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2017 Conference Journal Vol. 1


8th Session of the Upper New York Annual Conference June 1-3, 2017: Journal Vol. I

Table of Contents

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Letter from Upper New York Area Resident Bishop Mark J. Webb .......................................................4

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Holy Conferencing Principles of the Northeastern Jurisdiction of The United Methodist Church ...........5

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Organizational Motion .......................................................................................................................6

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Consent Calendar ...............................................................................................................................8

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Annual Conference Agenda ................................................................................................................9

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Recommendations ...........................................................................................................................11

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Budget Booklet 2018 (narrative)............................................................................................................. 13

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Recommendations of the Conference Board of Pension & Health Benefits: ......................................... 36

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Recommendation of the Commission on Equitable Compensation ....................................................... 38

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Discontinuation of a Local Church - Embury United Methodist Church ................................................. 40

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Discontinuation of a Local Church - Hicks United Methodist Church ..................................................... 41

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Discontinuation of a Local Church - Syracuse: James St. United Methodist Church .............................. 42

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Discontinuation of a Local Church – Lassellsville UMC ........................................................................... 43

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Discontinuation of a Local Church – Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church .................................. 44

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UNY2017.SHRec -1- Avoid Purchase of Hewlett Packard Products ........................................................ 45

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UNY2017.SHRec-2 - Protecting the Right to Peacefully Address Injustice through Boycotts, Divestment, and Sanctions .......................................................................................................................................... 49

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UNY2017.SHRec-3 - Consider Investing in Wespath’s Equity Social Values Plus Fund (ESVPF) ............. 53

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UNY2017.SHRec.4 - Permission for a special offering to Support Prison Chaplains Certification through the New York State Council of Churches ................................................................................................ 56

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UNY2017.SHRec.5 - Special Sunday Offering .......................................................................................... 58

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Resolutions and Petitions .................................................................................................................59

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UNY2017.1 - Spiritual Gifts ..................................................................................................................... 61

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UNY2017.2 - Support the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act .................................................................. 63

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UNY2017.3 - Support to Raise the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction to Age 18 ............................................. 78

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UNY2017.4 - New Headquarters Operations Budget ............................................................................. 80

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UNY2017.5 - Speaking Out for Compassion: Transforming the Context of Hate in the United States .. 82

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UNY2017.6 - Resolution on Divestment from Fossil Fuel Companies .................................................... 84

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UNY2017.7 - Health Care for All in the United States............................................................................. 86

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UNY2017.8 - Health Care ........................................................................................................................ 87

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UNY2017.9 - Human Sexuality ................................................................................................................ 89

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UNY2017.10 - Support for New York Health Act – A.5062/S.3525 ......................................................... 90

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UNY2017.11 - Resolution Endorsing Equitable, Just, and Environmentally and Fiscally Responsible Carbon Pricing, in Conjunction with the Removal of Fossil Fuel Subsidies ............................................ 92

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UNY2017.12 - Rebuke and Repudiation of the Wesleyan Covenant Association................................... 94

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Reports (Conf. Teams) ......................................................................................................................97

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Africa University ...................................................................................................................................... 99

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Commission on Archives and History ................................................................................................... 101

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Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) ....................................................................................................... 102

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Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM) ..................................................................................................... 104

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Communications ................................................................................................................................... 106

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Disaster Response Team ....................................................................................................................... 108

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Episcopacy, Committee on the ............................................................................................................. 109

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Equitable Compensation, Conference Commission on ........................................................................ 110

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Finance and Administration, Council on ............................................................................................... 112

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Laity Report, Board of ........................................................................................................................... 113

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Lay Servant Ministries ........................................................................................................................... 114

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Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on ......................................................................... 115

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New Faith Communities........................................................................................................................ 116

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Older Adult Ministries (OAM) ............................................................................................................... 118

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Peace with Justice ................................................................................................................................. 120

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Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force On .................................................................. 121

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Pension and Health Benefits, Conference Board of.............................................................................. 123

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Refugee and Immigrant Support Services of Emmaus, Inc. (RISSE) ...................................................... 124

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Religion & Race (CCORR), Conference Commission on ........................................................................ 126

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Safe-SanctuariesÂŽ.................................................................................................................................. 127

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Social Holiness....................................................................................................................................... 129

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Status and Role of Women (COSROW), Commission on ...................................................................... 131

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Trustees, Board of ................................................................................................................................. 132

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United Methodist Men (UMM)............................................................................................................. 138

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Violet’s Garden (Garden for Young Disciples - Advance # 3075) .......................................................... 141

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Vital Congregations ............................................................................................................................... 142

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Young Adult Council .............................................................................................................................. 143

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Youth Ministries (CCYM), Conference Council on ................................................................................ 145

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Reports (Connected Organizations) ................................................................................................ 147

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Boston University School of Theology .................................................................................................. 148 2


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General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM) ................................................................. 150

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United Theological Seminary ................................................................................................................ 153

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Letter from Upper New York Area Resident Bishop Mark J. Webb Dear sisters and brothers of the Upper New York Area, Grace and peace to you in the name of Jesus the Christ! Very shortly, we will gather for the annual session of the Upper New York Conference of The United Methodist Church. Together, we will have the opportunity to acknowledge the many ways God is at work in our individual lives, our life as the body of Christ and in the life of the world among us. In a fresh way, we will proclaim our identity as followers of Jesus Christ and renew our commitment to the mission of partnering with God ‘to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world”. The 2017 Annual Conference session will be filled with times of worship, study, fellowship, and, of course, some important times of discernment, conversation, and decision. The days we spend together will allow us to embrace who we are in relation to God, one another, and the world around us, as we fully understand the awesome privilege and responsibility we have to boldly be the Church in the 21st century! Our theme this year is Together in Prayer – Trusting that God is Enough. Through all we do during our time together, we will be guided by the truth and promise that we have been invited and fully equipped by God to accept and share in a fresh, bold way the transforming work of God’s amazing grace in our lives and in the lives of others. We will be blessed to have the Rev. Dr. Kenda Creasy Dean, professor of youth, church and culture at Princeton Theological Seminary as our study leader. Rev. Junius Dotson, General Secretary of Discipleship Ministries of The United Methodist Church will be our preacher for the Service of Commissioning and Ordination on Saturday, June 3, 2017. Our own Rev. Natalie Hanson, will be the preacher for our annual Memorial Service. As we worship throughout our time together, we will have multiple opportunities to offer our financial gifts to undergird some very exciting ministries. We will receive offerings that will support our “Clergy Care Fund” (financial assistance for clergy and families), our “Helping Hands Fund” (financial assistance for laity of our congregations), the NEJ Mission of Peace, New Faith Community Development and UNY Mission Central Hub (a new ministry initiative to be housed in The United Methodist Center of Upper New York Finally, what would Annual Conference session be without some reports, resolutions, and recommendations to read, surround in holy conversation, and act upon. The pages in this workbook will prepare you to engage fully in all that we will consider when we gather. I hope you will take the time to read each report and every page. I urge you to surround your reading, preparation and consideration in prayer. I am grateful to be a part of this place called Upper New York, and to share the journey of ministry with each of you. God is accomplishing amazing things in us and through us and for everything God has called us to in the days ahead, God has promised all that we need! I know we are ready to allow God to use us in ways we have not yet dreamed or imagined. So, come prepared for an amazing experience of faith, community, and celebration, as we gather June 1-3, 2017 at the Oncenter in Syracuse. I look forward to greeting you, worshipping with you, and watching what God will do as we live Together in Prayer – Trusting that God is Enough.

Mark J. Webb Resident Bishop, Upper New York Area

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Holy Conferencing Principles of the Northeastern Jurisdiction of The United Methodist Church Ephesians 4:3 [Make] every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace • Every person is a child of God. Listen before speaking. • Strive to understand from another’s point of view. • Speak about issues; do not defame persons. Disagree without being disagreeable. • Pray, in silence or aloud, before decisions. Let prayer interrupt your busyness. • Strive to accurately reflect the view of others.

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Organizational Motion 1. This is the Eighth Session of the Upper New York Conference held on June 1-3, 2017 at the Syracuse Oncenter in Syracuse, N.Y. 2. The session shall be governed by the rules of General Conference of The United Methodist Church. Roberts Rules of Order 11th edition shall govern all procedural questions where the rules of General Conference cannot be applied. 3. Holy conferencing affirms our covenant with God and one another. At any time during the proceedings the bishop may call for a moment of discernment and prayer before a vote is taken. 4. The published agenda available on the website shall be the official agenda for the Annual Conference. Questions about the agenda may be directed to the executive assistant to the bishop. 5. All reports without recommendations shall be placed on the consent calendar. The Bishop’s address to the Conference, the report of the Conference lay leader and the superintendents’ report are exempt from this rule. Further, upon proper motion from the floor, any report may be removed from the consent calendar and placed on the agenda by a one-third vote of the Conference. 6. The roll call of attendance shall be taken from credential cards presented at the time of registration. 7. Lay members are those specified by the 2016 Book of Discipline, ¶32., Article I. Selection of Lay Equalization Members, as required in ¶32, Article I. was determined according to the Rules for Determining and Selecting Lay members to the Annual Conference, adopted by the Committee on Sessions on February 14, 2011. 8. Clergy entitled to vote are those specified by the 2016 Book of Discipline, ¶602, subject to the limitations contained in the same paragraph. 9. The voting area of the Conference [“bar of the Conference”] shall be the floor area of the convention center. Guest and non-members may be seated in the designated visitor seating area. Persons standing or seated outside the bar of the Conference shall have no voice on legislative matters or balloting. 10. Securing the Floor: Conference members wishing to speak to the Conference shall raise their colored placard at their seat and wait to be recognized by the bishop. When recognized they shall move to the nearest microphone. Please state your name, and your church (laity) or appointment (clergy). 11. In order to ensure the accuracy of the minutes and faithfulness to the intention of the mover, motions and amendments from the floor must be submitted in writing to the secretary of the Conference on a form provided for this purpose. A copy of the written motion or amendment will be provided by the author to the secretary after the amendment has been made. No motion or amendment will be voted on unless it is provided in writing. In order to facilitate this, as a motion or amendment is made, members of the Conference staff or volunteers will 6


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provide the speaker with the proper form documenting the motion or amendment. The documented motion or amendment will be taken to the Conference Secretary by the Conference staff or volunteer. A copy will be provided to the author as soon as possible. 12. No person shall speak more than once upon the same question and shall be limited to not more than three minutes, except the maker of the resolution or the chairperson of the agency submitting the resolution, who shall have up to five minutes to open and three minutes to close debate. 13. The journal editor shall have sole authority to edit, condense, organize and print the Upper New York Conference journal/yearbook. All material from this session must be submitted in writing no later than July 1, 2017. 14. The director of communications shall be responsible for reporting to the general periodicals of The United Methodist Church and secular news media. All references for printing by the Conference official publication shall be subject to editing and condensing by the editor. 15. No material may be distributed within the bar of the annual conference sessions without prior review of the agenda committee of the UNY Sessions team: Vicki Putney and Bill GottschalkFielding. 16. Votes on all motions, resolutions and petitions that refer to human sexuality will be taken by ballot.

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Consent Calendar

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Africa University

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Archives and History, Commission on

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Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM)

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Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM)

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Communications

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Disaster Response Team

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Episcopacy, Committee on the

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Equitable Compensation, Conference Commission on

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Laity Report, Board of

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Lay Servant Ministries

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Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on

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New Faith Communities

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Older Adult Ministries (OAM)

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Peace with Justice

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Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force On

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Pension & Health Benefits, Conference Board of

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Religion & Race (CCORR), Conference Commission on

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Safe-SanctuariesÂŽ

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Social Holiness

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Status and Role of Women (COSROW), Commission on

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Trustees, Board of

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United Methodist Men (UMM)

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Violet’s Garden (Garden for Young Disciples - Advance #3075)

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Young Adult Council

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Youth Ministries (CCYM), Conference Council on

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Annual Conference Agenda Wednesday, May 31, 2017 4 – 7:30 p.m. Open House at United Methodist Center, 7481 Henry Clay Blvd., Liverpool, NY 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Syracuse City Church Witness Event at Columbus Circle in the city of Syracuse. There will be music, testimony, and prayer 7:30 p.m. Dedication of United Methodist Center, 7481 Henry Clay Blvd., Liverpool, NY Thursday, June 1, 2017 7:30 a.m. Registration 8:15 a.m. Blessing of the Space 9:15 a.m. Opening Worship, Bishop Webb preaching (offering for Mission Central HUB) 11:30 a.m. Lunch Extension Ministry luncheon (by invitation only) 1 p.m. Clergy session - (Clergy Care Fund offering) Laity session - (Helping Hands Fund offering) 2:45 p.m. Short Break 3 p.m. Plenary 5:30 p.m. Dinner Memorial Dinner (by invitation only) 7 p.m. Memorial Service 8:30 p.m. Plenary (if necessary) Friday, June 2, 2017 8:15 a.m. Study Leader: Rev. Dr. Kenda Creasy Dean - “Love Made Me an Inventor: Why an Entrepreneurial Church Matters to Young People” 9:15 a.m. Short Break 9:30 a.m. Plenary 11:30 a.m. Lunch & Workshops 1-2 p.m. Study Leader: Rev. Dr. Kenda Creasy Dean - “Doing a New Thing: The Church of No Excuses” 2 p.m. Short Break 2:15 p.m. Plenary 5:30 p.m. Dinner Board of Ordained Ministry Dinner for Retirees and Ordinands (by invitation only) 7 p.m. Celebration of Ministry - includes setting of appointments 8:30 p.m. Plenary (if necessary) 9 p.m. Ordination Rehearsal Saturday, June 3, 2017 8:15 a.m. Worship led by Young People (Mission of Peace offering) 9 a.m. Plenary Noon Lunch 2 p.m. Ordination and Commissioning (offering for New Faith Community development)

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Budget Booklet 2018 (Narrative)

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Recommendations of the Conference Board of Pension & Health Benefits:

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1. The Board recommends the 2018 Past Service Annuity Rate for pension payment to retired clergy of the Upper New York Conference be set at $638 per qualified service year prior to 1982. This is an increase of 2% over the 2017 rate in accordance with the Board’s long term funding plan. 2. The Board recommends adopting the Housing/Rental Exclusion Resolution which designates 100% of United Methodist pension, severance or disability income as housing exclusion in accordance with IRS Code section 107 is approved for the year January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018 as follows: WHEREAS the religious denomination known as The United Methodist Church (THE “Church”), of which this Conference is a part, has in the past functioned and continues to function through Ministers of the Gospel (within the meaning of Internal Revenue Code section 107) who were or are duly ordained, commissioned, or licensed ministers of the Church (“Clergypersons”); and, WHEREAS the practice of the Church and of this Conference was and is to provide active Clergypersons with a parsonage or a rental/housing allowance as part of their gross compensation; and, WHEREAS pensions or other amounts paid to active, retired, terminated, and disabled Clergypersons are considered to be deferred compensation and are paid to active, retired, terminated, and disabled Clergypersons in consideration of previous active service; and, WHEREAS the Internal Revenue Service has recognized that the Conference (or its predecessors) as an appropriate organization to designate a rental/housing allowance for Clergypersons who are or were members of this Conference and are eligible to receive such deferred compensation; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: 1. That an amount equal to 100% of the pension, severance, or disability payments received from plans authorized under The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church (the “Discipline”), which includes all such payments from the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits (“GBOPHB”), during the period January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017, by each active, retired, terminated, or disabled Clergyperson who is or was a member of the Conference, or its predecessors, be and is hereby designated as a rental/housing allowance for each such Clergyperson; and 2. That the pension, severance, or disability payments to which this rental/housing allowance designation applies shall be any pension, severance, or disability payments from plans, annuities, or funds authorized under the Discipline, including such payments from the GBOPHB and from a commercial annuity company contracted by the GBOPHB to provide an annuity arising from benefits accrued under a GBOPHB plan, annuity, or fund authorized under the Discipline, that result from any service a Clergyperson rendered to this Conference or that an active, a retired, a terminated, or a disabled Clergyperson of this Conference rendered to any local church, annual conference of the Church, general agency of the Church, other institution of the Church, former denomination that is now a part of the Church, or any other employer that employed the Clergyperson to perform services related to the ministry of the Church, or its predecessors, and that elected to make contributions to, or accrue a benefit under, such a plan, annuity, or fund for such an active, a retired, a terminated, or a disabled Clergyperson’s pension, severance, or disability plan benefit as part of his or her gross compensation. 36


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NOTE: The rental/housing allowance that may be excluded from a Clergyperson's gross income in any year for federal (and, in most cases, state) income tax purposes is limited under Internal Revenue Code section 107(2), and regulations thereunder, to the lesser of: 1) the amount of the rental/housing allowance designated by the Clergyperson's employer or other appropriate body of the Church (such as this Conference in the foregoing resolutions) for such year; 2) the amount actually expended by the Clergyperson to rent or provide a home in such year; or, 3) the fair rental value of the home, including furnishings and appurtenances (such as a garage), plus the cost of utilities in such year. Each Clergyperson or former Clergyperson is urged to consult with his or her own tax advisor to determine what deferred compensation is eligible to be claimed as a housing allowance exclusion.

