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The Roundtree Manifesto

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The Case For Abandoning the Webster-Strength Model

Sheriff Richard Roundtree

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Building The CSRA’s Community FREE

The CSRA’s FREE WEEKLY WEEKLY

Newspaper Newspaper VOL.2 NO.24 VOL.2 NO.18

ENTERTAINMENT FEB. 28 - MAR. 6, 2013

Photo by Vincent Hobbs

Business Profile: Essential Cleansing Center • Shanta Johnson, Owner

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BUSINESS PROFILE ESSENTIAL CLEANSING CENTER

Shanta Johnson

A healthy lifestyle is not something that happens overnight, it’s a process and if anyone is interested in embarking on this journey, it would be my pleasure to share the knowledge that I have gained.  Be Blessed!

Certified Colon Hydrotherapist Essential Cleansing Center 2045 Central Avenue Augusta, Ga 706-733-5000

coloncleansingaugusta.com essentialcleansingcenter.com The undigested food ferments and putrefies, creating abnormal gas and poisons. Upon re absorption into the system it can provide the right environment for diseases to develop.  Symptoms of a toxic colon can be headaches, gas, bloating, indigestion, aches and pains, foul breath, skin problems, and simply feeling tired and sluggish to name a few. A person does not have to be constipated to need this service. The colon is the area where the toxins and impurities accumulate. If we practice keeping those poisons down to a minimum, it will allow the body to have the natural ability to resist disease, have the mechanisms of recovery, self regulation and maintain a state of equilibrium. 

UrbanProWeekly: Are you a native of the Augusta area? If so, where did you go to high school and/or college? SHANTA JOHNSON: Yes I am a native of Augusta.  I graduated from Richmond Academy High School.  I earned a BA degree in Psychology with emphasis in Counseling at Paine College. UPW: What prompted you to go into business for yourself and why did you choose the wellness industry? JOHNSON: I worked in the profession of Corrections for 17 years and as time passed, I experienced burnout.  I became tired of the confinement of the prison and having a job.   I felt I was under the total control of someone else. After working almost every weekend and holidays,  I started to feel like an inmate who was going home on a furlough only to return a few hours later. I chose the Wellness Industry because of my own personal quest to be healthy.  With most of us, as we age, our health has a tendency to decline.  I didn’t have a disease, but I wasn’t as healthy as I wanted to be. I was somewhere in the middle. I knew that if I didn’t make lifestyle changes, I would be faced with some serious issues eventually.  I wasn’t getting the answers I wanted through normal protocol, so I decided to open my mind to natural remedies.  I was never a fan of taking medication.  As I began to pray and seek for answers in the right direction, I was lead to the chiropractor’s office. Once I learned that chiropractors are wellness experts,  I felt compelled to give it a try.  I received an adjustment for the very first time and I felt wonderful.  Immediately after the adjustment, Dr. Walker on Central asked me if I had ever heard of Colon Hydrotherapy.  He began tell me about his experience.  It was as though God was speaking to me through him. I researched the nearest places and found one I was comfortable with in Atlanta. After my very first session, I felt amazing. I

decided then and there that people needed to know about this service. UPW: If we eat right and go to the doctor regularly, why do we have to still worry about our bodies not functioning correctly? JOHNSON: Eating healthy is one of the most important things we can do for ourselves because we are what we eat, literally.  What we eat determines how the tissue is formed in our bodies but we need a balance. Eating healthy, cleansing (colon hydrotherapy), exercising and drinking plenty of clean water.  If one of those vital steps is left out, a person’s health will suffer.   Unfortunately, the majority of us are clueless about eating healthy, myself included. So I decided to change my lifestyle.  Almost all name brand foods are filled with chemicals, additive and preservatives.  We all should put forth an effort to read labels, educate ourselves about our bodies and take responsibility for our own health. Going to the doctor regularly is extremely important.  It’s a must that we monitor our health.  If we take care of ourselves properly we can make the doctor’s job a lot easier. UPW: What do you think is the biggest misconception that people have about their bodies?

Photo by Vincent Hobbs JOHNSON: The biggest misconception about the body, based on my experience is the importance and function of the colon.  Many people run from this topic. UPW: Your website is great. It really gives people the information they need to understand if colon hydrotherapy is what they need. What is the colon and why is a clean colon essential to our overall health? JOHNSON:  The colon is a hollow tubelike organ.  It is approximately 5 to 6 feet long. The colon’s main function is to eliminate body wastes from the system.  When the colon is clean, we experience great health and well being. When it is sluggish, the body wastes accumulate causing constipation. When the body becomes constipated, feces accumulates and becomes hardened and lodged in the pockets of the colon wall. That hardened waste then will interfere with peristalsis (muscles that move the waste out of the body) and more feces builds up interfering with its proper evacuation. It may take months or years for a buildup to occur, resulting in 5-15 pounds of added weight. It may cause the colon to become distended, abnormally shaped and ineffective. The clogged colon then interferes with the final absorption and digestion of food and the body becomes deprived of nutrients. 

UPW: Isn’t there a drug that one can take to clean one’s colon or why not just have an enema? JOHNSON:  The first thing to remember is that all drugs have side effects. Too many laxatives can make you dependent on them. Colon Hydrotherapy is the Rolls Royce of cleansing the body.  It’s completely natural, the only thing the device is doing is introducing warm purified water into the colon.  The body takes over and the muscles start to contract in a wavelike motion pushing the water and waste out of the body (Peristalsis), and for 45 minutes this is being repeated. Several gallons of water will be introduced, cleansing the entire 5 to 6 feet of colon.  An enema at home will only cleanse 12 to 14 inches – not very much.  Over the counter colon cleanses don’t compare to this method.  Nothing comes close to warm clean water giving the colon a shower, rather than taking something by mouth hoping that it will work.  Colon Hydrotherapy works without a doubt! UPW: If a person feels OK, isn’t that all that counts. Many people feel that sometimes it pays to leave well enough alone. What’s wrong with that attitude? Continued on next page

