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WELCOME

Contents 1 Welcome

4 Senior School

Contents 1 Valete 2 From the Headmaster 3 Academic and Scholarship Success 3 Staff List 4 Staff News 5 Salvete 8 Development 10 The Board of Friends 10 The Bursary Fund Gala 11 List of Donors 2010-2011 12 The Parents’ Association 13 The Governors 14 The Catering Team 14 School Photo 15 2 School News Canons Park Activity Centre 18 From the Library 18 Book Day 19 AH Library Goes on Tour to Qatar 20 The Picture Book Project 21 Kids’ Lit Quiz 22 Headmaster for a Day 23 Verse Speaking 24 Visiting Speakers 25 ICT 26 House Assemblies 28 School Council 28 Drama 29 History Week 30 Science Week 30 Activities 31 Compass Course 34 Learning Support 35 Church 35 Charity 36 Prize Giving 37 Prize Winners 38 House Competition 40 Outstanding Achievement 41 3 Junior School Year 1 Trips and Activities Year 2 Trips and Activities Year 3 Trips and Activities Year 4 Trips and Activities Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival

44 45 46 48 50

Year 5 Trips & Activities Year 6 Trips & Activities Year 7 Trips & Activities Year 8 Trips & Activities Ski Trip Head Boys’ Review

54 57 60 63 67 67

5 Art & Design Review 70 Boys’ Work 72 6 Music Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term Associated Board Exam Results

90 92 93 95

7 Form Pages Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Year 8

98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112

8 Sport Football 116 Rugby 120 Hockey 123 Cricket 124 Twenty 20 Cricket at Lord’s 127 Cricket Tour to Jersey 128 Tennis 129 Sports Day & Athletics Championships 130 9 Old Boys The ‘42 Club Dinner Christmas Catch Up Class of 2005

134 135 136

Magazine edited by Stephanie Miller Design and production by Urban Juice www.urban-juice.co.uk

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WELCOME

Valete

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WELCOME

From the Headmaster

I

t may not be universally known that at Arnold House we do not produce a prospectus chock-full of carefully crafted photographs designed to embellish our image and surroundings. We are fortunate that the School’s continuing good reputation is passed on to the outside world by word-of-mouth, and by the deeds of the boys both past and present. Our Annual School Magazine, therefore, is an important record, and to many a treasured document, that not only celebrates our achievements from year to year but also defines our distinctive approach to the education of boys. The most recent edition of the Tatler Schools Guide, which lists the top Prep and Public Schools in the UK, says of us, ‘This is one of London’s pre-eminent boys’ preps...a well-mannered, charming school with plenty to shout about’. I hope the pages that follow will help you to hear loud and clear! Vivian Thomas

Academic and Scholarship Success We can feel justly proud of our Year 8 boys who successfully negotiated their way through the rigour of their final exams to secure places at their chosen senior schools. Of the 231 Common Entrance and Scholarship papers taken in English, Maths, Science, French, Latin, Greek, History, Geography and Religious Studies, 74% were graded A or B and 48% graded A – a record that stands comparison with the outstanding achievements of leavers in recent years. The competition for places in the leading independent schools grows fiercer by the year; these results confirm that Arnold House boys not only win their places but

do so in some style and gain inclusion in higher sets when they arrive. The key to this success is threefold: the commitment of the boys, the support from parents and the expertise and guidance of the teaching staff as the boys progress through the School.

were awarded All-rounder Scholarships to Bradfield and Mill Hill respectively. - - - - - was also rewarded by Rugby with the Classics Prize for his outstanding results in Latin and Greek.

Particular congratulations must go to the six boys who had the honour of being entered for scholarships: - - - and - - - - - - (Sport) both performed strongly and will have benefitted greatly from their experiences despite missing out on an award. To the delight of us all, - - - - - - - - won a Scholarship to Mill Hill and - - - - - - - - won a Music Scholarship to St Paul’s. It was fitting that our two head boys, - - - - - - and - - - - 3


WELCOME

Staff List Headmaster

Miss Sarah Mackay: 1M Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mr Vivian Thomas

Mr Mark Maddocks: Director of Studies, Head of Classics, 8M Form Teacher

Teaching Staff Mr Edward Arghebant: General Subjects Mr Max Arevuo: Gap Student (Autumn Term) Miss Kate Badenoch: 1B Form Teacher, General Subjects (maternity cover)

Miss Lucy Matthews: Teaching Assistant Mr David Moss-Marks: 7MM Form Teacher, Head of English Miss Monika Nemeth: Playground Supervisor Mr Nick Odlin: Teaching Assistant, GTP Student

Mr Richard Bagnall: Games

Miss Kate Rawlinson: Head of Art and Design

Mrs Kim Bahra: Head of Religious Studies and Compass Course

Mrs Rekha Ruda: Head of ICT

Mrs Allie Baker: 5B Form Teacher, Head of Drama, English

Mr Sebastian Stones: Second Deputy Headmaster, Head of Years 7 & 8, Head of Geography

Mrs Annabel Batty: 4B Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mrs Sophie Stones: 6S Form Teacher, Head of French

Mrs Yulia Boyarin: 2B Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mrs Aneta Struzik Mazur: Teaching Assistant

Miss Kate Coveney: Head of Learning Support (until December 2010)

Mr Paul Swinden: Director of Music

Mr David Cox: 4C Form Teacher, General Subjects, History

Mr Andrew Turpie: Head of Religious Studies, Director of Development (maternity cover)

Mr Andrew Cuthbertson: Piano

Visiting Staff

Mrs Susie Dart: Head of the Pre-Prep, 2D Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mr Stephen Aitken: Trombone

Mrs Netti Denes: Teaching Assistant Mr Matthew Dockary: Gap Student (Spring and Summer Terms)

Mr Clive Carroll: Guitar Mr Dave Clewlow: Trumpet Mr Tom Elliott: Saxophone

Miss Zoe Farmer: Teaching Assistant, Art Assistant

Mr Ben Griffiths: Flute

Mrs Rachel Ferhaoui: Senior Tutor, 6F Form Teacher

Mr Matthew Lee: Cello

Ms Leonie Flynn: Librarian

Mr Jason Little: Guitar

Mr Sean Gleeson: 5G Form Teacher, Maths

Ms Catherine Morphet: Clarinet

Mrs Lucy Glyn: Head of Art & Design (maternity cover)

Mrs Felicity Sadler: Violin, Piano and Pre-Prep Class Music

Mrs Elena Gregoriou-Ostojic: English and General Subjects

Canons Park Activity Centre Staff

Miss Victoria Hall: Head of Learning Support

Mr Rick Martin: Manager

Mr Jon Harahap: Physical Education, Games

Mr Paul Martin: Groundsman

Mr Josh Harrison: Physical Education, Games

Administrative Staff

Mr John Hill: First Deputy Headmaster, Head of History, 8H Form Teacher

Mr Richard Fletcher: Bursar

Mrs Carol Ioannis-Antoniou: Piano and Recorder

Miss Rachel Armstrong: Headmaster’s PA

Miss Lizzie Jones: Head of Years 3 & 4, 3J Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mrs Pauline Baker-Jackson: Laboratory Assistant

Mr Charles Keal: Head of Mathematics, 8K Form Teacher

Mr Philip Chester: Premises Officer

Mr Christopher Kerr: Head of Years 5 & 6, Director of Sport

Mrs Corinne Gibbons: Headmaster’s PA (until April 2011)

Miss Natalie Konya: Teaching Assistant

Miss Nish Malde: Bursar’s Assistant

Ms Patricia Legan: 1L Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mrs Stephanie Miller: Director of Development

Mr George Lester: Latin

Miss Deborah Sedler: Administration Officer

Ms Rachel Lovell: 3L Form Teacher, General Subjects

Mrs Penny Williams: Registrar/Office Manager

Mrs Jenny Lyons: Head of Science

Mr Paul Strugnell: Chef/Domestic Manager (until April 2011)

Mrs Joanna Chapman: School Secretary

Mr Mark Young: Chef/Domestic Manager 4


WELCOME

Staff News Mark Maddocks Enigmatic and a little eccentric, Mark is not your usual type; in fact not usual at all. With his silky way with words it is no surprise to learn that Mark originally trained in law. With his great learning, wit and eloquence

From Proust to Partridge, from the terraces at Highbury to the beloved stand of Newmarket his knowledge is vast, and encyclopaedic; his verbal dexterity is incredible, yet he is able to mix with all sorts, all without a hint of intellectual snobbery. He’s been a wonderful and entertaining colleague to work alongside and will, one day soon, make a fine Headmaster. George Lester Kate Coveney Kate joined the Arnold House team in January of 2008, and in her three year

he has in his short time at Arnold House made an indelible mark, not just as Director of Studies, but in so many other ways and areas. He has helped to put Drama firmly on the timetable for one. With Inspections, sadly the bane of all our lives these days, he has been a very useful person to have on board, as his incisive legal mind easily sifts out wheat from chaff. In the Classics Department his impressive set of CE results these past three years speak for themselves. He is undoubtedly a gifted teacher and his light touch has led to a rekindling of the boys’ enthusiasm for Latin after the drudgery of Years 5 & 6 with me. His interest and concern for the boys has been genuine and sincere. The boys, are so quick to pick up on such things and so when it comes wrapped up in such a colourful and slightly off-the-wall package, it’s an added bonus. Indeed he has been an inspirational figure, particularly for the senior boys providing a vital spark that metamorphs many of them from boys, into young men. Every school should have someone of Mark’s academic clout.

tenure as Head of Learning Support she dramatically changed the way in which support throughout the School was managed. Her goal was to ensure that each boy was provided with the appropriate form of specialist help so he could realise his full potential. It was a complex role, involving communication with every teacher in the School, management of an increasing number of teaching assistants and external experts, and building caring and productive relationships with the boys and their parents. The positive impact of her work was felt by boys, staff and parents and we are all very grateful for her wisdom and expertise. Kate left us in December 2010, after a whirlwind romance with an American gentleman named Doug Berry who whisked her off her feet and across the Atlantic to Washington DC. Kate and Doug married in March near her childhood home in Northamptonshire and despite a few visa complications they are happily settled

as husband and wife, expecting their first child in November. Kate is sorely missed at School, but we wish her lots of love and happiness as she adjusts to life in the USA. Lizzie Jones Andrew Turpie Andrew’s return to Arnold House to cover two maternity posts (Head of RS and Director of Development) was never going to be a run of the mill maternity cover. His long association with the School and his friendship with many of the staff gave him a unique insight into what he was required to do. In the classroom he did a splendid job preparing the Year 8 boys for Common Entrance with an excellent set of results in June. He worked equally productively in the Development Office, helping to organise a number of events with the Board of Friends. His integrity and professionalism, already well known to many staff, became evident to more recent colleagues who did not know him “first time round”. He has made

a new round of friends and acquaintances, who value his sense of humour and his good advice. Andrew is very loyal to the School and very fond of Arnold House; his departure is not likely to change these connections and we expect to see plenty of him in the future. John Hill

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WELCOME

Staff News that the Headmaster’s Office was right on top of things all because she held such a strong affection for Arnold House and its continuing good reputation. Thank you, Corinne. Vivian Thomas

Corinne Gibbons Corinne’s arrival in September 2007 had an immediate impact on the efficient running of the School. Her previous administrative experience as School Secretary and PA to the Headmistress at Channing Junior School, together with the fact that her son Tom was educated at Arnold House, made her the outstanding candidate for the new role of Headmaster’s PA.

Her ability to juggle a million and one things at the same time, yet remain focussed on those matters which she had correctly identified as priorities, was instrumental in turning the Headmaster’s Office into a welloiled machine. As a key player in the Administrative Team she proved her worth by preparing policy documents for the School’s successful 2009 inspection, by organising the annual cricket match at Lord’s and by ensuring that visitors to Arnold House were always well lookedafter. Her knowledge and understanding of the world of independent schools was also invaluable. As with all members of staff who succeed in prep schools she never failed to be amused by the boys’ little foibles and interested to learn of their achievements. This was particularly so in the sphere of music where her own interests lay as a very accomplished singer with the Highgate Choral Society and Hampstead Chamber Choir. Corinne’s professionalism, and at times seemingly formidable presence, ensured 6

support or a cheery ‘you can do it’ when it is needed. Zoe was an integral member of Preprep as well as the Art department, a lady of many talents! Although we are delighted that she is pursuing a teaching career, we are incredibly sad to see her go and wish her every success. Patricia Legan Clive Carroll After fourteen years inspiring boys to learn the guitar with his unflappable, dedicated teaching style, Clive is leaving to pursue a multitude of musical projects closer to his home in Essex. His modesty and lack of pretension do not sit well with the perception of an internationally renowned musician, but his impact on the boys he has taught here has been phenomenal and something I know they will remember for many years. Clive’s final guitar concert was a true celebration of music written for the instrument which the boys performed with much enthusiasm and talent. We wish Clive well in all his future musical endeavours he will be a much missed member of the teaching staff at Arnold House. Paul Swinden Zoe Farmer Zoe is made for Arnold House, even on her taster day she threw herself in with gusto and has maintained her enthusiasm day in, day out. It was the start of a fantastic partnership, and we shall greatly miss her. Zoe’s serene exterior is mirrored by her calm, caring attitude in the classroom. The boys adore her as she lovingly encourages them to do their best; providing the appropriate

Natalie Konya Natalie joined us in January 2011 as the Year 3 Teaching Assistant. She threw herself wholeheartedly into the role right from the start and quickly built successful and productive relationships with the boys in Year 3. Her warmth and enthusiasm have made her an integral part of the team and we all wish her well as she embarks on her PGCE course at Goldsmiths College. Lizzie Jones


WELCOME

Staff News Monika Nemeth

he was asked to carry out additional work in the Summer term by the Headmaster. He is now working in the USA and starts his studies at the University of Michigan in the autumn. Good luck, Max. Sebastian Stones

Paul Strugnell

Matthew Dockary

Monika joined Arnold House at the beginning of the year as the Playground Supervisor. With a relaxed, caring and friendly manner, the boys and staff all warmed to her immediately and break times were quickly brought to order. Monika was an over qualified Playground Supervisor, having studied Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health at London Metropolitan University. She has now gone on to follow a career in this field. She will be missed and we all wish her the best of luck in the future. Susie Dart Max Arevuo

Max is an old boy of Arnold House and Westminster. He spent the autumn term with us as the gap student and it was immediately apparent that he was going to be a fantastic addition to the staff. He not only carried out duties and tasks with a high level of competence but also had innovative ideas and was able to help improve the efficacy of how we do some things. Such was the success of Max’s time as a ‘gapper’,

Matthew arrived at Arnold House in January probably jet lagged as he had just stepped off the plane from his native New Zealand. It must have been quite daunting, sitting in the Headmasters’ Office, in a foreign country, being told what would be expected of him. After a lecture of at least 20 minutes which had me sinking back in my seat, he was asked by Mr Thomas if he had understood what had been said. I will never forget the moment’s pause from Matt, followed by a softly spoken, ‘...... yis’. We quickly learned that this was the way Matt did things. He went about his business in a highly efficient and understated way. He was liked and respected by boys and staff for his modest, industrious, polite and loyal nature. No mean footballer himself, he was an asset to the Games Department and he was a great help to myself as well as to the ladies in the office. Matt has now returned to New Zealand but we hope he will return one day and visit. Thank you, Matt. Sebastian Stones

Paul joined Arnold House in November 2009. He had worked at St Paul’s Girls’ School and the German School in London as well as many London restaurants over his career and was well regarded and loved being a chef. His role at Arnold House included line management of the cleaning services as well as catering at a time when there were many changes to personnel which he managed in consultation with the Bursar. An opportunity to return to being a sole chef occurred just before Christmas 2010 which he took and is currently working at the Oval cricket ground in their new hospitality suite at the Vauxhall End. We thank him for all the work he did for us in his time here, and wish him well for the future. Richard Fletcher

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WELCOME

Salvete New staff As a School we are lucky to have regular intake of “new blood”, but it is perhaps a reflection of the highly comradely nature of the staff room that new teachers are quickly made to feel at home and soon lose the sense of being new. Indeed every year when we come to making the list for this part of the magazine we often think, “Has he/she only been here since September? It seems like so much longer!”.

in command in Maths and a Year 5 Form Teacher. Jon Harahap (along with Allie Baker, Matt Dockary and Josh Harrison) was part of the ANZAC invasion of Arnold House this year. Although initially here on a shortterm contract, his very high levels of professionalism and application meant we didn’t want to let him go!

Allie Baker, joined us as Head of Drama, and brings great enthusiasm to all she is

Although she was only with us for a few months, It was a pleasure to welcome, Kate Badenoch, an Arnold House “old girl”

Victoria Hall joined us as the Head of Learning Support in January, having previously worked at the school since asked to do. She gets on well with boys and staff alike, bringing a big slice of Antipodean wit and wisdom to the staff Common Room and much experience from teaching at different schools. Sean Gleeson came from a primary school in Croydon and quickly settled into the slightly different world of a

prep school. His interest in Maths and his genuine care for the boys soon confirmed his suitability for his new roles as our second 8

(being well acquainted with the school through her brothers Tom and Alec). Although only here as a maternity cover, she settled quite naturally into the school and added much to the Pre-Prep team.

September in an in-class support role. She is highly regarded both for her excellent and meticulous approach to her work as well as for her glamorous appearance. Another member of the ANZAC crew, Josh Harrison, joined us in April and quickly made his mark in the Sports Department. He is a talented sportsman and can be relied upon to accomplish his varied roles with efficiency.

Lucy Glyn came to us from a comprehensive school, but soon found


WELCOME

Salvete her feet teaching younger boys. She has a gentle manner as well as a clear vision of what she needs to do in the Art Room. Her artistic talents and her professionalism make her an excellent maternity cover for Kate Rawlinson as Lucy was able to get straight down to work. In the Science department we welcomed the return of Pauline BakerJackson who has a long association with

Marriages Congratulations to our very own Arnold House lovebirds: Lucy Kettlewell and Dayne Matthews. They were married in New York City in February. At the time Dayne was working in Qatar, while Lucy was still at Arnold House. Dayne’s return from Qatar and his new start at the School in September will allow them to celebrate their wedding with family and friends in London and then at Easter in Dayne’s homeland, New Zealand.

Daniel Gregoriou-Ostojic

Lucy and Dayne on their wedding day Arnold House from her years of work for Sodexo; it was a pleasure to welcome her as Laboratory Assistant, which meant she had more direct dealings with the boys. She has been an invaluable help to Jenny Lyons in the lab, enabling the boys to do much more practical work. Our last new arrival this year was the new Headmaster’s PA, Rachel Armstrong. She has quickly settled into her new role and impressed us with her organization and initiative. Her skills were put to the test quickly as she arrived at the start of one of the busiest summer terms ever!

Jake Sebastian Housden Births The fecund reputation of Arnold House continues, with a number of staff giving birth over the course of the year. Congratulations to all the proud mums (and dads): Sarah Mackay (Sophie), Kim Bahra (Simran), Elena Gregoriou-Ostojic (Daniel), Kate Rawlinson (Jake) and Rachel Lovell (George).

George Robin Lovell Woodrow

Simran Isaac Bahra

Sophie Ann Frances Mackay 9


WELCOME

Development The Bursary Fund Bursary places at Arnold House are funded through a combination of the School’s fee income and donations from current and former parents, old boys and friends of the School. Following a successful year of fundraising the School will provide four bursary places to boys from September 2011. The School has a comprehensive application process for bursary places, which begins with advertising within the local community in February. Applicants and their parents are invited to an open evening and Q&A session, followed by a day of assessment exams and finally individual interviews and taster days before informed decisions are made and places offered in May. All bursaries are means-tested and can be awarded to supplement the contribution made by parents or to cover the full cost of fees, uniform and extras each term.

Throughout the coming year, the School and the Board of Friends will continue to build upon the foundations which are now firmly in place, and will aim to replicate this year’s fundraising efforts year on year in order to ensure the long-term success of the School’s bursary scheme. The Annual Fund The Annual Fund continues to be an important part of the School’s development effort allowing the School to finance small projects and specific items, that have an immediate impact on the quality of what we do. This year the list of items purchased through donations towards the Annual Fund have included: • An A3 printing press for the Art & Design department • Datalogging Equipment and video recorders for the Science department

• ICT control equipment • Satellite Navigation Devices for the School minibuses • New computer software for the Library • An LCD Touch Screen for the Pre-prep In addition to the Bursary and Annual Funds, the School continues to develop the Endowment Fund for long term general purposes of the School and the George Smart Society for those who would like to remember the School in their will. For further information about any of these funds, please contact Stephanie Miller on 020 7266 6989 or e-mail smiller@arnoldhouse.co.uk. The School is most grateful to the parents and old boys who have supported these projects this year. The full donors list can be found on page 12. Stephanie Miller Director of Development

The Board of Friends Two years have passed since the Arnold House Board of Friends came into existence and we are pleased to say that there have been positive developments of our aims. Firstly, we have been able to get in contact with over one hundred lost old boys who have kindly updated their details so that we can revise the School’s records. This is a ‘work in progress’, so if you wish to update your details or know of other old boys who have not kept in contact with Arnold House, please send me an e-mail to afafalios@arnoldhouseschool.co.uk. Our other major aim is also long term, which is to support and help raise funds for the Arnold House Bursary Fund. In May, we were very happy to host the Bursary Fund Gala which was a great success and it was a particular pleasure to see the whole School 10

community coming together to give its backing to the scheme which is helping to widen access to the School and transform lives. il address not hold your e-ma At present we do updates from are missing out on which means you Boys. Old se Hou ld the Arno t fellow old est lies in news abou Whether your inter contributions nt School news or boys, events, rece would like to and magazines, we to our newsletters keep in touch. w and return e-mail address belo Please write your post. this postcard in the

tor of se e-mail the Direc Alternatively plea your details hanie Miller with Development, Step 020 7266 6989. use.co.uk or call ldho arno ler@ smil Name:

Email:

Stephanie Miller pment Director of Develo ool Arnold House Sch 1 Loudoun Road St John’s Wood London NW8 0LH

We are pleased to say that the fund supported three boys at Arnold House this year. We would like to thank all the parents, old boys and  friends for their continued support of the School. Anastassis Fafalios  Chairman of The Board of Friends

Arnold House Old Boys Are you missing out on Arnold House news.... updates....events?


WELCOME

Bursary Fund Gala On May 12th Arnold House officially launched the Bursary Fund by hosting a Gala at the American School in London. The Board of Friends organised an exciting evening including a three course meal, a live auction conducted by Lord Dalmeny, Deputy Chair of Sotheby’s, a silent auction and a raffle. 240 members of the Arnold House community attended the event including current, past and future parents, old boys, governors, staff and special guest Patrick Derham, Headmaster of Rugby School. The evening raised a fantastic total of £120,000 for the scheme which, when added to the £13,000 from the Parents’ Association’s successful Christmas Bazaar and other gifts, brings the first year total to an impressive £161,000. The money will be used as part of a long-term fundraising initiative to provide bursary places, and the great opportunity of an Arnold House education to deserving boys irrespective of their family’s financial means. We would like to thank everyone for their support of this event and the many generous donations on the evening and throughout the school year. Stephanie Miller Director of Development

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WELCOME

List of Donors 2010 - 2011 Bursary Fund

Mr and Mrs R Hatter

The Villiers Family

Mr and Mrs J Abrahams

Mr and Mrs A Heller

Mr J Vogel and Ms S Mackereth

Mr M Alexandroff Wilson

Mr P Lawrence

Mr A Warner

Mr and Mrs F Akyol

Mr and Mrs D Lemos

Mr and Mrs N Watts

Mr and Mrs M Arevuo

Mr and Mrs G Lemos

Mr and Mrs I Weston

Mr and Mrs G Ashton

Mr and Mrs A Lewis

Mr and Mrs U Wissen

Mr R Atkin

Mr and Mrs E Lipton

Mr and Mrs O Wright

Dr S and Dr P Bagheri

Miss M McCartney

Mr and Mrs V Yuan

Mr and Mrs A Bhak

Mr and Mrs R Mizrahi

Mr and Mrs J Zealley

Mr C Boyd and Ms I Taylor

Mr and Mrs G Moore

Mr and Mrs J Zehner

Mr and Mrs A Bouchier

Mr and Mrs J Naggar

Anonymous x 23

Mr and Mrs J Caplan

Mr and Mrs B O'Brien

Mr and Mrs L Cresswell

Mr and Mrs D O'Dea

Annual Fund

Mr and Mrs A Cross

The Oberoi Family Foundation

Mr R Law

Mr and Mrs J Dunford

Mr G Pemberton

Mr and Mrs A Maidment

Mr C Elliot and Ms N King

Mr and Mrs R Perper

Mr and Mrs D Tarizzo

Mr and Mrs S Elliott

Mr and Mrs C Ponticos

Anonymous x 2

Mr and Mrs J Flaherty

Mr S Prasad and Ms S Guha

Mr and Mrs A Freudenheim

Mr and Mrs T Riboud-Seydoux

Hanson’s Heroes (Commemorative Bricks)

Mr and Mrs B Fried

Mr C Rifkind

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Mr and Mrs A Fry

Mr I Rogers and Ms M Green

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Mr and Mrs A Gee

Mr A Rudolf

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Mr and Mrs T Gehrke

Mr R Seibel and Ms F Rangheri

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Mr and Mrs D Gestetner

Mr and Mrs S Sharpe

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Mr and Mrs N Gold

Mr and Mrs J Singh

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Mr and Mrs M Goldbart

Mr R Sherwood

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Ms E Gosnell and Miss L Gosnell