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Recommendation of the Commission on Equitable Compensation We are responsible for bringing to the Annual Conference Session, recommendations with respect to the Minimum Base Compensation, the increment for years of service, and any other measures that would insure that our clergy are fairly supported in their work. This year we bring two recommendations for approval: The Minimum Base Compensation and the additional amount for years of service. Minimum Base Compensation – A standardized Minimum Base Compensation is established for the Upper New York Annual Conference effective January 1, 2018 as follows: A. The minimum base salary, according to credential level, for all full time clergy persons is set as noted below: Base Full connection (elders & deacons): $39,984 Provisional (elders & deacons): $38,556 Associate: $37,842 FT LP completed Course of Study or MDiv $37,128 FT Local Pastor: $35,700 (Less than full time appointments shall receive a base salary pro-rated according to the appointment.) B. An additional amount is added to the base for each full-time equivalent year of service based on credentials as follows: FTLP w/MDiv or Per Yr. FTE Full Provisional Associate COS FTLP service up to $348 $340 $336 $332 $320 23 years C. Plus an additional $500 for each additional church on the pastoral charge (over one), not adjusted for part-time appointments. D. No pastor’s salary can be decreased as a result of this policy, as long as they retain their current appointment. E. All churches are encouraged to offer a salary increase of no less than the 10 year average increase in the Consumer Price Index (1.8% for 2018) in order to account for increases in the costs of living. Churches are encouraged to consider further raises based on exceptional service. There are no changes to the Accountable Reimbursement Plan policy for 2018 The members of the Commission on Equitable Compensation for 2016-17 have included: Lauren Swanson (chair), Lynne Blake, Peggi J. Eller, Robyn Wernham Hays, Patience D. Kisakye, Pamela Klotzbach, Paula Kuempel, Ray Noell, Nancy Rhodes, and Mitchel Smith Ex Officio Members: Kevin Domanico, William Gottschalk-Fielding, Vicki Swanson Conference Staff Support: Julie Valeski

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Church Abandonment(s)South Scriba UMC- Crosssroads District: Sept. 20, 2016

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Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church Session Resolutions Relating to the Discontinuation of a Local Church - Embury United Methodist Church WHEREAS, the Embury United Methodist Church was organized in 1770, and faithfully served its community in ministry for over 246 years; WHEREAS, Rev. Bill Mudge, the Adirondack District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed the Embury United Methodist Church’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with, listening to and guiding the congregation; WHEREAS, the district superintendent determined that the Embury United Methodist Church no longer serves the purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church; WHEREAS, in relation to the proposed discontinuation, the district superintendent recommended that control and possession of all real and personal property of the Embury United Methodist Church vest in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the membership of the Embury United Methodist Church be transferred to the Salem United Methodist Church or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and WHEREAS, Bishop Mark J. Webb, a majority of the district superintendents, and the Adirondack District Board of Church Location and Building received and consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations; IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Embury United Methodist Church is discontinued; and it is further RESOLVED, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust by the Embury United Methodist Church is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Trustees; and it is further RESOLVED, that the Annual Conference Trustees are authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions; or, in the alternative, and upon the consent of the Adirondack district superintendent, convey the real estate to another United Methodist faith community; and it is further RESOLVED, that in the event the real estate is sold, the balance of the assets formerly of the Embury United Methodist Church, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and it is further RESOLVED, that the membership of the Embury United Methodist Church is hereby transferred to the Salem United Methodist Church, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.

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Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church Session Resolutions Relating to the Discontinuation of a Local Church - Hicks United Methodist Church WHEREAS, the Hicks United Methodist Church was organized in 1909, and faithfully served its community in ministry for over 100 years; WHEREAS, Rev. Nancy Adams, the Mountain View District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed the Hicks United Methodist Church’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with, listening to and guiding the congregation; WHEREAS, the district superintendent determined that the Hicks United Methodist Church no longer serves the purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church; WHEREAS, in relation to the proposed discontinuation, the district superintendent recommended that control and possession of all real and personal property of the Hicks United Methodist Church vest in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the membership of the Hicks United Methodist Church be transferred other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and WHEREAS, Bishop Mark J. Webb, a majority of the district superintendents, and the Mountain View District Board of Church Location and Building received and consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations; IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Hicks United Methodist Church is discontinued; and it is further RESOLVED, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust by the Hicks United Methodist Church is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the Annual Conference Trustees are authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions; and it is further RESOLVED, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the Hicks United Methodist Church, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and it is further RESOLVED, that the membership of the Hicks United Methodist Church is hereby transferred to other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.

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Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church Session Resolutions Relating to the Discontinuation of a Local Church - Syracuse: James St. United Methodist Church WHEREAS, the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church was organized in 1911, and faithfully served its community in ministry for over 100 years; WHEREAS, Rev. Nola Anderson, the Crossroads District Superintendent comprehensively assessed the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with, listening to, and guiding the congregation; WHEREAS, the district superintendent determined that the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church no longer serves the purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church; WHEREAS, in relation to the proposed discontinuation, the district superintendent recommended that control and possession of all real and personal property of the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church vest in the Annual Conference Trustees; and, further, recommended that the property be sold, and the net proceeds of the sale, less expenses incurred by the Trustees in maintaining, administering and conveying the property, be used to continue the ministries in the Syracuse Area and support the ongoing ministries of the United Methodist Churches in the City of Syracuse; WHEREAS, the district superintendent recommended that the membership of the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church be transferred to the Syracuse: University United Methodist Church or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and WHEREAS, Bishop Mark J. Webb, a majority of the district superintendents, and the Crossroads District Board of Church Location and Building received and consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations; IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church is discontinued; and it is further RESOLVED, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust by the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the Annual Conference Trustees are authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions; and it is further RESOLVED, that following the sale of the real estate, the net proceeds of the sale, less expenses incurred by the Trustees in maintaining, administering and conveying the property, be used to continue the ministries in the Syracuse Area and support the ongoing ministries of the United Methodist Churches in the City of Syracuse; and it is further RESOLVED, that the membership of the Syracuse: James Street United Methodist Church is hereby transferred to the Syracuse: University United Methodist Church, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.

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Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church Session Resolutions Relating To The Discontinuation of a Local Church – Lassellsville UMC WHEREAS, the Lassellsville United Methodist Church was organized in 1839 and faithfully served its community in ministry for over 178 years; WHEREAS, Rev. Abel Roy, the Mohawk District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed the Lassellsville United Methodist Church’s past, present and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with, listening to and guiding the congregation; HEREAS, the district superintendent determined that the Lassellsville United Methodist Church no longer serves the purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church; WHEREAS, in relation to the proposed discontinuation, the district superintendent recommended that control and possession of all real and personal property of the Lassellsville United Methodist Church vest in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the membership of the Lassellsville United Methodist Church be transferred to the Dolgeville United Methodist Church or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and WHEREAS, Bishop Mark J. Webb, a majority of the district superintendents, and the Mohawk District Board of Church Location and Building received and consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations; IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Lassellsville United Methodist Church is discontinued; and it is further RESOLVED, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust by the Lassellsville United Methodist Church is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the Annual Conference Trustees are authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions; and it is further RESOLVED, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the Lassellsville United Methodist Church, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and it is further RESOLVED, that the membership of the Lassellsville United Methodist Church is hereby transferred to the Dolgeville United Methodist Church, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.

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Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church Session Resolutions Relating to the Discontinuation of a Local Church – Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church WHEREAS, the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church (also commonly known as Emmanuel Faith Community) was organized in 1831 and faithfully served its community in ministry for over 186 years; WHEREAS, Rev. Richard Weihing, the Albany District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with, listening to and guiding the congregation; WHEREAS, the district superintendent determined that the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church no longer serves the purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church; WHEREAS, in relation to the proposed discontinuation, the district superintendent recommended that control and possession of all real and personal property of the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church vest in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the membership of the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church be transferred to other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and; WHEREAS, Bishop Mark J. Webb, a majority of the district superintendents, and the Albany District Board of Church Location and Building received and consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations; IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church is discontinued; and it is further; RESOLVED, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust by the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Trustees, and that the Annual Conference Trustees are authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions; and it is further; RESOLVED, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and it is further; RESOLVED, that the membership of the Rensselaer: First United Methodist Church is hereby transferred to other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.

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UNY2017.SHRec -1- Avoid Purchase of Hewlett Packard Products

Total Number of Pages: 4

Book of Discipline / Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Upper New York Annual Conference Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Financial Implications: None Rationale: WHEREAS, Palestinians are forced to use Israeli-controlled checkpoints to move within the West Bank, which is part of their own designated homeland; and WHEREAS, a biometric system of scanning and ID cards are central to Israel’s system of control of the West Bank; and WHEREAS, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), one of the family of Hewlett Packard companies (HP), is responsible for developing, integrating, and maintaining the biometric system used by the Israeli military to control movement; and WHEREAS, HPE profits from developing systems to racially profile and control the movement of Palestinians, and as such is complicit in a breach of Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; and WHEREAS, HP operates a development center in Beithar Illit, an illegal Israeli-only settlement city in the occupied West Bank built on land confiscated from the Palestinian villages of Wadi Foquin, Nahhalin, and Husan, and, as an employer in the settlement, HP profits from stolen land and contributes to the tax base and job opportunities that strengthen the settlement, (http://investigate.afsc.org/company/hp-inc-and-hewlett-packard-enterprise); and WHEREAS, HP provides services and technologies to two of the other biggest Israeli-only, illegal West Bank settlements Modi'in Ilit and Ariel, and participated in the "Smart City" project in Ariel, providing a storage system for the settlement's municipality, (http://www.whoprofits.org/company/hewlett-packard-hp); and WHEREAS, the Hewlett Packard Company recently split into two companies, HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), with more spin-offs projected, and the various HP companies share certain logistical infrastructure, governance, supply chains, and technologies with one another, and they all draw on the HP brand’s long history of close connections with the Israeli military and occupation (http://uscpr.org/hp2016woa_pr/); and WHEREAS, The United Methodist Church has specifically and repeatedly condemned both the military occupation and the construction of Israeli-only settlements in the West Bank (2016 United Methodist Book of Resolutions #6111, p. 602-606); and WHEREAS, there has been no meaningful progress with HP and no indication of any willingness to change their involvement in the occupation of Palestinian territories (https://www.kairosresponse.org/corporate_engagement_04-11.html); and 45


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WHEREAS, more than 3,000 Palestinian Christians have implored Christians everywhere to put actions behind their words to end Israel’s occupation of Palestinian land ((http://www.kairospalestine.ps/index.php/about-us/kairos-palestine-document); and WHEREAS, The United Methodist Church asks all companies that profit from and/or support settlements through their business activities to examine these activities and stop any business transactions that contribute to violations of international law, promote systemic discrimination, or otherwise support ongoing military occupation (2016 United Methodist Book of Resolutions #6111, p. 605); and WHEREAS, nonviolent tools for education and ethical consumption are central to a living expression of discipleship, with Methodists participating in boycotts as an effective moral economic tool long used by people of conscience including such boycotts as Taco Bell and Mt. Olive Pickle Company, Inc to support farm workers, Nestle to challenge marketing of infant formula, and USA Today to support newspaper workers in Detroit; and WHEREAS, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), the United Church of Christ, Quaker Friends Fiduciary, the Alliance of Baptists, and Unitarian Universalists have divested from HP (http://www.fosna.org/free-your-church-hp); and WHEREAS, in 2015 the Upper New York Annual Conference approved a measure calling for divestment from HP; and WHEREAS, an international and interfaith coalition of organizations and groups have come together to challenge HP's complicity in human rights violations in the occupied Palestinian territories and to ask the company to withdraw from such contracts and stop profiting from the Israeli occupation, (https://www.afsc.org/resource/campaign-boycott-hp). THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Upper New York Annual Conference calls on all Conference boards, agencies, offices, local congregations, campus ministries, and individual United Methodists to refrain from purchasing HP products until this family of companies ends its involvement with the Israeli occupation. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT that the Upper New York Annual Conference Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel follow up on this resolution by reporting back to 2018 Upper New York Annual Conference the status of the boycott and when it might be lifted. Dated: February 24, 2017 Submitted by: The Upper New York Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Linda Bergh, Co-Chair Address: 116 Edna St. Syracuse. NY 13205 Phone: 315-492-8507 Email Address: lindagarybergh@gmail.com UNY local church membership: Bellevue Heights UMC- Syracuse