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SHANTA JOHNSON, owner, Essential Cleansing Center: My primary reason for starting this type of business was to bring about awareness in the area health and wellness. We all deserve to be healthy.  Photo by Vincent Hobbs from previous page JOHNSON: A lot of people don’t think about their health until they start losing it.  It’s best to take care of yourself and do maintenance on your body rather than trying to regain health.  I like comparing it to doing maintenance on a vehicle.  We all know that the life of the motor depends on the oil change.  If the oil is not changed, sludge builds up in the motor and eventually clogs it up.  Changing the oil is so much easier and economical than a new motor.   People don’t always like to spend money on things dealing with maintaining a healthy lifestyle but it’s much cheaper than a disease.   It’s my belief that we all deserve great health. Without health nothing else matters. UPW: Did you always have this understanding of your body or did you undergo some experience that led you to conclude that this knowledge was important for everyone? JOHNSON: No, I didn’t always have this understanding. I reached that point in my life where I was lead to pray and seek information. After having the first Colon Hydrotherapy session, I felt 100% better. As I went through the process, all I could think about was how every-

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UrbanProWeekly LLC Mailing Address: 3529 Monte Carlo Drive Augusta, Georgia 30906

body should know about this service. It changed my life! I still didn’t completely understand the job of the colon and how vital a role it plays.  The colon affects the whole body through blood stream and cells.  Without a healthy colon, you won’t have a healthy body! UPW: Some say our modern food processing industry is contributing to many of our health problems. Do you agree with that? JOHNSON: I totally agree! Meats are full of hormones, steroids and antibiotics. Fruit and vegetables are full of pesticides and insecticides not to mention all of the additives and preservatives so that the shelf life will last for 6 or 7 years. Fast food is readily available and our health is declining along with the quality of food we put in it.  We are what we eat literally! I personally don’t buy any of my food from the regular aisles of the grocery store and I never eat fast food.  UPW: Okay, let’s say you have a person who comes to you and feels that they could benefit from your service. What happens next? How much time will they have to spend in your center? How often will they have to return and can people fit the cost into a tight budget?

Publisher Ben Hasan 706-394-9411 Managing Editor Frederick Benjamin Sr. 706-836-2018

JOHNSON: The first step would be to fill out the personal history information.  If you don’t have any contra indications we can start the cleansing process.  I use the Colenz system, it’s a table.  It has an opening in the table with a very small rectal nozzle (smaller than a pencil) coming from the top of the opening.  It will be lubricated, you insert the rectal nozzle and you cover yourself with a drape sheet.  You ring the bell, I come back into the room and we start the water.  Warm purified water will start to fill you.  You hold the water as long as you can. Not excruciating but until you get a very strong urge to use the bathroom.  When you get that strong urge, you push.  Water and waste goes down in the opening in the table.  For 45 minutes you are filling up and pushing out.  The water will reach all the way over to your ascending cleansing your entire 5 to 6 feet of large intestines.  You are in private, massaging your own stomach in a very clean a comfortable environment.  After the timer goes off, I come back into the room. We turn the water off and I instruct you on how to get off of the system.  Since it’s not a laxative and just purified water, when the procedure is over, normal activities can be presumed.  You will not have to spend the day in the bathroom.

Sales & Marketing Phone: 706-394-9411 New Media Consultant Director of Photography Vincent Hobbs

The total time in the office is approximately a little over an hour. It is up to the individual how often they do it. I recommend a series of cleanses because you don’t get where you are in a day and you won’t thoroughly detox with one cleanse.  The sessions can cost anywhere from $79 to $50.  I set up payment plans for people who are interested and would like to make it easier to afford.

POSTSCRIPT: I am not a medical doctor; I do not diagnose, prescribe or claim to cure any ailments.  My primary reason for starting this type of business was to bring about awareness in the area health and wellness. We all deserve to be healthy.  I am a certified Colon Hydro-therapist, qualified to assist in creating a cleaner and healthier environment within.  This is not just a business for me, it’s a lifestyle that I’ve come to love and appreciate. There is not one piece of advice that I’ve offered to my clients that I haven’t incorporated into my own lifestyle. A healthy lifestyle is not something that happens overnight, it’s a process and if anyone is interested in embarking on this journey, it would be my pleasure to share the knowledge that I have gained.  Be Blessed!

email: Ben Hasan bzhasan54@yahoo.com Frederick Benjamin Sr. editor@urbanproweekly.com Vincent Hobbs photos@urbanproweekly.com


5 UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013 Sheriff Richard Roundtree recently implemented the first agency-wide leadership training course all of his supervisors. According to Roundtree, this was the first time in the department’s history that this has happened. Above, he presides over the first Citizens Police Academy. Photo by Vincent Hobbs

The Roundtree POLICING Manifesto The new sheriff embraces leadership training for all. By Frederick Benjamin Sr. Political Analysis Roundtree Interview by Ben Hasan Even before he was elected, Sheriff Richard Roundtree announced bold new initiatives that he would spearhead for the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office (RCSO). His implied manifesto — change the culture through professionalism and community involvement. As sheriff, the implied is becoming manifest. For the past 30 years, policing in Augusta through the auspices of the Augusta Police Department (pre-consolidation) and the RCSO has perpetuated a culture of “old fashioned policing” which means enforcement today, enforcement tomorrow and enforcement forever more. This played out in the pre-election sheriff’s debates. Conservatives argued in favor of locking folks up and throwing away the key and progressives wanted to see a police presence with some modicum of professionalism and community involvement. The concept of community policing became the clearest difference between Roundtree and his G.O.P. opponent Freddie Sanders. The Webster/Strength school of policing was adequate for the sleepy Augusta Masters town on the Savannah River with its genteel ways, good ol’ boy politics and post-bellem aloofness

to the emerging African-American population. Community policing was not only a foreign concept to Sheriff Ronnie Strength, it was anathema. For Strength, professional standards as defined by professional agency accreditation may as well have been a plot launched by the NAACP? Strength and Webster were one-man shows with groups of people doing stuff underneath them. Park your newfangled ideas at the door and pick them up on your way out could have been their creed. When one of their own, messed up, they dealt with it and moved on. They forged a police department with no need for a harmonious organization at its base. They didn’t want, and probably didn’t trust, civilian involvement. Roundtree hopes to change all of that and his actions over the past 60 days since he was sworn in is a testament to what might be coming. UrbanProWeekly sat down with Sheriff Roundtree this week on the heels of his unprecedented agency wide leadership training session and just prior to his implementation of the first ever, Citizens Police Academy (see story on page 7). Shortly after he was elected, but before he took office Roundtree was huddling with corporate training expert Bill Westfall of the Westfall