Mr and Mrs M Solomon

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Lord A Grabiner

Mr and Mrs T Sykes

Mr and Mrs J Green

Mr and Mrs C Tabor

Mrs A Griffiths

Mr and Mrs D Tarizzo

Ms J Hall

Mr and Mrs D Toledano

Mr and Mrs B Hammond

Mr and Mrs N Tudball

Money Raised 2010 - 2011 (Including Gift Aid) Bursary Fund

£160,935.85

Annual Fund

£2,243.58

Hanson’s Heroes

£1,025.61

TOTAL

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£164,205.04


WELCOME

The Parents’ Association

T

he Arnold House Parents’ Association aims to provide a link between the School and each and every Arnold House family. The School community prides itself on welcoming all parents, and the Parents’ Association, by running a number of social events throughout the year, with the aim of promoting friendship and support throughout the School. Whilst the main focus is a social one, the Parents’ Association also works hard to support and organise fundraising for the various charities chosen annually, and is a great supporter of the boys in their various community guises. The Autumn Term The main focal point of the year is the event which the Parents’ Association organises during the autumn term. This year we held a Christmas Bazaar which offered both the boys and their parents the chance to relax and enjoy an array of activities and delicious

food. We know that the boys are fortunate to have so many facilities at the School and as most people were feeling crunched we decided as a committee to raise funds this year for the Bursary Appeal. Entertainment included an incredible Grotto, with our very own Santa and many helper elves handing out gifts to the younger children. In the classrooms and

throughout the ground floor there was a number of different stalls – including a fantastic second hand designer clothes’

there is a black market in the tickets. It is always delightful to see the metamorphosis of our boys for the disco – white teeth, shirts tucked in, hair combed, shoes cleaned and they can dance! The boys talk of nothing else in the lead up to the event and spend the week afterwards comparing the amount of phone numbers they have managed to collect. The Summer Term The summer term is generally a busy time not just for the boys but also for the parents. For the Parents’ Association this is a social time with end of year class dinners, organised by the class reps, alongside school events such as Sports Day, end of year concerts and gymnastics displays.

stall and fairground attractions. We had a wide variety of food on sale from almost every continent in the world, including our traditional barbecue and lovely mulled wine. We were lucky with the weather and made great use of the playground area for a penalty shootout and tombola. As usual, the boys in Years 5 to 8 set up their own stalls, organising activities such as electric shock, cross bow and tin can alley. The boys showed such enthusiasm for participating and the boys’ stalls raised around £3,000, which was donated to the boys’ chosen international charity this year, Hope and Homes For Children. Additionally we hosted an auction which was a roaring success – the role of headmaster for the day being ‘sold’ for £700. We were delighted to have raised over £13,000 at the Christmas Bazaar. The Spring Term The spring term is generally a quieter one for the Parents’ Association, except for the Disco Committee who organise the annual disco for the boys in Years 6, 7 and 8. The Arnold House disco sees the school gym transformed into a nightclub, after a fashion. We had a great DJ, fabulous decorations, plenty of refreshments for adults and children alike, and most importantly, girls! We very carefully ensure we have the same number of girls as boys, as a result I hear

Throughout the year the Parents’ Association gives presents to teachers who are leaving, or who are getting married, or have had a baby – or all three! They also organise a Teacher Appreciation gift for a longstanding member of the school community. This year was the turn of Carol Ioannis-Antoniou who has nurtured and inspired the musical talents of many of our sons for so many years. As with all committees it is very much a team effort, and I would like to thank all the class reps for their help and support over this past year. Everything that we do on the Parents’ Association is only made successful by the parent body and the community spirit that is so strong at Arnold House. Being part of the PA has been very enjoyable and has been a great way to integrate into school life and put names to the myriad of faces whom I used to only recognise by sight. I wish the incoming team the very best of luck; I know that Candice Cresswell, with Claire Lipman at her side as Deputy chair, will do a wonderful job, and great thanks to Sangeeta Khemany who is staying on as Treasurer and to Maria Stannard who is moving on. Tessa Laws Chair of the Parents’ Association

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WELCOME

The Governors I have been a Governor for thirteen years now and in that time, not surprisingly, almost the entire composition of the Governing Body has changed. The only constants have been Tony Grabiner, Howard Raingold and, our Treasurer, Peter Beckman. Sadly, the latter two are now stepping down after a long and distinguished service. An old boy, Howard was for many years a professional fund raiser raising many millions for Oxbridge colleges. His advice and expertise have been invaluable in taking forward our own development plans and he has played an important role in getting our long term fundraising off the ground. Meanwhile, Peter, also an old boy, and father of - - - - in Year 8, has been a meticulous treasurer, overseeing the School’s finances for more years than

anyone can remember. Happily, Peter will continue as a Governor for a transitional period while the new treasurer, Stewart Sether, father of - - who is also in Year 8, plays himself in. We owe an enormous debt of gratitude to both Howard and Peter for all their hard work, dedication and loyalty to the School over many years. We hope, as they are old boys, to see them at the ‘42 Club dinners and events for many years to come. The Governors continue to place much emphasis on increasing the number of bursary places and, by September this year, we expect to have four pupils on bursaries in the School. These places do of course require significant funding – while the School can part-fund bursaries from its own

The Catering Team Early on in the year, it was decided that the School change their catering supplier to improve the quality of service that was on offer. We are delighted to have awarded the contract to Accent Catering who started in April. As a highly respected provider of modern and contemporary food, Accent has brought a highly flexible and personalised catering operation that has been tailor-made to accommodate the School. Their focus has been to engage the team to provide an outstanding service to the boys and staff. In addition to the exceptionally high standard of daily lunches provided, Accent have introduced fresh cut fruit and homemade biscuits and cakes for morning break. They have also provided catering for many parents’ events including the new parents’ evening, sports day and the Year 8 leavers party at Canons Park, which have all been well received thanks to the hard work of the catering team lead by Accent Executive Chef – Mark Young. 14

Thank you to Mark Young and the catering team for all their hard work this term.

resources, we need to raise two thirds of the cost from external sources. The highly successful Gala held at the ASL in May, when we raised £120,000, has gone a long way to helping with funding for the next year or two. But as we build our bursary numbers, we will need to increase our fundraising activities and to look to create a permanent endowment to help future generations finance bursary programmes. It is quite a challenge, but with the help of all Arnold House stakeholders, it is one that we are ready to meet. Alan Warner Chairman of Governers


WELCOME

School Photo 2011

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SCHOOLS NEWS

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SCH OOL School News


SCHOOL NEWS

Canons Park Activity Centre (touch wood with two weeks of the term to go) that hangs over us so I think we have managed pretty well. The fields themselves look fantastic and the site in general is clean and well kept. Thank you to Laurie and Csilla for doing all the cleaning and John for the catering.

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t is a Tuesday morning before the end of term. It is very quiet at Canons Park. Paul is off-site and at the moment only Arthur and I occupy the seven acres. He is under my desk recovering from an earlier walk and his usual perambulations following me about as I carry out certain tasks. I am catching up on some administration, checking the petty cash is in order and doing the schedules for the last two weeks of term that look frighteningly busy. This is the last time I will be writing a yearly review of The Activity Centre and although I am terrifically excited about my life post Arnold House there is a little regret at things I know I will miss. It has been a pleasure to manage the site for the last six years. Taking up the position here was a leap in the dark in many ways as

there was not a model that one could look to for guidance. The situation here is quite unique. Most of all I will miss working with Paul. I would like to think that we have learnt much from each other. I know I have learnt a lot about the art of being a groundsman and I look forward to using the knowledge in the future in pastures new. I wish him every success as the new site manager. I am sure he will do well. By the time that this magazine is published he will have his feet firmly under the table. Once again, we have had a busy year. The cycle of the seasons, weather, sport and the requirements of Arnold House throw up many challenges, most of which I think we have coped with. There is no one thing

The Bowls Club and Tennis Club continue to be busy and we have had our fair share of lettings. The Rotary Clubs of Stanmore and Golders Green have held a number of charity functions here. In October we have an event for breast cancer and groups from the local community have taken advantage of our facilities, including Stanmore Choral Society, Friends of Canons Park and the local police. Middlesex Ladies Cricket Association have used the ground and enjoyed our facilities for a number of county games and Primrose Hill CC have also played a number of their home games at Canons Park. On August 13th Canons Park hosted the National League 1 Women’s cricket match between Middlesex and Sussex. I wish all involved in the future at Canons Park all the very best I am sure the site will continue to be a jewel in the Arnold House crown. Rick Martin Canons Park Activity Centre Manager

From the Library

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here is no such thing as a ‘usual’ day in the Arnold House library. The boys’ needs change, classes become besotted by particular series, individual boys set themselves challenges (read all the Hardy Boys books? why not!) and new books are constantly appearing that can be dangled tantalisingly in front of the boys. New books mean that unread ones and out of date ones are shifted on to pastures new - books that don’t suit Arnold House go to other schools, tatty and out-of-date books go in the recycling. New books also mean a surge

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of interest, as the boys are always eager to see the latest titles and even more to be the first one to read them! From the Kids’ Lit Quiz, to Book Day to the Picture Book Project this has been yet another invigorating year. It’s also been one that has seen the library grow in terms of books borrowed and books read. I never fail to be inspired by the boys, both the ones who are passionate about reading and those who find it hard. Both groups challenge me as a librarian and as a reader,

and both groups keep my job more than just that - for being librarian here is less a job and more a vocation! Leonie Flynn Librarian


SCHOOL NEWS

From the Library Head Librarian’s Column If you have spent any time in the library at Arnold House you will always remember a few things - always go for the new sequel as soon as the library gets it because otherwise it can take three months to work its way round to you; there are always new books; there might be sweets available and, most importantly, that the library is a great place to do anything from hanging out, to debating about what should or shouldn’t have happened in the latest Doctor Who. As learning to read is commonly referred to as being one of the most important things in modern society, our fantastic librarian, Leonie, helps

everyone try to find their own favourite genre, be it action stories, superhero novels or Beano annuals. She aims to help everybody find their ‘comfort zone’ and lets everyone experiment with different books. She is a great influence on anybody who spends time in the library and is always available to discuss a good book that you have just finished.

my reading. I would also like to wish my successor good luck in the coming years as the library is always expanding and growing. The library is a great part of the school and I hope everyone can enjoy it as much as I have.

--- --Head Librarian (Year 8)

The library is important for many boys throughout their time at Arnold House and I hope it will continue to be so for many years to come. I have really enjoyed being Head Librarian and I will miss the library a lot when I leave the School because I have spent a lot of time there and it has really encouraged

Book Day

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n Friday 22nd October, Jim Eldridge, Tanya Landman and David Roberts all joined in the fun on Arnold House’s Wild West themed Book Day and Charity Day. A few boys took things literally and - - - - - (7M) came as a ‘cow-boy’ (that’s his lower half as a cow and his upper half in his school uniform!) and - - - - - - (7MM) came as a fantastic Mexican with a metal shotgun and two pistols! The estimated ratio had been about nine cowboys to every Native American, although there were a lot more Native Americans in the lower half of the school. We had a Wild West themed lunch which was lovely and it was obvious that the kitchen staff had put a lot of effort into making our day even more fun.

one about a detective and another with the great title ‘100% Pig’!

Tanya Landman talked to Years 7 & 8 about her books about Native Americans and Geronimo. In the second half of the talk she spoke about her personal life, which included a rather unfortunate encounter with a three year old whilst in a giant teddy suit when she worked for Bristol Zoo. She told us about how she had wanted to become a writer and then how she actually became one. She also spoke to the younger boys about her other books,

All the authors signed copies of their books after their talks.

David Roberts talked to the Junior School about illustrating for books and his drawings went down like a storm amongst the younger boys! He even got the staff drawing too. He also talked to Year 1, and rumour has it that he was brilliant, getting even the youngest boy to produce a really good drawing of his character, Dirty Bertie. Jim Eldridge talked to the boys about his Badlands books and his Warpath series. He was very funny too, though the books are serious. Badlands is set in the Wild West and Warpath during the 2nd World War.

A rather exciting end to the first part of the Autumn term! - - - - - - (Year 7)

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SCHOOL NEWS

AH Library goes on tour to Qatar

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to access religious texts, though that is slowly changing. Here, reading is something boys and girls are allowed equally, there, girls have been taught to read only recently. Here we are free to read anything we want.

hough I spend most of my working time at School, I often travel around book festivals to talk about books, or to other schools to advise them on their libraries. All of which is entertaining, interesting and keeps the ferocious Sussex wolves from the door. However, rarely have I been offered work quite as far away as Qatar… How it all came about was one of those round-about stories that seem almost unreal, but if you put The Ultimate Book Guides (my books, edited with Arnold House old boy Daniel Hahn), the fact that I am a librarian and a consulting librarian and the fact that Daniel Hahn is now a world famous translator who happened to be at a conference in Qatar and spoke there with someone who needed to contact an expert on libraries and reading… well, suddenly a week in the Qatari capital, Doha, was rushed through! Daniel and I travelled out from a slightly gloomy London to a Doha basking in 35ºC heat – at 9pm! During the day it was a mind-boggling 50ºC, and I can see exactly why everyone moves from air-conditioned buildings to air-conditioned cars and tries to avoid walking anywhere at any cost. Doha is a city being rebuilt from scratch, the skyscrapers are stunning and building work is everywhere. There can be nowhere else quite like it in the world, and I found the whole cultural experience amazing, perhaps especially because I got to spend most of my time with two lovely Qatari women, Ream and Maryam, who shared so much about their lives and their hopes with me, and who acted as the best guides one could hope for. But I was really there to work, and the two day seminar, Recipes for Reading, worked extremely well. As you can see from the photos, working with fully veiled women was a different experience from my usual one, but after a while I got used to it all, even to the simultaneous translation

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and remembering to talk more slowly, especially when reading aloud; imagine simultaneously translating ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’? Then ‘Room on the Broom’? Or ‘Click Clack Moo, Cows that Type’? Daniel and I felt the translator needed all the help he could get! Qatar is hungry for education, especially for change in the way education in perceived amongst the older Qataris. The attendees at the seminar were departmental heads who taught either Arabic and English, deputy heads, trainers, literacy coordinators, publishers and people working with children either in childhood or family centres. All of them were passionate about wanting their children to read, but education in Qatar is seemingly in a state of transition with no clear way forward. Daniel and I offered something that I really hope will help. I came home inspired by their determination to succeed. They have so few books available for children in Arabic; we have so many in English. Here schools understand that long-term love of books is essential to academic success – there, reading has been perceived solely as a way

On the second day we asked all the delegates to bring in a children’s book they loved. Most brought in some sort of religious text, a few came with actual picture books. One was written to help young children deal with grief, and the story was about a mother explaining that granny was gone, but that she was now in the moon, watching her granddaughter and loving her still. The person who brought it in read the book to us (the translator speaking in English to Daniel and me). Afterwards, the room almost erupted in argument, simply because that is not what the Koran teaches and so was considered by some to be something you could not use. Ever. It was an

eye-opening moment, and it made me sad for all those children who have never been allowed to read stories just because they are stories. However, things are changing, and future generations will hopefully enjoy books of all kinds and learn to read for pleasure. The Qatar experience was educational for me as much as for my students, and I have to thank the Headmaster for his encouragement. Leonie Flynn Librarian


SCHOOL NEWS

The Picture Book Project

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his project really came out of my experiences in Doha. Seeing how the adults I was working with there reacted to reading picture books properly made me think about how the boys read them here. The Library has lots of picture books, but quite often they are only read for the pictures, ignoring the text – or vice versa. It seemed to me that there were lessons to be learnt here by all ages about how story works, how story can mean many things to many people, and how sometimes the most profound insights can come from books with very few words. So, I gathered picture books. And then I read two particular books to every single class that I teach. The books I used were ‘Rosie’s Walk’ by Pat Hutchins and ‘Wolves’ by Emily Gravett. Both books are very simple, and each one tells one story with the words, one with the pictures and yet another

when both elements are put together. ‘Rosie’s Walk’ is by far the simpler story, but it leads into ‘Wolves’ and it’s many layers of possibility and inference brilliantly. In week one, I read the books to each class and we talked through them as a group. Seeing how each year responded was fascinating; some boys were disparaging of the idea of sitting as if they were still babies to be read to, others loved it – all of them became involved once storytelling started. Some saw the most amazing things in the books and made the most imaginative leaps in their interpretation of each story others took less away. I think most boys took something, even if just a willingness to look afresh at images and an openness to books that though officially ‘too young’ could still be engaging.

boys laugh, to make it fun, but most of all to make it so the stories could be read carefully and well. I think the photos prove that it worked!

I’m running an IAPS Librarians’ conference in the autumn at the British Library, and I’ll be reading them the same two books I read to the Arnold House boys. Sadly though I don’t suppose there will be any desks to sit under! Leonie Flynn Librarian

Reading aloud is a skill, and it helps to know the book you are reading. So, the next stage was to ask the boys to bring in THEIR favourite book. Which most of them did! To add to the intimacy of reading a well-loved story, and as a way to give an enclosed space, we moved all the chairs apart and the boys sat under the tables. When the classes were too big, some boys sat ON tables! I wanted to mix it up, to make the 21


SCHOOL NEWS

Kids’ Lit Quiz

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e’ve always heard about the Kids’ Lit Quiz, and always wanted to be on one of the Arnold House teams, but of course we had to wait until Year 7 before we could be! The first round of heats was in-school, and it was great to find out that we’d succeeded – the teams were made up of four Year 7 boys ( - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - with - - - - - - - as sub) and four Year 8 boys ( - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - with - - - - - - - - as sub). On the day of the London heats we all met up in the library – though sadly - - couldn’t be there and - - - - - - heroically stepped in to take his place. We met in the library to talk books and pizzas – as our first stop was Pizza Express and lunch! After that Mr Moss-Marks drove us to Broxbourne School in Hertfordshire for the quiz. The quizmaster was (as it always is!)

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Professor Wayne Mills from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He set up the quiz years ago and now spends half the year travelling the globe being quizmaster for hundreds of regional and national heats. He always wears a top hat and is very tall – he also knows an awful lot about books! The quiz took place in the school’s hall, and we sat down (next to UCS!), feeling slightly nervous. There were over thirty teams competing and it was all a bit squashed, but we settled down and looked through the list of titles for the ten rounds (ten questions in each) and did a brainstorm to chose one for our joker – which would double any points we won for that round – ending up choosing ‘Monsters’. We had to speak really quietly as other teams could overhear us and we didn’t want to give any right answers away! Then it began: the questions were a real mix of hard and simple. We argued over some answers, but not that many and all of

us contributed. - - - - wrote down our answers. Half way through there was a break and we were given sweets, crisps and drinks, then we had a chance to buy books and meet some of the many authors who were there. The second half was when we started to get 10/10 in the rounds – including doubling up on ‘Monsters’. There were also ‘spot’ questions for individuals and - - won one and Ms Flynn another! As the contest neared the end we were convinced that despite getting better we’d still come nowhere, but when Professor Mills announced the top three, we found that we were second – and only two points away from the winners! Sadly, only the winners went on the UK finals. Year 8 came tenth. It was a really enjoyable day ,and at least as Year 7 we get another try next year! - - - - - - - - - - - & - - - - - - (Year 7)


SCHOOL NEWS

Headmaster for a day admaster for e bid to become He th n wo y ----y carrying out man zaar 2010, - - - had a very busy da At the Christmas Ba He . nd Fu ry rsa Bu e stic ÂŁ700 for th a day raising a fanta outlined below. as s important dutie

FRIDAY 4TH FEBRUARY 2011

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SCHOOL NEWS

Verse Speaking

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n Friday, 25th March this year, the boys in Years 3 to 8 gathered on a beautiful spring morning at the American School in London, for the Verse-Speaking competition: the best ever, according to many hardened veterans of verse-speaking competitions from days gone by. This year, the judges comprised: the Headmaster showing what a versatile and wise head he can be on these occasions; Governor Jo Hearnden, a stalwart of many previous verse speakings; and Financial Times journalist, Harry Eyres, who was previously a King’s Scholar at Eton and a keen poet himself. The day began with the Individual competition, making - - - - - - job the hardest one as he began with a delightful rendition of a Roald Dahl poem. - - was followed by - - - - - - - - - - - with ‘The Polar Bear’, a cheekily dramatic reading of Spike Milligan’s poem. The Lower School entries were completed by - - - - - - - - - with his gripping account of Ahlberg’s ‘Complaint’ and - - - - - from 4B, the eventual winner, with a composed rendition of Hoffman’s ‘Little Suck-a-Thumb’. The pace was hotting up and it was now the Middle School’s turn.

- - - - - - began with a wicked version of ‘My teacher took my iPod’, followed by - - - - - - - - - - - - - with the ambitious choice of ‘A Light exists in Spring’ by Emily Dickinson. The audience was then treated to a dramatic performance by - - - - - - - - from 6F. He spoke like a stand-up comedian and gave a rapt audience a spell-binding exhibition. This made life difficult for Jo Moore with a Kenn Nesbitt poem to complete the 24

Middle School entries. No one was surprised to see - - - leave with the judges foisting plaudits upon the youngest of the - - - - - tribe. The Individual competition ended with some powerful entries. Two stood out: ‘Still I Rise’ by Maya Angelou recited by - - - - - - and ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen, read by - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - gave a sad, serious reading of ‘The Panther’ by Rilke. - - - - - changed the tone with his witty reading of Ogden Nash’s ‘Children’s Party’. Ultimately, the judges applauded - - - - for his emotionally charged reading but decided to give the prize to - - - for an incredibly stirring version of Maya Angelou’s crie de coeur. With hardly a pause for breath, it was onto the eagerly-awaited group poems: 3J began with ‘Disobedience’ by AA Milne. Here was a charming, beautifully enunciated version that proved a dramatic start to the group section. 4B won in the Lower School with Jez Alborough’s ‘Teacher Out of School’, a bizarre, fully-costumed reading of the popular poem to which most pupils could relate easily. Close contenders were 3L with ‘Halloween is Nearly Here’ by Kenn Nesbitt. The boys were slightly wrong-footed by the absence of masking tape to help them with positions that they had clearly relied upon in rehearsal. Finally, came 4C with ‘School Steeplechase’ – this was an unusual and charming adaptation of the original poem by David Kitchen. But there was no out-doing 4B. In the Middle School, the competition was fierce. ‘The ABC’ by Spike Milligan was wellperformed by 5G. 6S dramatised the poem ‘From a Railway Carriage’ by RL Stevenson, in

a way that used the stage at the American School in a powerful way. 6F stole the show in terms of colour and humour with their slick and impressive adaptation of French songs in a glitzy show called ‘Jacques Le Rapper’ adapted by Mme Ferhaoui. This may have won more acclaim if it had not been in French, which bent the rules slightly. The winners in this section were 5B, with ‘Your School’ by Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. This was another rendition that used the stage well and drew the audience in with a fresh, dramatic performance that packed a punch. Finally, in the Upper School, there was an excellent performance by 8H with Shakespeare’s famous rallying cry from Henry V, ‘Once more unto the breach dear friends,’ and 8K made a valiant effort to dramatise ‘The Smugglers’ Song’ by Rudyard Kipling. However, the competition hinged upon the entries from 7M and 7MM – not a misprint but the boys representing the two groups in Y7 and their form teachers Mr Maddocks and Mr MossMarks, in that order. First came ‘Technologic’ by Daft Punk, a technically perfect production from the School of Wizardry and Linguistic Legerdemain (otherwise known as Mark Maddocks). This was hard for the judges to compare with the 7MM entry, ‘Quinn the Eskimo’ by Bob Dylan, an equally ‘left-field’ choice, which ultimately won the judges’ hearts for its quirkiness and some strong, dramatic voices. Photos of the winners followed and then it was back to school where prizes were awarded. The verse-speaking competition was over for another year. A big thank you to all involved, especially the judges who had a hard job this year. David Moss-Marks Head of English


SCHOOL NEWS

Visiting Speakers

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nce again, Arnold House welcomed a number of visiting speakers to the School, giving the boys a great insight into a wide variety of topics with the experts at hand.

Autumn Term Y1

Gordon Singer

Thanksgiving

Y1

Sinora Phillips

Hannukah

Y1-4

David Roberts

Illustrator and author of Dirty Bertie.

Y1-8

Susie McCallum

Hope & Homes for Children

Y1-8

Fr Rob Wickham

Rector of Hackney Parish, Christmas Shoe Box Appeal

Y3

Naomi Gibney

The Amazon rainforest. Sky rainforest rescue and WWF on a research project into deforestation and environmental sustainability.

Y3-8

Tanya Landman

Native Americans. ‘Apache’, her Carnegie shortlisted bestseller, and her nonfiction, Geronimo to the senior school. Poppy Fields Mysteries to the middle school. Flotsam and Jetsam to the juniors.

Y4-6

Jim Eldridge

Author of The Badlands mysteries.

Y5-8 parents

Georgie Calder

Drug Awareness

Y5-8

Jack Pegram (old boy)

Charity Climb up Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Y6

Helen Smith

Titanic Disaster as a direct descendant of Captain Smith of the Titanic

Y8

Chere Hunter

Prison Chaplaincy

Jacqueline and Jonathan Gestetner

WW2. How their family escaped persecution from the Nazis and how they were able to expand their family company.

Y1-8

Space Shuttle Discovery Crew

Experiences in Space and the International Space Station

Y2

Jessica Brown

Artist

Y4

Lieutenant Zach Zehner (old boy)

Army Air Corps

Y5 & 6

Peter Gosnell

The Blitz

Y6 & 7

James Sellar

The Shard building in the City

Y7 & 8

Hermann Hirschberger

Kindertransport

Spring Term Y6 Summer Term

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SCHOOL NEWS

ICT

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I am particularly impressed this year by

Our new Intranet will be going live in 2011 and will replace part of the School Website

and the drop box system as a source of all current information and resources for our staff, parents and boys. The site will allow users to ‘subscribe’ to the areas they are interested in allowing them to stay up to date with, for example, sports fixtures, music lesson timetables or lunch menus! The Intranet will also make it much easier for staff to set assignments online and for boys to complete and submit them on time. Exciting times ahead! Rekha Ruda Head of ICT

Year 1 Fruit pictures

Year 1 Fish Pictures

Year 2 Jackson Pollock paintings

s ever, we have had a full year of varied projects produced by all the boys in Years 1 to 8. Years 5 & 6 have developed team work, research, presenting and ICT skills as part of the Compass Course and all other year groups have used a full range of software to improve skills in all areas of ICT from desk-top publishing to graphics and word processing to spreadsheets.

the high standards of work produced by the boys and am so pleased that they are achieving a great degree of attention to detail in their finished projects! I look forward to continuing to develop the ICT units of study next year in order to incorporate more animation and also some programming both of which are becoming ever more popular amongst the boys.

