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A Special Publication of The Journal | Fall 2010

Health & Fitness Celebrity Health: bo bice

The ‘American Idol’ alum dishes on his secrets to better living, inside and out

Shake the Sugar

Easy ways to solve a sweet tooth

Burn,Baby, Burn!

Kick-start a slow metabolism the natural way

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Scoring What You Eat Crawl, Then Walk Alternative Arthritis Treatments How to Avoid Hot Flashes


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Fall 2010

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s e s u c x E e h t ’ e ‘Spar Bowling can be a great source of exercise for the fun-seeking fitness enthusiast By Lisa Iannucci CTW FEATURES

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or those who think that bowling isn’t exercise, think again. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Md., lists bowling as a moderate-intensity exercise that’s helpful in lowering high blood pressure and The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition recommends bowling as an activity people can do to win exercise-related presidential awards. Bowling uses just about every muscle in the body, not just that swinging arm. However, for those looking to make bowling one part of a regular exercise routine, remember that it’s a better strength training activity than a cardiovascular one, so include a 30- to 60-minute cardiovascular routine to round out a daily exercise program. Flexibility is key to good bowling. The more flexible someone is, the easier it is to bend and move while bowling. Stretching also reduces the risks of muscle aches, pains and strains. To stay flexible, do some basic stretching exercises before and after bowling. And while hitting the lanes is mostly fun and games, using bad form – and yes, bowling can be done wrong — can cause injury. The most common injuries result from overthrowing, throwing improperly or bowling too much. To prevent injuries: • Use a ball that properly fits on the fingers. Too big, and it’s

more easy to drop the ball or raise calluses and blisters on the fingers. • Make sure the ball is the proper weight. Rule of thumb is that it should be 10 percent of a person’s body weight, up to 16 pounds. That means that for a person weighing 140 pounds, a 14-pound ball might be appropriate. However, if that’s still too heavy, try a 12-pound ball instead. • Focus on form – how the ball is thrown. Leaning over the line too far puts more weight on the back than on the legs, and it might cause a twinge of pain. That’s a warning sign to ease up. Don’t twist the body when throwing. Stay straight, bending to release the ball onto the lane. • Don’t overthrow and avoid swinging the ball too far behind the body. These movements can cause shoulder injuries. • Wear proper bowling shoes that aren’t sticky on the bottom. An abrupt stop at the line can increase the risk of serious knee and back injuries. Never bowl in sneakers or socks. Sneakers stick to the surface of the lane and the oil on the lanes can cause slips and falls. More than 30 million people bowl each year, and it’s a lot of fun. To keep fit by bowling regularly, consider joining a league or bowling a few times each week. Lisa Iannucci is the co-author of “Bowling for Dummies” (Wiley, 2010).


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Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

Baby Steps to Better Brain Development

Missing out on a major developmental milestone could lead to setbacks down the road

“Some parents think their kids are geniuses because they’re walking at 9 months, but they’ll have problems down the line because they didn’t spend time on the floor with their eyes and hands working together as a team.” – Patricia Lemer, developmental psychologist By ANNA SACHSE CTW FEATURES

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abies who are unable to crawl at 9 months are more likely to have behavioral problems and lag behind in school at age 5, a London study reveals. Though some health professionals agree that crawling is a critical developmental phase, the consensus holds that kids who don’t crawl will not pay later provided they develop gross and fine motor skills and reach other milestones, such as sitting and walking. “There are plenty of kids who skip crawling and they seem to do just fine. I look more at when they start walking. If at 18 months a child isn’t walking, that’s a concern,” says developmental pediatrician Dr. Deborah Mishek, San Diego. London’s Millennium Cohort Study, made public in February, likely will stoke the controversy, not lay it to rest. London University’s Institute of Education analyzed the progress of nearly 15,000 children born in 2000 and 2001 from birth to age 5. The study found that tots who were slow to develop motor skills such as crawling by 9 months of age were significantly more likely to be behind in their cognitive development and also more likely to have behavioral problems. In addition to building muscle strength


Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

and improving coordination, crawling likely plays a role in cognitive development, and it teaches babies where their bodies are in space and in relation to other objects, says Dr. Brent Jensen, a pediatrician at Sacred Heart Hospital, Eau Claire, Wis. But babies who don’t crawl typically learn these things by some other means, he adds. Others argue that the act of crawling provides for unique, necessary learning opportunities. Crawling requires oppositional arm and leg movements. Since movement on one side of the body is initiated by the opposite side of the brain, crawling requires the use of both the right and left hemispheres of the brain. Children who skip it and go straight to walking are not more advanced but rather at risk for a host of setbacks down the line, including learning disabilities, poor coordination and vision problems, says developmental psychologist Patricia Lemer, Developmental Delay Resources, Pittsburgh. “Some parents think their kids are geniuses because they’re walking at 9 months, but they’ll have problems down the line because they didn’t spend time on the floor with their eyes and hands working together as a team,” she says. Doctors tend to agree that fewer babies learn to crawl these days, in part because the American Academy of Pediatrics in the mid-’90s started advising parents to put their babies to sleep on their backs to help prevent sudden infant death syndrome. With so much less time spent on their bellies, babies literally are not in a position to learn to crawl or develop the necessary upper body strength. Babies learn to locomote in others ways, such as rolling or scooting to explore their environment. If these movements lead to walking, and there are no corresponding delays in other areas, most doctors say not to worry. However, “Compensatory movements limit how children scan their environments,” which can cause reading difficulties and other problems later on, says Dr. Deborah Zelinsky, a neurodevelopmental optometrist who practices in Northbrook, Ill. Whether or not crawling is important, doctors recommend giving babies supervised “tummy time” each day to develop back and neck muscles. Parents can then encourage crawling by holding an enticing object just out of reach. Kids generally start crawling between 6 and 9 months. If they don’t, “Watch the child’s development over time. If the development of gross motor skills occurs in a decent progression, that’s much more important than the actual act of crawling,” Jensen says. “If the kid is pulling up to stand, if all the rest is happening quite well, then if the baby’s not crawling, that’s OK.” © CTW Features

“There are plenty of kids who skip crawling and they seem to do just fine. I look more at when they start walking. If at 18 months a child isn’t walking, that’s a concern.” – Dr. Deborah Mishek, neurodevelopmental pediatrician

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Diminish Flab, Diminish Flashes

Reduction in hot flashes may be linked to women’s weight loss

Fall 2010 By Taniesha Robinson CTW FEATURES

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ot flashes or flushes may be the most common complaint among women experiencing menopause. Yet, these feelings of intense heat often accompanied by sweating and a rapid heartbeat may be more frequent for those who are obese or overweight. “In multiple observational studies, women with a higher body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) have reported more frequent or severe hot flushes compared with women with a lower BMI,” write the authors of a study published in “Archives of Internal Medicine.” The study showed that women who lost weight and decreased BMI and abdominal circumference reported less hot flushes during the six months of the study. Actual weight loss is key. There were no significant associations between changes in hot flashes and changes in physical activity, calorie intake, blood pressure or overall self-reported physical and mental functioning. Dr. Alison J. Huang, an internal medicine professor at the University of California-San Francisco, along with her colleagues, studied 338 women with an average age of 53 who were overweight or obese and had urinary incontinence. During a six-month trial period, 226 of the participants were randomized to the intensive weight loss intervention and 112 to the control group. At the beginning of the study, about half of the women in each group reported that they were at least slightly bothered by flashes. According to the study’s background research, hot flushes are not only among the most common concerns of women during menopause, they may also persist for five or more years after the stage in as many as onethird of women. “Our findings indicate that women who are overweight or obese and experience bothersome hot flushes may also experience improvement in these symptoms after pursuing behavioral weight loss strategies. However, improvements in weight or body composition may not be the only mediators of this effect,” the study’s authors concluded. The study was co-funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the Office of Research on Women’s Health and the National Center for Research Resources.