group based in Indiana and talked to him about using the sheriff’s department as a catalyst for changing the culture of the community. “Bill Westfall has been doing this for 20 years, especially in the area of law enforcement. He, originally, was an Alaska state trooper back in the 70s. He saw the importance of training good leaders,” Roundtree said. “We were able to talk to him right after the election and I told him my vision about change — not just making this agency better, but of changing the culture, not just of this agency, but of this community,” he said. Westfall shared Roundtree’s vision and they both agreed that if they wanted to change the culture of the largest sheriff’s office in the state of Georgia it would have to come from the leaders already within the agency. What they did next was revolutionary for the RCSO. “We took every supervisor we had from the rank of sergeant all the way up to chief deputy, myself included, and implemented a four-day leadership training program,” Roundtree said. The sheriff included every supervisor from every department in the agency — from detention, from records, from administration — every one. On day one, they discovered an amazing fact. “Some supervisors who had been

here 10 years and had never seen each other because they were separate entities within this agency. Some people have been in this department 10 and 15 years and never had a training opportunity and I’ll say that 90 percent of the people in that room had never been to a supervisor’s training — had never been to a leadership training session,” Roundtree said. It was a sad testament to the WebsterStrength mode of leadership. “With just that training they came to see that we had one common goal — to make this agency better and to make the city better,” Roundtree said. “It was my job to inspire them, their job was to inspire their men, and it was the men’s job to inspire the people. You could see some of the lights come on in the room,” he added. “How could I hold them accountable as leaders when I see them faltering, if I never provided them the training, if I never provided the tools to be leaders or express their leadership skills. It was a disservice to them. Not only was it a disservice to them, it was a disservice to the men they were supposed to be leading. Therefore it was a disservice to the people,” Roundtree added. “Now, every one of my frontline supervisors are on the same page — they know my vision and it’s no doubt that everyone under them knows my vision,” he said.


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LOCAL NEWS

Lockett: Penalties could be severe for three commissioners in procurement ethics lapse City attorney chided for “watering down” ethics investigation; Mayor Copenhaver handed “stick” to deal with alleged code violations.

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tioned penalties of the “slap-on-thewrist” variety that included censure and reprimand do not tell the whole Auto  Home Life Health Bonds story, Commercial  Auto Hom AUGUSTA according to Lockett. City officials who violate local ordiReading from the city ordinance dealnances designed to prevent them from ing with remedies available for dealing unfairly profiting from doing business with conflicts of interest involving city with the city could face stiff penal- officials and the procurement process, Auto Home  Life Health Bonds  Commercial ties including legal action and finan- Lockett emphasized that “they could cial restitution, Commissioner Bill be forced to repay any money and the Lockett said at Monday’s Administrative companies involved could be barred Services Committee meeting. Lockett from doing business with the city.” chairs that committee. The whole matter seems to have Commissioners Wayne Guilfoyle, Joe been taken too lightly, Lockett said. Jackson and Grady Smith find them- “This could have serious consequences selves at ground zero of an unprec- down the road,” he said. edented ethics probe. Chairman Lockett placed the burden Any attempts to “soft-pedal” the for carrying out the city’s ethics laws Commissioner Bill Lockett: “This should not be taken lightly.” alleged ethics violations on the part squarely on the shoulders of Mayor File photo by Vincent Hobbs. of the three sitting Augusta-Richmond Deke Copenhaver. 36-Ccommissioners Tobaccowill Rdnot go unchallenged JyNelle Agent Tobacc “It is my hope,2636-C and I would recom“AccordingHandy, to our charter and the missioners on the background of the mend, that all parties involved would alleged violations. if Lockett, along with Commissioners Richmond County Code, it is not the hzibah, GA 30815 Hephzibah, GA 3 INFO@INS-PROS.COM “Information received from the law make sure that this information is accuMarion Williams and Alvin Mason have responsibility of the Administrative their way. The trio have been the most Services Committee to establish or the department was deplorable because you rate and complete when it is forwarded vocal about making sure that any pos- hear such a case. This is the responsi- can see where information — and I to the full commission, because right informa- now — it isn’t. sible ethics violations are thoroughly bility of the mayor,” Lockett said. 2636-C Tobacco Rdbelieve pertinent and relevant JyNelle Handy, Agent Lockett then called for, and received, investigated and that any wrong-doing Lockett then took the law depart- tion — was not included,” Lockett said. “If you look at some of theINFO@INS-PROS.COM time lines of a motion to forward the matter to the is appropriately penalized. ment toHephzibah, task for the incomplete GAnature 30815 Media reports that previously men- of the information provided to com- some of the data – it was questionable.” full commission. By Frederick Benjamin Sr. UrbanProWeekly Staff Writer

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quently found, saw fit to issue an arrest warrant for Alexia Davis, an assistant public defender, because the AUGUSTA ring was valued over $1500 and Ms. An Augusta swiftly enough in .560.9997 fax attorney who was Davis did not act Auto  Home Life “unlucky” enough to find a ring that attempting to find the owner. Davis had been lost by a local woman was is 31 years old. 36-Carrested Tobaccoand Rd faces felony charges JyNelle Handy, Agent Feb. 26, Tanya D. On Tuesday, hzibah, after GA she 30815 turned the ring in to INFO@INS-PROS.COM law Jeffords, one of the attorneys who enforcement officials in Richmond will be defending Ms. Davis, issued County. a statement about the arrest warrant. Prosecutors in Columbia County, The statement, in its entirety, folwhere the ring was lost and subse- lows: By Frederick Benjamin Sr. UrbanProWeekly Staff Writer