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Year 1 Flower pictures

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Year 3 Van Gogh paintings

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SCHOOL NEWS

ICT Year 3 Ancient Egypt information sheets

Year 4 branching databases

Year 7 Floor Plans

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Year 8 Ticket designs

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SCHOOL NEWS

House Assemblies

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wice a term House assemblies are led by the House Captain and Vice House Captain, who often recruit fellow Year 8 boys from the same House to help. It is quite a daunting task for twelve year olds to stand in front of 70 to 80 people, yet we have been impressed by the eloquent and clear way that the boys deliver their message. Musicians are recruited from the House to perform, House teams are organised and examples of good work or acts of good citizenship are highlighted.

We were very impressed by the way the senior boys presented assemblies during Anti-Bullying week. The boys hear a lot about this issue from the teachers but when it comes from the older boys the message is very powerful.

thinking, ‘I want to be like him when I’m in Year 8’. Sebastian Stones Second Deputy Headmaster

House assemblies enable us to organise breaks differently, with Junior School boys sharing the playground with older boys. You can see the admiration in some of the younger boys’ faces and almost hear them

School Council

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ouncil members are elected from each Form between Years 3 to 8 and meet five times per year. The elected council members take their role suitably seriously. This year there have been some really interesting ideas proposed. One good idea 28

was to allow boys to wear their tracksuits during certain days in which they have PE. This has been successful in minimizing the amount of time the boys waste changing and has taken pressure off the cloakroom.

Next year it is hoped that time can be found in assemblies for the council members to give feedback about meetings to the rest of the boys. Sebastian Stones Second Deputy Headmaster


SCHOOL NEWS

Drama

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t is not in every teacher’s lesson that pupils are encouraged to engage in combat, make as much noise as possible, pretend to be their grandparents, grieve, show excessive pride or plot evil deeds...but I am lucky enough to teach Drama, where play is embraced as a legitimate, necessary and wonderfully enjoyable tool for learning!

Taking on Drama at Arnold House has been an enormous pleasure. It has been a year of exciting development as performing arts opportunities have been continually embraced by our very talented boys. The Junior productions have continued at Christmas and in the summer term, produced by the passionate Years 1 & 2 teaching team. Special effects this year included a fantastic cow on wheels! The annual Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival was another highlight on the Performing Arts calendar, ably led by Head of Years 3 & 4, Miss Lizzie Jones. This year’s production featured a combination of music, visual arts, poetry and drama. Years 3 & 4 boys rehearsed with vigour throughout the spring term and performed a fantastic physical theatre performance of ‘The Lorax’ by Dr Seuss: a story with a strong ecological message and some hilarious characters. Drama is now a timetabled subject across the School, with specialist lessons for Years 3, 4 and 5, Drama as part of the Compass program in Year 6 and several Canons Park Drama days during the year for Year 7 boys. Drama is also buzzing in the extra-curricular arena with a Years 5 & 6 Drama Club exploring the skills and elements in high quality Drama performances, and a Year 7 Drama Club which focuses on bringing scripts to life in performance. It has been a hectic and exciting year with the introduction of a House Drama competition during assembly time, Year 7s performing scenes from ‘Romeo and Juliet’ as

part of a joint English and Drama initiative and our continued involvement in the illustrious Shakespeare Schools Festival, culminating in this year’s production of Julius Caesar. (see page 63 for the full write-up). Boys in Year 6 took part in a performance workshop at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in Southwark early in the year, including the rare opportunity to perform some lines onstage, Year 3 visited Bloomsbury Theatre for a fast paced and zany performance of Roald Dahl’s ‘George’s Marvellous Medicine’ and Year 5 visited Little Angel Theatre for a Royal Shakespeare puppetry performance of ‘The Tempest’. In Year 3, boys took part in a variety of performance activities aimed at overcoming lack of confidence, building trust in the group and drawing out creative ways of exploring and performing stories. Year 4 focussed more on performance skills and characterisation, enjoying an action- packed study of heroes and villains and puppetry creation and performance. Year 5 studied different periods in Theatre History, using a range of expressive skills to perform slapstick comedy routines and scenes from the Italian theatre tradition ‘Commedia dell’Arte’, then later exploring Melodrama and Morality Plays. When a colleague passed me at school a short while ago, she remarked ‘I wonder sometimes, what it is you do in Drama...when I pass the room, the boys often seem to be dying!’ She was quick to reassure me that the boys had reported that they loved Drama, so the rampant deaths didn’t seem to concern her too greatly... but I thought this would be a great opportunity to talk about the ‘what’ and the ‘why’ of Drama lessons, particularly at Arnold House.

part of the school curriculum, it speaks volumes about the concerns of a school. Year round, Arnold House is a busy hive of activity. Our boys are clever, creative, diligent and motivated and enjoy a rich and diverse curriculum and Drama is valued as an integral part of our boys’ studies.

Drama offers boys the opportunity to work creatively, to share their ideas confidently, to take risks and dare to look silly! Frequently, the boys perform ‘work in progress’, where perfection is not sought or demanded, but boys show what they have created and invite their peers for feedback and ideas. In improvisation activities, boys must take risks, think on their feet, make offers, accept and extend the offers made by fellow performers. When preparing performances in a group, the boys must share their ideas, justify their opinions and negotiate a way through problems. So, in the ‘what’, we find our answer to the ‘why Drama?’ question... Creative expression, building confidence, sharing ideas, taking risks, being brave, experimenting and refining, valuing the process over the product, sharing with ones’ peers, thinking on ones’ feet, discussing and justifying, offering, embracing the ideas of someone else...these skills are integral to all studies at Arnold House, indeed, to all aspects of life! Allie Baker Head of Drama

In Drama performances, many of the benefits are immediately obvious; the building of confidence and interpersonal skills, the sense of achievement from learning lines and being responsible for a special role, the excitement of sharing and showcasing special skills, but Drama as a timetabled subject actually offers a very different experience and challenge. When Drama is a recognised subject, a genuine

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SCHOOL NEWS

History Week

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istory week was a tremendously successful event that drew due attention to the events of 70 years ago. Mr Hermann Hirschberger spoke to the boys in Years 7 & 8 on the Monday, telling in gripping detail of his own experiences as one of the children rescued from Nazi Germany by the Kindertransport scheme. His calm delivery belied the awful reality of what happened to him and his family (sadly he never saw his parents again once

he left Germany as they were murdered in Auschwitz). It was a harrowing privilege to hear such an excellent speaker and the boys were clearly moved by what they learnt. Equally spell-binding was Mr Peter Gosnell’s talk to Years 5 & 6 on the Wednesday. His first-hand experiences of the London Blitz formed the central theme of the week. I learnt a lot from the detail of his talk and the boys too benefited from listening to him and also to the sound recordings of sirens and air raids, which brought the past eerily back to life. On the Thursday we held a church service to commemorate those who died. The reading from the Old Testament prophet Jeremiah contained the hope-filled line, “The city shall be rebuilt upon her ruins”. The boys responded well to the meditative and sombre tone of the service (just as they do on Armistice Day). On a more lighthearted note the audience at the Senior

Summer Concert on the Tuesday were able to take part in a sing-song with the Vera Lynn classic, “We’ll meet again” and on Friday there were tremendous efforts from boys and staff who dressed up in wartime costumes. This spirit was carried into the excellent tuck shop organised by parental helpers, complete with ration cards for the boys to buy their sweets. The money raised from home clothes and the tuck shop was £1,345, which was donated to Hope and Homes for Children. Thanks to those who helped make this week such a success: Mr Hirschberger, Mr Gosnell, Mr Cox, the Office staff (who did a great job decorating the school with posters) and other teachers such as Mrs Lyons, who had an air raid siren for use in her Science lessons! John Hill Head of History

groups of boys were lucky enough to work with Mr Cross and see what effect the addition of sand had on the properties of plasticene. It was tremendous fun to have such a talented and enthusiastic band

Arnold’s Artefacts Last year the Grant Museum at UCL supplied us with a loan box, full of interesting artefacts. In typical Arnold House fashion, the following week witnessed a deluge of impressive objects brought from home by our boys. At the time I thought it would be a good idea to stage an Arnold House Museum but, in the hurly burly that typifies school life, the idea lay dormant until - - - and - - - - - arrived in the lab with a huge fossil they had found and carried over hill and dale. Inspired by this event, the Year 6 boys (plus Pani from Year 5), set about curating the first Arnold House Museum, which took place on the penultimate day of the summer term. - - - - - created worksheets, - - - - - - - - - ran around the school putting up the Arnold’s Artefacts posters he designed, and both homes and the Science Lab were ransacked to produce the necessary exhibits. It’s entirely possible that the - - family might have believed they had been burgled, as - - and - - - supplied a vast amount of minerals and gemstones. The Years 1 & 2 boys were duly summoned and then expertly guided through the exhibition by the well informed Year 6 curators. Great fun was had by all and I am sure the Arnold House Museum will make a return in the near future.

Science Week

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or our second Arnold House Science Week we drafted in some engineering expertise – Arnold House parents! Nadine Zakaria, Monique Law and Andrew Cross helped provide activities and workshops with a focus on materials and building. All the boys in Years 6, 7 and 8 competed in a Bridge building competition, whilst those in Year 5 made towers. (Mrs Ruda was right, the Lab could only contain so many bridges, building upwards was the only way left to go!). Year 4 took part in a Bubble Extravaganza, with dry ice and an attempt at entirely encasing each other in a bubble. Years 1 – 3 compared products made at Arnold House with their commercial counterparts, with some very scientific observations being made. Some

30

of helpers on board, who were not only generous with their time, but also donated materials and competition prizes. Thanks also to all those boys who made the Arnold House putty and play dough, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - being especially proactive in this. Jenny Lyons Head of Science


SCHOOL NEWS

Activities

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one activity and they run them willingly and with enthusiasm. Clubs range from Ju Jitsu, Football Skills and Gym to activities that are less physical but nonetheless challenging, such as Chess and Bridge. Some interesting

new clubs that have started this year include Bug Club, Paper Art, Photography Club and Football Skills. Sebastian stones Second Deputy Headmaster

This was an enjoyable year for coaches and gymnasts. Each Thursday evening three groups of boys from Year 2 to Year 5 spent a combined two hours working at the various skills combining flexibility, suppleness, balance and strength.

the end of the summer term.

March, a tune I will never fail to listen to without thinking about small boys propelling themselves over a vaulting horse.

The highlights were the internal competition, the London Schools Gymnastic Competition and The Gymnastics Display at

I particularly enjoyed the display, my last one ever, and thought the lads performed heroically to the strains of the Dam Busters

t the back of the termly School Calendar is a list of the activities available to the boys. It makes impressive reading with such a lot available and containing such variety. All teachers at Arnold House offer at least

Gymnastics

Arnold House at both U9 and U11 did very well in the London Schools Event winning both team golds and a host of other individual medals.

A big thank you to Lucy Matthews who has helped with the club and I wish her well as she takes over in September. Rick Martin Master-in-charge of Gymnastics

Mad Scientists’ Club

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fter lessons have ended for the day on Mondays, the Science Laboratory is invaded by 20+ Years 3 & 4 pupils intent on honing the less academic side of their scientific skills. Under the guidance of Miss Legan and her intrepid band of Year 7 assistants, icing sugar explodes, rockets are launched and all manner of materials are

made and investigated. In spite of their leanings towards the more wacky experiments, all of our Mad Scientists’ managed to put in enough project hours to gain the second of the National Crest Awards, the SuperStar Investigator.

Well done to all of our newly appointed SuperStar Investigators and a HUGE thank you to - - (Bunsen) - - - - (Dr) - - - - - and - - - ( - - - - wallus), without whose unfailing help and expertise, the Mad Scientists’ Club would surely flounder. Jenny Lyons Head of Science 31


SCHOOL NEWS

Activities Chess

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n exciting year of chess at Arnold House culminated in a nail-biter when the annual parents/nannies/teachers versus students match was tied 7-all with one game to go! The Headmaster was up against a strong senior boy - - - - - - - - However victory for the adults was assured when the Headmaster skewered Andrew’s queen and king. The Senior Chess Championship was won by - - - - - - - - - - who has shown, together with - - - - - - - to have an extraordinary passion for chess. They both have begun to compose their own chess puzzles, such as ‘White to play and checkmate in 2 moves’ and frequently challenge me to find the solutions to their creations. A special congratulations to - - - - - - - -

and - - - - - - - - for qualifying all the way to the gigafinals of the UK Chess Challenge. The UK Chess Challenge is a national competition that starts within school chess clubs, after which qualifiers play in tournaments outside of school. These two young boys have shown both tremendous talent and commitment to chess this year. The Most Improved player was - - - - - and the Sportsmanship award goes to - - - - - - - - himself a champion of the school several times, who bravely gave a lecture on the 4 move checkmate at the adults vs parents challenge.

won a match this year against South Bank International School - well done to all the boys! Thanks to the senior management for their continued support, and to David Moss-Marks the Arnold House Chess Master, Charles Keal and Jenny Lyons for dedicating their time to the chess club.  John-Paul Wallace Chess Master

The Junior club is thriving and very competitive! There is both a Monday and a Wednesday club and the boys compete on a ladder. The Junior teams have begun competiting at inter-school level and

Running Club

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he commitment to early morning Running Club is very impressive; on a cold, grey morning when the staff might be tempted to stay indoors, the mass of boys from Years 3 & 4 on the forecourt are always eager to get us going! We go running round St John’s Wood for half an hour, no mean feat before the school day has even started, and Mr Arghebant’s detailed knowledge of 32

the local area has provided the boys with a variety of running routes. Each session is rounded off with a sprint finish where the boys race in twos back to the school gate, dodging the sleepy latecomers. It has been wonderful to see how the boys’ fitness levels have improved over the year; by the end of the summer term Mr Harahap

even had to step in to keep a faster group challenged. Well-behaved and enthusiastic, the boys give a fantastic representation of the school to our neighbours and we’d like to commend them for their consistent dedication. Deborah Sedler Running Club


SCHOOL NEWS

Activities Circuit Training Club

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fter rebranding at the start of the year, Circuit Training Club has taken over the mantle from the running club in the afternoons, with boys taking part in a complete fitness regime on the playground. From squat thrusts to sit ups, crunches and

more unconventional exercises, the boys have been fantastic. It was made very clear from the start of the programme that it was about self improvement and that boys should push themselves as much as they could. Made up of a mix between Years 3

and 4, the dedication and improvements the boys have made over the course of this year has been very impressive. Thank you to Madame Stones for her commitment throughout the year! Edward Arghebant Teacher in charge of Circuit Training

sessions, however, are completely unrelated to bugs, depending on the interesting specimens brought in to school by the boys. A pair of frogs conveniently deposited themselves on - - - - - - - - - driveway in time for one of our Friday sessions. When - - - - - - - brought in Sammy the stag beetle, whom we kept safely in the Prep Room, we were then unable to look at Sammy due to the door being jammed by a fallen speed ramp. The excitement of working out how to open the door took up the entire session, with the Bursar becoming our hero by breaking the door down! Two snails were raced against each other, the smaller one representing Years 3 & 4 and the larger one our Years 5 & 6 helpers. The race elicited yells of delight by the boys, only matched in decibels by Miss Konya’s screams on her surprise introduction to a giant millipede. Whilst the definition of a bug is an insect that has sucking parts, I think that we can get away with the title because it was started by Year 2 bugging me on a daily basis!

for his genetic predisposition for inventing things and - - - - - for being our resident entomologist.

Bug Club

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suspect that Bug Club has been running in one guise or another ever since Miss Hanson first opened the doors of Arnold House in 1905. What self respecting young boy is not fascinated by an ant nest, a caterpillar or a huge spider? When I first came to Arnold House my Year 8 lessons just before lunch coincided with the Year 2 lunch break, and these were often interrupted by “emergencies”. These took the form of a ladybird’s wing needing to be looked at under a microscope, or a hand lens being required to observe a spider. Leading these expeditions was the intrepid explorer - - - - - - - accompanied by - - - - - and - - - - - The group seemed to increase in size on a daily basis and despite our efforts to avert them by leaving equipment they might need outside the lab, they always managed to sneak into our lessons. Luckily the Year 8 boys were more adept at deflecting their attention than I was, and whilst we got on with the business of tackling CE, the Year 2 boys were sat on the side benches producing intricate drawings of insects. So, Bug Club was started to satisfy the entomological needs of Years 3 & 4. Some

.......and of course a big vote of thanks goes to Miss Konya who will miss the weekly delights of Bug Club as she goes off to teach, and undoubtedly, to start a Bug Club of her own. Jenny Lyons Head of Science

Whilst it would take too long to mention all our numerous Years 5 & 6 helpers, - - - - deserves a special mention for his stoic attempts to organise me, - - - - - - - -

Photography Club

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here appears to be a real passion for taking photographs in Years 5 & 6. Photography club met on Wednesday lunchtimes. Each week we explored

a different technique or aspect of photography such as the rule of thirds, composition of a photograph and macro photography, before going out to take

some photos using those ideas. Andrew Turpie Teacher in charge of Photography Club

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SCHOOL NEWS

Compass Course

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ell done to all the boys who have participated so enthusiastically in the Compass Course this year. They have worked incredibly well together and produced some amazing work!

In Year 5 we started the Compass Course and had 3 lessons a week together on one afternoon throughout Years 5 & 6. In the lessons we used a range of software and we have become very confident with use of ICT.

Congratulations to the boys who so confidently represented Water for Africa in our charity presentations: - - - - - - (6F), - - - - - - - - - - (6S), - - - - - (6S) and - - - - - - - - (6S). Water for Africa becomes the School’s new international charity for this coming year. Rekha Ruda Acting Head of Compass

The subjects that we’ve been doing are Global Hazards, EU States, Art Movements, Book Genres, Heroes and Heroines, Energy Sources, World Religions and Charities. We also wrote our own Creation Story play scripts, performed in a Drama presentation and experimented with animation!

Global hazards, drama performances, world religions, art movements, charities...what do these have in common? The amazing Compass Course! We started in Year 5 by doing presentations on global hazards. ( - - - I did tsunamis and I found it really fun and interesting, especially the facts about the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. ( - - - I did global warming and found out that it is causing the Earth to heat up. I learnt that global warming is caused by the rising amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Also in Year 5, we did art movements. ( - - - I did Post Impressionism. It contained lots of greats like Matisse and Van Gogh and I really liked the brush strokes.

Our favourite topic was Creation Stories, where we were in a pair and wrote a play script about the Maori creation story. We also did a drama play which was euphoric and fun. The play was called ‘A History of The World (Abridged)’ and it was a comedy about travelling through time; it was enjoyed by all. Every week we look forward to Compass. We love Compass because it gives us the chance to research topics, work in a group (off a sports field!) and present our work to each other. We’ll really, really miss it! ----- ---- &-- -----(Year 6) Our second Year 5 project was about EU states. For this project we used Publisher to create a brochure about different members of the EU. The finished products were printed and given to the boys. A Year 6 project that we did was to create a web site in publisher about different world religions. To do this we had to research the religion and put that information into our web site. Once we had finished all the pages we had to insert hyperlinks. At the end of this topic everyone had a look at each others’ websites and marked them. By - - - - - - - & - - - - - - - (Year 6)

( - - - I was fascinated by pop art. My picture of a barking dog was a version of one of - - - - - - - pictures. I enjoyed making my painting on Dazzle. - - - - - & - - - - - - (Year 5)

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When we did the animations project it was really great fun! We all started off by creating a walking animation using the Pivot Stickfigure Animator program. We were able to move the stick men around by clicking and

dragging the different parts of the bodies around in each frame.

Many of the walking animations revealed that we were not the best animators in the world! Half of them looked as if they were zombie walking and the other half looked as though they were break dancing; some serious animator advice was needed. When we were all in need of direction, the mighty - - - - - - stepped in and helped us get our stick figures back up onto their feet. He showed us the real, professional way of mastering the tricky and difficult stick animation program. The animations project produced some wacky animations, some of which were shown at the compass presentation afternoon. - - - - - - - - - & - - - - - - (Year 6) The best part of the entire Compass Course was our play. This happened in the spring term of Year 6. Each person had at least one part that they had to act in this play. The title of the play was: ‘A Complete History of the World (Abridged)’. It was based on different times of the world, from a long time ago to the modern world, for example, the Vikings and the Greeks. ( - - - - I had one of the main parts in the play. I was called Old Father Time and told the whole story of the play, like the narrator. ( - - - I was Petron in the Greeks and I was dumb and I knew nothing in class! - - - - - - & - - - - - - - - (Year 6)


SCHOOL NEWS

Learning Support

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eflecting on the last year, the Learning Support Department has continued to strengthen and develop, and several new members have been welcomed to the team - including myself! A qualified Speech and Language Therapist, I had been a member of the department since September and took over the role of Head of Learning Support in January, following Kate Coveney’s departure to the USA. For a boy at Arnold House School, learning support may come from a number of sources. One to one sessions with myself; classroom, small group and individual support delivered by our dedicated Teaching Assistant team in the Pre Prep and Junior School; and in the Upper School additional in-class English and Maths support. We are very proud to also offer individual Speech and Language Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Literacy Support sessions within school. Ensuring good communication between the Learning Support department and home is essential for maximising the effectiveness of the varied support we provide. Therefore, this year I have introduced Home/School Books for all boys receiving one to one sessions. So far these

have been a great success and the scheme will continue to develop next year, with a view to an online version in the future. This year the superb Speech and Language therapist Juliet Clement has continued to work with boys two days a week. However, shortly after Christmas we reluctantly wished good bye to Dyslexia teacher Jennifer Donovan, due to increasing PhD commitments. Through Jennifer’s recommendation, we were able quickly to appoint experienced specialist teacher Julianne Miller, who has been delivering highly structured and targeted reading, spelling and writing programmes since March. Reflective of the progressive nature of the department, we have also welcomed a new Occupational Therapy team comprising Melanne Randall and Alice Kovacs from the fantastic Maximum Potential clinic. Currently in school one day per week, they deliver highly stimulating physical therapy sessions which are of fantastic benefit for boys with a wide range of motor difficulties, sensory integration disorders, memory and organisational issues. Involving skateboards and trampolines sessions have been an instant hit and we look forward to the

instalment of a range of specialist swings in the new academic year... Our core ethos of delivering a differentiated curriculum to best suit the learning needs of every boy could not succeed without the skilful support of the Teaching Assistant team. Mrs Matthews (nee Kettlewell), Mrs Struzik Mazur and Mrs Denes continue to provide invaluable support across the Pre Prep and Y4 but sadly at the end of term we will be losing Miss Farmer (Y1 and Art) and Miss Konya (Y3). Never seen without their smiles, they have our best wishes as they embark on their PGCEs. In their respective roles we will be welcoming to the school Miss Bisdee and to the teaching staff, Miss Sedler. I have thoroughly enjoyed my first year at Arnold House and look forward to returning in September. I have every confidence that the Learning Support department, with the ongoing support of both staff and parents, will continue to flourish, ensuring that every boy is given the opportunity to realise their full potential. Victoria Hall Head of Learning Support

Church

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he first and last services of the academic year took place during heavy rain. In September, we celebrated St Michael’s Day by making use for the first time ever of the stunningly beautiful Chapel at the Hospital of St John and Elizabeth for “wet church”. There was only sufficient room for Years 5 to 8 to attend, but those boys who had not been in before were all impressed by the sumptuous interior. It proved a fitting setting for the celebration of our patron saint and Arnold House’s 105 years of existence. At the Armistice Day service at St Cyprian’s Church, we introduced a new part of the ceremony, the blessing of a poppy wreath that would be taken by the Y8 boys on their Battlefields Tour after Common Entrance. The Chapel Choir gave an excellent display of their standards

at the Carol Service, which marked our first visit of the academic year to St John’s Wood Parish Church. There was more water on Ash Wednesday, but this time it was holy water, which Fr Anders used during the service, as a sign of penitence and forgiveness. Some Y8 boys, while happy to be cleansed from their sins (I’m sure they have some), did worry about their hairstyles being spoilt though! We remembered Prince William and the then Miss Catherine Middleton in prayers at the church service held the day before the Royal Wedding at the end of April. Because neither festival fell in term time, there were no services for St George’s Day or Ascension Day. The latter was replaced by a service to mark the 70th Anniversary of the end of the London Blitz (coinciding with a week of events at School).