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Fall 2010

Simple Steps to Boost Metabolism Red wine, resistance training and sleep are just a few of the tricks to speed up a slow metabolism By Dawn Klingensmith CTW FEATURES

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f all the health benefits tied to red wine, perhaps the most surprising is that it can help people shed pounds by boosting metabolism. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start guzzling Gallo just yet. There is no magic food, supplement or exercise that can shift your

metabolism into overdrive; however, there are foods and behaviors that, all together, can rev it up, says Dr. Zaid Jabbar, Edward Medical Group, Bolingbrook, Ill. Along with exercising and eating an overall healthy diet, drinking one glass of red wine at bedtime might help with weight loss and maintenance, Jabbar says. Other foods that have been shown to increase metabolism are hot peppers, green tea and carob fiber, but of these, only green tea in large amounts (at least five cups a day) is par-


Fall 2010

Health & Fitness

ticularly effective on its own. Therefore, a long-term strategy for optimizing a metabolism should focus on resistance training to build more lean muscle mass, because muscles require a lot of energy to maintain. In fact, “Muscles burn calories when you’re just sitting there,” Jabbar says. Aerobic exercise is important, too. It can help to split hourlong workouts into two half-hour sessions in the morning and evening, or split a half-hour workout into two 15-minute sessions because after each cardiovascular workout the body continues to burn calories for several hours, Jabbar says. By working out twice, people can burn calories all day long, potentially around the clock. After a workout, reach for protein rather than carbohydrates because some studies show that carbs halt the afterburn, Jabbar adds. Aside from exercise, “The ultimate way to boost metabolism is by eating things that the body uses a lot of energy to digest,” such as lean protein, Jabbar says. Also, “Eat foods that give you energy instead of dragging you down,” says Lyssie Lakatos, a New York-based dietitian and author of “Fire Up Your Metabolism: 9 Proven Principles for Burning Fat and Losing Weight Forever” (Fireside, 2004). “The trick is to combine energy-revving carbs – whole-grain carbs, fruits, vegetables, beans – with a little protein and fat to slow digestion.” The more energy a person has, the more likely she is to move and sustain a higher metabolic rate, Lakatos says. Sleep also plays an important metabolic role, and not just because it restores energy. “Not sleeping enough tends to increase our appetite hormones, whereas getting enough sleep helps regulate them,” says Los Angeles-based dietician Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. Plus, “Just think about it – if you’re sleeping, you’re not eating,” she adds. The body starts noticing it’s not getting food, though, and that’s why breakfast is so important, Lakatos says. “It gets your body out of conservation mode and provides you with the fuel you need to start your day and be more active.” “Trial after trial has shown that people who eat breakfast eat less calories throughout the day and are better able to maintain a healthy weight,” she adds. Eat multiple small meals instead of two or three large ones. “Metabolism is like a fire that needs logs. If you throw a ton of logs on it, you kill it. But if there aren’t enough logs, it dies out,” Jabbar says. “You want to feed it a little at a time.” Also, drink seven or eight glasses of ice-cold water a day because cold beverages make your body burn calories to maintain its temperature, and water fills you up, Jabbar says. For those looking to incorporate some of the proven metabolism-boosting foods into their diet, remember to make substitutions. “Always be careful because you want to get the benefits without adding calories,” Giancoli says. And try using salsa for something other than chips. “You might be getting a lot of bang for your buck because it has veggies,” along with the hot peppers, she adds. Any single food’s effect on metabolism will be small. “No one has done a study putting all these things together,” Giancoli says, “but if you’re really careful with your diet and you’re watching calories, these little things might add up.”

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Arthritis, Meet Your Alternative

Traditional Chinese exercises and treatments provide a boost for the mind, soul and joints

Fall 2010 By Jeff Schnaufer CTW FEATURES

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lder Americans suffering from osteoarthritis may find help in an even older source: ancient Chinese healing treatments and exercise. New studies by U.S. researchers are revealing the potential healing power of acupuncture, Tai Chi exercise and Qigong to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, which causes pain and reduced motion in the joints and spine. Experts say there is no current medicinal cure for osteoarthritis. In a recent study published in the journal “Arthritis Care & Research,” Dr. Chenchen Wang and colleagues at Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, recruited 40 subjects, averaging 65 years of age, suffering from knee osteoarthritis to participate in a 60minute Tai Chi session, instructed by a Tai Chi master, twice weekly for 12 weeks. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese mind–body exercise that enhances balance, strength and flexibility, and reduces pain, depression and anxiety in diverse patient populations with chronic conditions. “It’s very exciting,” says Wang, who says the study showed that Tai Chi appeared to improve physical function and reduce pain and depression. “We found that Tai Chi does have a lot of benefits for the elderly for physical and mental conditions.” In June 2008, Dr. Kevin Chen and fellow researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine, Baltimore, published a study in “Clinical Rheumatology” revealing the effectiveness of external Qigong therapy on people with knee osteoarthritis. External Qigong therapy is similar to therapeutic touch, in which the welltrained healer applies his/her Qi energy to the patient, Chen says. Chinese medicine considers knee arthritis to be caused by Qi blockage in the knee area.


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Fall 2010

Among the three groups treated for two weeks, Chen says “the placebo group had a 33-percent reduction in pain, the group by Healer 1 had a 35percent reduction in pain, while the group by Healer 2 had a 55-percent reduction of pain after two weeks of treatment.” This led Chen to conclude that External QiGong Therapy might have a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis, depending upon the qualities of the healer. Chinese acupuncture also has been studied as an aid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Lixing Lao of the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine has conducted three acupuncture studies from 1993 to 2004, from a small pilot study to a 570-patient clinical trial. “Patients who were randomly assigned to the acupuncture treatment group had significant pain relief and function improvement ... compared to placebo/sham control,” Lao says. Researchers realize more studies need to be done to incorporate Chinese exercise and healing practices into mainstream medicine in the United States, but they are seeing hopeful signs. “Acupuncture is more accepted by the public than any time before,” Lao says, citing a recently published survey conducted by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. “There were 27.2 visits to acupuncturists per year per 1,000 persons in 1997, but in 2007, this number increased to 79.2 visits per year per 1,000 persons.” Plus, Lao says, more medical acupuncturists are working in hospitals. “For example, in our University of Maryland School of Medicine, not only is acupuncture service provided by licensed acupuncturists in the center for integrative medicine but also by medical acupuncturists for their patients in the shock trauma center, cancer center and anesthesiology department.”

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Alternative by the Numbers lternative medicine, once saddled with the A

label of being “hippie” and “fringe” is now one of the major trends in modern healing. According to the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.: • One-third of all Americans are using some form of complementary or alternative medicine. • More than 1 million Americans currently use acupuncture. • More than $500 million per year is spent on acupuncture. • Most of the acupuncture treatments are combined with conventional Western medicine. • The number of acupuncture practitioners will double in three years. • Indications for the use of acupuncture in medical practice cover a wide range of clinical conditions.

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Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

Ask the Expert:

Greg Critser: I’m Gonna Live Forever! The author of ‘Eternity Soup: Inside the Quest to End Aging’ explains why humans want to live forever – and whether it’s possible By Matthew M. F. Miller CTW FEATURES

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n ordinary lunch with his elderly parents launched awardwinning science writer Greg Critser on a quest to understand why people will sometimes take extraordinary measures to live abnormally long lives. “We were at a restaurant in Palm Springs, which Bob Hope once dubbed ‘God’s Waiting Room’ because of its huge population of elderly. I was telling them all about how modern medicine sees aging, that it is natural and that we should aim to live, say, 85 years healthily, and then just die quickly without pain.” When his mother stabbed at her artichoke – “like a serial killer,” Critser recalls – he knew he’d struck a nerve. “She just looked at me and said, ‘Uh-uh, Greg, that’s not how we see it at all. Aging is un-natural. We plan to live to 100!’ She then went on to tell me about her various anti-aging experiences. So I got the picture real quick. I began to wonder if I had been too dismissive of anti-aging, sort of like I was 30 years ago when I said the Internet thing would never fly. After all, there are legitimate scholars out there now who think aging is un-natural!” Soon, Critser – whose award-winning book, “Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2003) delved into uncomfortable truths about America’s obesity epidemic – turned his attention to aging. His new book, “Eternity Soup: Inside the Quest to End Aging” (Harmony Books, 2010), is the product of years of research into the anti-aging movement and Critser’s single-minded pursuit of an answer to one question: Can humans end the aging process? We spoke to Critser about his journey.