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“At this time warrants have been JyNelle promptly turned it in. She knew it 36-C Tobacco Rd Handy, Agent 2636-C Tobacc issued by the associate magistrate was valuable, but she had neither hzibah, 30815 Hephzibah, GA 3 INFO@INS-PROS.COM who GA is not a lawyer in Columbia sold it nor wore the ring as if it was County for Ms. Davis for the crime of hers.  I trust that Columbia County theft of  lost or mislaid will do the right thing.  They will Auto  Home  Life Health property. Bonds  Commercial Auto Home Life Health Bonds  Commerc “A person commits the offense of likely wonder why their tax dollars theft of lost or mislaid property when are being spent to prosecute a perhe comes into control of property son when the lady who lost the that he knows or learns to have been ring got her ring back.  Ms. Davis Rd 2636-C Tobacco JyNelle Handy, Agent lost or mislaid and appropriates should not have to present a defense Hephzibah, GA 30815  the property to his own use without as to whether she took reasonable INFO@INS-PROS.COM  first taking reasonable measures to measures to restore the property   restore the property to the owner.  to the owner, because the lady did “No matter what shadow the Sheriff get her ring back as soon as Ms. Davis and the District Attorney’s office tries knew who she was. Mere possession Auto  Home LifeDavis’  Health  Bonds  ofCommercial  Auto Hom to cast upon impeccable the property for a length of time .560.9997 fax Ms. 706.560.9997 fax reputation and her motives, the legal does not constitute a crime. As her fact is that she did not appropriate lawyers and as her friends, we will 36-C Tobacco Rdher own use, which JyNelle Handy, 2636-C Tobacco Rd JyNelle the ring for is all prepareAgent for trial and pray that the theGA crime this statute is intending right thing will be done.  Ms. Davis Hephzibah, GA 30815 hzibah, 30815 INFO@INS-PROS.COM INFO@I to cover. When she learned who is represented by Tanya Jeffords, the owner was through the postings Charles Lyons, Jacque Hawk, and INFO@INS-PROS.COM online from the Sheriff’s Office, she Jack Long.“

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1st Citizens Police Academy launched

Captain Wendy George, leader of the Community Services Division, talks to the first class of the Citizens Police Academy at the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office new headquarters. The academy, a twelve-week class, introduces citizens to law enforcement procedures and training. Photo by Vincent Hobbs

RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION BOND ISSUE PROGRAM

JAMESTOWN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL RE-ROOFING PROJECT

INVITATION TO BID Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Re-Roofing of Jamestown Elementary School by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Thursday, April 4, 2013, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Thursday, March 28, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. local time in the Jamestown Elementary School Media Center, 3637 Hiers Blvd, Hephzibah, Georgia 30815. Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Cheatham, Fletcher, Scott Architects, 420 ½ Eighth Street, Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with a non-refundable deposit of $50.00 (payable to the architect) per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding materials will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible.

Contract, if awarded, will be on a lump sum basis. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of thirty-five (35) days after time has been called on the date of opening. Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Richmond County Board of Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities. BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. Contact Amy Bauman in the Business Office (706) 826-1298 or at baumaam@rcboe.org if you need additional information concerning the bid list.

To promote local participation, a database of sub-contractors, suppliers, and vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826 -1127 for location to review and obtain this database. Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Frank G. Roberson, Superintendent County Board of Education of Richmond County Administrative Office 864 Broad Street Augusta, Georgia 30901 c/o Mr. C. Gene Spires, Controller

UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

AUGUSTA The first Citizens Police Academy began this week on Tuesday, February 26. The new program was implemented by Sheriff Richard Roundtree through the agency’s Community Services Division. The initial group was comprised of the members appointed to the Citizen’s Advisory Council. The mayor, each commissioner, the president of the Chamber of Commerce and the RCBOE school superintendent each appointed a member to represent the community as part of the Citizens Advisory Council to the sheriff. Captain Wendy George stated “Although the first academy is being limited to the members of the council in order that they may begin their duties, the Community Services Division will hold approximately four academies per year.” The members of the council were each issued their official Citizens Police Academy shirts which were donated by Oakley for this first class. Sheriff Richard Roundtree said, “Partnering with the community and with corporate America to meet our needs at a reduced expense to the taxpayers is part of our goal. On that note, we are greatly appreciative that Oakley has donated all of the shirts for the participants and instructors in our first Citizens Police Academy class.” Also, for the first class, Augusta Public Transit volunteered to transport the participants to the various precincts as needed. The first class began with a welcome from Sheriff Roundtree, introductions, and a tour of the Sheriff’s Office facilities. The Citizens Police Academy is a twelveweek class that will present a comprehensive and ambitious course syllabus and will cover everything from Professional Standards, Community Policing, Crime Scene & Evidence Processing, and Special Operations to Firing Range and Practical shooting. There will be Closing Ceremonies and upon completion, Graduation. Former Chief Deputy Sid Hatfield will be the guest speaker/instructor during the class covering the history of the agency. Although the majority of classes are held one night a week for three hours, the academy attendees will also spend time at the training range on a Saturday learning about and shooting firearms, driving on the emergency vehicle course and observing demonstrations from the Bomb Squad and S.W.A.T. team. “Upon completion of various sections of the academy to include this day at the range, participants may ride-a-long and observe full time deputies during the course of their duties,” Lt. Lewis Blanchard said. In order to participate in a Citizens Police Academy & ride-along program, an applicant must successfully complete a background check, release Augusta-Richmond County & the Sheriff’s Office of any liability claims, successfully complete security and integrity training, be 21 years of age or older, and a legal resident of the United States and the State of Georgia. Priority will be given to citizens of Richmond County. For additional information or to sign up for a future class, contact Veronica Freeman with the Community Services Division at 706-261-0436.

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UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

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Cher’s Sisters Only Club Present their 2nd Annual Prom-A-Palooza 2013 WHAT will they do? Girls will be allowed to select from over 100 beautiful prom gowns and take them home for their perfect evening at their own High School Prom or ROTC Ball. Ladies will be available to assist them in picking out the perfect dress that compliments their body. Once girls select the dress they desire, they will be allowed to look at the shoes and jewelry that is available. Mary Kay Director Daveda Malone will

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The 2nd Annual Augusta Literary Festival on Saturday, March 2, 2013 will feature 100 authors from several states, genres and walks of life. Authors will be selling, signing and talking about their books throughout the day. Here are all of the scheduled speakers for Sat. March 2nd at the Festival: Auditorium A (1st Floor)

Auditorium B (2nd Floor)

10:15 AM: Hasheem & Deborah Francis Built to Prosper Companies 11:00AM: Bob Young Treasure Train 11:45 AM: Ruth P. Watson Blackberry Days of Summer 12:30 PM: Hawk McKinney The Lady of Corpsewood Manor 1:15 PM: Treymane Moore Take it From Her 2:00 PM: Victoria Thurman The Dating Dilemmas of Delia 2:45 PM: Alicia Michaels Daughter of the Red Dawn 3:30 PM: J. Lee Graham The Promise of Living 4:15 PM: Rahiem Brooks Murder in Germantown