The Leavers’ Service, on the last day of the Summer Term, was a day of deluge. We can’t have a “wet church” option at the end of term because boys are collected from the church, so we had to walk down in the rain. Some boys were drenched, but this did not dampen the great sense of occasion at this moving service. Wonderful singing and emotional farewells among the leaving boys showed that time honoured events such as this are a central part of Arnold House’s ethos – no one is expecting boys of other faiths to give up their traditions or beliefs, but we all have a common shared century’s long experience based on the School’s Anglican foundation in this round of services held year on year. John Hill Deputy Headmaster

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SCHOOL NEWS

Charity

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e have had another very successful year raising money for the various charities that Arnold House supports. What has been especially pleasing is that the boys have given so much of their time and effort to the charities, in addition to taking part in the termly Charity Days. The boys nominated ‘Hope and Homes for Children’ as the School’s international charity this year and two themed Charity Days took place to raise money for this worthy cause. The first was a Wild West themed day in October. Dressed as cowboys and indians,

--- ----- --- --- ---- --and - - - - - - delivered their winning Compass course presentation about the charity to the parents and staff attending the Pre-Prep Autumn Concert. - - - - - also decided to have some ‘Hope and Homes’ wristbands specially made to sell at

the School Office, a rather thoughtful and inspiring idea from a Year 6 boy. In May, the Cowboys and Indians transformed into pilots and evacuees in time for our WWII Day, an event to round off the History week to commemorate the end of the Blitz in 1941. The Parents’ Association also supported ‘Hope and Homes for Children’ with a generous donation of £3,000 raised from the boys’ stalls at the Christmas Bazaar. In addition to ‘Hope and Homes for Children’, the School continued to support the St John’s Hospice with a Royalty-themed Charity Day, the sale of SJH Christmas toys and a number of church collections. Mr Paul Swinden (Director of Music) and the Chapel Choir held a wonderful concert in the chapel at St John’s and St Elizabeth’s

hospital and Kate Rawlinson (Head of Art & Design) completed a tiling project with Year 8 who designed and made ceramic tiles which will be displayed in the Hospice garden for all to enjoy. As in previous years, the boys participated in the annual Christmas Box Appeal for Fr Rob Wickham’s parish in Hackney (with a few last minute boxes being hand-delivered in the December snow!) and continued to support the Poppy Appeal and Lifeboat Institution. It has been a fantastic year, with a huge amount of imagination and generosity shown by the boys, parents and staff; we look forward to building on this energetic approach to all our charitable work next year and in the years to come. Deborah Sedler Charity Officer Donations 2009-2010 Hope & Homes for Children

£7,804.65

St John’s Hospice

£3,555.63

National Charities

£742.30

GRAND TOTAL

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£12,102.58


SCHOOL NEWS

Prize Giving

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e were honoured with two excellent speakers at this year’s events, both, in their own way, known to the School. Mr Mark Maddocks, our departing Head of Classics and Director of Studies, was known to everyone, of course, as he spoke to Years 1 to 4. His speech was a charming and personal account of how Arnold House produces both kind and clever boys. He amused us with his anecdotes of the wit, wisdom and charm of the older boys he has taught over the past few years and then urged his young audience to take this example as a guide for when they are in the Senior School at Arnold House. The Senior boys themselves heard Colonel Mark Cook, the founder of Hope and Homes for Children, who had spoken on this occasion several years ago and was remembered by some boys and some staff. He spoke with elegance and eloquence about the work of his charity (which the School has been supporting this year) and said that everything he and his fellow charity workers did was based on the most simple of principles – loving and being loved. He told us about his time as an officer in the Gurkha Regiment and how his experiences of war made him a warrior for peace. He did however bring along a Gurkha knife, called a “kukri”, which provided some fascination. More relevant to the message of the talk was the presentation to Col Cooke by the charity boys of a cheque for £7,804.65 that the School raised this year for his charity. John Hill First Deputy Headmaster

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SCHOOL NEWS

Prize Winners Prize Winners Junior School Prize Giving Years 1 & 2 Individual certificates

Form Prizes: For Effort, Attitude and Contribution to the Group 3J --- ---- -- ---- -- --3L --- --- --- ---- -- ---4B -- -----4C --- ----- --- ---Individual Awards in Year 4 Year 4 Progress Prize

Book Prize

Mathematics

Prosser Cup

English

Parents’ Cup

Science

Southward Cup

French History Geography Religious Studies Art ICT

Pratt Cup Viney Cup Arnold House Cup El-Khazen Cup Oakley Cup Balcombe Cup

---- ------- -------- ---- ------------------ ---- ------ ----- --------- ------- ----

Senior School Prize Giving

Drama Arts Festival Humanities Library Chess Music Class Music Instrumental Sport PE Gymnastics Football Rugby Cricket Athletics All-Round Sportsman Ju Jitsu All-Rounder Year 3

Lynn Cup Crichlow Cup Laughton Scott Cup Book Prize Book Prize

-- ----- ------ ------ ------- ---

Baker Duly Cup Cuthbertson Cup

-- ------- ---

Games Bowl Clogg Cup Gibbs Cup Pritchard Cup Ackner Cup Fisher Challenge Cup Kingsley Cup Book Prize

---- -------- --- ---- ---- ----- --------- ------- -----

Levy Cup

Year 4

Young Cup

-- ----- ---- -------

’42 Club Prize winners Years 1 & 2 Huish Cup Years 3 & 4 Cooper Cup

French

Davis Cup

Latin

Rose Cup

History

Lass Cup

For Effort, Attitude and Contribution to the Group

Geography

Book Prize

5B

Religious Studies

Book Prize

ICT

Book Prize

Art & Design

Ralphs Cup

Compass

Fenton Cup

Music

Book Prize

Drama

Book Prize

Form Prizes:

5G 6F 6S 7M 7MM

-- ---- --- ---- --- ----- - --- ------ ---- --- ------ ---- -------- --- --- ------- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---

Subject Prizes (for Y6) Maths English Science

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Whittaker Cup Lass Grandfather’s Plate Roques Cup

Library

Book Prize

---- ----

Sport

Book Prize

----- ----

‘42 Club Prize Winner

---- --

Years 5 & 6

----- ---

--- ---- ------

-- ----- -------- ----- ------ ------ ---- ----- ------ ---- -------- ---- ------


SCHOOL NEWS

Prize Winners Prize List: Year 8 Edge Cup Baker Cup Classics Prize - - - - - - - - Howard Cup (City of London) McWatters Cup - - - - - - - - - Drage Award (Mill Hill) Braithwaite Cup Medawar Cup Forbes Trophy -- ----(Eton) Griffiths Cup Bagnall Cup Book Prize -- ---(Bradfield) Atkin Cup Cargill Bowl (joint) Cemlyn-Jones Cup ---- --(City of London) Tregarneth Cup Boyton Cup Sanders Cup -- --(Highgate) Birch Cup Book Tokens --- -(UCS) Jazz Cup Book Prize --- -(The Harrodian) Lorenz Cup Book Prize -- -(City of London) Sellar Cup Gluckstein Cup --- ---(St Paul’s) Pappin Cup May Berkery Cup Philips & Lester Cup -- --(Mill Hill) Book Prize - - - - - - - - Broderick Cup (St Paul’s) Kate Davis Cup Castello Cup - - - - - - - - Book Prize (Portland Place) Low Life Cup

--- ---

(Rugby)

Latin Verse Speaking Rugby School Classics Academic Progress ICT Academic Excellence Rugby Classics English Cricket Contribution to sport Design Tennis Head Boy English French Graphic Design Comitas et Industria French The ‘42 Club Jazz 8H Form Prize Football Academic Progress Piano Geography History Woodwind Hockey Religious Studies Head Chorister Musical Excellence Latin 8K Form Prize Drama

-- ----

(Highgate)

--------

Sugarman Cup Book Prize Woolf Cup Book Prize

Contribution to music Religious Studies Science 8H Form Prize

Beswick Cup Thompson Gibbons Prize Shrimpton Cup Book Prize Andrew Reid Cup Nerdrum Cup Williamson Noble Cup Cargill Bowl (joint) Book Prize Richard Norris Cup Wheeler Cup Robinson Cup Beckman Cup Book Prize Raingold Cup Crown Cup Elton Cup Tooth Cup Winser Cup

Science Brass

(Eton)

--- ---

(St Paul’s)

--- ---

(Eton)

-- ---

(Highgate)

-- ----

(Highgate)

---- ---

(Rugby)

---- ---

(Bradfield)

--- ---

(Bradfield)

---- ----

(Winchester)

Maths Strings Greek Academic Progress Rugby Head Boy Academic Progress Maths Geography fieldwork ICT All-round sportsman 8K Form Prize History Excellence in sport Art Greek Drama

Head Boys for 2011 - 2012

---- -------& ---- ----

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SCHOOL NEWS

House Competition

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he House competition continues to be an exciting part of the School year. The boys’ industry and citizenship grades are added together and at the end of each

term the Houses are issued with points according to their position. The four Houses are also awarded points for the House sports events held each term. Congratulations

to the winners Brunel who are the proud custodians of the House Cup, which continues to be displayed in House Corner.

House Positions at end of Summer Term Position for Industry and Citizenship

Football House Matches

Accumulated Total

Autumn Term

Autumn Term

Autumn Term

1st

Brunel

8 points

1st

Nelson

4 points

1st

Brunel

9 points

2nd

Wellington

6 points

2nd

Wellington

3 points

2nd

Wellington

9 points

3rd

Nelson

4 points

3rd

Pitt

2 points

3rd

Nelson

8 points

4th

Pitt

2 points

4th

Brunel

1 points

4th

Pitt

4 points

Position for Industry and Citizenship

Rugby, Hockey, Table Tennis, X-country

Accumulated Total

Spring Term

Spring Term

Spring Term

1st

Brunel

8 points

1st

Pitt

4 points

1st

Brunel

20 points

2nd

Nelson

7 points

2nd

Brunel

3 points

2nd

Wellington

17 points

3rd

Wellington

6 points

3rd

Wellington

2 points

3rd

Nelson

16 points

4th

Pitt

5 points

4th

Nelson

1 points

4th

Pitt

13 points

Position for Industry and Citizenship Summer Term

House Athletics Championship, Tennis & Cricket House matches Summer Term

1st

Brunel

8 points

2nd

Nelson

6 points

3rd

Wellington

4 points

4th

Pitt

2 points

1st

Nelson

4 points

2nd

Wellington

3 points

3rd

Brunel

2 points

4th

Pitt

1 points

Accumulated Total Summer Term 1st

Brunel

31 points

2nd

Nelson

30 points

3rd

Wellington

26 points

4th

Pitt

19 points

Sports Day 1st

Nelson

4 points

2nd

Pitt

3 points

3rd

Wellington

2 points

4th

Brunel

1 points

House Captains and Vice-captains 2010 - 2011 Captain

Vice-Captain

Brunel

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Nelson

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Pitt

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Wellington

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SCHOOL NEWS

Outstanding Achievement

B

oys throughout the School are awarded achievement grades in their interim (halfterm) and progress reports (end of term) in all subjects: English, Maths, Science, Latin (Year 5 upwards), Greek (Years 7 & 8), French,

History, Geography, Religious Studies, ICT, Music, Art & Design, Drama, Compass (Years 5 & 6) and Physical Education. We hope that each boy will make consistent progress during the year and be performing

3 ‘A’ Grades

5 ‘A’ Grades

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Year 7

6 or more ‘A’ Grades

4 ‘A’ Grades ----------------------------------------------------------

(Number of Grades in brackets)

Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 4 Year 4 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 6 Year 6 Year 7

- - - - (7) - - - - - - - - (6) - - - - - - (7) - - - - (7) - - - - - - - (10) - - - - - - - 8) - - - - - (13) - - - - - (7) - - - - (6) - - - - - - - - - - (11) - - - - - - - - - (6) - - - - - - - - (7) - - - - - - - - (8)

Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 4

at his best by the end of the summer term. The following boys in Years 3 to 7 were awarded 3 or more ‘A’ grades for Outstanding Achievement in their end of year reports and are to be highly commended.

- - - - - (6) - - - - - (9) - - - - - (7) - - - - - (9) - - - - - (11) - - - - (11) - - - - - - (9) - - - (6) - - - - - - - (7) - - - - (6) - - - - - (8) - - - - - - - (7) - - - - - (11) - - - - - (8) - - - - - (10) - - - - (6) - - - - (7) - - - - (9) - - - - - (10) - - - - (6) - - - - - (7) - - - - - (10) - - - - - (6) - - - - - (9) - - - - (6) - - - - - - - - (13) - - - - - (8) - - - - (7) - - - - (9)

Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 5 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 6 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7 Year 7

Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 4 Year 4

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JUNIOR SCHOOL

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3

JUNI ORS Junior School


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 1 Trips & Activities

Year 1 DAY TRIPS

30th September - ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ at the Little Angel Theatre 4th March - Geffrye Museum 20th May - National Gallery

CANONS PARK DAYS

16th May & 27th June - Cricket Days

Geffrye Museum On Friday 4th March, Year 1 went to the Geffrye museum. First we went to the Browns room. We were told a story about a mouse and got to do drawings about the story. Next we went to the Victorian room.

learning about Van Gogh. The boys had a fantastic time, here are some of their thoughts: “I liked looking at the picture of the sunflowers by Vincent Van Gogh” “I had fun learning to pronounce Van Gogh the Dutch way” “Our class liked comparing landscapes and still-life paintings” “I enjoyed the story about Venus and Paris and the competition of the goddesses”

Materials Workshop In the autumn term the boys had a workshop on materials and learnt that materials come from rocks, plants, animals and oil. Here are some of the highlights: “I liked it when - - - - was Rock Man and - - roared as Animal Man.” “I enjoyed feeling the snakeskin, it did not feel like I expected.” “ - was the fire and melted the ice cube. We made the molecules move further away as the ice cube melted.”

The boys had a lovely time and would like to thank all the mummies who came on the trip. Kate Badenoch 1M Form Teacher

“ - - - - and - - were in the rock band, their instruments were made out of metal and - - - - was funny blowing his horn.”

It had lots of patterns in it and was very comfortable. It had two candles around

“ - - - wore a plastic wig and had his face distorted looking through plastic. He was very funny. We had to answer questions and earn points for our team. At the end both teams earned the same points.” Year 1 boys

the piano. Last we went to the Modern room, it looked like a room in my house. My favourite bit was how that room had the bedroom on top of the kitchen, where I could sneak down to get food.

--- --National Gallery On Friday 20th May Year 1 went on a trip to the National Gallery because they were 44

Year 1 Nativity Play


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 2 Trips & Activities

Year 2

were powered by electricity. The conductor of the tram held a wooden stick that connected the electricity to the tram. A lady called Claire brought us through a time

DAY TRIPS

30th September - ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ at the Little Angel Theatre 28th February - St Paul’s Cathedral 12th May - London Transport Museum

CANONS PARK DAYS

5th November - Victorian Day 16th May & 27th June - Cricket Days

Victorian Day On 5th November we went to Canons Park for Victorian Day. Mrs Brain showed us around a Victorian house and showed us

St Paul’s Cathedral On Monday 28th February, Year 2 visited St Paul’s Cathedral as part of their project about The Great Fire of London. The boys were able to discover how Sir Christopher Wren was given the job of designing the splendid masterpiece that is today’s Cathedral. We walked around the building and visited The Crypt and Cathedral floor

machine and gave us tickets to the past. We saw people digging huge tunnels for the trains. They had to work for 10 hours a day

looking at some of the amazing statues that survived the Great Fire. There was also a model of the old Cathedral – the one that Londoners saw go up in smoke! The boys also had the chance to sit below the great Dome and lie down in the Quire to see the amazing mosaic designs on the ceiling. Susie Dart 2D Form Teacher

and they only earned 12p. My favourite part was the gift shop. It was my favourite part because we got to buy things and look at some cars and buses they did not have in the exhibition. At 2pm we left the museum and got back to school at 3pm. That was the end of our trip!

jobs that people did in Victorian times. My favourite part was when I did the ironing in the laundry room. I had to pretend to put the iron next to the fire to make the bottom of it hot so it would make the clothes flat. Mr Martin taught us how they did PE in

Victorian times. He shouted out numbers and we had to obey instructions. We also learnt about how to play with Victorian toys.

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London Transport Museum On 12th May, we went to the London Transport Museum. We left at 9am and got there at 10am. A nice lady told us the museum rules. In the museum we saw horse drawn carriages, old and new buses, old and new tubes and trams. The trams 45


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 3 Trips & Activities

Year 3 DAY TRIPS

21st October - London Zoo 13th January - ‘George’s Marvellous Medicine’ at the Bloomsbury Theatre 9th June - Science Museum

London Zoo One exceedingly chilly morning in October, Year 3 set off for their day at the zoo. We bundled the boys up enthusiastically in fleeces, hats, gloves and scarves until they looked like a convention of Michelin men, and all was fine until we realised that our first destination of the day was the extremely hot and humid Clore Rainforest Lookout! Oh well…everyone disrobed and took part in a fascinating session about animal adaptations in the desert and rainforest presented by one of the Education team. Once again it was an enormously successful trip; everyone was delighted by the baby meerkats, entertained by the cheeky monkeys in the rainforest (animals, not boys!) and fascinated (or was that terrified Mr Arghebant and Miss Jones) in the BUGS zone. The boys were a delight to be with – a real credit to their school. Thanks must go to our parent helpers on the day, Mrs Boateng and Mrs Widdowson. Lizzie Jones 3J Form Teacher Ancient Egypt Theatre Group Visit On Friday 26th November a visiting theatre group gave Year 3 a presentation on Ancient Egypt. The boys share their experience below: “We had to complete challenges about the landscape, how people lived and when it happened. The challenges were hard – we didn’t succeed! The person who led us through was called Daphne. There was also a tomb guardian. The challenges were fun because History is my favourite subject!”

-- --46


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 3 Trips & Activities “We had to successfully complete the challenge so the curse would be gone forever!”

---- --“We were the assistants of Daphne the explorer. We had to complete the challenges of Mentuhotep’s tomb. I liked the challenge when we had to make a landscape of Egypt, because the guardian was really funny.”

-- --“I enjoyed when the time line went around the whole circle and we put cards on the timeline to show when things happened.”

-- ---“I liked the bit when they showed us canopic jars. I took part when we were making the Valley of the Kings.”

---- ----George’s Marvellous Medicine When George gets bossed by his granny he doesn’t just stand there, he does something about it. So at, 10.05, 55 minutes before Granny takes her medicine, George looks for things to mix up to make granny a new batch of medicine. But when he gives it

to granny, Dad is proud. However Mum is annoyed and Granny gets gigantic! His Dad asks him what he put in the medicine. Dad goes to the shops, they make some more medicine and sell it to farmers to make their animals grow. All of Year 3 went to see ‘George’s Marvellous Medicine’ with Mrs Baker, Miss Jones, Mrs Lovell and Mr Odlin. We took the tube and had a packed lunch. The play was the same as the book we had studied by Roald Dahl. Having reviewed this play at Bloomsbury Theatre, I give it a 4 stars out of 5. It is one of the most imaginative plays that I have seen. It is a mad story but has in it a good lesson in life that we can always make things better ourselves. There is always a medicine for every problem. Maybe things can be a bit calmer. Another title for the play could be: ‘Be active. Don’t cry!’

---- ----Science Museum The Science Museum trip is the day the Year 3’s look forward to the most all year! The boys have always come back from the trip extremely happy after a day full of fantastic activities. Of course, this year was

no exception. First up was the chance to see Wild Ocean in 3D on the huge IMAX screen! When the boys weren’t trying to catch all of the fish that were swimming out from the screen, they learnt about nature’s annual migration, which is described as an underwater feeding frenzy where whales, sharks, dolphins, seals, gannets and billions of fish meet, along with mankind. After that, the boys then spent some time in the famous “Launchpad”. Here, everyone had the opportunity to try different experiments, and to see how they could be used in everyday life. Highlights included hearing music through our teeth, trying to complete electrical circuits and attempting to build the Wembley arch with bricks! That wasn’t the end of the excitement either. The boys then went to see a show which taught them what three things are needed to make cool explosions (don’t worry; they won’t try them at home!). One boy even had a chance to go on stage and fire a Barbie doll out of a cannon! All the boys (and teachers!) had a fantastic day out and will be very jealous when next year’s Year 3 boys go on the trip. Nick Odlin Teaching Assistant

47


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 4 Trips & Activities

Year 4 DAY TRIPS

7th October - Verulamium 10th March - West Stow es 23rd June - The Wetlands Centre, Barn

Verulamium On Thursday 7th October Year 4 went to the Veralamium museum (in St Albans) for our Roman trip. We left school at about 9:00 a.m. The journey to St Albans took about two hours. We entered the museum and left our belongings in the changing room. Then we went upstairs to look at some mosaics. Some of my classmates took photos of us all standing in front of them. Then one of the teachers gathered everyone up to go and see some Roman artefacts. The artefacts were on four tables in a brightly lit room. We were split into four groups – one table each. The first table was the “kitchen table”. We were given some of the artefacts (a saucepan and a stove) and asked to guess what they were. And guess what we came up with? Yes. We masterminds said “a saucepan and a stove” so I put my hand up to tell the teacher. The next table that we went to was the “liquid table”. Now we were asked to guess what type of liquid was usually buried with a wealthy Roman. I pointed out an amphora of liquid with what looked like some salt sprinkled on the top. We discussed what it might be and guessed that it was probably wine. And we were right. Our teacher was very impressed as the group before hadn’t got it! Next came the “clothes table” where we had to label all the clothes, which was easy, and, finally, the “building table”. There was a chipped brick, a round brick even a brick with the paw print of a dog on it! Then it was time to have a snack.

48

Afterwards we went to a different building and examined a large mosaic taken from the ruins of a Roman villa nearby. It was a picture of a table with different types of food on it, all done in yellow, brown and red tiles. After lunch we saw a film in the museum about how the Romans made mosaics and used them to decorate their houses, which was very interesting. Finally, we all went to the gift shop where I bought a replica Roman coin with the head of Caius Julius Caesar on it. The original may have been minted to commemorate Caesar’s successful invasion of Britain in 54 BC. Then it was time to go back to London and we arrived back at school around 4.00 p.m. after a tiring but very interesting and enjoyable day.

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West Stow On the 10th March, Year 4 went on a trip to West Stow. When we first arrived, we went to a building, where, strangely, there were hens running around everywhere… We then went to see the Anglo-Saxon museum. Most of the objects on display were made from broken pieces that had been discovered and then glued together by archaeologists. There were some objects that we could try on such as a war helmet (it stank inside!) and some old clothes (that were much too big for me!). My favourite piece was a comb because the teeth were so thin and delicate, and the comb was full of beautiful carved decorations. Afterwards, we watched a video showing how archaeologists had reconstructed the Anglo-Saxon village from local clues. The village consisted of around ten houses dotted around a hill. The houses were made


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Year 4 Trips & Activities of wooden boards from oak trees that were sometimes placed over a shallow pit. These boards were then placed side-by-side to make a cuboid shape. Each house had a thatched roof with two to six poles holding the roof up. Some houses had rooves going into a pit dug in the ground. There were some special houses such as the hall (for feasting), the weaving house (where clothes were made) and the blacksmith’s workshop. One house even had a ladder leading up to a second floor mezzanine full of pottery. Unfortunately, we were not allowed up there!!! Visiting the village really helped me to understand and visualise how Anglo-Saxons lived a very long time ago.

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The Wetlands Centre On Thursday 23rd June, Year 4 went to the Wetlands Centre in Barnes. All week everybody had been worried that it would rain because the weather had been so awful but luckily, when we woke up that morning, it looked bright and sunny. We left at 9:10am. The journey was only supposed to take half an hour by coach but it took double that time. When we got there we all felt very restless and wanted to have our morning snack! After we had recovered from the journey we set out on a long walk to investigate the place that had many small ponds and lakes. On our way we saw lots of ducks, geese, swans and even some eggs! Then we went to a bird watching tower. There we saw some of the homes for kingfishers. The

kingfishers make little holes in the side of the bank where they lay their eggs. I think this is quite clever because the nests are designed so that no other animals can get in and steal the eggs. When we got back to the main buildings of the Wetlands Centre we went pond dipping. I loved it! We caught some really interesting and unusual animals that I never even knew lived in ponds, for example the Water Scorpion, the Diving Beetle and some Water Boatmen. When we looked at them under a microscope they looked weird and almost scary. After that, we had lunch. Then we went to look at different exhibits in their museum. Finally we went to the Adventure playground where they had great tunnels that you could crawl through. Then it was time to go home. I really enjoyed this visit. It was one of the best school trips I have ever been on!

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Volcanoes and Viking longships

Junior School Leavers --- ------- --------- ------- ------ ---- -------- -49


JUNIOR SCHOOL

Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival

O

nce again the Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival took place in the final week of the spring term. Now into its 4th year, this event is now a firm fixture in the calendar and expectations were high! Preparations began during lessons early in the term and gradually built up to a crescendo during the final days, with rehearsals at Canons Park giving the opportunity to put the whole programme together. On arrival, parents were given the opportunity to admire the boys’ superb art work in the Art exhibition. The performance itself was given a rousing start by Mr Nelson’s African drummers, before continuing with French songs from each year group. Each form performed a poem, all of which were fabulously entertaining, with three soloists also reciting a poem of their choice. - - - - - - rendition of ‘Forgiven’ by A. A. Milne, a tale of a boy, his nanny, a matchbox and a beetle named Alexander deserves special mention. A new feature this year was the dramatic tale of Dr Seuss’s ‘The Lorax’, told in four separate chapters, one by each form – capturing the audience’s imagination and conveying a salient message. The grand finale involved all boys in the year group joining together to sing the tale of ‘Jonah Man Jazz’, an uplifting end to a wonderful evening! I never fail to be amazed by the boys’ commitment and energy on these occasions; throughout rehearsals they were unfailingly enthusiastic and the excitement come the evenings of the performances was wonderful to see. I felt thoroughly proud of the way they joined together to produce such a slick and entertaining show. My very grateful thanks to all involved – both staff and boys. Lizzie Jones Head of Years 3 & 4

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JUNIOR SCHOOL

Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival

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SENIOR SCHOOL

52


4

SEN IORS Senior School


SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 5 Trips & Activities

Year 5 DAY TRIPS

26th November & 11th March Europa Centre 17th March - Outward Bound Day, Redhill, Surrey 11th May - ‘The Tempest’ at the Little

“I loved having the French money and credit card to use to buy things.”

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“I liked going around the village and doing things that you couldn’t do in England!!”

“I think that the mock village of Haricotville looked like France a lot and I enjoyed that; I also liked getting the movie tickets in French – we went to see Harry Potter!”

--- ---“It was funny when I was in the Magasin de Vêtements because I tried on a hat and sunglasses, in the Boucherie I bought a lot of sausages and we all got a discount!”

Angel Theatre 28th June - St Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral

RESIDENTIAL TRIP

“I thought the French Punch and Judy show was cool!”

n

3rd - 6th May - Teamwork Week, Devo

CANONS PARK DAYS

14th October - Religious Studies Day 9th February - Art & Design Day

The Europa Centre On Fri 26th November, Year 5 went to the Europa Centre – the mock French village in Hornchurch. The boys share their experience below: “I really liked trying the French food like croissants, pain au chocolat, crêpes au chocolat and chocolat chaud.”

--- --“It was really cool when we went around the mock French village because the shops looked real : the detail was tremendous!”

---- ---“My favourite shop that we went to was the Epicerie (grocers') because this time we were the shopkeepers and our teachers were the customers!”

--- ---“I really liked the market and the bakery shop.”

---- ---“I loved the food; I had a Madeleine and a crêpe while I watched the puppet show!”

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-- -“I really like that we had to speak in French to the ladies and they had to do the same for the whole trip.”

---- ---“I really liked the bit at the beginning when the French-speaking ladies all described to us which Francophone country they were from in French!”

“The money was real euros and a credit card which was awesome; I felt like a real tourist!!”

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--- ---Little Angel Theatre, The Tempest On Wednesday 11th May, Year 5 went to see ‘The Tempest’ at the Little Angel Theatre, in Islington. It is the oldest puppet theatre in the UK, or maybe even Europe. We saw whole body puppets acting with humans on stage. We left at 8.45am and travelled there by coach. Once inside, we quietly took our seats. The performance started with a ship getting wrecked at sea. It continued with the unravelling of an amazing series of events where we learned how Prospero and his daughter Miranda got shipwrecked on the island themselves and why Prospero has used his powers to cause this shipwreck. We saw Miranda fall in love with a Prince from the stranded ship, the actor actually strangely resembling Prince William! There were some amazing puppets for the characters of Ariel and Caliban (the monster on the island). All of Year 5 loved the Shakespearean play.