Will it ever be possible to stop the negative aspects of aging? Think about the question itself – would anyone have asked it about 20 years ago? Yet today it is not an uncommon discussion. The short answer is no. But the real question is, why are we ask-

ing it? It’s because America, and the rest of the world, is entering a new phase. By 2050, there will be 1 million people over 100 years old in the U.S. alone! Twenty million will be 85 or older. That means a huge chunk of the population’s dominant worldview was forged nearly a century ago. The youth culture may be on its way out.

What does the phrase ‘eternity soup’ mean? The deeper I  got into the search for longevity, the more I saw it as an amalgamated soup of claims, ideas, beliefs and agendas. Also, the first person to intuit that caloric restriction could expand the maximum lifespan was a 16th century Italian humanist whose main diet was soup! One day I just blurted it out – eternity soup – and it stuck.

Is there anything the average person can do to stop the aging process, or is the idea just a marketing gimmick? Sorting through that was one of the reasons I wrote the book. On the one hand, you have a growing commercial enterprise, from cosmetics to hormones, whose promoters promise the elderly and the young alike a new, extended future. On the other, you have the academics, the people who specialize in the science of aging, who demonize all anti-aging claims – except, of course, the ones that reflect their own theories. When you have that kind of divide, one driven by beliefs and ideology as much as science, you know there must be a great story to tell. And when that combines with stunning demographic changes – imagine those 1 million centenarians – well, that’s a story you can’t pass up.

You said ideology drives this debate. What do you mean by that? Let’s start with the anti-aging industry, or what I call “cash therapy.” These are folks who, in countless books, symposiums and infomercials, tout the rejuvenating wonders of hormone replacement, usually in the form of custom-tailored compounds,


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The Journal | 13

or bio-identicals. Their beliefs are essentially 19th century, based on the idea that merely by replacing what one loses – hormones – it’s possible not only to age healthier but to live longer. They also claim that their concoctions work better than Pharma’s solution to aging, which seems to be a thrilling and weird cocktail of medications such as Prempro, Ambien, Prozac and Zantac.

Do these replacement therapies work?

Unfortunately, those claims are hugely over-inflated. With hormone replacement the real  issue is effectiveness. Because humans differ, sometimes wildly, in their native levels of hormones, it is almost impossible to find the best dose. Even when one does, the effects are rarely spectacular. They may indeed be safer; I am not convinced but I am open for evidence. Anyway, saying that you are safer than Big Pharma is not exactly something to crow about!

What advice would you give someone considering anti-aging compounds?

Hold on to your wallet! You may go in for a hormone-related issue and end up walking out the door with hundreds of dollars worth of every nutritional supplement in the world, most of which will be – I won’t be the first to say it – expensive urine.

What is the strangest thing going on in the anti-aging movement today?

One strange land the Calorie Restriction Society, folks who are trying to achieve the same lifespan-extending effects scientists have achieved in mice that have been deprived of food. I once had a fellow tell me, perfectly straight, “It’s really not so bad after the first five years.”

Based on your research, is extreme calorie restriction a viable idea for the average person?

Calorie restriction is not even a viable idea for the above-average person. While it may indeed change your body’s physiology to resemble that of a long-lived, calorie restricted mouse, there is no evidence that it will make you live any longer than if you simply took good care of yourself. And you will be miserable. The old joke: Calorie restriction may not make you live forever, but you will feel like it.

Is the discussion of anti-aging a form of ageism?

Even discussing the notion of aging as a condition that can be cured somehow implies ageism – that it somehow suggests that the elderly are  inferior and that being young is better than being old. Well, ageism is an important issue, and we see it all around us. But aging is, fundamentally, a disease-like state. It bears all the hallmarks of disease. We intuitively know this. I mean, Cicero pronounced it as such two thousand years ago. And, frankly, it is always better, physiologically, to be younger than older. In terms of wisdom, of course, that’s another matter.

What about the opposition to the use of hormones? Again, it is based on ideology and self interest as much as the beliefs of the “cash therapists.” For example, consider resveratrol, the grape skin extract thought to mimic the lifespan-extending

“By 2050, there will be 1 million people over 100 years old in the U.S. alone! Twenty million will be 85 or older. That means a huge chunk of the population’s dominant worldview was forged nearly a century ago.The youth culture may be on its way out.”

effect of caloric restriction. It is the only supplement that professional gerontologists deem acceptable. But this is a belief. The facts, at least when it comes to applying it to humans rather than mice, do not stand. The big groundbreaking news a few years ago was that grape skin compounds extend the life of highfat-eating mice by 30 percent. However, what you did not hear much about is that when they tried it with mice eating a normal diet, it did not work. So we have a “correct” anti-aging compound that only works if you are obese and eating a high-fat diet! Moreover, resveratrol seems to work by inhibiting the growth hormone pathway. A huge academic enterprise has grown up around the notion that because low growth hormone works with yeast, flies, worms and mice, then it must translate to humans. In my reading it does not.

Will there ever come a time when aging is perceived to be undesirable and unwanted?

I think all generations go through this as they age as a group, reinforcing and amplifying their collective and individual fear of death. It is worse now because it’s the boomers – the world’s greatest confessional and therapeutic generation – who are going through this. There are huge businesses that have a stake in our acting on that fear of aging by buying their products.


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Fall 2010

More Kids Taking To The Gym For competitive edge or confidence boost, teens and younger exercise By Laura Casey Contra Costa Times

At Forma Gym in Walnut Creek, Calif., 13-year-old Zakery Galambos climbs a newly installed bouldering wall with the help and encouragement of his personal trainer, Robert Jackson. About 20 miles away at Hercules (Calif.) Fitness Gym, kids ages 3 and up work with personal trainers and CrossFit instructors Lesha Capitanich Kastl and Bryan Kastl on running and squatting skills as their parents take pictures. Instead of being left at home or plopped into the child care center at the gym, kids as young as 3 are learning some of the same exercises — modified for their ages — their parents are doing. They are working with personal trainers, taking yoga, Zumba, boot camp and CrossFit classes. “Parents want their kids to be introduced to a gym and have the tools for exercising later on,” says Jackson, co-owner of Forma. His gym has about 50 young clients, ages 6 and up, whose parents pay up to $75 an hour for these one-on-one sessions. With nearly 20 percent of children obese or at risk of becoming obese, according to the 2008 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System, many parents are desperate to get their kids active. But there are other reasons, besides weight management, why parents are footing the bill for professional fitness services. Kids like Zakery, who plays ice hockey, want a competitive edge over their peers. “We’re giving him all the tools he needs to succeed,” says Nelson Galambos, Zakery’s dad. “Not only does it keep him busy and out of trouble, he excels. It’s a wise investment.” Galambos also says it will pay off for Zakery not only physically but mentally. “He will notice a difference when he competes against kids his age and older kids,” he says. Zakery asked for a trainer, and Galambos says that he wouldn’t push Zakery to use one to improve his hockey skills if Zakery didn’t want it. The family hopes the extra help might lead to a scholarship for Zakery, who would like to attend a top-tier school on the East Coast such as Boston University. Others, including 17-year-old Matthew Haupmann, work out with personal trainers to boost their self-esteem and improve their physiques. Haupmann has been working with trainer Kirk Michals for more than a year. A skinny kid when he first arrived at All In One Fitness in Walnut Creek, Haupmann has gained 32 pounds of muscle. “I feel a lot more confident now that I have a bigger body and more muscle,” says Haupmann, adding that the exercise has helped him focus in life in general. His trainer, Michals, sees the change in Haupmann’s personality.