10:30 AM: Keith Flynn Asheville Poetry Review 11:15 AM Tamika Newhouse Urban Fiction 12:00 PM Ted Dunagan The Yellow Watermelon 1:00 PM Eugene Stovall, PhD (Yerby Expert) Blood & Brotherhood 2:00 PM Janie Dempsey Watts Moon Over Taylor’s Ridge 2:45 PM Charmaine Z. Brackett Keys of Elyon 3:30 PM Clifton Wade, III Q’sique Body Sculpting 4:15 M.H. Wesley Christian Non-Fiction For more information, contact Sherryl James (706) 821- 2604 or Corey Washington (706) 664-8622

ALF Tribute to Frank Yerby presents the Inaugural Yerby Award for Fiction There will be a small ceremony at the Yerby House on the campus of Paine College on Fri. March 1st, at 3:00 PM. The five finalists will be touring the house and taking pictures with Frank Yerby’s nephew Gerald Yerby. Later on that evening at 7:00 PM at the Main Library at 823 Telfair St., Augusta, there will be an author’s reception for all participating authors in the Augusta Literary Festival. The program will feature jazz by Karen Gordon, remarks by Gerald Yerby, and Yerby Scholar Dr. Eugene Stovall from California will also be on hand to share his expertise on Frank Yerby. The highlight of the night will be the announcement of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners of the Yerby Award for Fiction.

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First Friday Activities With The Augusta Arts Council Big Day Cake Bakery hosts cake tastings. Come in for a sandwich, a cupcake and a chat with the one sweet bakery owner in downtown Augusta. 120 9th St. 5-7PM   theClubhou.se hosts “Escaping the Matrix with Descartes and Plato” Discussion - In the movie “The Matrix,” the bulk of the human population is wired into a virtual world with no concept of any world outside. In this talk, Woody Belangia, an Adjunct Professor in philosophy at Georgia Regents University, will introduce the problem of the difference between the virtual and the Real as explored by Plato and Rene Descartes, with an open discussion to follow. Free Admission. 816 Broad St. 7:30PM   Psychotronic Augusta is having a $1 record album sale on the night of First Friday! Look forward to live art demos and other promotions during future First Friday events.

849 1/2 Broad St. 5-9PM Gallery on the Row hosts a meet and greet the artists. Enjoy wine and refreshments and see what’s new this month at the gallery. This month’s featured artist is Cyndy Epps. 1016 Broad St. 5-9PM Curvitude Boutique will be having a “50% off Jewelry” sale on First Friday. 1033 Broad St. 5-9PM Sky City is hosting ‘80’s Night and will feature a brand new art show opening that night. 1157 Broad St. 5-9PM   Schrodinger’s Cat will host “eXtreme Theatre Games”. The adult-centered entertainment of this risqué improv troup is sure to thrill and delight! Head over for off-color, tongue-in-cheek giggles to be had by all. Le Chat Noir. 304 8th St. 8-10PM For information on this event, as well as other events, call Jamie Lowe at 706-8264702, extension 13.

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Poet Jessica Greenbaum and Novelist Marcia Douglas will be featured AUGUSTA Presentations by New York poet and magazine editor Jessica Greenbaum and Colorado-based novelist Marcia Douglas will highlight the Georgia Regents University Spring 2013 Sandhills Writers Series on Tuesday, March 12 in the Jaguar Student Activities Center’s Coffee House on the Summerville Campus.  The series will begin with a poetry reading by Greenbaum at 10 a.m., and Douglas will share her most recent fiction work at 1 p.m. An informal colloquium, book-signing and reception will be held at the conclusion of each presentation. All events are free and open to the public. Greenbaum is the author of the poetry collections “Inventing Difficulty” and “The Two Yvonnes.” Her poems and essays have appeared in “The New Yorker,” “Poetry,” “Harvard Review” and “Southwest Review.” She is the editor of the annual magazine, “upstreet.”  Douglas is the author of the novels “Madam Fate” and “Notes from a Writer’s Book of Cures and Spells,” and the poetry collection, “Electricity Comes to Cocoa Bottom.” Her work has appeared in many anthologies, including “The Art of Friction,” “Mojo: Conjure Stories” and “Sisters of Caliban.”  “The Sandhills Writers Series is committed to bringing new and established authors to the Augusta community who are both good writers and good teachers of writing,” said Tony Kellman, GRU Professor of Creative Writing and Director of the Sandhills Writers Series. “The series aims to reinforce and augment what is taught in our writing program and to provide Augusta and neigh-

boring communities with the opportunity to hear and interact with regional, national and international authors of fiction, non-fiction and poetry.” The series began in 2011 as a reconfiguration of the Sandhills Writers Conference that was founded in 1975

by the late Dr. Charles Willig. Kellman has directed the conference since 2010. The program has attracted main-stream American authors, such as the late Ray Bradbury, Edward Albee, Paule Marshall, Nancy Willard, Billy Collins, the late Doug Marlette and Rick Bragg, in addi-

tion to Hispanic, Romanian, African, Asian (notably Maxine Hong Kingston), Caribbean (notably Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott) and Native American writers. For more information, visit www.sandhills.aug.edu or call (706) 729-2417.

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Commentary

Jim Crow Isn’t Dead, He Just Got Lawyers The US Supreme Court’s upcoming decision on the Voting Rights Act could let discriminatory laws make a comeback by Diane Roberts When a black man won the White House in 2008, many in the commentariat declared the United States a “post-racial” society, no longer hamstrung by old hatreds, freed at last from the embarrassments of segregation – finally and triumphantly color blind. Conservatives have been telling themselves some version of this pretty lie ever since Robert E Lee surrendered at Appomattox. This week, we’ll hear it again when the Supreme Court takes up a challenge to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The case, Shelby County v Holder, centers on Section 5 of the VRA, which requires that nine states with histories of discrimination (Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, Louisiana, Texas, Georgia, Alaska and Arizona), and parts of seven more states must seek permission from the justice department to The Voting Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon change election laws. The Alabama Johnson in 1965, a few months after civil rights marchers were beaten county argues that Section 5 is an and teargassed on the Selma to Montgomery March. unconstitutional infringement on nantly (the state says coincidentally) minorities. “state sovereignty”, and a relic from The state’s Republican leadership cut back the number of polling places and the bygone days of poll taxes and reduced early voting, including the Sunday before election day, when African literacy tests. American churches would traditionally organize trips to the polls. Many, like Granted, citizens in the old Desaline Victor, the 102-year-old President Obama featured in his state of the Confederacy are no longer forced to union address, had to wait in line for hours. More than 200,000 others were say how many bubbles are in a bar unable to vote. of soap before they can cast a ballot. Texas and South Carolina (entirely covered by Section 5) tried to institute But the last national election provides absurdly restrictive voter ID laws in 2012, but the Department of Justice, citplenty of examples of voter suppres- ing the Voting Rights Act, shot them down. “Federal courts sided with DOJ, sion. Florida (five counties of which finding that the new rules would disproportionately affect black and Latino are included in Section 5) enacted a citizens. largely inaccurate purge of its elecShould the Supreme Court strike down Section 5, Texas and South Carolina toral rolls. The people whose right to (and any other state with a legislature worried about too many of the wrong vote was challenged were predomi- sort of voters) can come right back and try again. Perhaps that’s why two