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Leah Mae Carlisle, Co-Chair Address: 437 Lachenauer Drive Watertown, N.Y. 13601 Phone: 315-778-7511 Email: leahtomc@verizon.net UNY local church membership: Asbury UMC Watertown Karen Peterson, Co-Chair Mailing Address: 116 Greenridge Drive Horseheads, N.Y. 14845 Phone: 607-739-3141 Email: dpeterson1@stny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Horseheads UMC – Horseheads Endorsed by: The UNY Social Holiness Team The Rev. Alan Kinney, Chair Phone: 518-374-4306 Email: akinney3@twcny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Schenectady Eastern Parkway UMC Task Force Members: The Rev. Gary & Elaine Doupe 243 Mount Pleasant Rd., Bainbridge, N.Y. 13733-3224 Phone: 607-743-5062 Email: gary@doupe.com ehendrickson001@stny.rr.com Bainbridge UMC Ron Bretsch 7 Elm Street, Norwood, N.Y. 13668 Phone: 315-353-2735 Norwood UMC Tom Carlisle 437 Lachenauer Drive, Watertown, N.Y. 13501 Phone: 315-778-7510 Email: tremodel@verizon.net Asbury UMC Watertown The Rev. Gary Kubitz 68 Maple Ave. Voorheesville, N.Y. 12186 Phone: 607-624-9314 Email: Kubi514@yahoo.com VoorheesvilleUMC

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Arlene Lundquest 74 Suburban Drive, Elmira, N.Y. 14903 Phone: 607-358-4023 Email: lene1223@aol.com Big Flats UMC Christine Root 6 Carefree Lane, Gansevoort, N.Y. 12831 Phone: 518-587-6811 Email: Christiew067@gmail.com Saratoga Springs UMC Alice Trost 2678 NY Hgwy 43, Averill Park, N.Y. 12018 Phone: 518-674-1973 Email: alicemtrost@gmail.com Church of the Covenant UMC, Averill Park Robert Long Email: BikeALong2@nycap.rr.com Donna C. Cullen 9 Fox Hollow, Ionia, N.Y. 14475-9704 Phone: 585-398-1282 Email: dccret@rit.edu Clifton Springs UMC Elaine Chorley 4765 Rosemary Ln., Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-457-5382 Email: grma03@outlook.com Gethsemane UMC Linda Fiske 14 Town Garden Drive, Apt. 8, Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-437-5840 Email: lfiske@yahoo.com Gethsemane UMC The Rev. Leonard B. Bjorkman 681 Ivory Foster Rd, Owego, N.Y. 13827 Phone: 607-689-0017 Email: lenandjudy@sny.rr.com First Presbyterian Union Church, Owego The Rev. Thom White Wolf Fassett 4019 Ball Diamond Rd., Rector, N.Y. 14841 Phone: 607-546-4626 Clergy- retired, UNYAC


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The Rev. Merle Showers 401 Highgate Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 14215 Phone: 716-862-4235 Email: Revshowers@gmail.com Buffalo, University UMC Donald & Grace Snyder 6018 Unionville Rd., Bath, N.Y. 14810 Email: Dongrace52@hotmail.com Centenary UMC Bath

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Dianne Roe 90 West Market St., Corning, N.Y. 14830 Phone: 607-654-3450 Email: vineandfig@aol.com Corning First UMC Elizabeth G. Woolever 240 Cobb Terr., Rochester, N.Y. 14620 Phone: 585-355-4381 Email: ewoolever03@aol.com


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UNY2017.SHRec-2 - Protecting the Right to Peacefully Address Injustice through Boycotts, Divestment, and Sanctions Total Number of Pages: 5 Book of Discipline / Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Upper New York Annual Conference Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Financial Implications: None Rationale: WHEREAS, boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS) are constitutionally protected forms of free speech and protest that have often been used by people of conscience to effect positive social and political change; and WHEREAS, a wave of anti-BDS legislation that has been proposed in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures and public institutions across the United States threatens to penalize the use of these time-honored nonviolent justice-seeking actions; and WHEREAS, New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed anti-BDS Executive Order 157 in June 2016, blacklisting and threatening companies and institutions supporting BDS; and WHEREAS, United Methodists and other religious communities have long used the non-violent methods of boycotts, divestment and sanctions to stand in solidarity with oppressed people and to work for justice, and such advocacy measures by the United Methodist Church have proven to be useful tools in helping to bring about a wide range of constructive social change, including the strengthening of labor rights for farm workers in the United States and ending of apartheid in South Africa; and WHEREAS, in 2005, after studying the success of such efforts, a broad coalition of Palestinian civil society issued a call for a global movement of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) to advance the Palestinians’ long-denied rights to self-determination, freedom, justice, and equality; and WHEREAS, in 2009, Palestinian Christians echoed the call for boycott and divestment in their landmark document, "Kairos Palestine: A Moment of Truth," ~ an ecumenical confession of faith and urgent call to action often compared to the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" and other Christian manifestos written in times of crisis ~ that has been signed by thousands of Palestinian Christians and endorsed by the 13 Patriarchs and Heads of Churches in Jerusalem; and WHEREAS, in recent years, more than a dozen United Methodist Annual Conferences have called for their own conference and/or the denomination to divest from companies that support and profit from the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land; and WHEREAS, in 2012, the United Methodist General Conference approved the resolution "Opposition to Israeli Settlements in Palestinian Land," {#6111) which calls on “all nations to prohibit...the import of products made by companies in Israeli settlements on Palestinian land,” i.e. calls for an international boycott of the Israel settlement; and 49


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WHEREAS, in 2016, the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits of the United Methodist Church announced that five Israeli banks would be excluded from their investment portfolios, explicitly because of those banks’ involvement in settlement construction in the occupied Palestinian territories. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Upper New York Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church opposes any state or federal legislation that seeks to restrict the right to address injustice through boycotts, divestment and sanctions and joins the Rabbinical Council of Jewish Voice for Peace in calling on our elected officials “to resist efforts to stifle the movement toward justice for Palestinians through the current wave of ‘anti-BDS’ legislation;” or Executive Orders; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Conference Secretary write a letter to the President of the United States, the Governor of New York State, the New York State congressional representatives, the Speaker of the New York State Assembly, and the President of the New York State Senate informing those elected officials of this resolution and attaching the full text of the resolution. Said letter to include the approximate number of congregations and church members within the Upper New York Annual Conference; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT in the letter to the Governor of New York State, the Governor be urged to rescind the Anti-BDS Executive Order 157 of June 2016; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Upper New York Annual Conference Secretary write a letter to the New York Annual Conference Secretary informing the New York Annual Conference of our resolution; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT that the Upper New York Annual Conference urges all United Methodist Annual Conferences, congregations, and church members to contact their local, regional and national elected officials, to communicate this resolution and to advocate against anti-BDS legislation appearing anywhere in this country. Dated: February 24, 2017 Submitted by: The Upper New York Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Linda Bergh, Co-Chair Address: 116 Edna St. Syracuse. NY 13205 Phone: 315-492-8507 Email: lindagarybergh@gmail.com UNY local church membership: Bellevue Heights UMC- Syracuse Leah Mae Carlisle, Co-Chair Address: 437 Lachenauer Dr., Watertown, N.Y. 13601 Phone: 315-778-7511 Email: leahtomc@verizon.net UNY local church membership: Asbury UMC - Watertown

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Karen Peterson, Co-Chair Address: 116 Greenridge Dr. Horseheads, N.Y. 14845 Phone: 607-739-3141 Email Address: dpeterson1@stny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Horseheads UMC – Horseheads Endorsed by: The UNY Social Holiness Team The Rev. Alan Kinney, Chair Phone: 518-374-4306 Email: akinney3@twcny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Schenectady Eastern Parkway UMC Task Force Members: The Rev. Gary & Elaine Doupe 243 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Bainbridge, N.Y. 13733-3224 Phone: 607-743-5062 Email: gary@doupe.com ehendrickson001@stny.rr.com Bainbridge UMC Ron Bretsch 7 Elm St., Norwood, N.Y. 13668 Phone: 315-353-2735 Norwood UMC Tom Carlisle 437 Lachenauer Dr., Watertown, N.Y. 13501 Phone: 315-778-7510 Email: tremodel@verizon.net Asbury UMC Watertown The Rev. Gary Kubitz 68 Maple Ave., Voorheesville, N.Y. 12186 Phone: 607-624-9314 Email: Kubi514@yahoo.com VoorheesvilleUMC Arlene Lundquest 74 Suburban Dr., Elmira, N.Y. 14903 Phone: 607-358-4023 Email: lene1223@aol.com Big Flats UMC Christine Root 6 Carefree Ln., Gansevoort, N.Y. 12831 Phone: 518-587-6811

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Email: Christiew067@gmail.com Saratoga Springs UMC Alice Trost 2678 NY Hgwy 43, Averill Park, N.Y. 12018 Phone: 518-674-1973 Email: alicemtrost@gmail.com Church of the Covenant UMC, Averill Park Robert Long Email: BikeALong2@nycap.rr.com Donna C. Cullen 9 Fox Hollow, Ionia, N.Y. 14475-9704 Phone: 585-398-1282 Email: dccret@rit.edu Clifton Springs UMC Elaine Chorley 4765 Rosemary Ln., Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-457-5382 Email: grma03@outlook.com Gethsemane UMC Linda Fiske 14 Town Garden Drive, Apt. 8 Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-437-5840 Email: lfiske@yahoo.com Gethsemane UMC The Rev. Leonard B. Bjorkman 681 Ivory Foster Road Owego, N.Y. 13827 Phone: 607-689-0017 Email: lenandjudy@sny.rr.com First Presbyterian Union Church, Owego The Rev. Thom White Wolf Fassett 4019 Ball Diamond Rd., Rector, N.Y. 14841 Phone: 607-546-4626 Clergy- retired, UNYAC The Rev. Merle Showers 401 Highgate Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 14215 Phone: 716-862-4235 Email: Revshowers@gmail.com Buffalo, University UMC


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Donald & Grace Snyder 6018 Unionville Rd., Bath, N.Y. 14810 Email: Dongrace52@hotmail.com Centenary UMC Bath Dianne Roe 90 West Market St., Corning, N.Y. 14830 Phone: 607-654-3450 Email: vineandfig@aol.com Corning First UMC Elizabeth G. Woolever 240 Cobb Terr., Rochester, N.Y. 14620 Phone: 585-355-4381 Email: ewoolever03@aol.com

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UNY2017.SHRec-3 - Consider Investing in Wespath’s Equity Social Values Plus Fund (ESVPF) Total Number of Pages: 3 Book of Discipline / Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Upper New York Annual Conference Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Financial Implications: None RATIONALE: WHEREAS, the Equity Social Values Plus Fund (ESVPF) is available for participant defined contribution accounts and conference deposit accounts with Wespath Benefits and Investments (Wespath); and WHEREAS, Wespath has developed a policy that may remove companies from its ESVPF named by seven to 10 Annual Conferences in divestment resolutions (http://www.wespath.org/assets/1/7/investment_policy.pdf); and WHEREAS, in 2015 the Upper New York Annual Conference approved such a divestment resolution; and WHEREAS, Caterpillar, Motorola Solutions, and Hewlett Packard are the subject of such resolutions and have been removed from the ESVPF per Wespath's policy; and WHEREAS, while Wespath as a financial institution does not take a stand on the reasons Conferences have voted to divest from these three companies, they have responded to serve those clients by providing the ESVPF; and WHEREAS, Caterpillar Inc. provides military bulldozers and earth-moving equipment, which are used to uproot olive groves, demolish Palestinian homes, construct illegal settlements, and build segregated roads and the separation barrier on occupied land; Motorola Solutions provides surveillance systems for illegal settlements, military bases, and the separation wall as well as communication devices for the Israeli military; and Hewlett Packard provides data storage for settlements, manages information technology for the Israeli Navy, and provides biometric monitoring of checkpoints inside the West Bank; and WHEREAS, for up to 10 years, many religious investors and ecumenical groups have asked these companies to stop selling their products to the Israeli government for use in sustaining and maintaining the military occupation and settlement building and they have refused (https://www.kairosresponse.org/corporate_engagement_04-11.html); and WHEREAS, the Palestinian Christian community, through the Kairos Palestine Document, has requested the support of the wider Church in their struggle (Kairos Palestine. “A Moment of Truth: A Word of Faith, Hope and Love from the Heart of Palestinian Suffering” December 2009 http://www.kairospalestine.ps/index.php/about-us/kairos-palestine-document). THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT Upper New York Annual Conference clergy and lay employee participants and the annual conference consider ESVPF for the portion of their accounts invested in equities. Dated: February 24, 2017 53


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Submitted by: The Upper New York Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel Linda Bergh, Co-Chair Address: 116 Edna St., Syracuse N.Y.13205 Phone: 315-492-8507 Email: lindagarybergh@gmail.com Member: Bellevue Heights UMC- Syracuse Leah Mae Carlisle, Co-Chair Address: 437 Lachenauer Dr., Watertown, N.Y. 13601 Phone: 315-778-7511 Email: leahtomc@verizon.net UNY local church membership: Asbury UMC - Watertown Karen Peterson, Co-Chair Address: 116 Greenridge Dr., Horseheads, N.Y. 14845 Phone: 607-739-3141 Email: dpeterson1@stny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Horseheads UMC - Horseheads Endorsed by: The UNY Social Holiness Team The Rev. Alan Kinney, Chair Phone: 518-374-4306 Email: akinney3@twcny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Schenectady Eastern Parkway UMC Task Force Members: The Rev. Gary & Elaine Doupe 243 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Bainbridge, N.Y. 13733-3224 Phone: 607-743-5062 Email: gary@doupe.com Email: ehendrickson001@stny.rr.com Bainbridge UMC Ron Bretsch 7 Elm St., Norwood, N.Y. 13668 Phone: 315-353-2735 Norwood UMC Tom Carlisle 437 Lachenauer Dr., Watertown, N.Y. 13501 Phone: 315-778-7510 Email: tremodel@verizon.net 54

Asbury UMC Watertown The Rev. Gary Kubitz 68 Maple Ave., Voorheesville, N.Y. 12186 Phone: 607-624-9314 Email: Kubi514@yahoo.com Voorheesville UMC Arlene Lundquest 74 Suburban Dr., Elmira, N.Y. 14903 Phone: 607-358-4023 Email: lene1223@aol.com Big Flats UMC Christine Root 6 Carefree Ln., Gansevoort, N.Y. 12831 Phone: 518-587-6811 Email: Christiew067@gmail.com Saratoga Springs UMC Alice Trost 2678 NY Hgwy. 43, Averill Park, N.Y. 12018 Phone: 518-674-1973 Email: alicemtrost@gmail.com Church of the Covenant UMC, Averill Park Robert Long Email: BikeALong2@nycap.rr.com Donna C. Cullen 9 Fox Hollow, Ionia, N.Y. 14475-9704 Phone: 585-398-1282 Email: dccret@rit.edu Clifton Springs UMC Elaine Chorley 4765 Rosemary Ln., Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-457-5382 Email: grma03@outlook.com Gethsemane UMC Linda Fiske 14 Town Garden Drive, Apt. 8 Liverpool, N.Y. 13088 Phone: 315-437-5840 Email: lfiske@yahoo.com Gethsemane UMC The Rev. Leonard B. Bjorkman 681 Ivory Foster Rd., Owego, N.Y. 13827 Phone: 607-689-0017