“When kids train, they become more open when they become more active. Matthew has really opened up a lot. If he didn’t find this, he might have not found an outlet,” Michals says. His mom, Emma Andreoli, says Haupmann was never into sports so she wanted to get him active somehow. Having him come to All in One Fitness has helped Haupmann find his exercise niche. She thinks he will enjoy exercising like this for the rest of his life, and now Haupmann is training with Michals to get fit in order to become a firefighter. “He’s found something (working with a trainer) that he likes, and it’s worth it to me,” she says. Back in Hercules, eight young children surround Kastl and her husband during the CrossFit class. CrossFit — a cross-training program developed for adults but tweaked for these children — has the kids running around, using suspended rings and playing games for 30 minutes. Three-year-old Sierra Thompson is engaged in the activities, although she likely doesn’t even know she’s exercising. She does squats before her turn at duck, duck, goose and keeps up with the older kids as they run around the workout area. Sierra’s mom, Staci Thompson, used to teach physical education at a local school. She’s worried about current obesity rates for children and adults as well as cuts to physical education classes at schools. “I think it’s important to get kids exercising at an early age,” she says. “I want Sierra to have a healthy lifestyle and be healthy.” Carol Jorgensen, guardian to 4-year-old Khamani McGhee, says she models fitness for him by working out herself at Hercules Fitness Gym. Experts say parents and guardians are the best role models for their children’s future habits, and little guys like Khamani will learn that exercise is fun through classes like CrossFit. And classes, training and gym time are considered safer in some parents’ minds than letting kids play outside. Thompson noted that when she was a


Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

child, she used to play with friends outside, leaving the door unlocked all day. Now, she says, “I lock the door right when I go inside. It’s just not the same as it used to be out there.” Kastl agrees. If kids don’t have a place to go play and get exercise outside or in a gym, they’ll likely stay sedentary at home playing video games. “We lived in a cul-de-sac and played all day. You just don’t see that anymore,” Kastl says. Training kids and catering to kids in exercise classes is different from training adults. Kids’ bodies are different — they are still growing and do not yet have all the muscle mass they will have as adults — so exercise has to be modified for their specific needs. For instance, in Zumba classes for children, the moves are toned down and the pace is not as frenetic. And in yoga, instructors use different names for poses and hold the kids’ attention through storytelling. Lynn Love, a personal trainer at Club One Silver Creek in San Jose, says kids are generally shy when they first arrive at the gym and are surrounded by adults. “Most of them, when they come into the gym, are very uncomfortable in there because they don’t know what to do, and they don’t even know what they are looking at (in terms of exercise tools),” she says. “Even adults are uncomfortable in a gym because they don’t know what to do.” Love, who says she looks like a 16-year-old herself and is therefore approachable to a younger age group, says teaching kids how to use everything correctly puts them at ease in the gym. She helps them find their target heart rate and ideal weight for their age and height. Jasmine Buczek, co-owner of All in One Fitness, says kids are also up for new challenges when they train and are often more excited when they see the results of their work. “With adults, they want to see results quick, and they tend to talk down on

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themselves, especially women,” Buczek says. “Overall, adults have a harder time noticing the positive results. They are harder on themselves. Kids can be very appreciative very fast when they see just a little bit of results.” Fortunately, Buczek says, no matter what sort of exercise routine a child excels at, time is on the side of the younger set. Kids have had less time to build up bad habits than adults who have spent many years being inactive and eating poorly. Buczek teaches nutrition tips as well as physical exercise. After a few boxing exercises at Forma Gym, Zakery takes a break for water before plunging back into weights and coordination exercises. He says working with Jackson will certainly help his game. “I am building strength so I don’t get pushed around,” he says.

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Fall 2010

Men can count on their friends By Nancy Churnin The Dallas Morning News

Men often measure their health in terms of numbers: how many minutes of exercise they have logged and how many calories and nutrients they have eaten. Dallas native Ron Nevelow believes too many men overlook an additional factor: emotional health, the kind that comes from bonding with friends and doing activities you love. When Nevelow was 25 and working as an accountant, he found himself in an emergency room suffering gastrointestinal distress. Figuring out that it was stress-related, he switched careers to a field that made him happier — social work and psychotherapy — and joined an all-male singing group. Now, at 48 and a married father of three, he feels better than ever. “Being socially connected and bonding with other men has helped me tremendously to relax, become more secure and emotionally stable, and given me connections with men who have supported me in taking better care of myself,” he says. This makes perfect sense to Dr. Carlyle Stewart, an internal-medicine physician on the medical staff of Baylor Medical Center at Plano. “The public-health implications of one’s emotional state and its effect on physical health are rather profound, although somewhat controversial,” says Stewart, who says that he has long believed that each one affects the other. “As we speak, research is under way that explores the relationship between one’s state of mental health and the subsequent development of physical disorders. There appears to be a distinct relationship between the presence of chronic illnesses and an individual’s state of emotional wellness.” At the same time, he acknowledges that this can be a tough sell to many of his male patients.

Talk about it

Men tend to be sensitive about discussions that relate to emotions, especially when it comes to sharing feelings of depression or anxiety that may be perceived of as

a sign of weakness or loss of control, Stewart says. For this reason he rarely talks to men about their feelings directly. Instead, he asks casually about how life has been in general and more specifically, whether there has been a lot of stress at work or at home. If the men mention marital problems or layoffs, he explains how a patient’s mood or emotional state can cause biochemical or hormonal changes, which may affect someone physically and mentally. “An agitated or anxious state may lead to the release of adrenaline, which, in turn, may constrict peripheral arteries, elevate blood pressure and increase blood-sugar levels. On a theoretical basis, and as supported by a growing body of evidence, these changes may aggravate or predispose to hypertension, diabetes, heart attacks and other serious health conditions.” Then he offers tips for a nonmedical way they can treat themselves.

tradition of grieving for the dead. “I felt cared about.” Geoffrey L. Greif, author of “Buddy System: Understanding Male Friendships” (Oxford University Press, $29.95), says too many men feel isolated and alone when problems hit because they don’t know how to make friends or are socialized to believe this is not something that strong men do. At the same time, he says, most men’s friendships are fundamentally different from women’s friendships, and that’s all right. Women may enjoy getting together to talk over lunch. Men are usually more comfortable meeting for a shared activity. When men meet, they may not share anything personal at all. “The joke is that a man goes over to his friend’s house for a couple of hours and comes home, and his wife asks him about his friend’s divorce, and the man says, ‘It never came up,’” says Greif, a professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland.

Seeing the benefit

Great friendship

“Doing something that makes you happy, whether it’s hanging out with your buddies, spending time with a friend or loved one, even if it is just watching a funny movie, can boost endorphins, serotonin and levels of other naturally occurring hormones and chemicals that can leave you with a heightened sense of well-being and happiness. Not only that, elevated circulating levels of these and related chemicals may function to enable someone to better cope with stress afterward.” Nevelow says that’s exactly how he feels after rehearsing or performing with Kol Rina, a men’s choir that he joined at Anshai Torah, a conservative synagogue in Plano. “I feel a sense of joy that stays with me for hours afterward,” he says. It had been a leap for him, too, as he followed a longtime desire to sing, even though he had never done so before. The other men in the choir were supportive in unexpected ways. “My mother died after my first year with the group. And they all came to sit shiva with me,” he said, referring to the Jewish

The option to open up should be there if needed, he notes, quoting from his book: “What is a great friendship? For me the answer is ‘Let me sit and watch TV and not talk with my friend about anything other than the game. But, let me also know that if I need to talk to him about something bothering me, I can.’ Many men believe they do not have these or similar options in their friendships.” Nevelow says that working as a nonacademic counselor at the Greenhill School in Addison, Texas, he sees the early effects of that socialization in teens. The girls speak up about their problems and worries, but the boys who are under stress are reluctant to seek help or open up to their male peers because it doesn’t seem like a manly thing to do. That’s a perception he would like to help change. “As a psychotherapist, I think it is essential that we have people to talk to,” noting that this has allowed him to weather life challenges over the years. “I would like to see others find these healthy male friendships, too.”