weeks ago, the Virginia legislature decided that bank statements, utility bills, paycheck stubs and Social Security cards, all of which were specifically approved as valid voter ID just last year, will no longer be allowed. Concealed weapons permits, however, are perfectly acceptable. The Voting Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, a few months after civil rights marchers were beaten and teargassed on the Selma to Montgomery March. The state of Alabama filed a brief in support of Shelby that says, “that was a long time ago.” Congress reauthorized the VRA, however, not “a long time ago”. It was in 2006.Republicans and Democrats in Congress supported it overwhelmingly: 98-0 in the Senate, 390-33 in the House. Clearly, they saw a need for it. So why all of a sudden are conservatives hell-bent on scuppering the enforcement mechanism to the civil rights movement’s crowning achievement? They cite Barack Obama’s presidency, increases in minority voter registration, and African American and Latino elected officials. Philadelphia, Mississippi, the town where the Klan murdered civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in 1964, has an African American mayor. In 2009, Chief Justice John Roberts remarked blithely, “Things have changed in the South.” But Jim Crow isn’t dead: he’s just hired a good PR firm, got lawyered up, Continued on next page

March calls out Georgia’s national disgrace: Will Regents finally end college ban for undocumented students? By Jeff Biggers With comprehensive immigration reform afoot in Congress, and measures to grant undocumented immigrant students in-state tuition status spreadingacross the country, a galvanized movement in Georgia is ramping up its effort to end the state’sextraordinary ban for undocumented immigrant students at the top five state colleges. The nation is watching: How much longer will Georgia’s Board of Regents uphold a blatantly segregationist state law that has made the Peach State a national disgrace? Consider this: Even Arizona, ground zero in the controversial “papers please” state immigration law, allows undocumented students to attend college -- albeit with out-of-state tuition.

On March 6th, a large coalition of undocumented Georgia youth, students and a broad array of civil rights groups and supporters will host a march on the University of Georgia campus in Athens, under the banner that “Education is a Human Right,” and remind the state of Regents Vice Chairman Felton Jenkins common sense declaration against the ban two years ago. “They worked hard and earned their spot. They could help make the state a better place.” “We’re rallying for justice, for education, to not to be discriminated against because of our immigration status,” Miriam, a 21-year-old undocumented Georgia student noted. “Everyone deserves an education and the right to better themselves, to contribute to our state economy and to the nation. We’re not taking anyone’s spot; we

earned our admission and that should be honored and not be conditional on someone’s status. To better the United States, we need to educate the youth and barring higher education is not the solution.” “All my academic life from K-12,” added Aldo, a 17-year-old Georgia student, “I was told by the Georgia educational system that if I tried very hard in school, I would someday go to my local college. That gave me hope to overcome all the odds placed in front of me. That was the reason I got up every time I fell in all my academic attempts. But now that I am in my final year of high school I can see that I’ve been told nothing but lies and all the hard work I’ve done has been in vain.” Athens is also home to Freedom University, the nationally acclaimed

initiative by university professors and writers to provide college-level courses to banned students. In an email, Matt Hicks, a teacher at Cedar Shoals High School in Athens, wrote: We invest countless hours, resources, and money on providing our undocumented, immigrant students a K-12 public education. In The Education Notebook: The Cost of American Education, Dan Lips estimates the average cost of a K-12 education to be $100,000 per pupil. It is absurd to think that barring these or any students from a state institution is an intelligent financial decision. Not only are we losing their tuition dollars, we are losing all that we have invested. We invest in them, because they will Continued on next page


JIM CROW ISN’T DEAD from page 14 qualified” minority students were, a suit the Supreme Court is expected to rule on later this year. Blum is also responsible for recruiting the predominantly white Shelby County, just south of Birmingham, Alabama, to take Section 5 to the high court. Cities and counties can earn an optout of Section 5 if they demonstrate a clean record over a certain period of time, but Shelby County, with a troubling history of voting rights violations – 20 since 1975 – would seem

GEORGIA’S NATIONAL DISGRACE from page 14 go on to serve our state as productive members, but B.O.R. 4.1.6 brings that to a screeching halt when they turn 18 and matriculate. I have to ask you. How does this save money? How does this affect the proliferation and exchange of new ideas? How will this do anything but possibly lower state test scores and raise unemployment and crime rates? How does it make any kind of long term sense? To lock our undocumented, immigrant children out of college and out of their dreams doesn’t ensure more seats for everybody else. It only serves to cheapen them. It only serves to water down the competition that our students need in order to help us become the strongest state possible. “When I was 5-years-old,” said Joana Estrada, a Freedom University student, who plans to speak at the rally in Athens. “I promised my mom I would graduate from high school. So I did, with JROTC honors with the Cadet rank of Captain. The night of

my high school graduation I made another promise to her, that I would graduate from a University with a title and that diploma would once again be dedicated to her.” She added: I am a Dreamer! A Dreamer who dreams to reach a higher education! A Dreamer who will fight till the end for that education. I will not say I can’t do it because I know I can. It will just take us a little bit longer to get there, but we will because no matter who we are, where we came from, what color our skin is, or what tongues we speak, education is a human right and we need to fight for it! But this Ban only makes it harder for me and my fellow Dreamers out there to reach that higher education. One thing is for sure, state of Georgia, no ban nor any anti-immigration law will stop us. That is why we need to fight till the end. Jeff Biggers is the author of State Out of the Union: Arizona and the Final Showdown Over the American Dream

to be an argument for keeping the Voting Rights Act intact, not eviscerating it. We haven’t outrun the past; we’re not immune to history or old prejudices. As President George W Bush said when he signed the reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act a mere seven years ago: “In the four decades since the Voting Rights Act was first passed, we’ve made progress toward equality, yet the work for a more perfect union is never ending.”