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Email: lenandjudy@sny.rr.com First Presbyterian Union Church, Owego The Rev. Thom White Wolf Fassett 4019 Ball Diamond Rd., Rector, N.Y. 14841 Phone: 607-546-4626 Clergy- retired, UNYAC The Rev. Merle Showers 401 Highgate Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 14215 Phone: 716-862-4235 Email: Revshowers@gmail.com Buffalo, University UMC Donald & Grace Snyder 6018 Unionville Rd., Bath, N.Y. 14810 Email: Dongrace52@hotmail.com Centenary UMC Bath Dianne Roe 90 West Market St., Corning, N.Y. 14830 Phone: 607-654-3450 Email: vineandfig@aol.com Corning First UMC Elizabeth G. Woolever 240 Cobb Terr., Rochester, N.Y. 14620 Phone: 585-355-4381 Email: ewoolever03@aol.com Asbury First, Rochester

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UNY2017.SHRec.4 - Permission for a special offering to Support Prison Chaplains Certification through the New York State Council of Churches Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline / Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Social Holiness Financial Implications: None Rationale: WHEREAS, the Upper New York Annual Conference is called to respond to the call of Christ to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, visit the stranger, clothe the naked, take care of the sick and visit the prisoner that we hear in Matthew 25: 34 – 40. Matt 25:34 Then the king will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. 35For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.’ 37Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or naked and clothe you? 39When did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ 40And the king will answer them, ‘I tell you the truth, just as you did it for one of the least of these brothers or sisters of mine, you did it for me;’ and WHEREAS, the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision is responsible for the care, confinement, and rehabilitation at 57 correctional facilities owned and operated by the State of New York (as of 2014) Not including county jails or federal prisons in New York; and WHEREAS, there are presently 54,700 people who live behind locked doors and are not able to respond to Bishop Webb’s invitation “The doors, hearts, and minds of our churches are open to all, and I invite you – whether you are long time church member or someone seeking a church family – to join us for worship; and WHEREAS, all chaplains of all faiths in the 57 New York State Prisons are certified through the New York State Council of Churches; and WHEREAS, financial support from the Upper New York Annual Conference for the New York State Council of Churches has decreased markedly over the past three years resulting in great difficulty for the certification and support of all New York State prison chaplains. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT that the Social Holiness Committee of the Upper New York Annual conference be granted permission to invite all congregations of the Upper New York Annual Conference receive a special offering to help support and fund the prison ministries through the New York State Council of Churches; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT resources supporting and pertaining to Prison Ministries for this ‘special offering” shall be made available to all local congregations to help educate and involve them in the vital ministry we are called by Jesus Christ to be a part of; and 56


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BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the date for this special offering shall be coordinated with the Social Holiness, the Bishop’s office and the Finance offices of the Upper New York Annual conference for the fall of 2017. Dated: March 27, 2017 Submitted by: Social Holiness Rev. Alan D. Kinney, Chair Electronic Signature: Phone: (518) 374-4306 E-mail: akinney3@twcny.rr.com UNY local church membership: Schenectady Eastern Parkway UMC

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UNY2017.SHRec.5 - Special Sunday Offering Total Number of Pages: 1 Book of Discipline: ¶263 Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: NONE RATIONALE: WHEREAS, The 2016 Book of Discipline states that “six church-wide special Sundays with offerings shall be

celebrated in each United Methodist Church” (¶263); and

WHEREAS, we are “called to be in ministry with our neighbors in all places”; and WHEREAS, The Upper New York Conference only achieved an average participation rate of 22.23% for these special Sunday offerings in 2015 as indicated below: Human Relations

UMCOR Native American Peace With World (1 Great Hr) Ministries Justice Communion

20.50% 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

32.30%

21.40%

18.70%

13.90%

UM Student 26.60%

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED That worshipping communities of the Upper New York Conference pledge to actively discuss and become educated about these offerings in effort to commit to supporting each offering; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED That the Upper New York Conference set a conference-wide participation goal of at least 30% for each of the six Special Sunday Offerings for 2018 as we move toward 100% participation; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT that the Conference Director of Communications publish a list of all congregations who participate in all six Special Sunday offerings like that celebrating congregations who pay ministry shares in full. Dated: January31, 2017 Submitted by: Heather Smith, Peace With Justice Coordinator Electronic Signature: Heather Smith Mailing address: 10 Arthur Road Newtonville, N.Y. 12110 Phone: (518) 785-7383 Email: peacewithjustice@unyumc.org Confirmed member UNY local church membership: Newtonville UMC

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Resolutions and Petitions

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UNY2017.1 - Spiritual Gifts Total Number of Pages: 2 The 2016 Book of Discipline: ¶131 / The 2016 Book of Resolutions Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Responsibility would come under the direction of the Conference Leadership Team and the District Leadership Teams with the support of those persons in the Conference who have already taken this type of training. FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: All expenses would be incurred by the local church. RATIONALE: Some people have already been trained in spiritual gifts and can help train others who are interested in finding their gifts and teaching about them. The training should help people to discover their spiritual gifts and how they can use them in ministry in the church in practical ways. WHEREAS, The Discipline ¶131 “The Unity of Ministry In Christ” states that there is but one ministry Christ, but there are diverse gifts and evidences of God’s grace in the Body of Christ (Ephesians 4:4-16)”; and WHEREAS, “Christ gave his people gifts when he ascended on high to prepare God’s people for works of service so that the body of Christ may be built up, until we all reach unity in the faith and knowledge of the Son of God, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ...” Ephesians 4:7-13; and WHEREAS, this teaching has been lost in the centuries following Christ’s time on earth, but has been revived in recent years; and WHEREAS, the teaching of the seven basic spiritual gifts is found in Romans 12:1-8, I Corinthians 12 and other scriptures; and WHEREAS, churches that have been taught about spiritual gifts prosper because everyone knows their spiritual gift(s) and uses them to minister to Christ in unity together; and WHEREAS, children and young people today find their spiritual gift and begin to use it for God’s Kingdom while they are still young so they will become an integral part of the Body of Christ; and WHEREAS, many people in the church do not know about spiritual gifts and have not found their gift to help minister in the church for Christ, and have wondered how they can help in some way, and the unity of the church has been hindered as it serves Christ. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT all of our churches in the conference receive training in the Spiritual Gifts this coming year of 2017-2018. Dated: January 17, 2017

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Submitted by: Rev. Raymond Shaw Electronic Signature: Raymond Shaw Mailing Address: 9653 Big Tree Road Hemlock, N.Y. 14466 Phone number: (585) 367-2789 Email: rshaw@disciples.com UNY local church membership: Retired member of UNY, First UMC Schenectady

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UNY2017.2 - Support the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act Total Number of Pages: 15 The Book of Discipline: ¶164 H / The Book of Resolutions: ¶R5031 Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Conference Secretary, Director of Communications Financial Implications: None RATIONALE: The people of the United Methodist Church support efforts to humanize the criminal justice system and therefore call on the New York State Legislative bodies to pass the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act (https://www.ny.gov/2017-criminal-justice-reform-act/2017-criminal-justice-reform-act) WHEREAS, current New York State Laws do not expressly allow judges to set conditions required for release - the risk to public safety is not considered in deciding if an individual should be released for trial; and WHEREAS, in New York, release is determined by an individual's ability to post bail, often resulting in the disadvantaged being confined for months and even years because of financial constraints - not because they pose a danger; and WHEREAS, The Sixth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to a speedy and public trial - yet today defendants are held in custody for excessive periods of time awaiting trial; and WHEREAS, New York is only one of two states—the other being North Carolina—that treats teenagers as adults in criminal court with potential imprisonment in local county jails or state prisons; and WHEREAS, currently, there are approximately 500 people under the age of 18 being held in local jails and state prisons and without age-appropriate facilities, these teenagers face a greater risk of assault, sexual violence, and suicide; and WHEREAS, most witness identifications are conducted using prejudiced photo arrays—that is, without “blind” or “double-blind” administrators—shown to a victim or witness of a crime to confirm or deny the identity of a suspect; and WHEREAS, New York does not currently require that interrogations of criminal suspects be recorded by law enforcement. These interrogations provide vital evidence against criminal offenders and exonerate innocent people. But there are cases of wrongful convictions and police officers subjected to erroneous allegations; and WHEREAS, accounts of individuals receiving vastly disparate levels of court appointed representation are heard all too often. For example, in 2014, the Hurrell-Harring et al. v. State of New York lawsuit revealed failure to provide the necessary levels of indigent defense services in Ontario, Onondaga, Schuyler, Suffolk, and Washington Counties; and WHEREAS, the passage of the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act will address all of the above grave injustices; and

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WHEREAS, The 2016 Book of Resolutions ¶5031 states that “The biblical view of the criminal justice system is one that should be characterized by accessibility to all (Deuteronomy 1:17; 16:18), impartiality (Exodus 22:1-3), honesty (Exodus 23:7), integrity (Exodus 23:6, 8), and fairness to all without regard to status (Leviticus 19:15).”; and WHEREAS, The 2016 Book of Resolutions ¶5031 states, “the United Methodist Church urges the following recommendations…(a) speedy trial provisions; and (b) a presumption that a person accused of a crime should be released on personal recognizance unless an evidentiary-based determination is made that personal recognizance will not reasonably assure future appearance or represents a risk of imminent physical harm to others” and that “Financial bond should be used as a last resort. A monetary bond can create an undue burden on individuals accused of crimes who have limited financial means and results in unnecessarily prolonged periods of pretrial detention”; and WHEREAS, The 2016 Book of Resolution ¶5031 states that United Methodists advocate for “legislation that will eliminate racism and classism in the criminal-justice system; ensure equality, transparency, and fairness; and protect the human rights of all adults and children”; and WHEREAS, The 2016 Book of Discipline ¶164H states that as United Methodists, we believe that “Through God’s transforming power, restorative justice seeks to…bring healing to all involved, including the victim, the offender, the families, and the community.”; and WHEREAS, we believe that the reforms listed in the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act will bring New York State’s criminal justice system closer to a model of restorative justice rather than retributive justice; and WHEREAS, the Upper New York Annual Conference has more than 168,000 members in 49 of the 62 counties of New York State; and WHEREAS, criminal justice reform is a non-partisan issue. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Upper New York Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church heartily and emphatically supports the passage of the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the members of the Upper New York Annual Conference boldly petition New York State lawmakers to pass the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Upper New York Annual Conference calls on faithful United Methodists in the state of New York to petition their State Senators and Assembly Members to show their support for the passage of the 2017 Criminal Justice Reform Act; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Director of Communications of the Upper New York Annual Conference be directed to publish this resolution as they see appropriate, no later than thirty (30) days after the adjourning of the 2017 Upper New York Annual Conference Session; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Secretary of the Upper New York Annual Conference be directed to send a letter to every New York State Senator and Assembly Member (addresses attached) and Governor Andrew M. Cuomo (address attached)—no later than thirty (30) days after the adjourning of the 2017 Upper New York Annual Conference Session—notifying them of the passage of this resolution including the WHEREAS and BE IT RESOLVED sections of this resolution as well as a copy of The 2016 Book of Resolution ¶5031 in its entirety, and

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BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED the Secretary of the Upper New York Annual Conference is also directed to notify the Secretaries of the North Carolina and Western North Carolina Annual Conferences (contact information attached)—no later than five (5) days after the adjourning of the 2017 Upper New York Annual Conference Session—of the passage of this resolution in whatever medium he sees appropriate including the WHEREAS and BE IT RESOLVED sections of this resolution, a call to the leadership of these Annual Conferences to study the injustice of their state prosecuting teenagers as adults, and an invitation to prophetically speak out against it. Dated: February 1, 2017 Submitted by: Ian C. Urriola Mailing Address: 636 Kayleigh Drive Webster, N.Y. 14580 Electronic Signature: Ian C. Urriola Phone: (585) 705-9334 Email Address: i.urriola@yahoo.com Confirmed Member of Asbury First United Methodist Church 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76

Additional Sponsors: Theresa Eggleston 519 West 2nd Street, Apt. A Elmira, N.Y. 14901 Phone: 607-259-3162 Email: thereslouise@gmail.com Confirmed Member of Freeville United Methodist Church Bethany M. Printup-Davis 2253 Mt. Hope Road Sanborn, N.Y. 14132 Phone: (716) 579-2160 Email: bethany.printupdavis@gmail.com Confirmed Member of Asbury First United Methodist Church J.J. Warren 217 Main Street Penn Yan, N.Y. 14527 Phone: (315) 398-4541 Email: warrenjj97@gmail.com Confirmed Member of Penn Yan United Methodist Church Zach Stahlsmith 81 North Erie Street Mayville, N.Y. 14757 Phone: (716) 581-3280 Email: zachstahlsmith@yahoo.com

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Confirmed Member of Hurlbut United Methodist Church Rev. Elizabeth Quick 32 Barnes Street Gouverneur, N.Y. 13642 Phone: (315) 729-7099 Email: bethquick@gmail.com Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Annual Conference serving the Gouverneur First United Methodist Church & North Gouverneur United Methodist Church Marthalyn Sweet 149 Island Branch Road Gouverneur, N.Y. 13642 Phone: (570) 470-6354 Email: mmmk.sweet@gmail.com Confirmed Member of Gouverneur First United Methodist Church Elyse Muder 10 Terrace Hill Drive New Hartford, N.Y. 13413 Phone: (315) 520-5142 Email: mude7179@fredonia.edu Confirmed Member of New Hartford First United Methodist Church


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Rev. John Martin 1801 Gary Drive Vestal, N.Y. 13850 Phone: (607) 725-5696 Email: phlppns121@hotmail.com Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Annual Conference serving the Foundation United Methodist Church Rev. Sharon Rankins-Burd 1115 North Winfield Road West Winfield, N.Y. 13491 Phone: (315) 822-3342 Email: pastorsharon@windstream.net Licensed Local Pastor serving the Creek and Schuyler Lake U Laurel O’Connor 1290 Vestal Avenue Binghamton, N.Y. 13903 Phone: (315) 382-0556 Email: laurelmoconnor@gmail.com Confirmed Member of High Street UMC Rev. Benjamin O'Connor 1290 Vestal Avenue Binghamton, N.Y. 13903 Phone: (315) 529-1648 Email: oconnor.benjamin.p@gmail.com Licensed Local Pastor serving the High St UMC Clergy Rev. Melanie Ollett 14224 Roosevelt Highway Waterport, N.Y. 14571 Phone: (585) 682-6066 Email: melollett@gmail.com Licensed Local Pastor serving the Carlton and West Barre UMC Rev. Darryl R. Barrow 75 East Avenue Lockport N.Y. 14094 Phone: (716) 433-2838 Email: darrylpteumc@aol.com Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Annual Conference serving the Lockport: Emmanuel United Methodist Church

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Rev. Colleen Hallagan Preuninger 1321 S. Loudoun Street Winchester, VA 22601 Phone: (315) 527-7383 Email: cpreunin@su.edu Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Annual Conference serving in Extension Ministry: Dir. Shenandoah Youth Theo. Inst. New York State Senate: The Honorable Kenneth P. LaValle New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable John J. Flanagan New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Thomas D. Croci New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Philip M. Boyle New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Carl L. Marcellino New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Kemp Hannon New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Elaine R. Phillips New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable John E. Brooks New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247


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The Honorable Todd D. Kaminsky New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable James Sanders, Jr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Tony Avella New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Michael N. Gianaris New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Jose R. Peralta New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Leroy G. Comrie, Jr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Joseph P. Adddabbo, Jr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Toby Ann Stavisky New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Simcha Felder New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Martin MalavĂŠ Dilan New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 67

