/could-la-maison-simons-join-nordstrom.html http://superfuture.com/supernews/berlin-bikini-berlin-mall-opening http://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g187323-d5588572-i95598753-25hours_Hotel_Bikini_Berlin-Berlin.html http://aasarchitecture.com/2014/07/bikini-berlin-saq.html http://www.tagesspiegel.de/berlin/bikini-berlin-veraendert-die-city-west-aufbruchsstimmung-am-breitscheidplatz/9703426.html http://haworthtompkins.com/built/proj22/index.html http://coinstreet.org/our-developments/iroko-housing-co-op/ https://wahousinghub.org.au/display/RES/2015/01/27/Iroko+Housing+Co-operative,+London http://www.bookapartmentsinlondon.co.uk/blog/upcoming-events-in-london-03feb-2014-09feb-2014/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brookfield_Place_(Toronto) http://www.eatertainment.com/venue/brookfield-place/ http://www.event-destinations.com/en/germany/berlin/event-locations/sony-center-am-potsdamer-platz http://www.staedte-fotos.de/bild/Deutschland~Berlin~Neuere+Architektur+und+Bauwerke/35729/blick-vom-kollhoff-tower-am-potsdamer-platz http://www.e-architect.co.uk/berlin/sony-center-berlin http://www.archdaily.com/173305/flashback-sony-center-berlin-murphy-jahn http://www.wherescool.com/spots/borneo-sporenburg-houses-amsterdam/photos/ http://www.kcap.eu/en/projects/v/borneo_sporenburg/3831f http://www.mimoa.eu/projects/Netherlands/Amsterdam/Borneo%20Sporenburg/ http://ca.archello.com/en/project/borneo-sporenburg-amsterdam/image-9 http://www.evanseasyspace.com/blog/2013/05/latest-news/blackstone-takes-80-million-risk-on-london-business-park http://www.broadgateestates.co.uk/chiswick-park https://www.flickr.com/photos/14008620@N03/sets/72157616035234051/ http://www.enjoychiswickpark.com/welcomepage/ http://www.pksarchitects.com/projects/canadab1.php http://www.canadawater.org/ http://www.canadawater.org/


39


Urban Block

single Lot

Single Lots

Lots

Urban Block

Urban Block

30

30 198

198

46

46

16

51

51

57

55

38

74

74

35

38

90

22

57

25

22

41

25

39

66

39

66

77

77

34

34

41 55

22 46

22 46

21

74

16

21

74

35

15

15

81

81

26

26

38

38 47

47

13

13

Queen Richmond Centre West Toronto Dominion Centre

7

7

16

16 14

7

7

14

17

17

81

28

81

28

77

23

23

34

34

47

32

77

12

12 32

47

81

81

215

215 62

40

16

14

40

57

57

170

170

47

47

MaRS Discovery District

Bikini Berlin 58

58 20

11

34 195 49 188

18 17

17

93

93 63

63

Thompson Hotel & Residence 93

93 15 8

15 8

100

100

61

26

61

26

11

188

45

18

195 49

18

19

7

45

7 18

20

11

11 19

34

106

106

47

Sony Centre

40

14

58

58

16

62

47


11

6 80

260 177

150

60

46

29

Multi Block

24

8

130

22

23

14

31

50

39

Multi Block

24 16

10

98

10

216 12

12

43 14

180

247 34

19 35

49

11

6 10 0 8

23

260

18

42

42

51

16

177

150 36

28

10

98

18

60

34

46

16

29

14

130

14

31

50

39

23

22

10

Multi Block

24

8

52

216 12

24 16

51

25

12

43 14

180

Borneo - Sporenburg

247 34

19

48

67

260

25

73 18

42

24 16

51

177

150

42

51

25

16

11

17

18

6 10 0 8

23

35

49

19

36

28

10

98

18

24

52

60

34

20

130

22

23 22

31

50

14

39

46

29

16

216 12

46

10 57 50

8

14

73

12

27

43

180

14

32

Chiswick Business Park

48

17

67

18

25

73 18

42

51

16

42

51

25

19

36

28

18

34

14

73

16

20

52

57 22 27

50

46

Canada Water

32

41 48


Citizens' guide to mixed use