-- --“When we went into the clothes shop the person I was with, - - - spent 30 euros! on a crown!!”

--- ---54


SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 5 Trips & Activities Teamwork Week, Devon The Year 5 boys had a very exciting and challenging stay in Devon. We were treated to some fair weather, although it rained on the Wednesday. This didn’t really matter as we donned wet-suits that day for surfing and body-boarding in a bracing Atlantic ocean. Other activities included Jacob’s Ladder, capture the flag, orienteering and kayaking. I was very impressed by the boys’ attitude and determination. They said that they had enjoyed the week and greatly benefitted from the experience.

- - - and - - - - - - - impressed with their map reading skills. All the boys seemed to enjoy the obstacle course and - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - - - - - showed off some cat-like climbing skills. The winning team completed their route in an impressive 9 minutes, which according to the instructor was a very quick time! Key to their victory was their team work; - - - - - and - - - - - - deserve special praise in this respect as they were always on hand to help out the less confident climbers over a variety of daunting obstacles.

Many thanks to Mr Gleeson, Mrs Baker and Mr Lester who looked after the boys so well during the week. Sebastian Stones Head of Geography

It was a pleasure to accompany the boys on the trip and I was later sent a very complimentary email from the chief instructor which praised the behaviour and application of the group. Thanks also to Mr Bagnall for some excellent driving and to Josh Wint. Man of the trip - - - - - - a real ‘Crocodile Dundee’ in the making! Chris Kerr Head of Years 5 & 6

Outward Bound Day in Surrey On 17th March the boys in Year 5 had a really enjoyable Team Building Day in Redhill. The activities seemed to be lifted straight from the pages of ‘The Dangerous Book for Boys’ and included such important skills as using catapults, building camp fires, filtering and boiling pond water, map reading and manoeuvring around an obstacle course. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - proved themselves to be nifty shots with the catapult. - - - - - - and - - - - - - were the best ‘fire starters’.

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 5 Trips & Activities St Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral On Tuesday the 28th June Year 5 were taken on a trip to see St Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Bayswater. After a very quick bus ride (or taxi for some!) we were seated in the amazing surroundings and given an introductory lecture by the very knowledgeable Fr Theonas, who then proceeded to take 10 minutes of questions from the boys. He was very impressed with the boys’ existing knowledge and the relevant questions that they asked.

Religious Studies Day As part of the Religious Studies syllabus section on world religions, Years 5 & 6 spent a morning at Canons Park watching the Tara Arts company perform ‘When the Lights Went Out’. This performance tells the story of the Hindu festival of Divali, which celebrates the victory of good over evil. It is a festival of light, driving out darkness. In different parts of India, there are different traditions about the origins and significance of Divali. "When the Lights Went Out" explores the story of Sita and Rama and the ten-headed demon Ravana. The lights are lit to welcome Rama and Sita back to the city of Ayodhya. The boys enjoyed this colourful and vibrant performance and some even got up on stage to get involved. Andrew Turpie Head of Religious Studies 56

Following on from this we were shown around the Cathedral with the help of Mr and Mrs Fafalios, who were able to give us a lot of detailed information, as well as doing a great job of translating! After a final few words and a blessing from the priest, we were allowed to light a candle, say a prayer and be on our way.

Many thanks to Mr and Mrs Fafalios, Mr Hill and Fr Theonas for taking the time to help organise the trip and to be so generous with their time with the boys Edward Arghebant General Subjects Teacher

Art Day On Wednesday 9th February we went to Canons Park for a day of fun Art. An artist called Russell came to help us with our work, it was great! I really enjoyed the artist’s talk about various other artists’ paintings and how they used all different recycled materials to produce some brilliant pieces of art work. It was a challenge to cut and stick multicoloured pieces of plastic bags on a larger piece of plastic and to make pictures of ordinary objects like pencils or rubbers into extra exciting pieces of work. It really was a great day!

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 6 Trips & Activities

Year 6

The Globe Theatre On 1st December, Year 6 went to the Globe Theatre on Southbank. We were part of a Drama workshop on some of Shakespeare’s plays and we even had the chance to perform on the Globe stage.

DAY TRIPS

1st December - Globe Theatre 25th January - Imperial War Museum 6th June - Cabinet War Rooms & Churchill Museum

RESIDENTIAL TRIP

n

3rd - 6th May - Leadership Week, Devo

CANONS PARK DAYS

14th October - Religious Studies Day 2nd February - Art & Design Day

Art & Design Day On Wednesday 2nd February, Year 6 travelled up to Canons Park to meet the fantasy architect Thomas Hillier. We started off by being shown a presentation on Thomas Hillier and on what he does. We were then taken into the hall where we were given a piece of A3 paper and lots of different types of paper, pictures and glue, scissors, pens and pencils. The theme was circuses. We then started making the base of our house and then we started standing things up. It was amazing what you could do with just paper. After lunch we were given another piece of paper and told to focus on one room of our house and make it in more detail. I focused on my TV room. It was really fun!

We started the day in the entrance area where we had a snack and a lady explained what the day would focus on. We went to a rehearsal room where actors rehearse and the wooden floor had markings that replicated the real Globe stage. We started by doing some walking and silent exercise, then used our body and faces to show a mood or situation. In pairs, we were given an extract from ‘The Tempest’ and we were told to learn the lines. We later moved to the actual Globe stage where each of us performed our scenes. In the afternoon, we had lunch and visited the museum and the shop. The museum had exhibitions about all of Shakespeare’s plays, the history of the Globe Theatre and findings from archaelogical digs at the original Globe site.

Transport for London Presentation In February, Year 6 were given a talk by a representative from Transport for London to advise the boys how they should travel on public transport in our great city. The talk is part of Arnold House’s preparation for the boys to become more proficient when using public transport, because in Year 7 they will be using the tube at least twice a week to travel from St John’s Wood to the School’s playing fields at Canons Park. The boys learnt an array of things such as how they should conduct themselves on public transport and the importance of always being vigilant for suspect packages. The boys certainly found the talk very informative and were keen to ask many questions such as how the Oyster card works and where on the public transportation system you can use it. Being a Londoner myself, I thought I knew everything about our public transport system, but even I learnt many a new thing! David Cox History

Overall, it was a great trip and we all thoroughly enjoyed it.

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 6 Trips & Activities Leadership week, Devon The Year 6 boys really stepped up to the mark during the Leadership week in Devon and passed with flying colours. - - - - for example, managed to cycle all the way to the top on the ‘Hill Challenge’ – a very steep, narrow and rough country lane that got the better of me after about 10 metres. The view from the top of the hill almost made the toil of climbing it worthwhile. Wild ponies roam free on Dartmoor although they fled from the site of a peloton of helmet-clad Arnold House cyclists careering towards them. The Atlantic Ocean proved to be as cold as ever, but all the boys either surfed or body-boarded and had to be persuaded to leave the waves. As well as taking part in all the physical challenges and tasks requiring teamwork, cooperation and strategic thinking, the boys proved to be supportive of each other and helpful. They were always willing to do their meal-time duties, setting the tables and clearing-up afterwards and often volunteered to help. They were cheerful and good company. Thanks to Madame Stones, Mr Kerr and Mr Thomas who looked after the boys so well and who braved the freezing sea, too. Sebastian Stones Head of Geography

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 6 Trips & Activities History in Year 6 As always, it has been an exciting year for the pupils in Year 6 in their History lessons. The year gives them the chance to learn about the two World Wars. Their study of World War One forms part of a project on important topics they have learnt about. The boys were very fortunate once again to be able to go to both the Imperial War Museum in January and the Cabinet War Rooms in June. The year also saw them have visiting speakers: the godmother of - - - - (5G) whose brother - - - - - is in Year 6, spoke about the role of her great-great-great uncle Captain Smith of the Titanic; we also had the grandparents of - - - - - - - - speaking about life in Czechoslovakia in WW2 and how their family business was affected by the war. The study of these two fascinating topics gives the boys an opportunity to research family members they have who were involved in either conflict. They then give a presentation to their peers and I was impressed both by their research and by the way they delivered their stories. We heard many fascinating and diverse accounts such as the family member of - - - - - - - (6F) who was given the Victoria Cross in 1918 and is now remembered with a memorial window at

Preston church in Hertfordshire. For many of the boys, they may not have had a family link to either of the World Wars, but they were still able to produce some wonderful presentations of alternative conflicts. - - - - - - - - (6F) spoke passionately about how his grandparents were involved in the Indo-Pakistan War in 1971. It gave the boys of Year 6 an opportunity to learn about other wars that have affected our world. David Cox History Imperial War Museum In January, Year 6 went to the Imperial War Museum with Mr Cox and Mr Harahap. We left School at 9am and travelled by tube to the museum. Once we got there we were put into groups. The display cases in the museum started at different times in World War One. My group started at case 1 which was when the war started. All the cases were different and we have studied many of them in class like Gallipoli, the Battle of Jutland and trench warfare. In many of the display cases there were medals and bombs! There was even a mock up trench which smelt really badly! When it got to 12 noon it was time to head back to school and have our lunch!

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Cabinet War Rooms and Churchill Museum In June as part of their study of World War Two, Year 6 were taken to visit the Cabinet War Rooms and Churchill Museum in central London. The trip gave them an insight into how the country was run during the War. The boys were able to see the rooms that the then Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, was using to make the decisions that would shape our country’s future. A big favourite was visiting the toilet that was actually a room where private phone calls could be made to President Roosevelt. The boys certainly found it interesting that, seventy years previously, the surrounding area was under daily attack during the Blitz. As part of the trip, the boys were able to see some of the sites that were on our screens only a few weeks previously for the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. Many thanks to Ms Silvela, Mrs Hatter, Mrs Tugwell and Miss Anderson for assisting Mr Harahap and me on the trip. David Cox History

Julian Royds Gribble VC (a direct relation of - - - - - - - 6F) 59


SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 7 Trips & Activities

Year 7 DAY TRIP

13th January - Tate Britain

RESIDENTIAL TRIPS

27th - 28th January - Paris 22nd - 23rd June - Geography Trip, Dorset

CANONS PARK DAYS

15th October - Science Day 26th January - Drama Day 18th March - Drama Day

Paris Mon śejour à Paris J’ai pris l’Eurostar pour aller à Paris. Le voyage était rapide. J’ai visité le Stade de France. C’était chouette. J’ai mangé un burger et des frites chez Quick. J’ai bu une limonade. J’ai visité la Tour Eiffel. C’était super mais très haut. J’ai eu un peu peur! J’ai vu la Place de Tertre et Montmartre. J’ai acheté des macarons et des chocolates pour ma mère. C’ètaient un peu cher! Le soir, je suis resté à l’Hôtel Campanile. Je suis allé au Palais de la Découverte. C’etait intéressant. J’ai mangé une crêpe à la Crêperie du Cloutre. C’était bon. Je suis allé au Musée D’Orsay.

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 7 Trips & Activities

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 7 Trips & Activities Tate Britain In January Year 7 went to the Tate Britain to study the Rachel Whiteread exhibition. During the 45 minute coach journey we discussed how amazing it would be. The exhibition was mostly about architecture. There were lots of interesting materials and muted colours, Tipp-Ex and nail varnish, paintings and sketches on different kinds of paper from normal paper to isometric paper, pieces focusing on different architectural features (e.g. doors, tables and chairs) and a mysterious cabinet with objects from skulls to a lemon. During our visit we filled in some question sheets about the exhibition and gave our opinions. My favourite part of the exhibition was the part where Rachel Whiteread focused on floors because the paintings looked complicated but in fact they were very simple. After that we went to the Tate shop and bought some souvenirs before getting back on the coach. We could not have gone on this trip without Miss Rawlinson, Mrs Ruda and Miss Farmer, so thank you!

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existence of a number of souvenir shops and ice cream stands (apparently good for the boys and their mums). Headmaster’s games were on Swanage beach. I was present for the first part, a surprisingly ‘sensible’ game of football/ cricket. - - - - - - - however, whacked the ball into the sea. Only - - - - - - was brave (or daft) enough to run into the waves, fully clothed, in an attempt to save runs. At this point I departed to seek out essential staff provisions to get us through our time in the Youth Hostel. During my increasingly desperate search I received a call from a distraught Mrs Ruda. Mr Thomas had apparently gone mad and had encouraged the boys to play some sort of insane game where they all piled up on top of each other and a ball. It was ‘crazy and wild’ and someone was bound to get hurt. How were we possibly going to get the boys to settle down in the Youth Hostel, let alone sleep? I had to get back at once, I was told, and ‘stop him’. I rushed back at a gentle strolling pace to witness the glorious chaos for myself, only to be bombarded by scientific facts about adrenalin and blood sugar levels and boys becoming over-tired after an optimum point in time. ‘Oh, well’, I said, ‘he is the Headmaster’. Next morning, the boys found it difficult to measure and record the gradient of the beach, left their clip boards open so that all their sheets were blown into the sea and Group 4 thought that the clinometer was ‘one of those wheel things you role along

the floor to measure distance’. At this point I realised that the Head of ICT had been right. They woke up, however, at the spectacular views and precipitous cliifs of Old Harry’s Rock. ‘It’s even better than it is in the textbook’, proclaimed Robert Keith. Music to a Geography teacher’s ears! Sebastian Stones Head of Geography Science Day In October, Year 7 went up to Canons Park with Mrs Lyons and Mr Bagnall, to examine the local flora and fauna. For this, we used a number of instruments. First we used a quadrat, which is a metal square outline, in this case 30 x 30 cms. We placed it randomly on the ground (we did this by throwing it over our shoulder, with only a few injuries) and then counted what we found inside them: how many seedlings, conkers, beetles, types of grass and so on. The pitfall traps had been prepared the day before, so our next task was to see what insects had fallen in. Unfortunately, there were barely any (although I suppose fortunately for the bugs!). Finally we used pooters– a pooter is an instrument used for capturing bugs in a clear plastic jar, with two plastic tubes coming out of the top. You suck one tube while holding the other over the bug, which is then brought into the jar. We caught a couple of ladybirds and beetles (all of which were later released) and didn’t swallow any. Thank you to Mrs Lyons, Mr Bagnall and Mr Martin and Mr Martin Jr.

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 8 Trips & Activities

Year 8

seats for the first two performances - we were on third. The audience filed in and the show began. The first two productions went by in a flash. And then it was the interval. Fifteen minutes until curtain up.

DAY TRIPS

p 5th October - Unicorn Theatre Worksho se 28th June - ‘Gallipoli’, Picture Hou Cinema

RESIDENTIAL TRIPS

on

27th September - 1st October - Mais Claire Fontaine, Burgundy 20th - 22nd June - Battlefields Tour, The Somme

CANONS PARK DAY

23rd March - Orienteering Day

Julius Caesar production at the Unicorn Theatre A group of Year 8 actors, handpicked by our directors, all met outside the School one Wednesday morning. Little did we realise that this day was going to be a fantastic and memorable experience for us all. The team consisted of our directors (Mr Moss-Marks and Ms Windle), the production team (eg. lighting, filming, and photography) and of course the actors. We boarded the tube bounding with excitement as we imagined what lay ahead of us. When we arrived at the Unicorn Theatre we were told what the day would consist of. We would first be in our dressing room for around an

hour, and then we would do our technical and dress rehearsals. In the dressing room we practised lines and went over cues and props. We were subsequently called by the team from the ‘SSF’ to do our tech rehearsal: this was mainly for - - - - and - - - - - - to figure out lighting and sound effects. We then did a dress rehearsal, watched by another cast. After that, it was time to go back to school. Once we got back, we had lunch and went through a few tricky bits of the play. We also watched ‘Outnumbered’ and played football to relax ourselves. Key parts of the play were rehearsed in the gym and we went over some lines. We were also given a quick course by Ms Windle on how to project our voices. Later that evening we were given an inspiring speech from Mr Moss-Marks, much like in ‘Henry V’ by Shakespeare when he encourages his troops with the famous lines ‘we few, we happy few, we band of brothers.’

We were on! We had to relish every moment of it as it went by so fast. It was an unbelievably memorable experience for all of us. I am sure that we will all treasure the memory for years to come.

Thanks go to our directors who did a brilliant job of organising everything from transport to the food. They took time out of their weekends and evenings to help us make the production as great as it was on the night. For this we are extremely grateful.

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Year 8 presents ...

When we got back to the Unicorn, via the tube, we were given some warm-up exercises to do from one of the ‘SSF’ team. These helped us to loosen our muscles in our mouths so that words could come out more easily. We were then told to take our

Wednesday

10/11/2010 THE UNICORN THEATRE LONDON SE1

Poster by - - - - - - -

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 8 Trips & Activities Battlefields Tour to the Somme In June, Year 8 went on their annual postCommon Entrance trip to the battlefields of World War One. The boys would normally stay in the Ypres region in Belgium, but this year we decided to visit the Somme region in France. We stayed in the town of Arras, the scene of so much fighting during the war. The trip gave the boys the opportunity to visit the grave of ex-Arnold House pupil, Frederic Cloete Walker, who is buried at the Aubigny Communal Cemetery. The story of the Battle of the Somme is a very tragic one for Britain. On 1st July 1916, the first day of the battle the Somme was to prove the most catastrophic day’s fighting in the history of the British Army. Losses were appalling: of the 120,000 British soldiers who fought that day, almost half became casualties, over 19,000 of them dead. Sixty percent of the officers involved were killed. As the fighting continued after the first day, the Battle of the Somme quickly spiralled into the grim, protracted struggle that typified so much of the fighting on the Western Front, drawing in forces from all over the Commonwealth.

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The area that the boys visited obviously presents a different picture today, but there is much evidence of what happened there in the summer of 1916. The region has been restored to its rural tranquillity but the chalky landscape still bears the scars of trench systems, mines and the colossal bombardment. The area is thick with military memorials and, of course, the very many cemeteries. The visit to Frederic’s grave was particularly moving as the boys learnt how he so tragically died. Nick Fear, the excellent historian who accompanied us on the trip had done some extensive research into how Frederic died. He had joined the Royal Naval Air Service in June 1916 and on a mission the following year he was in the vicinity of the little village of Savy-Berlette in the Somme region. His plane was flying at a low altitude, estimated at about 400 feet, when his engine stalled. The loss of power meant poor Frederic was put in a desperate situation of having to think quickly to save his life. He had no choice but to land, but was tragically killed in the process. An investigation after the accident showed that his plane was not fit to fly. His commanding officer, Major Maclaren wrote to Frederic’s

father personally and said,’ we all thought very highly of him indeed and he was certainly one of my most promising pilots. He was a good officer and very keen on his work. Men like him are exceedingly difficult to replace.’ His life ended abruptly thirty-five days short of his nineteenth birthday. Along with so many of his generation the world will never know what contribution he would have made to it. Such stories typify so many from this tragic war and the Year 8's as they move onto the next chapters in their lives, will realise and understand the ultimate sacrifice that those before them made. The trip also gave the boys many other opportunities to visit areas of particular importance in this region of France during the Great War: the Canadian Memorial at Vimy Ridge, Beaumont Hamel, the Thiepval Memorial, the Lochnagar Memorial Crater, the Footballers’ Battalion Memorial, the Pozieres Cemetery, the South African Memorial and the museum at Delville Wood, the Arras War Memorial and the Wellington Tunnels in Arras itself. The loss of life at all these places is just incomprehensible. The Thiepval Memorial


SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 8 Trips & Activities records 72, 000 British servicemen who died in the Somme sector up to 23 March 1918 with 90% of them just from the 1916 battle alone. It’s the largest memorial to British servicemen in the world. One such story whose name is recorded here is that of a school teacher from up the road in Willesden Green. His name was Evelyn Lintott who was the first England international to play for our local football team, QPR. The boys can be very proud of the way they conducted themselves on this trip. I am sure it will be one they will always remember. It’s really a place one must visit just to try and understand a little bit the destruction that the Great War brought to this world and the sacrifice that was made by so many. Thank you to John Hill and Charles Keal who accompanied me on the trip. David Cox History

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SENIOR SCHOOL

Year 8 Trips & Activities Ma Semaine en Bourgogne On the 27th September, the Year 8 boys met under the ‘Lovers’ Statue’ in St Pancras International, at a very early hour. After saying goodbye to our parents, we boarded the Eurostar. We were really excited and we couldn’t wait to get there. We pulled into Gard de Nord and automatically recognized some of the monuments from when we went to Paris in Year 7. After a short walk to our coach, we set off. Our driver was called Malcolm. We stopped at about half way to have lunch and then we arrived at the Circus, where we were taught how to juggle, how to walk the tightrope and how to perform many other circus-based activities. We finally arrived at Maison Clare Fontaine, where we would be staying. After unpacking and having dinner, we made a jigsaw of France in a group competition. My group won! Throughout the week we participated in many activities such as archery, French lessons, visiting Vezelay, playing boules, sculpturing, kayaking, baking, tree climbing (only a few broken bones!), talent competition (in which some of the boys performed very accurate teacher impersonations), visiting the market at Vermenton (where in groups we purchased the ingredients for our French picnic, which we later prepared and ate). As you can see, we were very busy.

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It was late on the last day and we were going back home. We were on the coach and we encountered some traffic just outside Paris. As Mr Stones realised that we weren’t going to make the train, many became nervous. We crawled in the centre of Paris, hopped off the bus and charged frantically towards the train. It was as if we were running a race. Due to the sprinting skills of the boys (and teachers) we made it onto the train and back to England (we don’t think we left anyone behind!). The trip was very enjoyable and it was a great experience. The week was full of drama and activities. Many thanks to the teachers, who organised and took us on the trip and, of course, to Malcolm, Cedric, Elodie, Patricia and Olivier.

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Visit to the Picture House Cinema The Y8 boys had a special treat after CE - a visit to a film studio: Film Works in Marylebone. They watched the moving World War One classic “Gallipoli” in the special screening room. This film tied in very well with the trip the boys had gone on to the Somme the previous week. After the film the boys went on a tour of the location, learning about the process of film making from scripting through to final editing. The studio is currently working on the next film in the “Johnny English” series. Thanks to Mrs Carlyn Zehner for organising such an interesting afternoon out for us.  John Hill Deputy Headmaster


SENIOR SCHOOL

Ski Trip to Switzerland

T

he Arnold House School Ski trip started on 3rd April and ended on the 9th April. We left School very early, at 5.30am, and travelled to London Heathrow Airport by coach. Our flight was at 8.10 and we landed in Basel a few hours later. Our destination was Murren, which is in the Jungfrau Region of Switzerland next to the famous mountain called the Eiger. To get to Murren we took a coach, a funicular and, finally, a cable car to our resort. Luckily our bags were carried to our rooms by the hotel staff. The hotel was the 4 star Hotel Eiger. The hotel had amazing food and we had flat screen TVs in our bedrooms!

For skiing we were placed into groups based on our ability. We were instructed by expert skiers. After a hard day’s skiing we were allowed to go the Co-op supermarket to get a drink and a snack. After this we could play football or go swimming at the nearby sports centre. Each evening we played board games, cards or with our electric gadgets or watched a movie in the Movie Room.

group sang a song. After this we had a disco. The ski trip was a brilliant trip and I would love to go again next time.

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On the final night there was a Presentation Evening. Each ski instructor awarded medals to the skiers in their group. After the presentation there was a Talent Show. My

Head Boys’ Review Our life at Arnold House has been an unforgettable experience. Over the past eight years we have formed tight friendships that will definitely continue at our new schools. The pressure of this year finally hit us when we entered the spring term: many boys were off doing interviews and entrance exams. Finally CE arrived and Year 8 managed to push through to the end of the

week and when the big day of our results arrived thankfully Mr Thomas greeted all of us with good news. We think that despite this year being our most challenging at Arnold House it has definitely been the most rewarding. Happily this tough year has been broken up by some extremely fun and interesting trips. Firstly we spent a week in Burgundy doing adventurous activities while learning a

good amount of French at the same time (hopefully !) Then after CE we all were relieved after finding out our results and were rewarded with a week of activities and three days in France on a battlefields trip. Our time as Head Boys has been a remarkable experience that we will never forget. It has been an honour to be Head Boys, and we have enjoyed every moment of it. We wish Nick and Andrew the best of luck for next year as they succeed us. Finally we would like to thank - - - - - our fantastically cheerful Deputy and all of the teachers who have made being at Arnold House so enjoyable and special. Thank You. -- ---- &-- ---

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ART & DESIGN

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5

ART &DE Art & Design


ART & DESIGN

Review

I

t has been another busy year in the Art and Design department and we were extremely pleased to welcome Miss Zoe Farmer to the new post of Art Assistant. Zoe has ably assisted me in the day to day running of the department as well as supporting the boys in their lessons and in both junior and senior Art clubs. We wish Zoe every success as she leaves us to commence her Art PGCE at the Institute of Education.

Thoburn to Arnold House to introduce the boys to some exciting new techniques which involved melting plastics together to create montages of everyday objects. The boys produced some stunning work which they are currently developing into lino prints.

Year 5 boys also produced a piece of work inspired by the theme ‘Africa’ to submit to the annual arts festival hosted by the Haileybury School. I was hugely impressed by the boys’ enthusiasm and commitment to the project and was thrilled that - - - - - - was awarded runner-up and - - - - - - winner from Arnold House’s entries.

Over the summer I discovered the inspirational work of Thomas Hillier at the Royal Academy’s summer exhibition. His house inside a lampshade was one of the outstanding pieces in the architecture room, so I was thrilled when he agreed to host a Design day for boys in Year 6. We had a truly wonderful day at Canons Park which left both boys and teachers fired up with ideas for our fantasy architecture project. Tom has followed the boys’ progress with interest and I hope this will be the start of many more Design days in the future.

In the spring term Year 5 worked on a new project ‘Making the ordinary extraordinary,’ looking at the work of artists Patrick Caulfield and Michael Craig-Martin. We were lucky to welcome artist Russell

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studies inspired by Egon Schiele’s rich and textured paintings. We achieved success in both age categories with 9 boys having their work selected, of which 6 were awarded commended and 1 highly commended. It was lovely to attend the exhibition and to meet so many proud boys and parents.