The Honorable Roxanne J. Persaud New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Jesse E. Hamilton New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Kevin S. Parker New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Martin J. Golden New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Diane J. Savino New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Andrew J. Lanza New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Velamentte Montgomery New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Daniel Squadron New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Brad M. Hoylman New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Liz Krueger New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247


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The Honorable Jose M. Serrano New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Bill Perkins New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Marisol Alcantara New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Reuben Diaz, Sr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable J. Gustavo Rivera New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Jeffrey D. Klein New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Andrea Stewart-Cousins New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Jamaal T. Bailey New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable George S. Latimer New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable David S. Carlucci New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 68

The Honorable William J. Larkin, Jr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Terrence P. Murphey New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Susan J. Serino New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable John J. Bonacic New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Kathleen A. Marchione New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Neil D. Breslin New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Elizabeth O’Connor Little New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable George A. Amedore, Jr. New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Joseph A. Griffo New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Patricia A. Ritchie New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247


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The Honorable James N. Tedisco New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable John A. DeFrancisco New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable James L. Steward New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Frederick J. Akshar, II New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable David J. Valesky New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Pamela A. Helming New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247T The Honorable Rich Funke New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Joseph E. Robach New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Catharine M. Young New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Thomas F. O’Mara New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 69

The Honorable Patrick M. Gallivan New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Christopher L. Jacobs New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Michael H. Razenhofer New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Robert G. Ortt New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 The Honorable Timothy M. Kennedy New York State Senate Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12247 New York State Assembly The Honorable Fred W. Thiele, Jr. New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Anthony H. Palumbo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Dean Murray New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Steven Englebright New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Alfred C. Graf New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building


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Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Philip R. Ramos New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Andrew R. Garbarino New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael J. Fitzpatrick New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Joseph S. Saladino New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Chad A. Lupinacci New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Kimberly Jean-Pierre New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Andrew P. Raia New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Charles D. Lavine New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable David G. McDonough New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248

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The Honorable Michael A. Montesano New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Anthony D’Urso New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Thomas McKevitt New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Earlene Hooper New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Edward P. Ra New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Melissa L. Miller New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Brian F. Curran New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michaelle C. Solages New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Stacey G. Pheffer Amato New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable David I. Weprin New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Nily D. Rozic New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Edward C. Braunstein New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael A. Simanowitz New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Andrew D. Hevesi New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Alicia L. Hyndman New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Brian Barnwell New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michele R. Titus New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Vivian E. Cook New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Clyde Vanel New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael G. DenDekker New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 71

The Honorable Jeffrion L. Aubry New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Aravella Simotas New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Catherine T. Nolan New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael G. Miller New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Francisco P. Moya New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Ron Kim New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Helene E. Weinstein New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Rodneyse Bichotte New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Diana C. Richardson New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Robert C. Carroll New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Steven Cymbrowitz New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Pamela Harris New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable William Colton New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Dov Hikind New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Peter J. Abbate, Jr. New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Joseph R. Lentol New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Felix W. Ortiz New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable JoAnne Simon New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Maritza Davila New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Erik Martin Dilan New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 72

The Honorable Latrice M.Walker New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Tremaine S. Wright New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Walter T. Mosley, III New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable N. Nick Perry New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Charles Barron New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Matthew J. Titone New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Ronald Castorina, Jr. New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael J. Cusick New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Nicole Malliotakis New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Yuh-Line Niou New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Deborah J. Glick New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Linda B. Rosenthal New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Robert J. Rodriguez New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Daniel J. O’Donnell New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Inez E. Dickens New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Herman D. Farrell, Jr. New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Carmen N. De La Rosa New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Dan Quart New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Brian P. Kavanagh New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Richard N. Gottfried New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 73

The Honorable Rebecca A. Seawright New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Latoya Joyner New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Jose Rivera New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael A. Blake New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Mark Gjonaj New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Jeffery Dionwitz New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael R. Benedetto New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Carl E. Heastie New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Carmen E. Arroyo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Marcos A. Crespo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Victor M. Pichardo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Luis R. Sepulveda New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Amy R. Paulin New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable J. Gary Pretlow New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Shelley B. Mayer New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Steven Otis New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Thomas J. Abinanti New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable David Buchwald New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Kevin M. Byrne New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Sandra R. Galef New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 74

The Honorable Kenneth P. Zebrowski New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Ellen C. Jaffee New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Karl A. Brabenec New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable James G. Skoufis New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Aileen M. Gunther New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Brian D. Miller New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Peter D. Lopez New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Kevin A. Cahill New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Frank K. Skartados New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Kieran Michael Lalor New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Didi Barrett New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Steven F. McLaughlin New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable John T. McDonald, III New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Patricia A. Fahy New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Phillip G. Steck New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Angelo L. Santabarbara New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Mary Beth Walsh New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Carrie Woerner New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Daniel G. Stec New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable D. Billy Jones New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 75

The Honorable Addie Jenne Russell New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Kenneth Blankenbush New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Marc W. Butler New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Anthony J. Brindisi New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable William A. Barclay New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Bill Magee New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Clifford W. Crouch New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Donna A. Lupardo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Christopher S. Friend New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Barbara S. Lifton New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Gary D. Finch New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Albert A. Stirpe, Jr. New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Pamela Jo Hunter New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable William B. Magnarelli New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Robert C. Oaks New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Brian M. Kolb New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Phillip A. Palmesano New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Joe Errigo New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Peter A. Lawrence New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Mark C. Johns New York State Assembly The Honorable Michael J. Norris New York State Assembly 76

Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Joseph D. Morelle New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable David F. Gantt New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Harry B. Bronson New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Stephen M. Hawley New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Robin Schimminger New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Crystal D. Peoples New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Michael P. Kearns New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Monica P. Wallace New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Monica P. Wallace New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248


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The Honorable Angelo J. Morinello New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Raymond W. Walter New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable David J. DiPietro New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Joseph M. Giglio New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Sean M. Ryan New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 The Honorable Andrew Goodell New York State Assembly Legislative Office Building Albany, N.Y. 12248 Governor of New York State The Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo Governor of New York State N.Y.S Capital Building Albany, N.Y. 12224 New York Annual Conference Secretary Margaret Howe New York Conference 20 Soundview Avenue White Plains, N.Y. 10606 (914) 615-2231 confsecy@nyac.com

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UNY2017.3 - Support to Raise the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction to Age 18 Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: None RATIONALE: The Geneva Study Bible: 1Corinthians 13:11-12 Parallel Commentaries; “When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away Childish things. “ and “He sets forth that which he said by an excellent similitude, comparing this life to our infancy, or childhood, in which we mutter and stammer rather than speak, and think and understand childish things and therefore have need of such things as may form and frame our tongue and mind. But when we become men, to what purpose should we desire that stammering, those childish toys, and such like things, by which we are formed in our childhood by little and little.” Interfaith Impact of New York State is calling upon the Legislature to raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction to age 18 and process all 16 and 17 year old youth accused of crimes as juveniles and customize sentencing to youth for all but the gravest of crimes of violence. WHEREAS, a large and relatively new body of research is revealing that young adulthood is a time of dramatic change in basic thinking structures, as well as in the brain. Consensus is emerging that an 18 year old is not the same person she or he will be at 25, just as an 11 year old brain is not the same as he or she will be at 18. They don’t look the same, feel the same, think the same, or act the same. Whereas, across theories and research frameworks, a sequence of developmental shifts emerge, which can be organized into three categories; adolescence (generally defined as puberty through age 18), young adulthood (generally defined as 18-22 or 18-25), later adulthood (generally defined as mid-20s and older) Whereas, New York state is only one of two states that continues to prosecute 16-and17- year-olds through the adult criminal justice system; and Whereas, leading brain research indicates that the cognitive skills of youth are not fully developed until their mid-20s, rendering them more susceptible to peer pressure, less capable of mature judgment and consequential thinking, though highly receptive to interventions; and Whereas, youth incarcerated with adult are less likely to receive the services they need to succeed, and are at increased risk of violent or sexual assault, mental health issues, and suicide; and THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Upper New York Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church publicly supports a change in the law raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction to age 18 and process all 16and17 year old youths accused of crimes as juveniles and customize sentencing for all but the gravest crimes of violence. We call for access to programs and services tailored to support rehabilitation for all minors under the age of 18 and we call for implementation of polices that both promote public safety and improve outcomes for court-involved youth. 78


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Submitted by: Kenneth Bollerud on behalf of the Church and Society work area of the Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church. Mailing address: 68 Michael Drive Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 Phone Number: (518) 584-1192; Fax Number: (518) 584-3720 Email Address: kenboll@nycap.rr.com UNY local church membership: Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church

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UNY2017.4 - New Headquarters Operations Budget Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline: Conference Committee/Agency: Treasurer/Trustees: Financial implications: None RATIONALE:

Since the Conference owns and operates a new Conference headquarters building, the members of the Annual Conference have a right to know its costs of operation. WHEREAS, the Upper New York Annual Conference has purchased and now operates a new office and meetings building headquarters for use by the Conference and the housing of Conference and Area staffs; and WHEREAS, in purchasing, renovating, and furnishing an office building, the Conference has transferred cash assets to fixed assets, i.e. real estate; and WHEREAS, in spending cash assets the Conference has lost potential investment income; and WHEREAS, the Conference has a policy of financial transparency; and WHEREAS, our local church members have a right to know the various costs and expenditures of the annual conference, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Treasurer and the Trustees of the conference provide to this 2017 session of the annual conference the proposed annual 12-month costs of operating the headquarters building with the following details and line items: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Salaries (Building manager, accounting, custodial, including payroll taxes, benefits) Utilities (gas, water, electricity, sewer) Custodial supplies (equipment, supplies, service contracts) Snow removal Grounds upkeep Insurance Reserve for future major replacements, i.e. heating, parking lot paving, roof repair/replacement, air conditioning, etc. 8. Miscellaneous expense 9. In lieu of invested income from cash assets, 4% of capital investment in real estate, renovations and furnishing; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT future budgets provide detailed projected expenses for the operation of the headquarters building with the heading, “Conference Building Operations Expense�; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Treasurer and Trustees provide this Annual Conference with an analysis of the difference in costs for 2017 over 2016; and

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BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Treasurer and Trustees provide this Annual Conference with a comparison of conference headquarters operations costs with the average office occupancy costs in our region. Dated: January 23, 2017 Submitted by: Nelson Price

Electronic Signature: Mailing Address: 6305 Hamlet Crest Jamesville, N.Y. 13078 Phone: (315)446-7656 Email: nprice@twcny.rr.com Confirmed Member of University UMC, Syracuse, NY

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UNY2017.5 - Speaking Out for Compassion: Transforming the Context of Hate in the United States Total number of page: 2 The 2016 Book of Discipline: œœ 162 and 164B / The 2016 Book of Resolutions 2016: pages 377-383 Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation, if passed: Conference Social Holiness (Church and Society) FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: None RATIONALE: Recently there has been an increase in verbal and physical bullying, defacing houses of worship, attacks both physical and verbal against women and immigrants. We find this trend to be very disconcerting. WHEREAS, reports of hate crimes or acts of bullying have become part of our daily lives of late; and WHEREAS, these acts promote and are manifestations of bigotry based on religion, race, sexual orientation and national origin; and WHEREAS, we are alarmed by the climate of hate in public discourse of late; and WHEREAS, we must challenge the misdirection of anger toward the most vulnerable in our society; and WHEREAS, we deplore acts of hate or violence against groups or persons based on race, color, national origin, ethnicity, age, gender, disability, status, economic conditions, sexual orientation, gender identity, or religious affiliation; THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT United Methodists in the Upper New York Annual Conference be encouraged to end complicity with hate by speaking out when jokes, disparagements, and stereotypes are based on differences; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT we create opportunities to hear from excluded groups about the reality and impact of hate and partner with them to act for justice; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT conversations be convened within families, churches and community gathering, and other political arenas about realities, fears and the need for compassionate response; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT United Methodists work with other ecumenical and interfaith partners to develop community activities to unite religions in our work to end all manifestations of hate; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT United Methodists of the Upper New York Annual Conference be active participants in civic or religious organizations that promote unity and diversity, and work to eradicate acts of hate as well as work with diverse grassroots and national organizations; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT become aware of and understand internet bullying and peer pressure; and

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BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT language of responsibility and healing be used rather than blame and punishment. Dated: January 26, 2017 Submitted by: Kenneth Bollerud Chair of Church and Society Work Area Electronic Signature: Kenneth Bollerud Address: 68 Michael Drive Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 Phone: (518) 584-1192 Email: kenboll@nycap.rr.com UNY local church membership: Member of Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 Generated by the Church and Society Work Area of the Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church and the Church Council and unanimously passed

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UNY2017.6 - Resolution on Divestment from Fossil Fuel Companies Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline: ¶160D Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Conference Treasurer/Conference Council on Finance and Administration/Frontier Foundation FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: No impact on conference budget. RATIONALE: Psalm 24:1-2: The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it; for he founded it on the seas and established it on the waters. WHEREAS, The United Methodist Church has acknowledged the risks of fossil fuel dependence for 37 years through its Energy Policy Statement in the Book of Resolutions, resolution 1001. The investment policy goals of The United Methodist Church as outlined in the Book of Resolutions, resolution 4071 include investing in corporations, companies, institutions or funds making a positive contribution to the realization of the goals outlined in the Social Principles and the Book of Resolutions, and exclude investing in companies that violate church values; and WHEREAS, The Social Principles in ¶ 160.D state that climate change will bring “severe environmental, economic, and social implications,” which will “disproportionately affect individuals and nations least responsible for the emissions." The Arctic reached 50 degrees above normal during the 2015-2016 winter. Ice is melting, wildlife is dying and subsistence hunting is giving way to food banks and feeding programs, and WHEREAS, the processes and byproducts related to the extraction of petroleum, coal and natural gas are damaging to the health of people who work in these industries as well as those who live on or near extraction sites. The extraction and burning of fossil fuels exacerbates climate change. Limiting the warming of the earth to 2-degrees Celsius, the internationally agreed upon limit for human survival, requires that the vast majority of the world’s fossil fuels be left in the ground. Avoiding the worst impacts of climate change urgently requires a transition to sustainable energy, and WHEREAS, United Methodists live and serve on the front lines of disasters like Hurricane Sandy, Typhoon Haiyan, prolonged droughts, devastating floods, massive wildfires, and other extreme weather events, which will increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Continued investment in fossil fuel companies undermines The United Methodist Church’s ministries to the most vulnerable among usincluding those who are hungry, sick, and/or living in poverty. Continued investment in fossil fuel companies signals a grave disregard for the lives of young people. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT that the Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church and any of its agencies shall not knowingly make investments in any company or entity whose core business activity involves the production of petroleum, natural gas or thermal coal. Core business activity refers to a company's primary, or central focus of activity and is an essential element in the company's economic success. A "core business" is one that accounts for 10% or more of a company's revenue derived from the objectionable products and/or services; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church 84