EAST AUGUSTA COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION

SUMMER CAMP

The East Augusta Community Organization will hold a Summer Camp at May Park Commujnity Center for students in grades 5-8 and 9-12 from June 10, 2013 - July 19, 2013. This Summer Camp will strengthen academic skills, promote community awareness, and provide participation in a team sport, such as basketball. The unique set of academic, cultural, and athletic experiences wil enhance the participants’ self-estem, expand their critical thinking skills, and improve their physical fitness. All students in the Augusta community are encouraged to apply. If you need additional information, please call (706) 231-4937 or (706) 860-9872. If no one answers, please leave your name and number and you will be contacted. Please sent you name, address, and telephone number to the address below: East Augusta Community Organization P.O. Box 6366, Augusta, GA 30916

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Responsible for work performed under the supervision of the Center Director. Duties include tasks necessary to maintain effective office routine. Proofs and types all correspondence, organizes and maintains a filing system. Handles all day to day office activities. Performs other duties for the good of the Agency as required. Operates office machines, copiers, computer hardware and software, including word processors, and other machines. Must be able to communicate effectively, orally and in writing. Must be able to lift at least 50 pounds or more. Business College graduate required. Must have at least one-year typing with a minimum of 50 wpm and clerical experience. Must have a valid driver’s license and reliable transportation.

QUALIFIED Persons interested in applying for these positions must send a written notice to the Personnel Office no later than March 10, 2013. Detailed job descriptions are available in the Personnel Office, 1261 Greene Street, Augusta, GA. Fax 706-722-8565

Diane Roberts is a writer and broadcaster. A native Floridian, she was educated at Oxford where she was a Marshall scholar. She broadcasts regularly for the BBC and National Public Radio in America, and writes for newspapers such as the Washington Post, the New York Times and the St Petersburg Times. She is also professor of literature and writing at Florida State University and the author of four books, the most recent of which is Dream State,

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and learned to call voter suppression “fraud prevention”. Edward Blum of the Project on Fair Representation, calls the Voting Rights Act “a bill stuck in a Jim Crow-era time warp”. Blum is a visiting fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and a one-man crusade against civil rights legislation. He persuaded a young white woman named Abigail Fisher to sue the University of Texas on the grounds that she was not admitted while “less

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BOOKS: Beautiful Scars

UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

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New book offers guidance in dealing with emotional problems By Timothy Cox Special to Urban Pro Weekly 

HIGH FLYER: Cross Creek High School junior Randall Waltower soars through the air as he clears eleven-feet on the pole vault event. The track meet, held at Westside, also included teams from Grovetown, A.R. Johnson, Westside and Evans high schools. Photo by Vincent Hobbs

Kiana Robinson, a Grovetown High School sophmore, comes out of the blocks on the first leg of the 4 x 100m relay race. Photo by Vincent Hobbs

The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History

Nancy Wellington Bookhart Alterations: Fashioning a Black Identity

Exhibit: March 1 - April 30, 2013 Opening Reception: Sunday, March 1, 3 - 5 p.m. Nancy Wellington Bookhart, producing mixed media works in her usual theme of social consciousness, forces us to face rather dismal moments in African American history and observe the transition of

a people and culture through the Harlem Renaissance movement. Bookhart is currently an assistant art professor at Paine College. For information, call 706-7243576. Museum admission fees apply.

Brian Keith Anderson’s physical exterior belies the unfortunate, illfated life that he has experienced during his years on earth. At six-feet, 200-plus pounds, Anderson’s physical stature offers many to guess that he could be a former professional footballer or someone of athletic prowess. On the contrary – for Anderson is an author and social worker who has just released a self-penned book and he’s eager to show the world exactly who he is. Today, Anderson is a professional counselor and life coach. He is gifted in helping others get through difficult emotional periods in life. He can assist people in certain types of challenging environments based on the difficulties that he has already faced and overcome when he was a child and as a younger man. Today, at age 47, Anderson stands confident, proud and strong – but, he only appears that way externally, due to the obstacles that he has faced and overcome. His first book is aptly titled, Beautiful Scars: My journey to wholeness and healing. The book was released in 2012 and captures the ill-fated lifestyles of Anderson that he shared with his two older brothers as they waded through emotionally-horrid events provided while they were in foster care and living with their father. During Anderson’s first 25 years of life, he experienced drug addiction, homelessness, hopelessness, mental illness, jail and depression. It all began in Jersey City, N.J. when Anderson lived in the “higher echelon” of an inner-city housing projects.  “It was the projects, but we had a loving mother and father, and overall a great family of three boys and two girls. “My parents were teenagers when they got married. When my mother continued to party and use drugs, my father eventually wanted out. He wanted to give his boys a chance in life.” Anderson’s father an aspiring min-

ister, took his three sons with him and left the girls with their mother.  “My father was studying to become a minister, so, he moved us to Ohio while he studied  theology at a semiKeith Anderson nary” Anderson now works for a government-supported agency, where he assists men and women in gaining their self-esteem, many whom were once addicted to drugs and alcohol, as was Anderson. Anderson said he wrote his book to reveal to patients and those who suffer from emotional ills, that they too can overcome their illness. Due to having a history of mental illness and drug/alcohol addiction, Anderson says that he is not ashamed of his path.  “Because of my history, I can be effective in doing my work. I can help others. It’s the type of work that I do, helping people when they need it most.” For his efforts, Anderson has been featured on TBN Christian TV, Atlanta Live and on several TV and radio shows. The Augusta resident says he’s also happy with results since releasing the book, a year ago. “We’re quite happy. I don’t have any type of marketing team but I’m happy with the results of my written work. He’s also a vocalist and recording artist. “I realize the stigma attached to this thing. But I’m confident and selffulfilled. I’m happy with the results because people’s lives are being changed after they learn what I’ve been through,” he said. “It’s certainly a book that people will benefit from after reading,” he stated.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Brian Keith Anderson is available to discuss his book, Beautiful Scars with church groups, youth groups or with social service agencies. For more information, call 706-231-2388)