Next came the Year 7 trip to Paris where the boys visited the Musee d’Orsay, followed by a trip to Tate Britain to see the Rachel Whiteread exhibition later in the term. The boys have enjoyed looking at such a wide range of artists and have produced some rich and varied work over the course of the year.

Boys in Years 2 & 5 have worked hard to produce work for the Royal College of Arts Young Art exhibition. Year 2 produced stunning mixed media birds inspired by the work of artist Abigail Brown and Year 5 submitted paint and oil pastel rooftop

One of the biggest events in the school calendar is the Years 3 & 4 Arts Festival. Boys work for a whole term in preparation for the exhibition and excelled themselves yet again with a collection of thoughtful and accomplished Art work. Year 3 exhibited Cubist self portraits and tonal paintings along with dreamtime water colour paintings inspired by Aboriginal Art. Year 4 focused on Abstract Art and produced a range of mixed media pieces inspired by still life drawings of shells. They also experimented with some new materials and techniques, which included rag rugs and wax entrapment.


ART & DESIGN

Review and hosted a question and answer session about her work. The boys had a thoroughly enjoyable morning with many announcing that they would now like to be an artist when they grow up! To finish off the year in a creative fashion we were pleased to be asked to design a Christmas card for the charity Hope and Homes. After the initial confusion of designing Christmas cards in May, boys in Years 3, 4 and 7 all worked hard to submit an entry. Due to the high quality of the entries, two designs were chosen to represent the charity this year – - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - – well done boys!

Following on from the success of the garden project with St John’s Hospice, we were invited to build on this relationship by producing a range of nature-inspired tiles to decorate one of their garden walls. Year 8 were keen to get involved and produced a range of designs based on their observational studies, before developing their favourite into a ceramic piece.

Year 2

Year 3 Kate Rawlinson Head of Art and Design

Year 6 Design Day

During the summer term Year 2 studied the work of Vincent Van Gogh and learnt how to set up and draw a still life arrangement. We were excited to welcome the still life artist Jessica Brown to the Art department, who showed us some of her stunning paintings

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ART & DESIGN

Year 1 Collage creatures inspired by Sara Fanelli

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Year 1 Paper cut-outs inspired by Matisse

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Year 2 Bird studies inspired by Abigail Brown

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Year 2 Fruit inspired by Vincent Van Gogh

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Year 3 Aboriginal dreamtime paintings

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Year 4 Abstract shells inspired by Gaudi

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Year 4 Russian architectural paintings

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Year 5 African Art

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ART & DESIGN

Year 5 Recycled carrier bag montages

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Year 6 Fantasy houses

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Year 6 Impressionist studies

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Year 7 Architectural studies inspired by Rachel Whiteread

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Year 7 Gustav Klimt studies

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Year 8 Clay tiles inspired by close-ups in nature

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Year 8 Urban London

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MUSIC

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6

MUS ICM Music


MUSIC

Autumn Term

O

ur musical year began in earnest with two informal concerts performed by Years 7 & 8. The quality of solo playing and the variety of music presented were excellent and audiences at both events were impressed by the continued commitment, dedication and enthusiasm of the boys. Year 8 boys deserve a special mention for their concert preparation in the midst of exams, senior school interviews and other attendant academic pressures. As always, a rightly poignant note is struck on Armistice Day on 11th November. The challenge for the Director of Music here lies in choosing choral repertoire sensitive to the theme and the occasion. Fauré’s ‘In Paradisum’ from the Requiem suggested exactly the right balance of respectful observance and sense of quiet optimism. The Chapel Choir rose to the challenge and conveyed a sensitive and resonant performance of the text from the Burial Service. A defining musical moment in the Christmas term was the inaugural Chapel Choir concert, held on 24th November at St John's and St Elizabeth's Hospital Chapel.

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The concert was arranged with the grateful assistance of Anthony Delarue, an old boy of the school and a Knight of Malta, with two purposes in mind – to raise the profile of the choir in its music-making and to help raise funds for St John’s Hospice. Over the past twelve months, the boys in the Chapel Choir have worked very diligently to improve their singing technique. The sound quality, clarity of diction and discipline of the boys had evidently improved during services of worship; here was an opportunity to consolidate their efforts and achievements in a dedicated concert. After several weeks of rehearsals, many of which took place in the boys’ own time, the Chapel Choir sang outstandingly in some very challenging


MUSIC

Autumn Term

repertoire. With the programme embracing primarily liturgical anthems ranging from 16th century Renaissance polyphony to the modern, lyrical warmth of John Dankworth, the boys tackled all works with a brio and technical finish worthy of a cathedral choir. With an assembled audience of roughly one hundred Arnold House parents, staff and members of the public, the event proved to be a defining and memorable musical moment this year. The School was also delighted to pledge over £600 to the funds raised for St John’s Hospice. Special thanks should be given to Andrew Cuthbertson for his accompanying and Carol Ioannis-Antoniou for her help during sectional rehearsals. At the end of another hugely busy term, 91 boys and several members of the music staff were transported to Canons Park for the annual Christmas Concert. Once again, the standard of festive music-making did not disappoint as all groups impressed with their colourful and accomplished playing. The large number of parents who attended is testament to the popularity of this event and to what a key place the concert plays in the Arnold House musical calendar. As always, the autumn term was packed but never anything less than hugely rewarding and exciting when working with such committed and enthusiastic boys and music staff. 91


MUSIC

Spring Term

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n many ways, the spring term in the Music Department is calm when compared to the whirlwind of activity in the autumn and summer terms. With no major concerts at Canons Park, we enjoyed the more intimate Informal Concerts from Years 5 & 6, held in the gym. There was an impressive range and variety of performances from the boys, including an outstanding rendition of a Snow Patrol song from the latest Year 6 band. At the beginning of the spring term, Year 3 and 4 boys start preparation for the musical component of the Arts Festival at Canons Park. They worked very hard to learn the words for ‘Jonah Man Jazz’ by Michael Hurd and did not disappoint on the two nights of performance. The boys’ singing was tuneful, uplifting and enthusiastic and I would like to thank them for their diligence and unceasing ability to rise to the occasion.

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MUSIC

Summer Term

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n a very brief, Oxbridge-length term, much was packed in musically. The programme this term began with the Chapel Choir performing on a subtropically rainy Wednesday afternoon in May at the North London Music Festival in Muswell Hill. This was the first time we had entered a competition and it represented a different type of performing experience for the boys. As befits its raison d’être, the choir was entered in the sacred category, fulfilling the stipulation of submitting two contrasting anthems for performance. As always, the

and it was evident how these boys had flourished musically with the invaluable help and dedication of the peripatetic staff. As always, this was a memorable event for both participants and a willing audience of parents and academic staff.

boys rose to the occasion and sang with great clarity and musicality. They won first prize in their category, and the adjudicator marked their performance as officially commended. The Senior Summer Concert is always laden with poignancy for the Year 8 boys. Being one of the last events they would participate in this year, it was the musical culmination of all that they had achieved under the direction of their instrumental teachers throughout their time at Arnold House. In both solo and group performances, quality abounded, 93


MUSIC

Summer Term On 28th June, the Junior Summer Concert took place at Canons Park. Although a smaller scale event, the quality of performance from our younger musicians was remarkable. In both solo and ensemble items, the boys distinguished themselves with a maturity and style in their playing that was conspicuous in its excellence. From the Junior Recorder and String groups to impressive piano solos performed by - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - some truly captivating musical offerings illuminated the stage for an hour. A few final penned thoughts are appropriate regarding the sad departure from the music teaching staff of guitar teacher, Clive Carroll. Clive’s final guitar concert was a true celebration of music written for the instrument, and the boys involved treated us to a festival of electric and acoustic pieces. Paul Swinden Director of music

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MUSIC

Associated Board Exam Results Music Exam Results 2010 – 2011 Piano Preparatory Test - - - - (P)

- - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - - - - (P) Grade One

- - - - - - - (D) - - - - - (D) - - - - - - (M) - - - (M) - - (M) - - - (P)

------- - - - - - - - - - - (P) Grade Two - - - - - (D) - - - - (M)

- - - - - - - - (M) - - - - (P)

Grade Three

- - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - (P) Grade Four

- - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (P) Cello Grade Two

- - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (D) Grade Three

- - - - - - - (M) Clarinet Grade One

- - - - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - (P)

Grade Three

Grade Two

- - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - -- -- -- -- (M) - - - - - - (P)

- - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - (M) - - - (P)

Grade Four - - - McDonnell (D) - - - - - - - - (P) Grade Five - - - - - - (M) Violin Grade One - - - - (D) - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - (P)

Grade Three

- - - - - - - - (M) Descant Recorder Grade One

- - - - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (M) Grade Three

- - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - (M)

- - - - - - - - - - - (P)

Grade Four

Grade Two

- - - - - - (D)

- - - - - - (D) - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - (M)

Trumpet Grade One

- - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - (P)

Grade Two

- - - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - (P) - - - - - (P)

Trombone Grade One

- - - - - (P) Grade Four - - - - - - - - - (P) Tuba Grade Two - - - - - (M) Jazz Alto Sax Grade One - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - (P) Grade Two - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - (P) B Flat Cornet Grade Four - - - - - - - (D) Baritone Grade One - - - - - - (P) Voice Grade Two - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - - (M) Grade Three - - - - - - (P) - - - - - - - - (P) Theory Of Music Grade One - - - - - - (D) - - - - - (D) Grade Two - - - - - - (D) - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - (M) - - - - - - - (M) Grade Three - - - - - - - (D) - - - - - - - - (M) Grade Five - - - - - - (D)

Key P = Pass M = Merit D = Distinction

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7

FOR MPA Form Pages


FORM PAGES

1L Dr. Seuss Hong Kong I have two eyes, three legs and two arms. I live on Jelly Mountain and I like to jump on jelly, squashing it into shapes.

Venom the Snake I’m green and scaly with wiggly lines down my back. I live in a poisonous swamp and eat meat with my shiny sharp teeth.

Thomas I’m like a train and I move on rails. I live in a shed and enjoy spinning around on turntables.

Bumpy Botter I have one eye and 100 legs. I live on a snowy mountain where I enjoy snowball fights with my friend, Flower Pat.

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-------Wibble Wobble I am triangular with a skeleton body and wobbly legs. I live in trees and eat bushes. I enjoy climbing up buildings and jumping off chimneys.

Grars Tooth I have two teeth as eyes. I live in the clouds and catch water when it rains.

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Cheeky I have 100 eyes. I live in a swimming pool and swim a lot. I use the water to help firemen to put out fires.

Wacky Wednesday I have 77 eyes and live in an aeroplane. I like to travel and I come from the planet Clipper.

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--------Jagglag Jabble My body is bulletproof and I have 40 eyes. I live in a cupboard and use my invisible powers to sneak out at night.

Bingo I have four hands. I live in a sunken ship and like to play tricks on my friends from under the water.

Wobbly Bran I’m multicoloured with two bodies and nine legs. I live in an eyeball. I fire lasers out of my Nerf Pistol.

Piggy Fish I have a fish face and a pig body. I live in a gigantic greenhouse. I’m kept busy working all day and then I read lots of books.

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--------Bubbles Using my super eyes I can see miles away. I live in a road and blow bubbles all day. I enjoy jumping like a spring and can jump up to space.

Bleoowell I have 22 hands and use them to feel around my dark cave. I like to play hide and seek and pop up to surprise my friends.

--------Rubber Head Mat I have crumply legs and tickly arms and a very green tummy. I live in a smelly swamp and put slime all over people when they sleep.

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------Macs My body is brown and yellow with four eyes and four legs. I live on a mountain where I play with my dog. I enjoy climbing around like a monkey while chasing jaguars.

------Tiger Tooth I have claws as sharp as arrows. I live in hiding in the wild and eat all sorts of meat.

Jungle of

Canons

e sevill u o H nold

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by

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Slice My brown skin has slimy slugs stuck all over every part of my body. On the top of my head I have three floating eyes. I live on the mud flats and help people.


FORM PAGES

1M When I grow up ...a goal keeper because then I can be like Mesi and I can play for Vienna and Germany.

...a veterinary surgeon because I like animals and I am going to look after pandas.

...a policeman because I want to know what jail is like. I want to have a go at locking the jail.

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...a footballer manager for Arsenal and sometimes I will play because people get injured and I like to score goals.

...a helicopter pilot and fly through the sky, because then I can wear a uniform.

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...an animal camera man because I like animals and I am very good at taking pictures.

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...a cricketer because I like batting and bowling and it is really fun.

...a footballer because I want to play for Liverpool and I want to score goals.

...a bus driver for the 338 because I like buses. I would see buildings, buses and other cars and I would go to Hackney Wick.

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...a chef because then I can cook spaghetti.

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-

-

-

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...an ice- cream man so I can serve ice-cream when it’s hot and I’m a bit naughty because I will eat a lot!

...a policeman because I want to look after everyone in London.

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...a captain of a sailing boat because I like to sail and swim and I would catch fish and jelly fish.

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...a chef because if I were hungry I could cook something for myself. I would cook pizza, fish, beans, icecream, apples and berries.

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338

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...a footballer because I could be a striker and score lots of goals. It would be so cool if I could score a hat-trick.

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When I grow up I would like to be...

...a space scientist because I can study space and how we even had the right to be here.

...a tennis player because I like sports and I want to be a sportsman. I will play lots of tennis.

...a footballer because it is a really fun game.

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2B If I could touch the sky....

If I could touch the sky, I would pull down the Moon and use it as a reading light. If I could touch the sky, I would pull down a star and give it to my baby brother, so that he could use it as a night light. If I could touch the sky, I would pull down a cloud and use it as a fluffy toy. If I could touch the sky, I would get all the stars I could find and share them with my family.

---- ---If I could touch the sky, I would put the sky under my covers so I could read a book in the dark. If I could touch the sky, I would get the Sun and use it for my lamp. If I could touch the sky, I would take the Moon and use it for a football. If I could touch the sky, I would give all stars to my brother.

-- --If I could touch the sky, I would grab the Sun and use it to make the fire glow. If I could touch the sky, I would grab all the stars to sprinkle everywhere. If I could touch the sky, I would grab the Moon and use it to light my way. If I could touch the sky, I would grab a cloud to use as my pillow and would use it as a trampoline.

--- --If I could touch the sky, I would jump onto the clouds. If I could touch the sky, I would get Mars and kick it like a football. If I could touch the sky, I would get a bird and fly on it. If I could touch the sky, I would get an aeroplane and jump on it. If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars.

--- ---If I could touch the sky, I would take a cloud and sit on it. If I could touch the sky, I would take down the Sun and the Moon myself. If I could touch the sky, I would take all the stars I could. If I could touch the sky, I would use it to protect me and my family and friends.

If I could touch the sky, I would bring the sky to my mum. If I could touch the sky, I would share it with my family. If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars to light my way. If I could touch the sky, I would take it everywhere with me, I would take it to my swimming lessons and yoga.

If I could touch the sky, I would grab a star and give it to my mum. If I could touch the sky, I would grab Jupiter and give it to my baby brother. If I could touch the sky, I would grab Pluto and hang it in my house to cool it down. If I could touch the sky, I would grab Mars and give it to my dad!

--- --

-- -----

If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars and experiment to see if I could transform the stars into a trophy. If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars and make them into a ball. I would play football and I would win! If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars and give them to my brother. If I could touch the sky, I would get the stars and give them to the poor people to make gold.

If I could touch the sky, I would not touch the stars because they are big balls of fire. If I could touch the sky, I would go to Mercury and Mars. If I could touch the sky, I would play with the Moon in the daytime. If I could touch the sky, I would jump from planet to planet.

----- ---If I could touch the sky, I would take the sky and put it on the door. If I could touch the sky, I would take the Moon and give it to my mum and dad. If I could touch the sky, I would take the clouds and use them as my bed. If I could touch the sky, I would share the stars with my family.

---- ----If I could touch the sky, I would share them with my friends. If I could touch the sky, I would make a wish and wish for DS and a Wii. If I could touch the sky, I would catch a star so I could turn the lights off when it’s bed time. If I could touch the sky, I would take all the stars and make them into a big house.

--- ------

If I could touch the sky, I would grab a star and play with it. If I could touch the sky, I would grab a space rocket. If I could touch the sky, I would grab a rock. If I could touch the sky, I would give stars to people I love!

If I could touch the sky, I would go on an aeroplane over the sky and into space. When I arrived in space the plane would turn into a jet that would carry fire. When I lost my way I would be in the middle of space. I would look around but then I would turn the jet and I would shoot to a planet. I would land on a planet and it would definitely not be Earth, so I would look around to explore. If I could touch the sky, I would bring all the things down from space. If I could touch the sky, I would get out of the jet and hang all the things up.

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-- ----

100

--- --If I could touch the sky, I would get a star and get more to share with my family. If I could touch the sky, I would get some of the Moon and use it as a flying carpet. If I could touch the sky, I would get a little rock from the Moon and use it as a tennis ball. If I could touch the sky, I would grab a cloud and use it as a pillow.

--- --If I could touch the sky, I would grab the little stars and hang them in my room. If I could touch the sky, I would share the little stars with - - - - If I could touch the sky, I would share the little stars with Arnold House. If I could touch the sky, I would wish for a DS and Wii party!

-- ---If I could touch the sky, I would grab a galaxy and use it as a fan. If I could touch the sky, I would grab an asteroid and use it as a burning coal. If I could touch the sky, I would grab the Sun and use it as a light. If I could touch the sky, I would jump into the sky and grab a cloud and use it as a pillow.

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FORM PAGES

2D If my house were on fire I would take.......

if my house were on fire i would take ... my Arsenal teddy bec ause I support Arsenal. I wou ld also take my cats called Chocola te and Vanilla because I love them.

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... my iPod Touch becaus e I have all my favourite games on it. I would also take my lava lam p because it is really cool when it give s you an electric shock.

-- ----

would have ... my hamster so I h. I would also wit y pla to e eon som e I would not aus bec s toy my take without them. ep sle to go to be able

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... my iPad because I play on it a lot. I would also take some money because then I could buy some water.

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ause if my ... my money box bec I would buy gry hun re we ily fam for them. I some food and water y brother bab my e tak o als would cuddly. and e cut is he because

because I ... a fire extinguisher . I would also would put out the fire because he will take daddy’s OBE never get one again.

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... Kaloo and Carter, my teddies, because they are cud dly and I sleep with them every night.

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... Darcie and her rara skirts because I love Darcie very much. I would also take my medals and trophies because the y are very precious to me.

... my lion Yoo Hoo because I earned money in order to buy him. I would also take my bora blanket because I was given it for my birthday.

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... my Yoo Hoos becaus e they are very cuddly. I would also take my brother because he is really funny.

-- ---

ause they are ... my blankets bec with them ep sle I and us precio o take the als uld wo I ht. every nig ry night. eve h wit ep sle I toys that

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... my precious diary bec ause then I can write about the fire . I would also take my toy rabbit bec ause I sleep with it every night.

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n rabbit ... dirty rabbit and clea m every the with p slee I e aus bec t nigh

- - - - - -- -- - -

e I love playing ... my iPad becaus e some water tak o als uld wo I it. on e. aliv us p to kee

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... my family because they are very special. I would also take my two cuddly toys because the y help me sleep at night.

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... my two Yoo Hoos because I sleep with them. I would also take my iMac because it is fun.

- - - ----------------

because he .... my daddy’s trophy in 2006. I will won it on my birthday ause I always bec r bea my take also . him with p slee

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... water because wh en I get hot I normally ask for wa ter. I would also take my sister ’s dol l because she never sleeps withou t it.

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3J Guess Who? -- ---

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I like playing cricket with my friends. I enjoy climbing. I love trying new things and getting out and about. I am quite a fast runner.

I go to Israel once a year. I am Jewish. When I grow up I want to be an Olympic Wrestler. My mum is from Switzerland. My Dad is from Lebanon.

I have a dog called Caramel. My favourite animal is a leopard. I have a rabbit called Roger. My Dad is from Ghana. He is famous for making clothes.

I have a pet cat called Nancy. My Mum comes from Bolton. I am going to be a wine merchant when I grow up. I am part Scottish, part Irish and part English.

I love skiing. My hero is Frank Lampard. My mother is from Hong Kong. My dad is from Switzerland. My favourite sport is football.

I am left-handed. My favourite animals are cheetahs and leopards. I have a dog called Nutella. I want to be a football player when I grow up. I love the colour blue.

My favourite football player is Arshavin. I love tigers. In school I like Maths and English. I am one quarter German. I moved house to Belsize Park in March. Once in France on the beach I dug a well. My favourite football player is Theo Walcott. I love Maths and History. I enjoy playing cricket.

102

My favourite sport is cricket. In my free time I play on the iPad. I really enjoy bowling and rollerblading. My favourite animal is a monkey. My biggest hobby is music. I love listening to a band called Nickelback. I also have a house in Switzerland.

I have been to Egypt. When I went to Egypt I went to Luxor. My favourite animal is a cheetah. I enjoy playing cricket. When I grow up I would like to be in a band. I have a dog called Brian.

I enjoy playing at the seaside. My favourite foods are steak and cheese (some kinds of cheese). I am Australian. I like skiing. I am in the Tiger Club.

I am from India. My two favourite countries are India and Egypt. My two favourite animals are tigers and the harpy eagle. I have one little sister. I am fundraising with a club to help save the tigers. My best sport is cricket.

I admire Cheryl Cole because she is a great singer. My favourite animal is a dog. I support Chelsea. I love the colour dark blue. My best subject is Art.

I have blue eyes. I’m a little bit Native American. My granddad is half Irish. My favourite subject is History. I know a Japanese song. I am 8 years old. I am half Jamaican and half English. My favourite subject is Science. When I grow up I would like to be a scientist making my own acid – I would have so much fun!

My favourite colour is red. I love going skiing. I support Arsenal. My best lesson is Games. I have two brothers and one sister. My favourite places that I have been to in the world are Thessaloniki (Greece) and Cape Town (South Africa). My Mum’s family come from South Africa and Eastern Europe. My dad’s family come from Spain and Morocco. I have an older sister and a younger brother.


FORM PAGES

3L The best thing about the Royal Wedding -- ----

hi of the Royal Wedding was that I made lots of new friends. I also played a rugby match in the park. My new friends are called - - - - - - - - - and - - - -

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th he Royal Wedding was that I went to Flash’s house and we had a great time!

-- --

hi ut the day of the Royal Wedding was that I was in Norfolk that day. In the afternoon my cousins came and the next day we had a water gun fight with our new water guns.

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t he Royal Wedding was that I got a day off and the next day was even better! My parents and I went to a street party at our local canal in Little Venice.

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of yal Wedding I went to someone’s house. It was great because, they had a secret staircase on the roof!! There, we saw lots of planes.

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t he Royal Wedding was that I went to see my friends called - and - - - When we got there, we went upstairs to watch the wedding. Then we went to play football in the back garden.

--

--

hin the day of the Royal Wedding was that my mum bought me a Bakugan toy and chocolate fudge bath soap. On holiday in France I beat my Dad three times on the table-football.

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es ut the Royal Wedding day was that I went to the park and played on my friend’s trampoline.

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e g about the Royal Wedding was that I had the best lunch ever! My lunch was burgers, chips and hot dogs. The dessert was chocolate, ice-cream and sweets. After this, we watched the wedding for about four hours on the TV.

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t ut the Royal Wedding was that we had a street party. There was lots of delicious millionaire shortbread and one of our teachers even came! When our family went home I got to stay with my teacher and eat cookies.

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t ut the day of the Royal Wedding was that I had a massive party at my house with all my friends! We had a cardboard cut-out of William and Kate and I told everyone they were real. I enjoyed stuffing myself with cake!

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st out the Royal Wedding day was that I went for a picnic and then went on my bike on Hampstead Heath.

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he day of the Royal Wedding was that I went to my grandmother’s house with my whole family. We all watched the wedding together and we saw the planes flying past our window! We also got a day off school.

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ab yal Wedding was that I had the day off and I played Playstation with my brother and watched the wedding on the TV with some of my family.

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tt out the Royal Wedding was that I had the day off school and watched the Royal Wedding. I liked Kate’s and Pippa’s dresses and the wedding was very stylish! I also went to a party where there was lots of yummy food. My friend ate five meringues!

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g Royal Wedding day was that I went to my grandmother’s house and played on the swing in her garden.

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es e Royal Wedding was that we had the day off School and got to spend time with friends and family at home.

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hin ut the day of the Royal Wedding was that I had a lovely day at home. I watched television all day. It was great!

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4B Stranded on a desert island

If I were stranded on a desert island,

I would like to be

stranded with‌

-- --

Steven Finn

-- --

-- ----

-- --E

Mike Perham

Andre Arshavin

Albert

instein

- - - -pard

Frank Lam

- - T-em-pah

- - - -gb-a -

-- ---Grah

Tinie

Didier Dro

am Swann

- - - er-on- -

- - C-onn-ery

David Cam

Sean

- -sc

France

-- ----

Roger Rabbit

Fabreg

- - - e -Do-g -

Lucas th

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as

James Bond

- - - -ro-ng

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Sir Dav id Attenbo rough

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Neil Armst


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4C The road to the premiership ‘’Taraabt’s too good for you’’ - - - - - - - -- -- -- ------ --------- --------

‘’You’re going to Hartlepool, we’re going to Liverpool’’ ---- --------- ----

- ------- ------

‘’E........I..........E........I............. E..........I...................O............. up the football league we go’’ ----- ----

WE ‘R’ QPR

--- ---

2010/11 FOOTBALL LE

AGUE

CHAMPIONS!

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‘’Neil Warnock’s blue and white army’’ ‘’Running down the Uxbridge Road, to see the Queen’s Park Rangers............’’

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5B Unknown Family tree

Unknown-family tree

and how they are remembered...