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Something’s Fishy A new study shows that regular use of fish oil supplements may reduce risk of breast cancer By Taniesha Robinson CTW FEATURES

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or women, the benefit of a fish fillet may go beyond the protein, mental health and the delicious taste. A recent study by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle links consumption of fish oil supplements with a decreased risk of breast cancer. Regular consumption of high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA contained in fish oil supplements was linked with a 32-percent reduced risk of breast cancer in the study led by Emily White, Ph.D., a member of the public health sciences division.

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The Hutchinson study is the first to link these substances to breast cancer. Previous studies of fish intake and omega-3 fatty acids have been inconsistent. “It may be that the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements are higher than most people would typically get from their diet,” White says. White and other researchers followed 35,016 postmenopausal women for six years. Initially, none of the women had a history of breast cancer and each completed a 24-page questionnaire about their use of non-vitamin, non-mineral “specialty” supplements. Six years later, 880 cases of breast cancer were identified. While excitement has emerged with

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increasing evidence about the health benefits of fish oil, White and other medical professionals encourage caution. “It is very rare that a single study should be used to make a broad recommendation,” said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and an editorial board member of “Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.” “Over a period of time, as the studies confirm each other, we can start to make recommendations,” he says. Harvard researchers are now enrolling what they plan to be a study of 20,000 patients to examine the impact of fish oil supplements and vitamin D on cancer, heart disease and stroke.

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Health & Fitness

Celebrity Health:

Bo Bice

‘American Idol’ runner-up reveals how better living and more giving back led him to better health and a happier life By Lisa Iannucci CTW FEATURES

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on’t ask the longhaired Southern rocker and former party bad boy Bo Bice to give up his pizza. He won’t do it ­– but don’t hold it against him. In the last few years, he has made other significant changes to his life that have made him healthier and happier. It took him a while to get to this place, though. In 2005, Bice’s world seemed to be heading up. He had just placed second to country superstar Carrie Underwood on “American Idol” and signed a recording contract with 19 Recordings/RCA Records. He married Caroline Fisher and became a dad to son, Aiden. He had his first No. 1 single, “Inside Your Heaven,” and collaborated with artists he had only dreamed about performing with, including Lynyrd Skynyrd, Willie Nelson and Carlos Santana. He should’ve been completely over the moon about his success, but instead he was completely stressed out. The show’s competition and touring were strenuous, and he admits he liked his liquor. He drank way too much and didn’t take care of his health. Add in the fact that Bice suffered from intussusception, an intestinal condition he’s had since birth that worsens under stress, and Bice was on a collision course. “I knew liquor wasn’t good for the body, but I liked it. The stress and the drinking made my medical condition much worse,” Bice says. During the American Idol tour in 2005, things started

Fall 2010


Fall 2010

Health & Fitness

to go downhill when his condition flared up and he underwent emergency surgery to remove an intestinal blockage. Another emergency operation followed in 2006. The next year he was one of several American Idol artists dropped by his record label. Bice saw this as a sign to pull back and regroup. “When the Lord mumbles, you need to stop and make some changes,” he says. First, he quit drinking and started watching what he was eating. “I just try not to abuse myself.” He also says that the birth of his son was the catalyst he needed to make his health a priority. “It was the reason I had to shut everything down,” he says. “I kept up the pace as much as I could, but then I realized that my three priorities in life are God, family and then my career. If the first two fall out of that order, I’m not going to be good at my music.” Bice continued to perform at various functions and on television shows throughout the years, but at a more manageable pace. He says he relies on great people around him to make sure he stays focused. “I also know that God provides and I don’t stress a lot about the music anymore,” he says. “It’s good to get accolades, but if someone doesn’t like [me] that inspires me to do even better the next time.” He formed his own record label called Sugar Money/StratArt (in partnership with Strategic Artist Management) and worked on his second album “See the Light.” With his health improving, his priorities in order and his career on track, Bice was back. He used this time to write more music for what would be his third album, aptly titled “3,” released earlier this year. But a big new problem was at hand – one that threatened his entire community. In May 2010, flash floods in Tennessee, Mississippi and Kentucky killed dozens and wiped away homes and possessions. “It’s hard to explain that when the rains came, they didn’t stop,” he says. Bice, a Nashville resident, says that his damage was minimal, but “I know people who lost everything.” When Bice was a little boy, he remembers being taught the value of giving back and he knew that he had to help. During Hurricane Katrina, he opened his home to someone who had been displaced, and now it was time to help again. “Neighbors started to help each other,” he says. “They would start with one home and then move to the next. To see the true spirit of an entire city is humbling.” Bice now devotes part of his career to giving back, and he instills these values into his three sons (Caleb James, born in 2008, and Ean Jacob, born in January 2010). “I wanted to pass that on to my kids, so I brought Aiden with me when we brought water and toiletries [to victims of the flood]. I wanted him to know what it’s like to give back.” He says he’s having fun raising money for the city. “We’re making triumph out of tragedy,” Bice says. “We can’t get back the stuff that we lost, but it’s a beautiful place, and we love that.” This philanthropic, spiritual man is a far cry from the party boy who was once arrested for cocaine and marijuana possessions (charges were dropped) and who has been in and out of hospitals. His doctors have given him a clean bill of health, his career is once again going in the right direction and he’s a happy husband and dad. So if you ever see him eating pizza, let him enjoy it.

“I knew liquor wasn’t good for the body, but I liked it. The stress and the drinking made my medical condition much worse.”

The Journal | 19

What’s Wrong with Bo? According to the Mayo Clinic, intussusception is a rare but serious disorder in which part of the intestine – either the small intestine or colon – slides into another part of the intestine. This “telescoping” often blocks the intestine, preventing food or fluid from passing through. Intussusception also cuts off the blood supply to the part of the intestine that's affected. Intussusception is the most common cause of intestinal obstruction among children. Intussusception is rare in adults. Most cases of adult intussusception are the result of an underlying medical condition. In contrast, most cases in children have no demonstrable cause.


20 | The Journal

Health & Fitness

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Eating the ‘ANDI’ Way In early 2010, grocery retailer Whole Foods began posting Aggregate Nutrient Density Index scores around its stores to help shoppers identify the healthiest offerings. The scores are based on Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s Nutrient Density Scoring System. Furman, author of “Eat To Live: The Revolutionary Plan for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss” (Little, Brown & Co., 2003) analyzes several nutrients and assigns a score to every food based on the nutrients-per-calorie it delivers. The higher the score, the more nutrients the food carries. Furman contends that consuming the most nutrients with the least amount of calories is key to health and weight control.