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joins the New York Annual Conference in requesting and urging that the United Methodist Frontier Foundation add a similar investment screen to its holdings and investments related to any and all funds held on behalf of the Upper New York Annual Conference. (Note: this request has also been made by the New York Annual Conference). Dated: February 1, 2017 Submitted by: Kevin M. Nelson on behalf of First United Methodist Church, Schenectady (approved by Church Council on January 31, 2017) Electronic Signature: Kevin M. Nelson Mailing Address: 503 State Street Schenectady, N.Y. 12305 Phone: (212)729-4059 Fax Number: (518) 374-1606 Email: kmichael07@yahoo.com

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UNY2017.7 - Health Care for All in the United States Total Number of Pages: 1 Book of Discipline: Âś162V /Book of Resolutions: Âś3201 Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Social Holiness Financial Implications: None RATIONALE: This is being written as the health care delivery system in the United States is undergoing significant redesign. We are concerned that costs and services in any redesigned system be shared equitably. WHEREAS, from our earliest days United Methodists have believed that providing health care to others is an important duty of Christians. John Wesley found ways to offer medical services to the poor in London. The first Methodist Social Creed (adopted in 1908) urged working conditions to safeguard the health of workers and community. The provision of health care for all without regard to status or ability to pay is portrayed in the parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:24-35) as the duty of every neighbor and thus of every person; and WHEREAS, the United Methodist Church is committed to health care for all in the United States, and therefore advocates for a comprehensive health-care system that includes access for all, quality of care, and effective management of costs; and THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that a call for swift passage of legislation that will entitle all persons within the borders of the United States to the provision of health-care services, the cost of such services to be equitably shared by American taxpayers, and the government to distribute the funds to providers in a coordinated and comprehensive manner. Dated: January 27, 2017 Submitted by: Kenneth Bollerud, Generated by the Church and Society work area and submitted to the Church Council which passed it unanimously. Kenneth Bollerud, Chair of Church and Society. Electronic Signature: Address: 68 Michael Dr. Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 Rochester, N.Y. 14607 Phone: (518) 584-1192 Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church Email: http://Saratogaumc.org Pastors: Rev. Heather Williams and Rev. Drew Sperry

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UNY2017.8 - Health Care Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline /Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Social Holiness or Church and Society Financial Implications: None RATIONALE: We are writing this at a time when great energy is being exerted to undo the Affordable Care Act and replace it with a different plan. We feel that United Methodists in the Upper New York Conference of the United Methodist Church should express their concerns for the values guiding any replacement plan. WHEREAS, Jesus admonished his followers to care for the poor and by his example demonstrated his concern for the sick by his compassion and healing; and WHEREAS, without health insurance many people cannot afford healthcare, and thereby defer seeking treatment until their condition is critical to the point of fatality; and WHEREAS, the United States ranks 37thamong the nations of the world as to health care of its citizens, (France, Australia, Germany, Canada, Sweden, New Zealand, Norway, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the U.K. were all judged to be superior), and “a lack of universal health care was noted as the key difference between the U.S. and the other industrial nations”; (Time Magazine, June 17, 2014), and 13th among the developed nations as to its health care of its citizens (World Health Organization Ranking; The World’s Health Systems); and WHEREAS, the Affordable Care Act of 2010 has made health insurance accessible to over 20 million people who, because of the cost of a preexisting condition, were unable to obtain it prior to the inception of the law, and by the testimony of many of these people, would not be alive now without the ACA; and WHEREAS, we believe that equal access to the benefits of effective health care is a human right, which should not be denied because of the inability to pay, or because of a preexisting condition, or age; or curtailed when cost exceeds a determined sum, nor should there be a limit on annual or lifetime cost. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Upper NY Conference of the United Methodist Church encourage its members to petition their federal representatives to preserve the Affordable Care Act unless and until they have a better plan that the ACA, to insure that every American, regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, age, financial condition, mental, or physical health has access to affordable health insurance; and to unequivocally adopt the policy of resisting all efforts to abort or curtail the present plan as it has been implemented without guarantee. Dated: March 27, 2017 Submitted by: Kenneth Bollerud Electronic Signature: 87


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Address: 68 Michael Dr. Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866 Phone: (518) 584-1192 Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church Email: http://Saratogaumc.org Pastors: Rev. Heather Williams and Rev. Drew Sperry

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UNY2017.9 - Human Sexuality Total Number of Pages: 1 Book of Discipline /Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: RATIONALE: Many people in this Conference have strong convictions about marriage between a man and a woman and sexuality and need to be heard and respected in their views. They feel they have been influenced by the culture more than by scripture, and want to see things different. WHEREAS, throughout the Bible, marriage is always spoken of as between a man and a woman; and WHEREAS, Jesus quoted the Genesis definition of marriage as between a man and a woman; and WHEREAS, our Discipline supports Biblical marriage and bans self-avowed practicing homosexuals from ordination; and WHEREAS, the election of the first openly gay Bishop (Karen Oliveto-Western Jurisdiction) is in violation of church law and the scriptures; and WHEREAS, the Southern Jurisdiction is petitioning the Judicial Council of the United Methodist Church to make a decision concerning church law; and WHEREAS, the Bishop’s Commission is appointed to find a new way forward through strengthening and clarifying our church stances and convictions; and WHEREAS, the Bishops themselves desire more response from the people of the church. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Upper New York Conference fully supports the United Methodist Church’s stand on sexual ethics and its teaching on marriage; it encourages its boards and agencies to abide by them, and its Bishop to enforce them. Dated: January 28, 2017 Submitted by: Rev. Raymond Shaw, Retired Elder Electronic Signature: Address: 9653 Big Tree Road Hemlock, N.Y. 14466 Rochester, N.Y. 14607 Phone Number: Email: rshaw@disciples.com

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UNY2017.10 - Support for New York Health Act – A.5062/S.3525 Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline paragraph (¶): 161 Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Conference Secretary Financial Implications: None Rationale: WHEREAS, United Methodists and members of our congregations in the Upper New York Annual Conference struggle with grave health needs, access to health care and affordability of health care expenses; and, WHEREAS, in ¶ 161.V of the Social Principles, The United Methodist Church affirms health care as “a basic human right”; “providing the care needed to maintain health, prevent disease, and restore health after injury or illness is a responsibility each person owes others and government owes to all, a responsibility government ignores at its peril”; and “we believe it is a government responsibility to provide citizens with health care”; and, WHEREAS, alongside its many flaws, the Affordable Care Act brought improvements to health care in the U.S., including expansion of access to health care for tens of millions of U.S. citizens, banning denial of coverage based on pre-existing conditions, expanding coverage of children on parents’ plans up to age 26, expanding access to contraceptive coverage, and expanding access to Medicaid for low-income U.S. citizens; and, WHEREAS, the Trump Administration and Congress are in the process of repealing the ACA, while making promises to reduce costs and expand access to coverage but without having a ready alternative; and, WHEREAS, as a general rule, expanding coverage of services increases costs while decreasing coverage of services decreases costs but expanding access to coverage has no meaning if the coverage isn’t affordable; and, WHEREAS, the only obvious solution that achieves all the important goals of 1) expansion of coverage, 2) expansion of covered services, 3) decrease of costs, and 4) elimination of limited health networks, providing access to all doctors and medical centers, is government-run, single-payer health care; and, WHEREAS, one of the most important keys to the success of such a system is the elimination of health insurance companies because it reduces the middle layer/third party administrative waste and eliminates the presence of third parties seeking to profit off our health care, including their incentives to capriciously deny coverage of services in order to pump up their profits; and, WHEREAS, such a system would be paid for more fairly and evenly, including the elimination of disparity between large businesses/organizations/unions that have the leverage to bargain for lower costs and good health care coverage for their employees, while employees of smaller businesses/organizations have little bargaining leverage and individuals have no leverage and no means for bargaining which creates a direct relationship between type/size of employer and cost and quality of health coverage, as 90


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directly evidenced by the Upper New York Annual Conference’s health insurance plans that are available to its clergy in comparison to the far superior plans and lower costs offered by large, private, and public sector employers; and, WHEREAS, at a time when positive, comprehensive solutions are not going to come from Congress, a universal coverage, single-payer system has been introduced in the NY State legislature (for full text go to http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us and type: a5062) and is poised for passage again in the Assembly with work needed to advocate for its passage in the Senate; THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, the Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church supports the New York Health Act (A.5062/S.3525); and, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the UNYAC authorizes the Conference Secretary and Bishop Webb to band with others to organize and work toward passage of the NYHA by taking the necessary steps for the UNYAC to join the Campaign for New York Health (www.nyhcampaign.org) and endorse the NYHA; and, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Conference Secretary, on behalf of the UNYAC, will express its support for the NYHA to the sponsors of the NYHA, which include Assemblyman Richard N. Gottfried (GottfriedR@assembly.state.ny.us), chair of the Assembly Health Committee, and Senator Bill Perkins (perkins@senate.state.ny.us). Dated: February 1, 2017 Submitted by: Kevin M. Nelson on behalf of First United Methodist Church, Schenectady (approved by Church Council on January 31, 2017) Electronic Signature: Kevin M. Nelson Address: 603 State Street, Schenectady, N.Y. 12305 Phone: 212-729-4059 Fax Number: 518-374-6060 Email: kmichael07@yahoo.com UNY local church membership: FUMC, Schenectady, N.Y.

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UNY2017.11 - Resolution Endorsing Equitable, Just, and Environmentally and Fiscally Responsible Carbon Pricing, in Conjunction with the Removal of Fossil Fuel Subsidies Total Number of Pages: 2 Book of Discipline: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS: None RATIONALE: In the book of Genesis 1:1 God created the heavens and the earth. In the books of Deuteronomy 6:4; Matthew 22:37; Mark 12:29, and Luke 10:27 Jesus commands us to love God with all our heart, soul, mind and spirit. In Matthew 22:38; Mark 12:31; Luke 10:27, 10:29 and 10:37; and 1 John 4:20 21 Jesus commands us to love our neighbor as ourselves. Then, who, but all of God’s Creation, is our neighbor? Then, if all of God’s Creation is our neighbor, let us love and protect God’s Creation. WHEREAS, global warming is causing calamitous change to our climate and the life inhabiting our planet; and WHEREAS, a Task Force, formed by action of the Cal-Nevada 2014 Annual Conference, recommended that the United Methodist Church take action on behalf of current and future victims of climate change; and WHEREAS, in order to arrest the alarming rate of global warming and climate change, urgent action is needed to smoothly and rapidly move away from artificially cheap fossil fuels whose prices do not include the environmental and health costs of their use; and WHEREAS, all people throughout the world will benefit as the United States moves quickly away from fossil fuels. In particular, those with the least resources who are least able to protect their homes, livelihood and habitat from coastal and inland flooding, drought, rivers drying up, melting glaciers, receding bodies of water and crop failure will benefit as the United States shifts to renewable energy and makes new grid and storage technology available to the world; and WHEREAS, to allow our economy to "freely" and smoothly withdraw from fossil fuels and shift to clean energy, economists advocate putting a price on carbon pollution (CO2e emissions) that (1) follows a predictable path, rising every year until the price is no longer needed because the switch to renewables has been accomplished, and (2) is assessed “upstream” where the carbon first enters the economy, at the point of import or extraction; and representatives to preserve the Affordable Care Act unless and until they have a better plan that the ACA, to insure that every American, regardless of WHEREAS, an upstream carbon price assigns a cost to carbon that is partly passed on “down” throughout the economy and becomes imbedded in all prices for all products to the degree that fossil fuels are used in their manufacture or transport. There are two ways to put an upstream price on carbon. First, the quantity of carbon emissions allowed can be restricted, and emissions allowances can be auctioned to fossil fuel suppliers. In this case, the price paid at auction, for an "allowance" (right to emit a ton of CO2e) is the "price on carbon". Second, a fee or tax can be assessed on fossil fuels as they are imported 92


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or extracted. In this case, the "price on carbon" is the fee or tax paid by the importer or extractor. In both cases, suppliers of fossil fuel will adjust prices to incorporate some or all of the fee or tax. For producers who use a lot of fossil fuel in the manufacture of their product -- such as power plants, or manufacturers of iron, steel, glass, cement or paper – employing more energy efficient technologies and switching to renewable energy sources will become increasingly attractive as the carbon price increases. Consumers will adjust their purchasing decisions as they confront higher prices for fossil fuel and electricity. A carbon fee or tax is favored by most economists because it is simple, transparent, and relatively inexpensive to administer; and WHEREAS, without pricing carbon pollution, suppliers and consumers of fossil fuel are able to pollute the air and water and send carbon into the atmosphere without financial consequences. Shouldn’t the prices we pay for fossil fuels and fossil fuel-intensive products reflect the cost of our fuel use to our health and our planet?; and WHEREAS, without offsetting compensation, persons of low income will suffer disproportionately from increased costs arising from an effective carbon price. This is unfair and unjust, because persons of low income are “carbon virtuous”: they have the lowest carbon footprints and are least responsible for climate change. Economists recommend a portion of revenues from pricing carbon be used to “offset unfair burdens on lower income households;” and WHEREAS, pricing carbon is only one fundamental piece in the complex puzzle we must complete together as we confront climate change. Many other actions and policies are also vital. Not investing in coal, natural gas and petroleum is critical. Joining with native peoples in protecting their land, air, and water is important. Funding research for energy and carbon storage and grid interface technologies that can be used both in the United States and in the developing world is paramount. The success of all of these actions will be facilitated by a carbon price. In addition, if the public and our policy makers so choose, some of the carbon price revenues may be used to fund the research on which global cooperation and success in combating climate change depend; and WHEREAS, economists recommend the removal of subsidies that “reward” fossil fuel extraction; and WHEREAS, as imperfect human beings, it is natural that our highest expression of love for Creation is our love for our children; THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT that for the sake of our children and our Creator, we endorse carbon pricing that: is equitable, just, and environmentally and fiscally responsible, does not hurt persons of low income, is assessed at the point of import or extraction, and rises briskly at a steady, predictable rate, is implemented in conjunction with removal of fossil fuel subsidies. Dated: February 1, 2017 Submitted by: Katherine Barnum Skura Electronic Signature: Katherine Barnum Skura Address: 405 State Route 38 Dryden, N.Y. 13053 Phone: (607) 330-0645 Email: katherinebarnum@gmail.com UNY Local Church Membership: St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Ithaca, N.Y.