--------------------Amazing inventions

- -- -- -- -- ----- -

------------------

Endless gr umpiness and shouting

Sporting prowess and great wisdom

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Playing football for Arsenal

- -- -- -- -- - Buying coun tless ap for his iPod ps

--------------Using the computer for hours on end

- -- -- -- -- -- Teleportin

g to Mars

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-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -Winning th

e World Cu

--------------Behaving crazily at family

p

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Excelling at Cat Hockey

reunions

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

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-- -- -- -- -- --

Playing Cric ket for the Rashistani Royals

- -- -- -- ----- His love of

sloths

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Masterful

Running away to the Bahamas

-------------Not having to wear a mask on halloween

investigatio

- ----- -- -- His amazin

g football

skills

n skills


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5G Top Trumps

--- -----

----- ----Idol

Gordon Banks

Idol

Footballer

Known for

Known for

--- ---

Idol

Bubba S tewart Motocro ss rider

Known for

OP T TRUMPS

---- --Steve Jobs

Idol

Nelson Mandela

Known Former President of S.A / Anti-Apartheid Activist for

CEO / Inventor

Known for

Shaun Michaels

Known for

- - - -- - Idol

-- --

Idol

Wrestler

-- --

Blues Brother

Idol

50 Cent

Band member

Known for

Pop Star

IDOLS -- --Idol

Rowan Atkinson

Idol

Actor

Known for

- Idol Known for

- ----

Freddie Flintoff

Idol

Cricketer

-- ---Idol Known for

-- --Idol Known for

Paris Hilton Absolutely nothing!

-- ---Idol Known for

Thomas Eddison Inventor

Known for

Wiz Khalifa

--- -PelĂŠ

Known for

Footballer

Pop Star

Paul Scholes Footballer

Idol

Known for

---George

--- --

Cloone y Actor

Idol Known for

Mozart Pianist

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6F Behind the scenes at Arnold House!

ite

s Dynam

ittle Mis

Debs ...L

Mr Thom under contas...has got it all rol...or ha s he?!

t fertility her secre’ brew! ns slips rs Mrs Lyo into the teache drops

Mr Hill an d the la shoes on, dies...Dance Action!

ouse rnold H ms...A y Sofa u M e it Th Matern

Rick B everyone aggers Bagnall... 's favouri te AH un cle

hews... Mrs Matt Mr and trotters in love e b Glo Mr Martin ...On dogs. Ee e man and his by gum!

Madame Ferhaoui and Mr Hill...Forever..

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. s Ralphs. , r and Mis ays Mr Leste r the good old d e rememb after Vietnam! just


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6S The Olympics

the

olympics ---- ----

--- --

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An Olympic gold medal champion for Holland.

The No1 tennis singles player in the world. He has won the last four grand slams.

Olympic Judge

My stroke is very powerful and allowed me to win the gold medal for tennis.

---- ---

-- ---

--- ---

--- ---

I smashed the world record of the 400 metres swimming.

My horse Silver Star has been 1st place in the last four Olympics in the show jumping event.

The fastest cyclist the world has ever seen!

I am the best Hockey player in the world.

--- ---- & --- ----We are the world best doubles tennis champions.

----- -----

----- --- ------ ---

. ble tennis bros We are the ta s. on pi am ch e We are th

---- --- ----This is

The longest discus thrower in the world

when we brok e the 100m sprint re cord.

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7M Dragons Den

DRAGONS DEN

THE HOPEFULS

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and

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Our stain-proof suits are covered in a material that looks and feels like cotton but repels wine and a variety of drinks. It also comes with a shirt. Our suit is now in stock with Ralph Lauren and Armani. We are expanding our company and hope to be in every highstreet store by 2013. We would like a full £100,000.

You know when you’re in the supermarket and you have to buy chicken and melon separately. Now you can have 2 for 1. Better than Chicken Cottage. I want £500,000.

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These amazing socks can be put in the microwave. Two minutes later, open the microwave, pop on the socks and savour the heavenly warmth.

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The Cat-excretion exterminator. Simply strap the little man to the back of your cat and its faeces will be nowhere to be found. Every time your cat is about to poo, the man will drop his hat and the poo will fall into it. Then he puts it in his poo-storage container while releasing a burst of fresh fragrance from his nose.

My item is called ‘Meal and Heal’. It can heal any bruise, bite, scratch, break or burn as well as being a tasty treat if you’re hungry. It can be used anywhere but was designed for people marooned on a desert island.

The Artificial Intelligencer. Simply pop into your head for an instant imagination-injection. Can also store any facts, documents or web-pages in your brain.

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and

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Small v Tall Wrestling Arena. Watch two wrestlers both alike in fury but very very different in height, battle with each other for a tiddlywinks. Tickets: £25

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This is an aircon-hat which cools you down during the hot days abroad (Britain is always rainy).

THE DRAGONS ---- ---

This is a quick and easy shot of cereal ready for a quick getaway from the house.

- - - - - - - - Made his money collecting insurance payouts from faking his own death. Deborah Meaden aka - - - - - - - Deborah Meaden made her money impersonating - - - - - - - - - - - - Made his money owning 20% of Apple Corp. 110

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This magnet is literally a ‘babe magnet’ to help the disadvantaged like Louis Walsh.


FORM PAGES

7MM CBeebies

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I would like to be Igglepiggle because he is always sleeping and I love to sleep. He always sleeps on a boat and I love sailing.

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I want to be Timmy from Timmy Time because he is so fluffy and he is a leader like me

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I would be Shaun the Sheep because he is cool, creative, skilled and very funny. Most importantly, he is a leader and a very active person, like me. His ideas are fantastic and he is a hero when there is a problem.

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Robby the Seal is great. He is Pingu’s best friend and I love swimming because it is fun and refreshing.

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I like Bob the Builder because I like building and taking them apart.

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My favourite CBeebies character is Pingu because he is the only one I can remember and because he is the most awesome penguin. I always wanted to live in a snowy place, like Antarctica. His best friend is Robby the Seal and I love seals!

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I chose Frank from the Koala Brothers because he’s adventurous and likes to explore, just like me. I like doing teamwork, just like Frank.

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I would be Peso the Penguin from Octonauts since he is the team medic and I like to help people. Also, he is very organised, rather like me.

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I chose to be Noonoo from the Teletubbies as he likes porridge in the morning, like me. I also look up to Noonoo as he is original; and a bit wacky like me.

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I have chosen to be Quarzi from the Octonauts: he’s adventurous and always has a fun time, the sort of life I would like.

Captain Barnacle is easy going, like me, and he is full of questions and answers. He is also clever and witty.

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I love Sporticus from Lazy Town as he is so sporty and active – I like the way he moves so fast, even when he doesn’t need to.

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I like Po from Teletubbies because he is always happy like me and he is also the red teletubby. This suits me as I am in Pitt – the house that wears red.

I like Thomas the Tank Engine because as a child I found him fun and amusing. He is blue, my favourite colour and he was my mentor when I was five. He always took on the bad train, which in my book was a very good thing to do.

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I chose Buster because he is fun and is extremely cheeky – a bit like me (apparently!)

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FORM PAGES

8H Angry Birds

ANGRY BIRDS --- --

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Red bird

Yellow triangle bird

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Black bomb bird

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Small blue bird

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Black bomb bird

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Small blue bird

---- ----Red bird

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Boomerang bird

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Black bomb bird

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Yellow triangle bird

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Big eagle bird

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Yellow triangle bird

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FORM PAGES

8K Explorers

My favourite explorer is...

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0eal (145 Corte R guese Gaspar u rt o as a P 1501) w ho sailed to w r re lo exp 00, and nd in 15 Greenla lso reached the a perhaps orth America N f o t s I like coa ndland). (Newfou se he has a au him bec ecause e and b m d a n cool reenlan G vered s he disco here I’ve alway w is h ic wh . to go to wanted

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Captain Cook is my favourite expl orer. He made three vo yages to the Pacific Ocean , accurately charting man y areas and recording several islands and co astlines on European map s for the first time.

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rn in s was bo Columbu vered the o c is d e 1451. H ularly d. I partic New Worl that he ct like the fa amaica. dJ discovere

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Mungo Pa rk was bo rn in Selkirkshir e, Foulshiels Scotland, at on the Ya rrow Water, ne ar S tenant farm elkirk, on a which his fa rented fro m the Duke ther of Buccleuch . On 21 Ju ne 1795, he reache d the Gam bia River and on 2 Dece mber he started for the un known interior. In the autum n of 1803 Park was invite d by the governme nt to lead another expedition to the Nig er.

as an Drake w aring d Francis d n a nced y experie ng man o m A r. seafare s, the ‘famous re adventu is successful ’, h voyage n of the avigatio circumn een 1577 and etw world b ured that he ns e best 1580, e one of th of e b ld u wo ures ered fig rememb land. Some ng Tudor E ople regarded pe h s li g En a hero. him as

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David Livingstone was a great explorer because he discovered Lake Ngami, Lake Malawi, and Lake Bangweulu as well as Victoria Falls. Livingstone was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society of London.

Pytheas of Massalia. He is a Greek geographer and explorer from the Greek colony, Massalia. He made a voyage of exploration to north-western Europe at about 325 BC. He travelled around and visited a considerable part of Great Britain. Some of his observations may be the earliest report of Stonehenge. Pytheas is the first person on record to describe the Midnight Sun, polar ice, Germanic and possibly Finnic tribes. He is the one who introduced the idea of distant Thule. His account of the tides is the earliest to state they are caused by the moon.

Vasco Núñez de Balboa was a Spanish explorer, governor, and conquistador. He is best known for having found Panama in 1513, becoming the first European to lead an expedition to have seen or reached the Pacific from the New World. He traveled to the New World in 1500 and, after some exploration, settled on the island of Hispaniola.

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Charles Robert Darwin was born on 12th Fe bruary 1809 and died on 19 th April 1882.H e was an English naturalist and believed that all species have descended from a common ancestor. He pr oposed the scientific theory that this branching patte rn of evolution resulted in som ething called Natural Selectio n. This theory was developed when he was in the Galapagos when he was on the voyage of th e Beagle.

My favourite explorer is Marco Polo because he discovered Parts of Asia and China that then led him to bring back knowledge to Europe and helped the advance of medicine and of trade.

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Francis Xavier (7 Ap ril 1506 – 3 December 1552) was a pioneering Ro man Catholic missionary born in the Kingdom of Sp ain and co-founder of the Society of Jesus. He was a student of Saint Ign atius of Loyola and one of the first seven Jesuits. He took the Faith to Go a and to many parts of ea stern Asia.

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SPO RTS Sport


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Football 1st XI Played 13, Won 8, Drew 0, Lost 5 Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

---------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - Player Profiles - - - - The Neville Southhall of the 1st Xl. The similarities went way beyond a passing resemblance to the Everton legend of yesteryear. Big - - was as good a keeper as I have seen at this level. Agile, brave and commanding – his nonchalant style gave me palpatations! - - - - - - - - 1 was AH’s reluctant right back. Despite a mild aversion to defending, he still managed to have a great season – always linking up well with the midfield and his penchant for mazy runs from deep endeared him to the AH faithful!

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- - - - - - - - Mr Nice Guy. Hard-tackling and powerful, yes, but there isn’t an ounce of meanness in his body. In fact confronted with an awkward centre forward, he would be more likely to play a soothing melody on one of his instruments than hack him down. One of the hardest strikers of the ball in the team. - - - - - - - The other member of the nicest central defensive pairing in Prep School football. He reads the game as well as he reads music and therefore always seemed to be in the right place at the right time. - - - Came into the side midway through the season and flourished into a really useful player. When not thinking about suicidal back passes he proved to be a tough tackling and creative utility defender. One player to look out for next year. - - - - Another player who was signed from the 2nd XI in a big money mid-term transfer. - - - - managed to blend the ability to make the odd thunderous tackle with a cultured left foot. This made him a popular choice at left back.

- - - - Captain Fantastic has more tricks than Paul Daniels. Each week I pitied the poor opposition left back who had to try to keep him quiet. Fast, skilful and the possessor of a rocket-like shot he made an impact in every game and proved to be a great skipper. - - - - - - The Cesc Fabregas of the team. When he was on song he got the team playing. Deft touches, awareness and great fitness levels were the hallmarks of his game. He also weighed in with his fair share of, often brilliant, goals. AH’s heartbeat of the team will be sorely missed. - - - - Creativity, energy and confidence were traits that made - - an asset to the team. Notionally he was a left midfielder but he regularly exercised his licence to roam and this meant that he was a frequent goal threat. Could he be the next - - - - - ? - - - - Fast, direct and with an eye for the net- ‘Tumble’ - - - grew into his role as centre forward. Scored plenty of goals with a variety of body parts (always a sign of a natural goal poacher) also won the ‘miss of the season award’ with a ‘Ronnie Rosenthal’ in the last match of the campaign.


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Football - - - - Brought a generous dollop of North African flair to AH’s team. He grew into a very useful centre forward with the ability to hold the ball up, beat a man and score goals. - loves scoring goals, mainly because it gives him the chance to showcase his range of carefully choreographed celebrations! Chris Kerr Director of Sport

2nd XI Played 11, Won 4, Drew 2, Lost 5 Team Coach Sebastian Stones Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - -

This was a very enjoyable and successful season. It was pleasing to see a few boys, who started their season in the 2nd XI, move into the 1st team. - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - were notable examples. Much credit should go to this season’s Captain, - - - - - - - - - who always led by example. A determined and combative centre back, he was aggressive in the tackle and caused the opposition defence a lot of problems when he popped up for corners and free kicks. - - - - - - and - - - - - were always full of goals. Some of - - - strikes were spectacular long-range efforts. Another player with the ability to strike the ball is - - -

- - - With a sweet left foot, he could be a useful left-back or left winger for the 1st XI next season. - - - - - - - showed a lot of promise in midfield and he was ably supported by - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - - came into the team half way through the season, a product of the 3rd XI, and proved to be a very accurate and astute passer of the ball. Against City of London, his passing was excellent and prompted a superb, overall performance from Arnold House. - - - - - - - when in full flow, is also a thoughtful and precise footballer. He can cross the ball, pass the ball accurately and has an eye for goal. - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - played a few games and did a sterling job when they were required. Our goalkeeper, - - - - - - - - improved as the season progressed. His best performance was against The Hall. I have never seen anyone make so many great saves in one half of football as - - - - did in that match. Unfortunately we ended up losing, but it was a great effort all round but especially in defence where - - - - - - - - - - - and, once again, - - - - - - - - were outstanding. I very much enjoyed coaching this group of players and admire their sportsmanship and spirit. Sebastian Stones Second Deputy Headmaster

3rd XI Played 6, Won 3, Drew 0, Lost 3 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

---------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - It is always satisfying to start with a win and our visit to Edge Grove did not disappoint with a - - - hat trick being the highlight in a fine performance. St Anthony’s was a thrilling encounter: behind by four we slipped to a slender defeat of 3-4 after an exceptional comeback. Back to winning ways with a 5-2 score line in our favour versus Durston House, we were narrowly edged out by Westminster before our most accomplished team effort, a resounding 6-2 win against City of London where some of our football was outstanding. Unfortunately missed chances were to prove crucial as an effective Hall side won at Canons Park. A really enjoyable and accomplished season from every boy. Richard Bagnall Games

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Football Colts A

team shape and an understanding of the position most suited to different boys.

Played 8, Won 1, Drew 3, Lost 4 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The best performance of the season came in a 2-1 win at home to St Anthony’s. The goals were scored by - - - ‘Golden Boot’, - - and one from - - - - - who deservedly won Player of the Season along with defensive lynchpin - - - - - - - - - Jon Harahap Games

-----------------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - - - -

Under 10 A

I

t was a rather frustrating season for the Colts A boys, who are a talented side; however the results were rather unkind. Against North Bridge House we controlled throughout with a draw the outcome. Two excellent matches versus St Anthony’s, gained one reversal and an entertaining 1-1 draw. Westminster and The Hall were strong and we succumbed to defeat in both games. We played St Paul’s, with honours even, a narrow defeat at Aldenham and in our final outing a resilient win against Lyndhurst 4-3.

Played 10, Won 8, Drew 0, Lost 2

Colts B Played 7, Won 3, Drew 1, Lost 3 Team Coach Jon Harahap Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Players of the Season:

-----------------Golden Boot: - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - was an inspirational Captain; he led the side with spirit and never had a bad game. Richard Bagnall Games

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The Colts B team should be proud of the improvements they made throughout the season. The move to more eleven a side matches gave them the chance to develop

Team Coach David Cox Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

------------------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - - - - - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - This was an outstanding season for the Under 10A team of which they can be extremely proud. They won their first eight games of the season and had the side not been affected by illness in the final 2 losing games I am very confident we would have gone through the whole term winning every game. There were some notable performances: the games against Durston House, St Anthony’s, Lyndhurst and North Bridge House really stood out. The boys played with much panache and style throughout the season. Every boy played his part. They have worked so hard to improve their game and they have now laid the foundations to continue doing well as they progress through the School. David Cox Games


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Football stood out (2-0 and 4-1). Another epic performance was the 4-4 draw away at Newton Prep. The boys were able to find two late goals to salvage a draw in a ding dong battle in South London. I have every confidence that this side will continue to improve as they progress through the School, and I will certainly be looking out for their results. It was a real pleasure working with them, and developing their football skills. David Cox Games

Under 9 B Played 3, Won 1, Drew 1, Lost 1 Team Coach Nick Odlin Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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Under 10B Played 8, Won 3, Drew 1, Lost 4 Team Coach Jon Harahap Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

---------------------------------------Awards: Players of the Season: - - - - - - - - -

-------------Golden Boot: - - - - - A tremendous amount of effort went into the Under 10 B Team’s season. A huge number of players were used, as players competed for places in this team from throughout the year group. A number also played their way up into the A team following outstanding performances which showed a determined attitude. The highlight of the season was a 6-0 win over North Bridge House with goals scored by - - - - - - - two to - - - - - - - - - - - - and a hat-trick to - - - - Depleted teams due to illness in the last two matches against The Hall and Durston

House, at home, meant there were more losses than wins which was not a true representation of how this enjoyable season went. Jon Harahap Games

Under 9 A Played 6, Won 3, Drew 1, Lost 2 Team Coach David Cox Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - The Under 9A side can be very pleased with their season. This group of boys live and breathe the beautiful game. The only time they got a break from football is when they were in lessons! The team was ably led by - - - - - - There were many outstanding performances throughout the season, but the victories against North Bridge House

Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - - Golden Boot: - - - - - - - - Coach’s Award: - - - - - - - - The Under 9B team produced all the aspects of good football that a coach wants to see during a season. The passing was attractive; grit and determination were seen in abundance, and a fantastic team spirit ran through the squad. This showed in the results, achieved with the majority of the players, being in Year 3, playing against bigger, more experienced opponents. Highlights included a comprehensive victory against Newton Prep, accompanied by a wonderful ‘goal of the season’ from - - - - - - - as well as an enthralling 1-1 draw away at The Hall. All of the players made huge improvements in their technique and understanding of the game throughout the season, which augurs well for a successful campaign next year! Well done, boys. Nick Odlin Games

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Rugby 1st XV Played 10, Won 4, Drew 1, Lost 5 Team Coaches Rick Martin & Jon Harahap Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - - - Team Captains: - - - - - - - - -

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his season will mostly be remembered for two things: the twenty two tries of the fleet-footed  - - - - - - and what could have been in a number of matches that should have gone our way. A 26 point lead thrown away in the second half against Edge Grove for a 31 all draw was the perfect illustration of this. Games against St Anthony’s and Wetherby could have been won with a little more desire and application. Better performances followed the half term break with wins over North Bridge House and Keble. Durston House and The Hall convincingly beat us but the performance against the latter in the last match of the season showed how much the team had improved in terms of their teamwork and commitment. The forward

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pack in particular was fantastic in this game with heroes  - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - working tirelessly. More noticeable throughout the season were the contributions of the joint captains, - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - The way their leadership skills developed throughout the season was impressive and inspirational for their team-mates. Their tenacious tackling and general forward play were intimidating as was the sight of either one of them on the rampage with ball in hand. The team went on tour to Shrewsbury in early March. It was a fun weekend with the behaviour of the boys exemplary throughout. The first match against Wrekin College was lost, as were the boys on the full sized field, 28-46. In the second match we proved to be too strong for Kingsland Grange winning 50-0. The highlight of this match was - - - - - - - - - scoring a - - - - - - - ike try from inside his own 22. In the seven a side form of the game the School once again hosted a successful tournament with four schools sending teams to compete. Unfortunately The Hall beat us in what ended up effectively as a grand final in this round-robin tournament after both teams had been unbeaten up

until this match. We also participated in the Durston House Sevens Tournament. Unfortunately this team was depleted due to the Under 65kg restrictions but this did not prevent us from being competitive. One victory in the group stage was not enough to progress to the semi finals. However, this win was notable for tries being scored by - - - (2), - - - - - - and - - - and not just - - - - - - who was to prove even more devastating in this form of the game. Jon Harahap Games

2nd XV Played 7, Won 5, Drew 0, Lost 2 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - - The season started in the most positive fashion with a triumph against St Anthony’s, which was a solid-all round team performance with the - - - twins, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - all in the points, and - - outstanding in the pack. A reversal against a strong forward display by Wetherby came next, but back to winning ways as the side played some innovative rugby, and were rewarded with exceptional wins against North Bridge House [40-0], Keble [59-10], Durston [42-7] and a tense victory versus Devonshire House 46-42. The match against The Hall was a battle of attrition and the toughest of encounters. We slipped to defeat but the performance was full of spirit and determination. The points tally exhibited how we played with enterprise and flair, 233 points registered in opposition to strong well-drilled sides.


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Rugby Every boy played their part and the leadership of Captain - - - - was paramount in rallying his troops. Overall, this was an enjoyable and evolving team to coach and the improvement very pleasing.

Keble with a satisfying win and excellent performances against Devonshire House and North Bridge House sides. Overall, it was a wonderful season. Richard Bagnall Games

Thanks for all the hard work boys. Richard Bagnall Games

Colts B

Colts A

Team Coach David Cox Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Played 7, Won 2, Drew 1, Lost 4 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - - - - Wetherby arrived with a huge pack for our first contest and although we played the more enterprising rugby, we slipped to defeat. Next was a thriller with St Anthony’s, with a super try by - - - - and a share of the spoils. Edge Grove witnessed the most outstanding display from - - - - - - - and - - - - successful with points but still a narrow loss. Against The Hall and we secured a memorable victory with some scintillating rugby, - - - - [2], - - - and - - getting over the white wash. The boys played mesmerising rugby against

Played 6, Won 6, Drew 0, Lost 0

----------------------------------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - The Under 11B team have etched their names into Arnold House folklore. They were able to win all of their games. Every single member of the side can be very proud of his contribution to this magnificent achievement. The side was led by captain, - - - - - and he led from the front as the team produced superb performances against Wetherby, St Anthony’s, The Hall, Keble, Devonshire House and North Bridge House. It would be unfair to single out any particular boy, but - - - - - - from Year 5 scored 18 tries in the season and was sublime with his trickery. It really was the perfect balance in the side with the strength of the Year 6 boys in the pack and the

emerging backs with the pace and skill from Year 5. It will be a season the boys will never forget. Well done!  David Cox Games

Under 10 A Played 4, Won 2, Drew 0, Lost 2 Team Coach Rick Martin Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - It was an eventful season for the Under 10 As. They experienced the low of defeats and the high of victories. - - - - - - capped an outstanding season with a number of well-taken tries, his speed and movement providing a cutting edge. - - - - - - made the step up to ably assist the try scoring with a similarly nimble game. Upfront the strength and power of - - - - - - and - - - - - - helped lay a solid foundation. Sean Gleeson Games

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Rugby crowned with a couple of excellent tries. The ‘Forward of the Season’ was awarded to - - - - - - - - who consistently put pressure on the opposition with a string of fine tackles.

Under 10 B Played 4, Won 2, Drew 0, Lost 2 Team Coach Sean Gleeson Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

---------------------------------------Awards: Back of the Season: - - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - -

It was a pleasure seeing the players grow not only as individuals but as a team. Well done boys! Sean Gleeson Games

Under 9 A Played 4, Won 2, Drew 1, Lost 1 Team Coach Andrew Turpie Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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-----------------------------------------------Back of the Season: - - - - - - - Forward of the Season: - - - - - Most Improved Player: - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - took the award for back of the season with a series of gritty displays

I have been thrilled with all of the boys who played in this side through the term; they have a great attitude, and they developed their skills well through the term to play very positive rugby in every game. Special mention must go to - - - - - - who has captained the team and been outstanding

he Under 10 B team made great progress in both their attitude to the game and their ability. After a tough start with an away loss to Durston House, the boys bounced back and scored memorable victories against both The Hall and North Bridge House.

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in the standard of play he produces every time he takes to the field. He is full of commitment and enthusiasm. Andrew Turpie Games

Under 9B to F I have been so impressed with the progress of the boys this term. The standard of rugby produced in the end of term House Matches was extremely high for boys of this age. They also play with a great deal of determination and will to win. There were many boys throughout Years 3 and 4 who could have made it into the A team by the end of the term and this is a very encouraging sign for the future. Andrew Turpie Games


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Hockey 1st XI

2nd XI

Played 9, Won 5, Drew 1, Lost 3

Played 6, Won 3, Drew 0, Lost 3

Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Team Coach Sebastian Stones Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - Most Improved: - - - - - Golden Stick: - - - - - -

T

he 1st XI enjoyed another busy and successful season in the spring term. 20 boys elected to focus on hockey twice a week in games time and over the season every boy made considerable progress. There were plenty of opportunities for the boys to test themselves against other teams as over the course of the term 9 matches were played and the team also participated in two tournaments. The team chalked up 5 wins against City of London, Durston House (twice), St Paul’s Cathedral Choir School and The Hall. The game versus St Anthony’s ended with a 5-5 draw and the team were beaten by Edge Grove, Newton Prep and Westminster Under School. For the first time in several years the 1st XI entered the IAPS National Hockey Championships. The competition was fierce but every boy gave his all and learnt a great deal from the experience. In the annual Arnold House 7-a-side Hockey Tournament AH achieved a creditable 3rd place finish in the 8 team competition. In the end of season awards assembly several boys’ successes were celebrated.

Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - - - Most Improved: - - - - - - Golden Stick: - - - - - - The 2nd XI also played a number of games during the season. Victories came against St Anthony’s, City of London and Durston House. They also tasted defeat at the hands of Edge Grove, Newton Prep and The Hall. Every boy gave his best and it was clear that the team as a whole improved over the course of the season. Special praise should go to - - - - - - who developed into a very useful goalkeeper. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - all impressed me at various points and it will be interesting to see how they develop next year.