The top 30 foods on the ANDI scale (0-1000, with 1000 the top score) are: 4. Bok choy 824 5. Spinach 739 6. Brussels sprouts 672 7. Swiss chard 670 8. Arugula 559 9. Radish 554 10. Cabbage 481 11. Bean sprouts 444 12. Red peppers 420 13. Romaine lettuce 389

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Health & Fitness

Kicking the Sweets Habit

There’s hope for even the sweetest tooth in the battle against sugar addiction

Fall 2010 By Dawn Klingensmith CTW FEATURES

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s the friendly neighborhood Girl Scout actually a pusher of one of the most addictive substances on earth? While she may not be culpable of ill intent or dealing anything illicit, some would say her cookies are the edible equivalent of drugs. Perhaps it’s no joke. People talk about sugar highs and call themselves chocoholics. There’s even a 12-step program called Overeaters Anonymous, with 54,000 members worldwide. But do sweets actually have addictive properties? Does sugar affect the brain in the same way that drugs like nicotine and heroin do? The evidence of food’s addictive properties is growing, and it is convincing if not quite conclusive, says Ashley Gearhardt, whose food addiction research appeared last year in the Journal of Addiction Medicine. What’s been studied most so far is sugar, says Gearhardt, a doctoral student in psychology at Yale University. It’s commonly understood that an initial sugar “high” or period of elevated energy, precedes a “crash” that leaves people wanting more sugar. However, those physiological changes are due not necessarily to an addiction but to an imbalance. Evidence of sugar’s addictive properties arises from animal studies and brain-imaging research in humans showing that sugar acts on the brain much like morphine, alcohol and nicotine, but with weaker effects. Let’s be clear, though, that sugar isn’t evil. It occurs naturally in every fruit and vegetable and is an important source of carbohydrates, our body’s primary energy source. “It’s a necessary fuel, but it’s sort of like gasoline – you can flood the engine,” says Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, a Kona, Hawaii-based physician and author of “Beat Sugar Addiction Now!” (Fair Winds Press, 2010). Unlike the sugar in an apple, which is bound up in fiber, refined white sugar (which does not occur naturally in the environment) rapidly converts to blood sugar. This adversely affects the mind and body, Teitelbaum says. Too much sugar is linked to obesity, which in turn is linked to heart disease and diabetes, he adds. The American Heart Association therefore recommends women consume no more than 100 calories in added sugars per day and men not exceed 150. Four grams of sugar equal about 20 calories. But are there some people for whom these restrictions mean nothing because they truly can’t


Fall 2010

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The Journal | 23

“It’s a necessary fuel, but it’s sort of like gasoline – you can flood the engine.” — Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, Kona, Hawaii-based physician help themselves around sugary snacks? Studies suggest sugar addiction is real and powerful. Rats fed an intermittent diet of sucrose tripled their daily sugar consumption, possibly exhibiting a tolerance to the effects of sugar-rich foods, Gearhardt says. Another study found that when access to sugar was removed from animals on a high-sugar diet, body temperature dropped and there were behavioral changes typically associated with withdrawal, such as anxiety and agitation. After binge-eating sugar for a month, rats will exhibit other signs of dependence, including physical withdrawal symptoms, cravings and cross-sensitization to other “drugs of abuse,” namely amphetamines and alcohol, says Nicole Avena, a medical research professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville. These behaviors coincide with neurological changes in the reward center of the brain that support the hypothesis that the rats are sugar junkies. Neurobiological evidence for food addiction is compelling, but the diagnostic criteria

for dependence, such as tolerance, withdrawal and loss of control, also must be looked at. “There is some evidence of tolerance and withdrawal for high-fat sweets in humans, but further research is needed,” Gearhardt says. However, there is substantial evidence that some people lose control over their food consumption, suffer from repeated failed attempts to reduce their intake, and are unable to abstain from or cut back on certain foods even in the face of negative consequences, she adds. Inasmuch as sugar is like a drug of abuse, is quitting cold turkey the best way to kick the habit? “If you’re an alcoholic you can say I’ll never drink again, but it’s harder with food,” Gearhardt says. Start by getting rid of “potent, highly processed, unnatural forms of sugar,” including fast food and sodas, she suggests. Study food labels, and as a general rule of thumb, don’t eat anything that lists sugar in any form – sucrose, glucose, fructose, dex-

trose, corn syrup – as one of the top three ingredients on the label. Avoid the white flour found in many breads and pastas, too, because the body rapidly converts it to sugar, Teitelbaum says. Milk aside, “If a food contains more than 10 grams of sugar, put it down. That’s a party food,” says Sharon Zarabi, a dietitian in New York City. Look out for stealth sugars. “A lot of food manufacturers add fiber because it’s healthy, but very often they add sugar, too, to make it appealing,” she says. Give into an indulgence every once in a while, Zarabi says. But remember, not all sweets are created equal. If a cup of sweetened tea, a piece of fruit or a stick of sugarless gum doesn’t satisfy your hankering, opt for dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate, or a small handful of peanut M&Ms (more healthful nut, less chocolate) It’s also a good idea to keep sugar-free frozen fudge bars on hand, Zarabi recommends. Some brands have as few as 40 calories per serving.

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Fall 2010

Exercise junkies use social networking tools to cheer on and to challenge By Leslie Barker Garcia The Dallas Morning News

When Libby Jones, who is four months’ pregnant, posted on Facebook that she was going to take a Zumba class, a comment immediately popped up: “It will get your heart rate waaaay up there, so be careful!” To which Jones, 30, replied: “Oh, I didn’t know that! Thanks! I’ll wear my heart-rate monitor and keep an eye on it!” The days Blanca Gonzales doesn’t log onto dailymile.com and record her runs, she hears from people who read her updates on Facebook regularly. “Where’s your workout?” they ask. “Where’s your report?” “It motivates me to go out and do it,” says Gonzales, 46, who lives in Arlington, Texas. “When I don’t feel like working out, I see friends online who did and I say, ‘I should be able to do that.’ ” After earning his MBA in 2003, Tommy Johnson had time to ride his bike again. He went online in search of coming races and found beginnertriathlete. com. Next thing you know, he’s connecting with strangers, recording his workouts and doing seven to 10 triathlons a year. It’s even led him into coaching for Texas Triple Threat, a triathlon training club. Exercise is something we do for ourselves. It’s also often better shared. In these days of social networking, that means a lot more than telling a friend at work about a good training run or grousing to a sister about hot your tennis match was. Instead, it means doing a little perusing, a little clicking, a little sharing. Feeling competitive? Then compare your workout to someone else’s, ask for advice, offer it. You can register for any number of websites, usually at no cost for the basic level, or just update your friends on Facebook or Twitter. You can use the Nike+, which goes into your shoe and, through your iPod, tracks your pace, distance, time and calories burned. Later,

you share the information online. “In some ways,” Jones says, “it feels so nerdy or geeky, like a futuristic society where we’re so dependent on our computers, with all these social media destroying the framework of social interactions. That’s so ridiculous. It’s completely the other way. It’s bringing you together with people you never get to see.” During her two years as president of the Dallas Running Club, Jones spent many hours and many miles at White Rock Lake with fellow runners. When her term ended, traveling 45 minutes each way from her home in Allen didn’t make as much sense. She began staying connected through dailymile.com, Twitter and her blog. She kept readers up-to-date on her running streak of 63 days. Without their encouragement, she says, she would have stopped. When she became pregnant with her second child, and her doctor warned her about getting her heart rate too high, Jones began recording other workouts. “It’s been so good for me,” she says. “If I put that elliptical workout or Zumba class, I might get feedback or ideas for another workout.” A time or two, she admits, she’s posted her workout before she actually did it. That way, she knew she’d have to follow through. “It’s the ultimate accountability,” Jones says. “You’ve published it, and you can’t lie.” Blanca Gonzales uses her account on dailymile.com to keep track of her own workouts, as well as to see what friends across the country are doing with theirs. “I have a friend from Oklahoma who’s running a marathon in Michigan or Minnesota,” says Gonzales, mother of three sons. “We comment on each other’s workouts. I have about 20 friends on it, and we push each other. A couple of them will say, ‘You’re doing good, but you need to do this. ...’” She found out about the site by read-

ing friends’ posts on Facebook. “It’s free, that’s the cool thing,” says Gonzales. “You can do biking, running, whatever, and it keeps track of your miles and tells you how many calories you burn.” As of early June, it told her that in 87 workouts totaling 106.33 hours, she had run 749.74 miles — enough to burn 408.15 doughnuts and power 1,473 television sets. When Tommy Johnson was training for the Ironman Louisville in Kentucky last August, he was corresponding on beginnertriathlete.com with a variety of fellow participants. One decided to order T-shirts so everyone in the group would recognize one another. “We got to the athletes’ dinner before the race, and we all have these fluorescent, lime-green T-shirts,” says Johnson, 49. “About 20 of us showed up, and we all sat together.” Without social networking, he says, he would never have met many of the people who are in his life these days. Some he knows only through shared posts; others, he actually meets. On the “Texas forum” spot on the site, he posts a workout: “Saturday I plan to do a 50-mile bike ride; who wants to come? I’ll be leaving from Starbucks in Frisco at 7 a.m.” He hears back: “I’ll be there; don’t leave me!” Or, “How fast do you ride?” “The first Beginner Triathlete person I met was at a race in Lubbock,” Johnson says. “We didn’t arrange to meet, but I saw her bike rack and her standing by it. I must have seen a picture of her online, so I went up and started talking.” Turns out she’s in the U.S. Air Force and often posts from Iraq. Other U.S. troops do so as well, then follow through with reports stateside of the triathlons for which they were training while overseas. “Pretty inspiring,” Johnson says. “So are others: People who’ve lost 100 pounds and are doing their first triathlon, or others who trained all year but didn’t finish. They say, ‘I’ll be back next year.’ ”


Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

The Journal | 25

MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY AUDIOLOGY/HEARING

CARDIOLOGY

Sandra Skipper, Au.D. 10239 Clemson Blvd., Ste. 170 Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 888-8865

Juan Cabanero, MD, FACC 704 N. Pine St. Seneca, SC, 29678 (864) 886-9300

Degree: Doctor of Audiology

Degree: Doctor of Medicine

Group: Oconee Audiology

Group: South Carolina Cardiology

Specialized Services & Interests: Complete Hearing Evaluations and Hearing Aid Sales & Services

Consultants, PA

Education: University of South Carolina, Arizona School of Health Services.

Certification: Internal Medicine/Cardiovascular Disesase

Years in Practice: 28

Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital

Education: University of the East College of Medicine Residency: UPMC/Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA Fellowship: UPMC/Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA

Cardiology

richard M. daum, Md, MSC, FaCC, FCCP 12016 North Radio Station Road, Suite B Seneca, SC 29678 864.482.2350 oconee Heart Center Medical School: Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY residency: Methodist Hospital, Baylor Affiliated Hospitals, Houston, TX Board Certification: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases

Cardiology

CARDIOLOGY

Raza Hassan, MD, FACC, FACP 704 N. Pine St. Seneca, SC, 29678 (864) 886-9300 Degree: Doctor of Medicine Group: South Carolina Cardiology Consultants, PA Specialized Services & Interests: Consultative Cardiology, Cardiac Catheterization, Peripheral Arterial Disease Management, Arteriography, Permanent Pacemaker Insertion & Follow Up, Stress Testing & Nuclear Cardiology, Echocardiography Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Certification: Cardiovascular Disesase, Nuclear Cardiology Education: King Edward Medical College Residency: Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY Fellowship: Mt. Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY & UPMC/ Shadyside, Pittsburgh, PA

Family medicine

Jeffrey M. lehr, Md 12016 North Radio Station Road, Suite B Seneca, SC 29678 864.482.2350

Kenneth H. Becker, md 12016 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.6141 Phone 864.882.6680 Fax

oconee Heart Center

Upstate Family medicine

Medical School: University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain

medical School: Ross University School of Medicine, Roseau, Dominica

residency: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ

Residency: St. Joseph Hospital and Medical Center, Patterson, NJ

Board Certification: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases

Board Certification: Family Medicine


26 | The Journal

Health & Fitness

Family medicine

Family medicine

l. claire Booth, dO 106 Ram Cat Alley Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4445 Phone 864.888.4345 Fax

mitchell dillman, md 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Between the lakes Primary care

Seneca medical associates

medical School: UMDNJ School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, NJ

medical School: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Residency: Christ Hospital, Jersey City, NJ

Residency: Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Family medicine

Fall 2010

Family medicine

ed evans, md 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Jennifer Hanke, dO 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Seneca medical associates

Seneca medical associates

Program Director, Seneca Lakes Family Medicine Residency

medical School: Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University, Chicago, IL

medical School: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Residency: Seneca Lakes Family Medicine Residency Program, Seneca, SC

Residency: University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, VA

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Family medicine

Family medicine

James R. Hanahan, Jr., md 12016 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.6141 Phone 864.882.6680 Fax

Robert P. lemmon, iii, md 106 Ram Cat Alley Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4445 Phone 864.888.4345 Fax

Upstate Family medicine

Between the lakes Primary care

medical School: Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA Residency: Memorial Hospital Medical Center, Savannah, GA Board Certification: Family Medicine

medical School: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Residency: Anderson Area Medical Center, Anderson, SC Board Certification: Family Medicine


Fall 2010

Health & Fitness

Family medicine

The Journal | 27

Family medicine

John F. miller, md 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Stanley Rampey, md 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Seneca medical associates

Seneca medical associates

medical School: MUSC, Charleston, SC

medical School: MUSC, Charleston, SC

Residency: Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC

Residency: Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Family medicine

Family medicine

Timothy Sanders, md 12016 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.6141 Phone 864.882.6680 Fax

conrad Shuler, md 11082 North Radio Station Road Seneca, SC 29678 864.882.2314 Phone 864.882.3677 Fax

Upstate Family medicine

Seneca medical associates

medical School: Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

medical School: MUSC, Charleston, SC

Residency: Seneca Lakes Family Medicine Residency Program, Seneca, SC

Residency: Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC Board Certification: Family Medicine

Board Certification: Family Medicine

Family medicine

GastroenteroloGy

daniel Smith, md 106 Ram Cat Alley Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4445 Phone 864.888.4345 Fax

Wilcotte rahming, MD 107 Omni Drive, Suite A Seneca, SC 29672 864.885.7475 Phone 864.885.7476 Fax

Between the lakes Primary care

Keowee Gastroenterology

medical School: MUSC, Charleston, SC

residency: Harbor Medical Center, Baltimore, MD

Residency: Anderson Area Medical Center, Anderson, SC Board Certification: Family Medicine

Medical school: Loma Linda University, Linda, CA Board Certification: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology


28 | The Journal

Health & Fitness

GENERAL SURGERY

Michael L. Hughes, MD 107 Omni Dr., Ste. B, Seneca, SC 29672 (864) 888-0909

Degree: Doctor of Medicine Group: Palmetto Surgery Associates Specialized Services & Interests: Lap Band for Obesity, Lung Surgery, Appendectomy, & Varicose Veins Including Sclerotherapy Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Certification: Surgery

GENERAL SURGERY Michael W. Paluzzi, MD 107 Omni Dr., Ste. B, Seneca, SC 29672 (864) 888-0909 Degree: Doctor of Medicine Group: Palmetto Surgery Associates Specialized Services & Interests: Lap Band for Obesity, Hiatal Hernia & GERD, Splenectomy & Appendectomy Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital

Education: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX

Certification: Surgery

Residencies: General Surgery – Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, MS; Thoracic and Vascular Surgery – Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System, Biloxi, MS

Education: Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA

GENERAL SURGERY

Residency: State University of New York, Syracuse, NY

Internal MedIcIne

Bradford Tyler, MD 16 Accountants Circle Seneca, SC 29678 864.886.9250 Phone 864.886.9251 Fax

andrea allyn, Md 501 Rochester Highway, Suite D Seneca, SC 29672 864.482.0500 Phone 864.482.0505 Fax

Upstate Surgical Associates

Mountain lakes Internal Medicine

Medical School: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX Residency: New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC

Fall 2010

Medical School: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Board Certification: Surgery

residency: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Internal MedIcIne

Nephrology

Board Certification: Internal Medicine

debra Wagner, Md 501 Rochester Highway, Suite D Seneca, SC 29672 864.482.0500 Phone 864.482.0505 Fax

Kevin r. o’Brien, Do 100 Omni Drive, Suite A Seneca, SC 29672 864.885.7881 Phone 864.885.7885 Fax

Mountain lakes Internal Medicine

oconee Kidney Center

Medical School: University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL residency: Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI Board Certification: Internal Medicine

Medical School: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA residency: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA Board Certification: Internal Medicine, Nephrology


Fall 2010

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

Health & Fitness

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

Virginia bass, MD 103 Carter Park Drive Seneca, SC 29678 864.482.2360 Phone 864.482.2365 Fax

ronnie A. brockway, MD 215 Stork Way Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 882-1311

blue ridge Women’s center

in Gynecology and Menopausal Management.