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UNY2017.12 - Rebuke and Repudiation of the Wesleyan Covenant Association Total Number of Pages: 4 Book of Discipline / Book of Resolutions: Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: Financial Implications: None Rationale: WHEREAS, the United Methodist Church is facing a crisis. WHEREAS, this crisis is 45 years in the making and it centers around the place of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) persons within the life of the church, and WHEREAS, one group in this crisis, evangelicals/orthodox/far right, uses a faith paradigm that emphasizes Biblical literalism, seeing Jesus through a doctrinal lens and upholding a set of core beliefs. This group holds the positions that “marriage is the uniting of one man and one woman,” and “God intends faithfulness in marriage and celibacy in singleness.” These positions are based in part on interpretations of biblical passages including but not limited to Leviticus 18:22 and Romans 1:26-27; and WHEREAS, out of these positions have sprung disciplinary policies that forbid UM clergy from officiating at same-sex weddings; forbid the use of UM facilities for same-sex weddings; and forbid the ordination of persons who are in sexual relationships with partners of the same gender, regardless of whether those individuals are in a covenantal, marital relationship with each other. This group speaks of the need for accountability and upholding The Book of Discipline; thus, these policies are enforced with the weight of chargeable offenses that may result in trials and penalties that can include defrocking any clergy and expelling any laity who violate said policies; and WHEREAS, another group, progressives/liberals/reconciling United Methodists, uses a faith paradigm that utilizes historical-critical biblical analysis, recognizes the Bible and the gospels as human products that are the result of historical processes, views much of the Bible as metaphorical with a more than literal meaning (a surplus of meaning) and looks to the Bible for what it can tell us about Jesus and God and the character of God that we are to emulate; and WHEREAS, this group holds the position that the policies currently enshrined in the Discipline result in discrimination against and oppression of LGBTQIA persons and their families and loved ones. This creates an incredible depth of harm that corresponds to destruction of mental, physical, spiritual, familial and communal lives and undermines the very essence of what it is to be followers of Jesus and children of God. This group rejects the interpretations of passages such as Leviticus 18:22 and Romans 1:26-27 as used by those on the Right, believing that historical context leads to different interpretations, and instead looks to passages that speak of God’s character as being about love, justice, compassion and grace, such as Micah 6:6-8, Matthew 15:10-20 and Mark 12:28-34. This group has fought to overturn the punitive church policies and replace them with what they believe to be more grace-filled and flexible policies; in advocating for such policies, they have generally sought to be attentive to not forcing or coercing any clergy into taking actions that violate their conscience and understanding of God’s will, such as requiring evangelical clergy to officiate at same-sex weddings would likely do; and

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WHEREAS, in an effort at finding a path beyond this current impasse, last year’s General Conference adopted a recommendation from the Council of Bishops to create a special commission on “A Way Forward,” with the charge of examining every paragraph in the Discipline relating to human sexuality and developing proposals related to the future of The United Methodist Church that would end the harm to LGBTQIA persons; and WHEREAS, despite this action, the progressive group has failed at fully overturning The United Methodist Church’s punitive policies across 11 successive General Conferences now, and those policies remain in effect even amid the work of this special commission. As such, many amongst this group have increasingly adopted positions of resistance over a period of many years, largely drawing on inspiration from figures such as Martin Luther King, Jr., and his rationale for the civil rights movement as expressed in his Letter from a Birmingham Jail. This rationale included an expression of the moral imperative to disobey unjust laws. “…One has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” “Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust;” and WHEREAS, last summer, in the immediate aftermath of the massacre of 49 individuals and wounding of 53 others on Latin Night at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, FL, members of the New England Annual Conference stood up and affirmed their commitment to a fully inclusive church. This action gave birth to the first “Action of Nonconformity” resolution, stating that the NEAC would no longer “conform or comply with provisions of the Discipline which discriminate against LGBTQIA persons.” Additional annual conferences and jurisdictional conferences, including the Northeastern Jurisdictional Conference, soon passed a wave of similar resolutions, and the Western Jurisdiction elected Karen Oliveto as the first out LGBTQIA person to the office of bishop in The United Methodist Church; and WHEREAS, individuals on the far right responded last fall by forming the Wesleyan Covenant Association (WCA), “a coalition of congregations, clergy and laity…committed to promoting ministry that combines a high view of Scripture, Wesleyan vitality, orthodox theology, and Holy Spirit empowerment.” The WCA has demanded that the special commission “bring forward a recommendation that would definitively resolve our debate over The United Methodist Church’s sexual ethics and its understanding of marriage.” Such a plan would include “accountability and integrity to our covenant.” “If the commission determines that no such plan is possible, then we believe it should prepare a plan of separation;” and WHEREAS, in short, the WCA has called for schism and a division of The United Methodist Church; and WHEREAS, this is an optional crisis; and WHEREAS, the far right is so intent on being right that it has chosen to push The United Methodist Church to this point of crisis by seeking to force their faith paradigm and force their Biblical interpretations, using discrimination of LGBTQIA persons as the ultimate wedge, upon all other United Methodists; they have sought to follow that up by enforcing those viewpoints through legislative action and judicial procedures and penalties. Their own individual faith freedom has not been enough and even the victory of official General Conference endorsement of their beliefs during the 1970’s and early 1980’s was not enough. The hammer of judicial penalties had to be added too. Nevertheless, that hasn’t been enough to coerce everyone into compliance. There will always be a segment that draws upon their membership vows “to resist evil, injustice and oppression in whatever forms they present themselves” and thus resists church laws and policies that they understand to cause grave harm and injustice and serve as tools of oppression.

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WHEREAS, now, through the creation of the WCA and official statements that the WCA has made since its formation in October, they have sought to add further leverage by demanding the breakup of The United Methodist Church if/when everyone doesn’t fall in line with the WCA’s demands. They are professing that they cannot tolerate being part of a Church in which LGBTQIA United Methodists are treated equally and are wholly unwilling to remain in relationship with LGBTQIA United Methodists and their allies; and WHEREAS, in the Upper New York Annual Conference, we believe in the Wesleyan way of holiness, which seeks to “do no harm, do good, and stay in love with God.” Recognizing that when John Wesley wrote; “The gospel of Christ knows of no religion but social; no holiness but social holiness” …he was rejecting solitary Christianity and recognizing that our Christian faith is only truly holy when it is lived out in the context of the Christian community of love and service to one another and the world. We know that God’s grace surrounds us all the days of our lives, and it is this divine prevenient grace that serves to place us in an ever-deepening relationship with God, self and others. This is our understanding of the sanctifying nature of God’s grace; and WHEREAS, in his sermon “The Catholic Spirit,” John Wesley taught that as long as we hold in common the essential elements of our faith, and as long as we unite in love — meaning that we love one another, that we commend each other to God in prayer, that we provoke each other to love and to good works, that we love each other not only in word but indeed and in truth — then our hearts are right and we should walk together hand in hand. Wesley further taught that differences of opinion ought not to tear this union of hearts asunder. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT, the Upper New York Annual Conference (UNYAC) affirms an understanding of God’s nature as one of love, justice and compassion and identifies this as a core element of the Christian faith. As such, UNYAC invites all United Methodists who are able to affirm this statement to unite with us in love, to commend each other to God in prayer, to provoke each other to love and to good works, and to love each other in word, deed and truth, and to take our hands and join in a union of hearts; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the UNYAC rejects the misuse of Wesleyan teachings by the WCA, and related individuals and groups, who claim that personal holiness can exist apart from social holiness. On that basis, we reject attempts by the WCA, and individuals affiliated with far right groups, to control discourse through threats of schism because it is counter to the purposes of Wesleyan holiness; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the UNYAC seeks unity, not maintained through forced conformity or selective scriptural literalism, but rather in ways that embody God’s love, compassion, healing presence and rejection of evil, injustice, and oppressive domination systems; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the UNYAC rebukes and repudiates the Wesleyan Covenant Association and its schismatic actions that strike at the characteristic United Methodist unity of hearts. Dated: February 1, 2017 Submitted by: Kevin M. Nelson on behalf of First United Methodist Church, Schenectady (approved by Church Council on January 31, 2017) Electronic Signature: Kevin M. Nelson, First UMC, Schenectady Address: 603 State Street, Schenectady, N.Y. 12305 Phone: 212-729-4059; Fax Number: 518-374-6060 Email: kmichael07@yahoo.com 96


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Africa University Africa University ended 2016 poised to celebrate its Silver Jubilee and eager to embrace new opportunities for transformative ministry over the next 25 years. It is a great joy to recognize and thank the Upper New York Conference for going beyond the asking with a 100.02 percent investment to the Africa University Fund (AUF) apportionment in 2016. All 10 Conferences in the Northeastern Jurisdiction led by example, giving to the AUF at 100 percent or higher for the second consecutive year. In 2016, the tremendous commitment to connectional giving and participation of local churches enabled 34 of the 56 United Methodist annual conferences in the United States — up from 32 in 2015 — to invest 100 percent or more of their asking to the AUF. The university community acknowledges, with heartfelt appreciation, the many ways in which the churches of the Upper New York Conference have been active, faithful, and generous in helping Africa University to realize its mission. The people of The United Methodist Church have accomplished a lot together, through the grace of God In addition to their investment in the AUF, United Methodists in the Upper New York area have made ongoing contributions to their scholarship endowment initiative at Africa University. Our students, faculty, staff, trustees and alumni are grateful to Bishop Mark Webb and his Cabinet, and to the entire membership of the Conference, for inspiring others with their passion and creative stewardship. Through Africa University, the Upper New York Conference helps young people to discover and sharpen their gifts for leadership. The disciple-making mission of the global United Methodist Church is alive in the contributions of the university’s 7,000+ graduates. More than 90 percent of these graduates are still in Africa, serving communities in 32 countries. Currently, more than two dozen Africa University graduates are missionaries in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Europe, under the auspices of the General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church. People who would otherwise be on the margins are actively helping others to experience God’s grace, peace and abundance. Over the past year, your Africa University continued to evolve and serve by:  

Restructuring its academic units in order to remain relevant and provide a broader-based education to meet new demands in the African workforce. Providing leadership formation experiences and learning for more than 1,400 students from 26 African countries. Contrary to the norm for African higher education institutions, women represented more than half of the student body. Generating new knowledge and capacity to support peacebuilding and to improve food security, human rights, and leadership for the African continent.

As part of the observance of AU’s 25th anniversary, we invite the individual members, congregations and districts of the Upper New York Conference to take time out during 2017 to celebrate their journey with Africa University. Your prayers and gifts are the difference, so please remain steadfast in supporting the AUF. Engage in a season of daily prayer for Africa University. Join Africa University’s honorary alumni association. Consider hosting a special “AU@25” event or Africa University Sunday in your local church or area. Use your event to increase awareness of Africa University’s ministry and invite attendees to each give at least $25 each in honor of the 25th anniversary.

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Thank you for your unwavering response to the call to active faith, hope, and renewal in the world. We pray that blessings continue to abound for all who lead and serve in ministry in the Upper New York Conference. James H. Salley Associate Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement Africa University Development Office P O Box 340007 Nashville, TN 37203-0007 Tel: (615) 340-7438 jsalley@gbhem.org

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The Commission now maintains two archival locations. One in Buffalo, which holds records from the old Western New York Conference and in March, have moved the records from the old North Central New York Conference and portions of the old Troy and Wyoming Conferences to the new United Methodist Center at 7481 Henry Clay Blvd., Liverpool, N.Y. The Buffalo location will be moved to our new central location in the spring of 2017 and will be all under one roof. This will be a great thing for researchers and other Conference personnel to have all the materials in one location. One of the churches that closed this year was the Cambridge/Embury UMC in Cambridge, N.Y. This congregation was founded out of the original congregation that was set up by Philip Embury just before the Revolutionary War in 1770. The Ashgrove Church (Cambridge) as it was known then was the first Methodist Church outside of New York City. The Ashgrove Church burned in 1835 and the congregation moved to the village of Cambridge where they built the present church in 1836. The archives received all their records as well as a scale model of the original Ashgrove Meeting House. The pastor grave marking program has been running smoothly overall. Each District Office has a supply of three markers, and those are replenished as needed. The commission decided in the fall that our budget cannot afford the cost of these markers anymore and there will not be any more purchased by the Commission. When the supply is exhausted, information will be provided to families as to where to purchase a marker if they would like to have one. The Commission had five members attend the Annual NEJ Commission on Archives in History meeting located in Dover, Delaware, hosted by the Peninsula-Delaware Annual Conference. This was held May 24-26, 2016. A resolution was presented at the 2015 Annual Conference for the formation of the Upper New York Conference Historical Society. The resolution was passed and the Historical Society has been slowly growing. All members of the Historical Society also have access to a closed Facebook group page where historical items of interest are posted for all to comment on and view. This has been working well. This year’s Annual Conference Display featured previous EUB Churches within the Upper NY Conference area. It was prepared by Rev. James Barnes and Adam Barnes. We are looking forward to the final transfer of archival materials to the new United Methodist Center. Once all is moved and organized, we can work on getting the whole collection catalogued. The former Troy Conference materials are already done and it is in an electronic format. The hope is to be able to get the whole collection catalogued electronically to make researching easier for all. Members of the Commission: Karen Staulters (Chair), Nancy Rutenber (Secretary), Margaret and Lee Flanders, Rev. Jim Lesch, Rev. Betsye Mowry, Rev. Don Hoff, Ken Jones, James Hare, Richard Ward, Ray Leonard (Emeritus), Gilbert Smith (Emeritus member),Ken Summers (Emeritus), and Merle and Catharine Doud (Emeritus). Respectfully submitted by: Karen Staulters, Chair of Archives and History

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Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) The Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) is privileged to have the ministry of caring for the clergy of the Upper New York Conference from the first perception of a call through retirement. We work through the 12 District Committees on Ordained Ministry (dCOMs), and in close partnership with the appointive cabinet. BOM is the credentialing body for clergy seeking licensing, commissioning and ordination in the Upper New York Annual Conference. The Board of Ordained Ministry has a wide scope of responsibilities in cultivating and supporting excellent clergy leadership; these tasks are outlined in ¶635 of the 2016 Book of Discipline. The Board’s membership is made up of clergy (deacons, elders, local pastors, and associate members) and at least 20% laypersons, appointed by the Bishop. Attention is paid to gender, ethnic diversity, age, and geography in the appointment of members. We work in six broad areas: Standards and Qualifications (of ordination candidates), Clergy Status, Clergy Effectiveness, dCOM Coordination, Recruitment/Enlistment, and oversight of the Provisional Members program. The co-chairs of the BOM serve overlapping four year terms (e.g. 2014 -18 and 2016 - 20). Currently the co-chairs are the Rev. Sue Russell, who was elected in 2016, and the Rev. Matthew Stengel, who was elected in 2014. Rev. Russell is the first Deacon to serve as co-chair of the BOM in UNY, or any of our predecessor conferences. Election of officers was held at the Annual Conference session in 2016. The Rev. Alice Priset continues as vice-chair, and Christine Doran, a layperson, was elected secretary. The Rev. Tom Pullyblank was elected as registrar. The Rev. Glen Hardman is assisting the registrar in preparing the BOM section of the “Business of Annual Conference” which is the official record of the status of every clergy person in the conference, and is published annually in the Conference Journal. Leading the Board’s divisions this year are: the Rev. Eleanor Collinsworth, standards and qualifications; the Rev. Carmen Perry, clergy status; the Rev. Bob Kolvik-Campbell, clergy effectiveness; the Rev. Brian Fellows, dCOM coordination; the Rev. Brooke Newell, provisional program; and the Rev. Lee Carlson and layperson Crystal Martin, recruitment. The Chairs of the Order of Elders (Heather Williams and Bob Kolvik Campbell), the Order of Deacons (Sheila Price and Dee Finch [not on BOM]), and the Fellowship of Local Pastors and Associate Members (Anne Cole and Timothy Middleton) serve on BOM as ex-officio members with vote. Much of our work during the year builds toward the interview retreat in March, when we interview candidates, and engage in discerning God’s movement and guidance in raising up future leaders for our church. As we write this in February, Board members are hard at work reading candidate materials, watching sermon videos, and praying for the 24 candidates and the BOM. Those who are approved by the BOM for commissioning, for Associate Membership, and for ordination as deacons and elders are recommended to the full members of the Annual Conference for approval. This year there is a change in the Discipline requiring that each candidate receive a ¾ positive vote of BOM in order to be recommended to Clergy Session. The culmination of each Annual Conference Session is the service of ordination and commissioning through the laying on of hands by the bishop and other full members of the conference. In September and January, the provisionals division offers a retreat for those on the path toward ordination. Candidates for full membership must attend three of four retreats offered in two years of provisional membership. Retreat content focuses on spiritual formation, and continued learning of knowledge and skills for ministry.