COLON HYDROTHERAPY {First Colon Cleansing Center In Augusta}

Harold V. Jones II

CONDITIONS RESPONDING TO COLON HYDROTHERAPY Cited by Rheumatologist, Arthur E. Brawer, M.D. Enhances Weight Loss • Allergies • Acne • Constipation • Irritable Bowel • Gas/Bloating •

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SHEPARD, PLUNKETT, HAMILTON & BOUDREAUX, LLP 429 Walker Street Upper Level Augusta, GA 30901

Phone 706-722-6200 Fax 706 722-4817 hjones@shepardplunkett.com

Shanta Johnson

• Body Odor • Headaches • Improves Sexual Health

ESSENTIAL CLEANSING CENTER 2045 Central Avenue, Augusta

706-733-5000

coloncleansingaugusta.com • essentialcleansingcenter.com


Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Additions to Sue Reynolds Elementary School Project by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. local time in the Board Conference Room, Richmond County Board of Education, 864 Broad Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901. Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901. Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Hughes, Beattie, O’Neal, Law & Associates, 1201 Broad Street, Suite 2A, Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $300.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding materials will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within ten (10) days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within ten (10) days after date of opening bid. Contract, if awarded, will be on a lump sum basis. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of thirty-five (35) days after time has been called on the date of opening. Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price. The Richmond County Board of Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities. BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. Contact Amy Bauman in the Business Office (706) 826-1298 or at baumaam@rcboe.org if you need additional information concerning the bid list. To promote local participation, a database of sub-contractors, suppliers, and vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826 -1127 for location to review and obtain this database. Bids shall be submitted and addressed to: Dr. Frank G. Roberson, Superintendent County Board of Education of Richmond County Administrative Office 864 Broad Street Augusta, Georgia 30901 c/o Mr. C. Gene Spires, Controller

17

SECTION A – INVITATION TO BID Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Additions & Renovations to Tutt Middle School by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Wednesday, February 20, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. local time in the Cafeteria of Tutt Middle School, 495 Boy Scout Road, Augusta, Georgia 30909.

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Of�ice of the Architect, (Holroyd & Associates, Architects, 929 Broad St., Suite 200A, Augusta, GA 30901). Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $500 (payable to the Architect) per set should be �iled promptly with the Architect. Bidding materials will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona �ide bid upon return of such set in good condition within ten (10) days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within ten (10) days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low Base Bid or the low adjusted Base Bid should the Owner accept Deduct Alternate No. 1. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of thirty-�ive (35) days after time has been called on the date of opening. Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certi�ied checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Richmond County Board of Education reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities. BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. Contact Amy Bauman in the Business Of�ice (706) 826-1298 or at baumaam@rcboe.org if you need additional information concerning the bid list. To promote local participation, a database of sub-contractors, suppliers, and vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826 -1127 for location to review and obtain this database. Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Frank G. Roberson, Superintendent County Board of Education of Richmond County Administrative Of�ice 864 Broad Street Augusta, Georgia 30901 c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires, Controller

UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

INVITATION TO BID


UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

18

U W rban Pro

eekly

THE CITIZENS AND BUSINESSES THAT APPEAR ON THIS DISPLAY SUPPORT OUR COMMUNITY-ORIENTED MISSION

Abdul & Janice El-Amin Dylan Walker

Dwannette Pullings &Joshua Toran

Asia Cates

Halim & Wendy Yazid

Aldrian Robertson

Willie & Brenda Aiken

Yusuf Rashada & Family

ARTHUR L. PRESCOTT

PRESCOTT INDUSTRIES, INC. 706-231-0446

GALLOP & ASSOCIATES

706-495-3796

Kreative Minds

Childcare and Learning Center, Inc. 2542 Milledgeville Rd. 706-364-5627 Fax: 706-364-5628

Dr. FAYE HARGROVE Hargrove Leadership Services 706-364-4237 706-814-6634

S

Rt tJ Trinity

Jennifer Norman-Dixon Independent Cruise & Vacation Specialist

I pay cash for unwanted cars, batteries, aluminum and more

706.832.6422 Reginald Sweatman Sr.

Hephzibah, GA 30815 Phone 706-925-2929 Toll Free (877-790-6082 Fax 404-601-4492

Email:jdixon@cruisesinc.com www.cruisesinc.com/jdixon

Nezer

House of Beauty Where Your Hair Is My Care!

Stylist Wanted Tumeka Porter

Master Cosmetologist

2439 Peach Orchard Road. Suite A, Augusta, GA 30906 (706)814-6934 (Salon) or (706)284-8247 (Mobile) Email: tumekakporter@aol.com


19

Dollars $ Sense Bookkeeping LLC

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House Plans • Church Plans Renovation Projects • Metal Buildings Larry L. McCord Can Provide All Your Design and Construction Needs All Under One Roof 2016 Highland Avenue Augusta, Georgia 30904-5352 Office: (706) 733-2931 Cell (706) 267-7998 Email: llmccord@comcast.net

CALL NOW . . . TAX TIME IS NEAR! Small Business / Individual 23 Years Experience Email: d.mccord25@comcast.net

Website: www.dollarsandsense-augusta.com 2016 Highland Avenue; Suite C Augusta, GA 30904-5352

Firefighter Opportunities Available with the Augusta Fire Department Requirements: At least 18 years of Age High School Diploma or GED Pass the Candidate Physical Ability Test Meet the NFPA 1582 Medical Requirements (tobacco products prohibited)

Be a Team Player Valid Driver’s License For additional information contact the Human Resources Department at 706-821-2303. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

The deadline to apply is March 31, 2013 Apply online at www.augustaga.gov.

UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

LARRY L McCORD LLC


20 UrbanProWeekly • FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2013

THE LAW OFFICE OF

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Need Credit Help? Providence Place 706-793-2664

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J Sears Company LLC

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INACCURATE BANKRUPTCIES INCOMPLETE INFO TAX LIENS STUDENT LOANS INCORRECT INFO CHARGE OFFS

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OUT OF DATE INFO JUDGMENTS MEDICAL BILLS COLLECTIONS INQUIRIES & MORE……….


Urban Pro Weekly