Medical school: MUSC, Charleston, SC residency: Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, VA Board Certification: Obstetrics, Gynecology

The Journal | 29

specialized services & interests:

Dr. Brockway started Oconee OB-GYN Assoc. P.A. on Jan 11, 1982. He now specializes

Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Certification: Pre Med at Auburn Univ., Auburn, Ala. education: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala. residency: University South Alabama Medical Center, Mobile, Ala. Medical Memberships: Oconee County Medical Society, SC Med Assoc.

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

Philip D. caron, DO 215 Stork Way Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 882-1311

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

christina Deluca, MD 215 Stork Way Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 882-1311

Group: Oconee OB-GYN Assoc. P.A. specialized services & interests: Infertility, Obstetrics, Gynecological Surgery with Complete Pelvic Reconstruction, Advanced Laparoscopic Procedures & Tubal Reversals Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital education: Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, Missouri residency: Naval Hospital, Jacksonville, Fla Fellowship: Board Certified American Board OB/GYNs Medical Memberships: Oconee County Med Society, SC Med Assoc., American Assoc. Profile OB/GYNs

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy Anne Hammond-Perrin, rn, cnM 215 Stork Way Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 882-1311 Degree: Registered Nurse/Certified Nurse Midwife specialized services & interests: New Obstetrical Patients: Counseling New Mothers, Breast Feeding, Birthing Techniques, Counsel Young Women Before Marriage, Birth Control, Well Women Exams All Ages education: Graduate of Vermont College RN residency: Medical University of South Carolina - Nurse Midwife Medical Memberships: American College of Nurse Midwifes

Group: Oconee OB-GYN Associates, P.A. Hospital Privileges: Oconee Medical Center education: Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Greenville, NC, Residency - OB/Gyn, June 2010 East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC, Doctor of Medicine, May 2006 Clemson University, Clemson, SC, Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences, May 2002, Cum laude

OBSTETRICS/wOmEn’S hEalTh aimee C. Duffy, mD 215 Stork Way Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 882-1311

Group: Oconee OB-GYN Specialized Services & Interests: Obstetrics, Breastfeeding and Focusing on Women’s Health from Adolescence through Menopause. Dr. Duffy also provides hormone pellet implantation. hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hosp. Certification: Advanced Life Support in Obstetric/Neonatal Advanced Life Support Education: University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas Residency: Seneca Lakes Family Practice Residency Program, Seneca, SC Fellowship Certified, American Board of Family Physicians medical memberships: Oconee County Medical Society, SC Medical Assoc.


30 | The Journal

Health & Fitness

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

Obstetrics/GynecOlOGy

shannon Poole, MD 103 Carter Park Drive Seneca, SC 29678 864.482.2360 Phone 864.482.2365 Fax

carol W. shuler, MD 112 Surgical Boulevard, Suite B Seneca, SC 29672 864.985.1799 Phone 864.888.4108 Fax

blue ridge Women’s center

blue ridge Women’s center

Medical school: University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA

Medical school: MUSC, Charleston, SC

residency: Yale – New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT

Fall 2010

residency: MUSC, Charleston, SC Board Certification: Obstetrics and Gynecology

Board Certification: Obstetrics, Gynecology

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Joseph L. Parisi, MD, FRCSC, FACS 931 Tiger Blvd. Clemson, SC 29631 (864) 654-6706

Degree: Doctor of Medicine Group: Clemson Ophthalmology Specialized Services & Interests: Diseases and surgery of the eye including cataract surgery and eyelid surgery, glaucoma and diabetes, Botox ®, Restylane ®, LASIK, and complete eye exams. Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Certification: Fellow American College of Surgeons Education: Queen’s University Residency: Mcgill & Queens University Fellowship: University of Ottawa Eye Institute Medical Memberships: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, SC Medical Association

OPHTHALMOLOGY

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Scott Massios, MD 530 Bypass 123, Ste. C Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 985-1110

Degree: Doctor of Medicine Group: Blue Ridge Eye Center Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Certification: Ophthalmology Education: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, MS Residency: Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX

Pediatrics

Brian R. Johnson, MD

Lorraine Bruce, Md 208 Frontage Road, Suite 1 Clemson, SC 29631 864.654.6034 Phone

Degree: Doctor of Medicine

207 Main Street Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4222 Phone

931 Tiger Blvd. Clemson, SC 29631 (864) 654-6706

Group: Clemson Ophthalmology Specialized services & interests: Diseases and surgery of the eye, including glaucoma, strabismus, and cataracts, as well as laser surgery and complete eye exams Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital Education: Medical University of South Carolina Residency: Pennsylvania State University Medical Memberships: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, South Carolina Medical Association

clemson-seneca Pediatrics Medical school: The Milton S. Hershey College of the Pennsylvania State University in Hershey, PA. residency: Richland Memorial Hospital in Columbia, SC Board Certification: American Board of Pediatrics


Fall 2010

Health & Fitness

Pediatrics

The Journal | 31

Pediatrics

Jordan dean, Md 208 Frontage Road, Suite 1 Clemson, SC 29631 864.654.6034 Phone

atieno ragwar, Md 208 Frontage Road, Suite 1 Clemson, SC 29631 864.654.6034 Phone

207 Main Street Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4222 Phone

207 Main Street Seneca, SC 29678 864.888.4222 Phone

clemson-seneca Pediatrics

clemson-seneca Pediatrics

Medical school: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

Medical school: Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY

residency: Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA

residency: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital, Los Angeles, CA

Board Certification: Pediatrics

Board Certification: Pediatrics

Pulmonary/SleeP

ravi Chandran, mD 125 Professional Park Drive Seneca, SC 29678 (864) 482-3000

Degree: Medical Doctor Group: Carolina Lung & Sleep Center Specialized services & interests: Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, Sleep Disorders, Regular and Interventional Bronchoscopy, Pulmonary Rehabilitation Hospital Privileges: Oconee Memorial Hospital, Cannon Memorial Hospital, Palmetto Health Baptist Easley Certification: Board Certified in pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Internal Medicine and Sleep Medicine education: University of Madras, Madras, India residency: Seton Hall University, Patterson, NJ Fellowship: Seton Hall University, Patterson, NJ, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA medical memberships: American College of Chest Physicians, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Thoracic Society, Oconee Medical Society

Urology

Rheumatology

Daniel J. holden, mD 103 Omni Drive, Suite A Seneca, SC 29672 864.885.7886 Phone 864.885.7890 Fax

Rheumatology Consultants medical School: University of Ottawa, Ontario Residency: University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Board Certification: Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Other medical prOfessiOnals

Steven K. lawton, MD 107 Omni Drive, Suite A Seneca, SC 29672 864.885.7475 Phone 864.885.7476 Fax

natalie dixon, pa-c Clemson-Seneca Pediatrics

Keowee Family Urology

carol h. meltzer, fnp-c Upstate Family Medicine

Medical School: University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS residency: University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR Board Certification: Urology

sharon holcombe, fnp-Bc Mountain Lakes Internal Medicine

Kay lynn Olmsted, fnp-Bc Upstate Family Medicine patricia smith, np Between the Lakes Primary Care pamela Wilson, pa-c Clemson-Seneca Pediatrics


32 | The Journal

Health & Fitness

Fall 2010

With a full spectrum of cardiology services including diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation, Oconee Medical Center is committed to giving you the best care possible. Our cardiologists are board-certified and were trained at some of the finest schools and medical centers in the country. They have chosen to make Upstate South Carolina their home, bringing qualified skill and expertise to help you feel better and live more fully.

Expertise with heart.

www.oconeemed.org/heart


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