Colts A Played 6, Won 3, Drew 1, Lost 2 Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - Most Improved: - - - - Golden Stick: - - - - - - -

The Colts A Team played six matches and ended with a record of won three, drawn one and lost two. One of the highlights was the win over The Hall which was the culmination of a great team effort with every player doing their bit. - - - - - deserves a special mention for his brave goalkeeping and - - - - - - - and - - - - - - also made huge progress. In the end of season awards - - - - - - was named ‘Year 6 Player of the season’, - - - was commended for his captaincy skills, - - - - - was given the ‘Year 6 Most improved Player’ and - - - - - - won the ‘Year 6 Golden Stick Award’. At Year 5 level - - - - - - was made ‘Player of The Season’, - - - - - - - - improvement was celebrated by the award of ‘Year 5 Most Improved Player’ and - - - - - - - picked up the ‘Year 5 Golden Stick Award’. - - - - - - - - was also commended for his captaincy skills. Chris Kerr Director of Sport

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Hockey Colts B Played 4, Won 2, Drew 0, Lost 2 Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

--------------------Awards: Player of the Season: - - - - - Golden Stick Award: - - - - - - -

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he Colts B Team played 4 games, winning 2 and losing 2. Wins came against The Hall and St Anthony’s. The defeats were at the hands of St Paul’s, Cathedral Choir School and Durston House. Every boy gave of his best in training sessions and matches.

Cricket 1st XI Played 13, Won 7, Lost 6 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

--------------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - - -

T

he season began with a fine team performance at Westminster F. - - - [78no], - - - [39no], and wickets by - - - - - - - - - - - and - - which assisted us to victory. Next was a comfortable win against Newton Prep, - - - - - [37].Bishop’s Stortford College inflicted our first reversal, - - - - wickets and runs, a blistering 61 by - - - - - F. - - - [21] edged us close, we fell short by five runs. Edge Grove were strong as usual resulting in a disappointing loss. North Bridge House set us a challenging total, but even with a positive response, we suffered a narrow loss. A return to winning ways was welcome against St Anthony’s, - - - - - [ 74no], - - - - [31], - - - [24], achieving a healthy 146-2 total. - - -

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- - - - - - - - - - - and - - - bowled the opposition out for 113. Our visit to Haileybury was a gripping contest, - - - - - [48], - - - - [12], - - [10] resurrecting the innings, the hosts chasing 100 for success. Our bowlers suppressed the reply; we succumbed in the last over, great game. A superb run chase by - - - - - [42] with his partner - - [11] got us close to Dame Alice Owens demanding total. A fine accomplishment versus Wetherby , - - - - [3-8], - - - [2-15], - - - - - - [2-11] with the ball, - - - - - [51] with the willow. The Hall arrived with an unblemished record, our boys were magnificent throughout the contest, - - - - - [38] and - - - - - - [25] always gave the opposition problems, the away side with a potent attack securing success. I thank the boys for all the effort and hard work this season; it has moulded them in to a fine 1st XI team that has been a great advert for the School. Without doubt this has been a group that play with a sporting ethos and with great companionship; I wish the senior players every success in their

future cricket careers. Richard Bagnall Games

2nd XI Played 6, Won 5, Lost 1 Team Coach Jon Harahap Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - - - -

The goal of developing players in readiness for the 1st XI in Year 8 was far more important than the results of this team but to be able to have a successful year was pleasing. A solitary loss to Edge Grove due to our worst batting performance, which


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Cricket saw us score our lowest total of the season (69 runs), was the only disappointment. Wins over Westminster Under School, Newton Prep, Wetherby and St Anthony’s (twice) were well deserved. The second match with St Anthony’s was a nail-biting one. A superb last over by - - - - - - - when our opponents only needed eight more runs to win with seven wickets in hand, we bowled to victory. The highlight of the season was - - - - - - - - five wicket haul against Wetherby with only seven runs conceded. His economy rate of 3.14 runs per over and bowling average of 6.28 were outstanding but they only just pipped - - - - - - (3.18 and 6.75 respectively).

- - - - led the batting averages with his aggressive hitting and running between the wickets at 28.25 followed closely by - - - - - - - (28). - - - - was able to guide us to a couple of victories chasing in the second innings. His 44 against St Anthony’s was our highest score of the season. Jon Harahap Games

Colts A Played 5, Won 2, Lost 3 Team Coach David Cox Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - - - - Batsman of the season: - - - - Fielder of the season: - - - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - -

The Colts A team can be pleased with their season. The records will show that they lost more than they won, but, bar their first fixture against The Hall the games were extremely close. The most pleasing aspect of the season was the improvement from the side. This is the most important thing when playing sport at School. The two victories against North Bridge House and St Paul’s will live long in the memory as we scored stacks of runs in both games and the bowlers were accurate with their bowling. They can go into senior cricket next year knowing they will form the spine of the side and I am sure they will continue to do well. Well done, boys. David Cox Games

Colts B Played 4, Won 1, Lost 3 Team Coach Josh Harrison Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - It has been a very enjoyable season. The boys have improved throughout with the bat, and only in the first game of the season did the opposition manage to bowl us out. - - - - - - has really helped this great team achieve by not getting out all season. Where we still need some work is in our bowling where we are still bowling too many extras. But improvement will come as the boys get more confidence. - - - - - has bowled well all season, taking four wickets. - - - - - grew as a captain with his organisation skills. Player of the season, - - - - - - scored the most runs for the team with an average of 16. He was one of our best bowlers taking 3 wickets. Our best performance of the season was our win against St Anthony’s where the boys batted well making 124 from 20 overs. I have been

impressed with the boy’s attitude and behaviour all season and all the boys should be proud of their efforts. Josh Harrison Games

Under 10 A Played 4, Won 0, Drew 1, Lost 3 Team Coach Jon Harahap Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

----------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - -

O

ur two matches against Wetherby demonstrated how much the boys had improved over the course of the season. A loss by 50 runs in the first game was followed by a 10 run defeat in the last week of the season. Particularly impressive in this match were the batting and bowling of - - - - and - - - - - - - - - - - - In our one fixture with a proper cricket ball an excellent opposition fast bowler and a wicket that was not conducive to batting saw us collapse at Durston House. Resistance did come from a partnership between co-captains - - - - - - and

-- Unfortunately our match with The Hall was rained-off which was a shame but the boys did have some fixtures as class groups against North Bridge House which were successful.

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Cricket A year of learning and development for this team will be beneficial for both the individuals involved and the School as a whole in the long run. This year group does not contain too many natural cricketers but with some further technical work and if the improvements seen this year continue there will be some very good players in the future. Jon Harahap Games

improve in what seems a promising future. Richard Bagnall Games

Under 9 A Played 5, Won 5, Lost 0 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - -

--------Batsman of the Season: - - - - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - -

---------------

Under 10 B Played 3, Won 1, Lost 2 Team Coach Richard Bagnall Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

This dedicated and evolving side started their campaign with an exciting win against a strong Wetherby side. Durston House were extremely formidable, in defeat some encouraging cricket was on display from our boys. In the return fixture versus Wetherby, a last over defeat in another tight contest. The squad worked hard, love the game and will

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Under 8 A Played 6, Won 3, Lost 3 Team Coach Josh Harrison & Edward Arghebant Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-------------------------------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - It has been a very pleasing and successful term for the U8 Cricket Team. The boys have shown enormous progress both with the bat and the ball. During the season, the team have seen off The Hall and Wetherby twice, beating The Hall U9 team convincingly.

-----------------------------Awards: Bowler of the Season: - - - - - - - Batsman of the Season: - - - - - - - Fielder of the Season: - - - - - - Player of the Season: - - - - - - - - -

North Bridge concluded a marvellous run of match winning performances. The future of the game is in fine hands at Arnold House as this team of players have the maturity, belief and a spirit that moulds all fine sides. Richard Bagnall Games

This talented and exciting squad have enjoyed a most impressive term, undefeated whilst playing some wonderful cricket. A comfortable and controlled win at North Bridge House gave them the perfect start and confidence was high. The Hall is always a real test and the game was full of excellent technical cricket. Our boys support each other and are a collective outfit; the victory by one run was testament to their quality. The side excelled in both fixtures against Wetherby, a double over

It would be unfair to name particular players with everyone who represented the A team performing admirably when called upon. If a boy was asked to captain the team he lead by example, and whether they were in the team just once or played every game they represented the School with a great deal of maturity and played for one another! A fantastic season boys. Well done! Josh Harrison Games


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Twenty/20 Cricket Match at Lord’s

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any great cricketers have graced the Main Pavilion England dressing room, then ventured on to the hallowed turf of the most famous cricket ground in the world. So our boys were totally absorbed by the initial introduction by Angus Fraser, ex-England and Middlesex player, in the pavilion. Shortly afterwards they walked onto the Nursery Ground to be presented to Reg Horne the Head of the Indoor School. Clegg’s side batted first and initially were struggling against the immaculate - - [2-3], - - - [1-16], - - - [1-6], (the best spell he bowled all term), - - - - [1-10] and - - - [2-7]. This innings was resurrected by skipper - - - - - - [28no] who played some wonderful shots back over the bowlers head, - - [28 no], who was strong behind the wicket and - - - - - - [10]. Clegg’s accelerated to a respectable 98 off the allotted 20 overs. In reply Allain’s team began with a steady knock by - - - [16] and were in control. However, a middle order collapse gave the opposition hope. - - - - - - [2-9], - - - - - [1-8], - - - - [2-2] halted the push for victory. Appropriately the 1st XI Captain - - - - - [26 no] playing with authority and assisted by - - - [12], edged his side to an exciting win.

The afternoon concluded with the presentation of the Memorial Trophy to the winning captain - - - - - - Clegg XI [Manager Josh Harrison] Allain XI [Manager David Cox]

98-9 102-6

Johnny Clegg’s XI

------------------------------------------------------------------John Allain’s XI

--------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Best Batsman: - - - - - Best Bowler: - - - - Best Fielder: - - - - - - Many thanks to our qualified umpires, Mr Todd and Mr Breeze and to our superb Year 7 scorers, - - - - - and - - - - - - - Yet again the Arnold House ‘Spirit of Cricket’ was evident throughout. Richard Bagnall Games

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Cricket Tour to Jersey

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ur arrival at Jersey International Airport was heralded by the sunshine. We travelled to play Victoria College, always a tight game in past years. Skipper - - - - [31] aided by his opening partner, - - - - - [35] played some wonderful shots around a huge ground. - - - - - - - [15] continued the run fest, - - - - - - [10] chipped in with some scurrying between the wickets. With 151-6, our hosts never really threatened in winning the twenty five over contest.

- - - - [3-6] bowled a fiery spell with superb control. - - - - - with [1-8] and - - - with [3-21]; his usual consistent contribution. - - - - - - [2-17], aided by some excellent outfield cricket, dismissed The College for 66.

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The following day our rich run of form continued as we were entertained by De La Salle College. - - - - - [50no], - - - [50no], - - - [12], - - - [24], saw us to a challenging total of 181.

continued in this vein back at the hotel. The compliments from the public were a tribute to these boys and it was without doubt the best group I have had the pleasure to take abroad. Thank you, boys.

The bowlers replied positively, - - [3-2], - - - - [1-9], - - - [2-1], were the pick as we secured a comfortable victory by 119 runs. Unfortunately our third encounter was a victim to the torrential rain that engulfed the island. Kung Fu Panda 2 in 3D with popcorn was the substitute!

I must commend Mr - - - - - Mr - - and Mr - - - - - - - our supporting parents, and Mr Harahap who contributed so much to the success of the tour.

The main ingredient of any tour is how the boys perform on and off the field. This touring side got both right. They played in a sporting and courteous manner and also

Tourists: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-------------------------------------------Richard Bagnall Games


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Tennis Under 13 Played 9, Won 7, Lost 2 Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Server: - - - - - Groundstroke maker: - - - - - - - - Volleyer: - - - - Open Champion: - - - - - - Under 12 Awards: Server: - - - - - - Groundstroke maker: - - - - - - Volleyer: - - - - - - - - - - The Arnold House Tennis Club had another successful season during the summer term of 2011. At Under 13 level, 19 boys chose tennis during Games afternoons and these boys were easily accommodated at The Canons Park Activity Centre, on the six courts at our disposal. Over the course of the season, nine matches were played with other local schools. Games were arranged to suit every standard and so during the season every one of the 19 boys who opted for tennis had at least one opportunity to represent the school in a competitive match. The schools that we played matches with were Bishop’s Stortford College, Durston House, City of London, The Hall (twice), St Anthony’s, Westminster Under, Wetherby and Newton Prep. Every boy who represented the school gave of his best and conducted himself well. As for results, the team won seven matches and were defeated only twice at the hands of Westminster Under School and on one occasion by The Hall. The stylish - - - - - - was an excellent Captain and he led the team by example, playing

with determination and a great level of skill. Other Year 8 boys who proved to be formidable opponents were - - - - - -

-- ------ ----- ---- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - - - - - - - won the Arnold House Open Championship. In the end of season presentation, at Under 13 level, - - - - - won the Serving Award, - - - - - - - picked up the Groundstroke Award and - - - - - won the award for most progress in his volleying. There was plenty of skill on display amongst the Year 7 cohort too, and - - - - - - - was singled out for his serving, - - - - - - - for his groundstrokes and - - - - - - - - for his volleying.

Under 11 Played 3, Won 2, Lost 1 Team Coach Chris Kerr Team - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

success. In the end of season awards ceremony - - - - - was crowned Server of the Season, - - - - - - won an award for volleying and - - - - - - consistent groundstrokes were honoured. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - - also made fantastic progress. Many Year 5 boys proved that the future of AH tennis is bright and I was particularly impressed with - - - - - - who won the Under 10 Groundstroke Award and the Under 11 Open Championship, - - - - - - - - who won the Under 10 Serving Award and - - - - - - who won the Under 10 Volleying Award. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - and - - - - - - are all also excellent players who will be pushing for honours as they progress through the school. Chris Kerr Director of Sport

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Awards: Server: - - - - - Groundstroke maker: - - - - - Volleyer: - - - - - - Open Champion: - - - - - - Under 10 Awards: Server: - - - - - - - - Groundstroke maker: - - - - - - Volleyer: - - - - - - The interest in tennis is not confined to the senior boys at Arnold House and the Under 11 Tennis Squad numbered twenty-four eager and enthusiastic Year 5 and 6 boys. Over the course of the season boys had the chance to play 3 fixtures with other schools. Our opposition included; St Anthony’s, Durston House and The Hall. Every boy made progress over the season and I was pleased with the high standard of play and sportsmanship that every player showed at all times. Several Year 6 boys enjoyed 129


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Sports Day & Athletics Championships Year 1 A Race Results Race Type 30 metres 50 metres Marathon Man of the zone

1st -- -------- ---------------------------- -------

2nd -- -------- -----

-- ---

3rd ------------------------------

Year 2 A Race Results Race Type 30 metres 50 metres Marathon Man of the zone

1st 2nd -- ----- -------- ----- ----------------------------------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - equal on 35 points

3rd -- ------ ---------------------

Endeavour awards for Men of the Zones in the four Houses N W B P

---------

Year 1 -----------

N W B P

Year 2 -- ----- -------- ------ ---

Year 3 A Race Results Race Type

1st --- ------------------

2nd -- ----

3rd --- ----

--- ----

--- --

Marathon

--- ----

------------------

----------------

Man of the zone

--- ---2nd -- ---- --------------------

3rd -- ---- ----------------------

50 metres 100 metres

Year 4 A Race Results Race Type 50 metres 100 metres Marathon Man of the zone

1st ---------------------------------------- -------

Endeavour awards for Men of the Zones in the four Houses N W B P

Year 3 -- ------ ------- ---------- ---

N W B P

Year 4 --- ----- ----- -------- -------

Year 5 A Race Results Race Type 50 metres 100 metres 400 metres 800 metres Relay Shot Vortex Standing long jump Standing high jump

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1st -- -- --- ------ ----

2nd ---------

Nelson

Pitt

Brunel

--- ----- ----- ------- --

-- ----- ----------- ----- ---

---- --- ----- ----- ---

-----------

3rd ---------

---------

D

espite the inclement weather, the Years 1-4 Sports Day was a great success. It was very heart-warming to see all the boys running, jumping, skipping, dodging and throwing as part of their various activities. There was a very good-natured, competitive atmosphere, and sportsmanship was shown by all the parents as well as the boys! There were numerous individual stories of success and these are charted in the results tables. Inter-House rivalry is a big factor motivating boys to run faster, jump higher and throw further and once again the House Cup was keenly contested. At the end of the morning’s events Wellington were in fourth, Brunel third, Pitt second and Nelson were in pole position. Unfortunately with the weather forecast pointing to further rain the Senior House Athletics Championships were postponed. The following week a full programme of events was completed and the results for this event also appear in the tables. Once again I was struck by the athletic talent on display and many excellent times and distances were recorded. All the points for these events were added together and, in the final analysis, Brunel came fourth, Wellington third, Pitt second and Nelson were crowned the winners. Chris Kerr Director of Sport


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Sports Day & Athletics Championships Year 6 A Race Results Race Type

800 metres

1st --- ---- ----- -------- ------

2nd - ----- ------- ------ -----

3rd --- -------- -------- -------- ---

Relay

Nelson

Wellington

Brunel

Shot

-- --- ----- ------- ------

--- ------ ------ ------ ---

--- ------ ------ ----- ---

Overall

1st --- ----- ---- ------ ------ ---- ----- ----- ---

2nd -- ----- ----- ------ ----- ----- ---- ----- ---

3rd --- ---- ----- ----- ---- ----- ------ ------ ---

4 x 100 metres relay

Nelson

Brunel

Wellington

2nd ----- ---- ------ -------- ---

Overall

1st --- ----- ----- ---- -------- -------------------- ------ ---

------ -----

3rd -- -------- ---- ------- ------- ------------------------- ----- ------

4 x 100 metres relay

Nelson

Pitt

Wellington

50 metres 100 metres 400 metres

Vortex Standing long jump Standing high jump

Year 7 A Race Results Race Type 100 metres 200 metres 800 metres Javelin Shot put High Jump Long jump

Year 8 A Race Results Race Type 100 metres 200 metres 800 metres Javelin Shot put High Jump Long jump

---- -----

Year 1-4 Results House

Total points

Number of boys

Points per boy

Brunel Nelson Pitt Wellington

3800 4350 4050 3500

34 35 34 35

112 124 119 100

House

Total points

Number of boys

Points per boy

Brunel Nelson Pitt Wellington

3300 9135 5375 4490

27 36 24 32

122 254 224 140

Year 5-8 Results

Final Positions House 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Nelson Pitt Wellington Brunel

Points per boy 190 163 119 116

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OLD BOY Arnold House Old Boys


ARNOLD HOUSE OLD BOYS

The ‘42 Club Dinner

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his year’s dinner at the ‘In & Out’ Club in St James’ on May 23rd had everything to make it a highly enjoyable evening. The food, the company and the speeches were all first rate and seemingly enjoyed by everybody there. This year’s guests from the School were Vivian Thomas, the Headmaster; Richard Fletcher, the Bursar; Sebastian Stones, Second Deputy Headmaster and the Head of Geography; Penny Williams, the Registrar and Rick Martin, Canons Park Activity Centre manager. I was at the school with Penny and Rick and it was great to catch up with them. Over dinner I also managed to plug Sebastian for all the latest insight into what is going at Arnold House. The sixth guest was Rhidian Llewellyn, who taught English and History at the School in the early 1980s before going on to be headmaster at another prep school. Through an anecdote about his job interview in the early 1980s to teach English at Arnold House, Rhidian reminded us of the gentle charm and affability of Johnny Clegg who was Headmaster between 1977 and 1994. The interview involved discussions on football and finished with gin and tonics at a nearby pub. Perfect. After a tasty dinner of salmon and lamb, Colin Winser, the ‘42 Club

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Chairman, opened the speeches with an account of the Club. He told us the finances were in pretty good health and that we needed to decide what to do for next year’s reunion. So far, so good. Vivian then gave a lucid account of School life through the writing of some of the older boys. The centrepiece was a vivid description of a cricket match against archrivals, The Hall. Importantly for the audience, the Arnold House team came from behind to win the match in the final over. After dinner, conversations continued at the bar. Having been in Barcelona for a stag party all weekend, I had to slip away to catch up on some sleep. When I left at about 10pm there were still plenty of Arnold House old boys in the bar and they looked settled. James Kilner (1985-1992)


ARNOLD HOUSE OLD BOYS

Christmas Catch Up

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ow well established in the School calendar the Christmas Catch Up took place at Pizza Express on Abbey Road again this year. Almost fifty boys who’d left the School in the previous two years gathered to catch up with each other, reminisce on the old days and share stories of life after Arnold House. Several members of staff were also in attendance. Having been away from Arnold House myself for three years it was a real pleasure to catch up with boys I’ve not seen for so long – they all seem to grow up so quickly. We always enjoy seeing old boys back at Arnold House, however long they have been away. The 2011 Christmas Catch Up will be held on Saturday 17th December for those who left the School in 2010 and 2011. Andrew Turpie Director of Development

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Class of 2005 We are always delighted to hear from Arnold House old boys and what they have done since leaving the School. Whilst working as a Gap Student at the School this year, Max Arevuo, caught up with his year group who left in 2005. Max Arevuo had five successful years at Westminster culminating in four A’s at A-Level in History, Economics, Maths and English. He also represented the school at the highest level in both football and cricket. Max is on a gap year during which he has worked at Arnold House for a term and was a ski instructor in California for a season. He will be attending the University of Michigan this autumn. Henry Armes attended Mill Hill for senior school where he was Head of House. He is also on a gap year during which he has been working at The Hall. Henry will be attending the Carol Davilla Medical School in Romania to pursue a medical degree.

level in both cricket and rugby. He was also a keen thespian. Haydn is now reading International Hospitality Management at Oxford Brookes. Arthur Fokschaner attended Mill Hill where he was the Senior Cadet in the CCF. He is now a club promoter in London and is in the process of receiving a commission from the Territorial Army. Upon leaving Arnold House Edmund Higham went to Shrewsbury. He is currently reading Mechanical Engineering at Imperial College, London Hamish Johnson started his senior school education at UCS, but decided to complete his schooling at Bryanston. He left with three A’s at A-Level in Maths, Physics and Design Technology. Hamish is at the University of Nottingham reading Physics and Philosophy.

Elliot Bowden achieved much at St Edward’s after leaving Arnold House; Head of House and rowing for the 1st VIII at Henley Royal Regatta to name but two. Elliot is now reading International Business at Loughborough and is in the 1st team for water polo.

After leaving Arnold House Max Jones went to Eton where he gained an A* in History of Art, A* in Art and an A in Politics. He also won two major Art awards and sold several pieces of artwork at a private view in his final term. Max is now studying History of Art and Fine Art at the University of Newcastle.

Philip Bronk went to Westminster after his tenure at Arnold House. He had an enjoyable five years and is now reading PPP at University College, Oxford.

Sam Julius attended UCS. He is currently on a gap year coaching cricket in Australia and will be attending UCL to read Politics this autumn.

Harry Cooke was one of three boys to attend St Paul’s after Arnold House. He is currently on a gap year, hiking up all of the active volcanoes in South America. Harry will be reading Law at UCL this autumn.

Nicholas Price attended Mill Hill until GCSE’s after which he moved to JFS for Sixth Form. He achieved an A* and three A’s at A-Level and is now at the University of Leeds reading International Relations.

Oscar Dub attended Westminster where he was extremely musically active. He is currently reading Music at Cambridge.

Leo Rifkind attended St Paul’s after Arnold House. He was a key component of the Tennis 1st VI while also chairing the Political Society. Outside school he chaired JDRF’s walk to cure diabetes in 2009, raising around £500,000, and has successfully completed a marathon. He is currently at

Haydn Elliott attended Haileybury where he was an active sportsman, representing the school at the highest 136

LSE studying Law. Henry Sether went to Highgate. He represented the school’s rugby 1st XV and is now reading Industrial Economics at Nottingham University. After his years at Arnold House Luke Shelley attended Mill Hill. He is currently studying at Regent’s Business School in London. Jamie Sparks went to Harrow where he was a very successful sportsman. He represented the school at the highest level in rugby and swimming and was captain of the water polo team. He pursued his rugby outside school and played for Middlesex U18s. Jamie is currently on a gap year and will be returning to read Anthropology at Bristol University. Matthew Stahl attended Latymer Upper and was a prefect in Sixth Form. He is currently on a gap year during which he was a ski instructor in France. This autumn he will be attending UCL to read Medicine. Alexander Turdean also attended St Paul’s and is now studying at Duke University in North Carolina. Sahil Vaswani attended Jumeirah College in Dubai after his two years at Arnold House. He is now studying at Nottingham University. Charlie Williams went to Mill Hill and was a monitor in his final year. He is currently on a gap year and will be attending Kent University this winter to read American Studies and Literature. After Arnold House Christian Young went to Shiplake College where he was an active part of the school’s tennis team and drama department. Since Shiplake Christian has completed a foundation degree in film at London College of Communication. The degree has helped him secure a place at


ARNOLD HOUSE OLD BOYS

Class of 2005 Ravensbourne University where he will study digital film and media. Jamie Yuan went to UCS after leaving Arnold House. He is now on a gap year and plans to study Classics at UCL. Nicholas Zehner attended Eton for senior school where he was the House Captain of Games and Secretary of the Model

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2000

UN Society. He is currently on a gap year during which he has worked for a US Senate Campaign in New Hampshire as well as pursuing the study of Arabic whilst travelling in North Africa and the Middle East. He will start at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, in September. Thank you to all the Old Boys who provided information. We wish you luck and

Class of 2005 in.....

enjoyment in your future studies. Unfortunately we were unable to establish enough information about the following boys. Please get in touch if you can help us fill in some of the gaps. Guy Bennett - Haileybury Luke Birch - Eton Ben Koerner - Winchester John Penny – City of London Max Toomey - Westminster

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Arnold House School, 1 Loudoun Road, St John’s Wood, London NW8 0LH Tel: +44 (0)20 7266 4840 Fax: +44 (0)20 7266 6994 Email: office@arnoldhouse.co.uk School website: www.arnoldhouse.co.uk Arnold House School (Limited by Guarantee) Registered in London No. 889424 An Educational Charitable Trust No. 312725


Arnold House Magazine 2011 - Redacted