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BOM officers participated in the quadrennial training provided by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry in October of 2016. Changes in the Discipline as a result of General Conference 2016 were highlighted, and seminars were offered in many areas of the ministry of the BOM. At various times throughout the year, Board members accompany district superintendents to visit students at seminaries across the connection. This is part of the work of the recruitment division, supporting and enlisting excellent candidates for ministry in our conference. The BOM provides financial support for students in seminary, in the Course of Study (COS) for local pastors, and in doctoral studies. We also provide support for continuing education of active clergy and retirees serving churches. This is accomplished using Ministerial Education Funds (MEF) from United Methodist Student Day offerings, invested funds and bequests, and Shared Ministry monies. Many thanks are due to Wayne Mort who handles BOM Continuing Education and Counseling funds, Betsy O’Flynn, who handles COS registration and reimbursement, and Crystal Martin and Lee Carlson who handle seminary grants. Special thanks to the late Rev. Michael Smith, who prepared the paperwork for 2016 seminary grants from his hospital bed shortly before his death. He is greatly missed. The Board Executive Committee meets with the Cabinet at least twice a year. This is an excellent way to build community and communication, as we work in our different, yet complementary, ministry areas. A representative of the Cabinet (the Rev. Sherri Rood) serves, ex-officio, on BOM. The Bishop’s Executive Assistant, the Rev. Bill Gottschalk-Fielding, is present with us for much of our work on an advisory basis. In the spring, we work with the cabinet to prepare the “Business of Annual Conference.” This task is handled ably and cooperatively between the board registrar and the bishop’s office. Many thanks are due to Mary Bradley, the Bishop’s Administrative Assistant, who is a tremendous help to both the BOM and the Cabinet. The Rev. Matthew Stengel participates as the representative of UNY Conference in the Northeastern Jurisdiction Board of Ordained Ministry. This body shares best practices of the 9 conferences’ BOMs and approaches to common struggles. We, the co-chairs, are immensely grateful for the time, energy, prayer and faithful service given by every member of the Board. It is a holy and humbling work that we share, and it is only possible through the loving effort of many faithful people working together. Thanks be to God! Susan Russell and Matthew Stengel, UNYAC Board of Ordained Ministry Co-Chairs UNY Board of Ordained Ministry members, as of February 2017: Nola Anderson, Marilyn Baissa, Bill Barber, Suzanne Block, Denise Bowen, Anne Canfield, Lee Carlson, Yohang Chun, Anne Cole, Eleanor Collinsworth, Greg DeSalvatore, Christine Doran, Brian Ethington, Brian Fellows, Vonda Fossitt, Richelle Goff, Bill Gottschalk-Fielding (advisory), Keith Grinnell, Glen Hardman, David Herrmann, Youngjae Jee, Noel John, Ann Kemper, Mark Kimpland, Bob Kolvik‐Campbell, Jeff Losey, Crystal Martin, Donna Martin, Timothy Middleton, Pam Mikel-Hayes, Patti Molik, Wayne Mort, Brooke Newell, Carmen Perry, Sheila Price, Alice Priset, Tom Pullyblank, Sherri Rood, Sue Russell, Sundar Samuel, Jane Sautter, Lynn Shipe, Caroline Simmons, Steven Smith, Matthew Stengel, James Stevens, Stacy Taylor, Michael Terrell, Bill Vallet, Leon VanWie, Denise Walling, Michael Weedon, and Heather Williams.

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Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM) Your Committee on Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM) has continued the work of advising and guiding our Camp and Retreat staff in providing places and experiences for the purpose of making disciples for Jesus Christ. As partners with the local church, and other organizations doing good in the world, we served nearly 8,000 guests at our six centers in 2016. Of the 8,000 guests, approximately 2800 were children and youth involved in a transformational experience of community at a summer program. While all of our centers offer similar quality experiences, each of our centers have a unique specialty: Aldersgate, while still offering a week and a half of summer camp programs and a family weekend, specializes in offering Christian Hospitality to week long guest camps. Asbury has continued to grow rapidly as a year round retreat facility with the unique opportunity to serve guest groups during warm weather months while our other sites are offering summer camp programming. Casowasco specializes in leadership development and water programming while offering year round retreats and Christian hospitality to guest groups. Sky Lake continues to excel at offering multiple weeks of Christ focused experiences for differently abled populations and Christian hospitality to guest groups year round. Skye Farm has a renewed focus on adventure programming and is offering a wide range of new programs this season. At the time of preparing this report we (CCRM) continue to participate in discussions surrounding the future at Findley and hope to be able to provide an update at Annual Conference. Generous donors assisted 219 campers by making camp possible for families that would otherwise not be able to send a child to camp. Donors gave to specific projects this year such as renovations to a bathhouse at Skye Farm, new roofs on buildings at Aldersgate, the nature trail at Sky Lake, the main parking lot at Asbury and walkways at Casowasco. The continued generosity of our donors is critical for the advancement of the mission and vision of camp and retreat ministries. We recognize and acknowledge the challenges related to ministry in a changing world with large facilities with many needs. We have reduced staff, streamlined operations and worked to increase ministry revenue. We continue to work with the finance department on financial reporting and to specifically ascertain what net assets rolled into the UNY Conference from previous conferences and we are confident that we will soon receive a finalized list of those assets. Many of our campers report making a first time or renewed commitment to follow Christ. It is said that more than half of the people in full time ministry today have made life-changing decisions at camp. Many not only gave their lives to Jesus, but also learned their leadership skills there.

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The Upper New York Conference, through Shared Ministry, advocacy, participation, and contributions equip leaders from our local churches, grow transformational young adult leaders, introduce creation care and stewardship to people of all ages as we invite all who spend time on our sites the opportunity to live a life of discipleship. We describe the Power of Camp as: Transformed lives: At camp and during retreats, people of all ages and abilities have the mental room to consider some of the most important issues of life. This break from the craziness of their regular routine allows campers to think about their future, to evaluate unhealthy patterns, and to discover the truth that there is a God, God loves them and God wants a relationship with them. Adult mentors: According to researchers, kids spend on average less than 40 minutes in meaningful conversation with their parents each week. At camp, caring adults, counselors and mentors come alongside campers, helping them think through decisions and experiences in a way that will prepare them for their future. Many campers point back to a positive role model they met at camp as one who helped shape the direction of their lives. Nature and adventure: Richard Louv, author of Nature Deficit Disorder is quoted as saying, “Kids are plugged into some sort of electronic medium 44 hours per week.” Because of this Louv also says; “Now more than ever we need nature as a balancing agent.” Our camps are set in some of the most beautiful spots in the state. Campers explore nature, participate in new adventures and test their limits in a healthy environment surrounded by the grandeur of God’s creation. Lifelong friendships: Good friends who exert positive peer pressure can make all the difference in a kid’s life. Friendships with caring adults and other campers, forged through shared experience and the compressed time at camp, can last a lifetime and provide a connection that helps young people navigate the challenges of life. Temporary Community: In a setting separate from their daily routine, with an opportunity to shed the expectations and pressures of others; campers and retreat attendees are freed up to truly be themselves, to live above artificial limitations and blossom into who they were created to be. If you haven’t been to one of our facilities recently, we encourage you to visit one during an Open House. We also encourage you to connect with one of our staff members or committee members at our Annual Conference display to hear more about your ministry. Respectfully submitted, Carmen FS Vianese, chair of CCRM Stuart Williams – Vice Chairperson Mike Huber, director of CRM

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Communications It has been another strong year for Communications in Upper New York. Staffing and communications channels continue to be tweaked for minimizing cost while maximizing outputs. Due to this hard work, many key ministries have received support and key stories have been told in far superior ways than in the past. One of the most well-received changes has been to the Advocate, which fully transitioned into a Ministry Magazine two years ago. That format continues to be improved, and the results are very strong. Recent issues of the Advocate; (e.g. Look at What We Can do Together) focused on connectional giving. Another issue, Embracing Racial/Ethnic Diversity, enabled measurable changes to ministries at the local church and beyond. These issues and others have been recognized not only for their excellence, but also for their potential as a tool for the local church. The new format enables a topic to be deeply explored and serves as a great way to help church visitors or members go deeper—to learn more about who we are as United Methodists in Upper New York. That audience has been very clearly defined and topics are chosen accordingly. When trying to reach other audiences though print media (e.g. church leaders), the team has made use of supplemental printed materials. Examples of these include the Annual Conference Guide and the Budget Booklet. Clarity about primary and secondary audiences allows the Communications Team to craft their messages in the best way possible. Another communications channel geared towards church leaders is the Weekly Digest, which we revamped in 2016. Many of the changes in the revamp were purely aesthetic, but there were also some shifts in content. One of the primary shifts was making use of regular features like Building Our Future, which gave weekly updates on the progress at the new United Methodist Center. In conjunction with the regular features in the Weekly Digest, the Communications Team also launched a seasonal blog on the Conference website. The topics started with General Conference and Jurisdictional Conference, but grew significantly to include things like A Day in The Life and What’s Cooking Around the Conference. These topics have generated a great deal of interest and conversation, particularly on Social Media. The blogs have also often had supporting video features. Video Ministry is another area that has seen exceptional growth over the last year. From offering new and creative ways to share about Annual Conference to telling stories of unique ministry at local churches, there are countless examples of fantastic videos that have told the story of what it means to be United Methodist in Upper New York in a new and exciting way. Other communications channels such as the Bridge and UNY Notes continue to see great success and are doing their own part in keeping the people of the Upper New York Conference connected. The coming year promises to see continued growth and refinement in Conference Communications. With the opening of the new United Methodist Center there will be many more opportunities for expansion though the video studio and the communications hubs that are being established around the Conference. There will also be many stories to tell about how the new space, and so much more, is empowering life-changing ministry around Upper New York through the local churches.

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As always, the focus will remain—walking alongside local church leaders and providing what they need “To make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. Submitted By: Phil Phaneuf, Chair of the Communications Commission and Stephen J. Hustedt, Director of Communications

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Disaster Response Team This past year has been a blessing for our Conference. We were able to close the open response plans in the three disasters that had happened in the previous years. Currently we do not have any disaster to respond to (that can always change based on the weather). We have been putting together teams from each district who will be the District Response Coordinators. We are working to find a way to have them all trained for Conference Response, UMCOR, and Volunteers in Mission. Recognizing the fact that we are such a large Conference, that so many people have different schedules, and the expense of taking all of them to one location, we are trying to create a training program that they can accomplish from their personal location. Continue to offer prayers for the safety of our Annual Conference and the people that respond in times of need. Respectfully submitted, Reverend Joseph H. Auslander UNY Conference Disaster Response Coordinator

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Episcopacy, Committee on the Every quadrenium, during a General Conference year, the Upper New York Committee on the Episcopacy (COE) experiences a time of transition and new beginnings. Those who have faithfully served the previous four years are freed from their responsibilities, and a new COE is formed. As a member of the new COE, please allow me to express our sincere thanks to our predecessors who served so faithfully. We can tell that Bishop Webb and his family have felt supported and appreciated in their first four years of living in the Upper New York Conference. The new UNY COE is made up of the following people: • Rev. Dr. Bill Allen – Chairperson • Dr. Scott Johnson – Vice-Chairperson • Pastor Abigail Browka • Mrs. Kelli Farrell • Pastor Olga Gonzalez-Santiago • Mrs. Susan Hardy • Rev. Dr. Sung Ho Lee • Mrs. Pat VanVleck The chair and vice-chair of the COE are determined as the result of their order of election to the General Conference delegation from UNY. The rest of the COE members are chosen by the bishop. After the start of the new quadrenium, the UNY COE met one time in the fall to begin to get to know each other and to consider the tasks set before us as a committee. It is important to recognize that confidentiality is a fundamental element of the COE. The COE serves as a type of S/PPRC for the bishop. Therefore we have made a solemn covenant with Bishop Webb to share neither specific content nor tone of COE meetings. This environment creates a space for grace, trust, and honesty in all our interactions. The role of the COE is to support the bishop by praying for him and his family, by ensuring that the episcopal residence meets the needs of the family, by blessing the family with encouragement and hospitality throughout the year, by providing a listening ear for the bishop, and by assisting the bishop in receiving evaluative feedback concerning his leadership. Typically the COE will meet together at least twice a year, along with one or two conference calls on ZOOM. We look forward to supporting and encouraging Bishop Webb and his family throughout the remainder of this quadrenium. We ask that the laity and clergy of the UNY Conference take seriously our privilege and responsibility of holding up Bishop Webb and his family in our prayers.

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Equitable Compensation, Conference Commission on The mission of the Commission on Equitable Compensation is to help equip struggling local churches to establish sound financial footing, so they can build leadership capacity, make disciples, and transform the world. The Commission on Equitable Compensation administers funds used to support clergy salaries for churches with pastors appointed full time where those churches are unable to meet minimum compensation standards. It is our policy to support churches that demonstrate the potential for moving back to full self-funding. The exception to this is in our support of certain mission locations, where unique demographics mitigate against such positive trends, but where the Conference goal of reaching the underprivileged has potential. The Commission on Equitable Compensation works with the Bishop’s Cabinet to encourage right–sizing appointments and other local church staffing, in order to prevent the need for conference support. In 2016 we saw a reduction in the number of churches requesting funding, which is a sign that the downsizing efforts of the cabinet are helping. We have also been working to clarify aspects of the conference moving policy. It is our hope in 2017 to promote discussion around better ways to fund our mission locations; ways that are more fully responsive to current needs and insure efficient use of connectional resources. We are responsible for bringing to the Annual Conference Session, recommendations with respect to the Minimum Base Compensation, the increment for years of service, and any other measures that would insure that our clergy are fairly supported in their work. This year we bring two recommendations for approval: The Minimum Base Compensation and the additional amount for years of service. Minimum Base Compensation – A standardized minimum base compensation is established for the Upper New York Annual Conference effective January 1, 2018 as follows: A. The minimum base salary, according to credential level, for all full time clergy persons is set as noted below: Base Full connection (elders & deacons): $39,984 Provisional (elders & deacons): $38,556 Associate: $37,842 FT LP completed Course of Study or MDiv $37,128 FT Local Pastor: $35,700 (Less than full time appointments shall receive a base salary pro-rated according to the appointment.) B. An additional amount is added to the base for each full time equivalent year of service based on credentials as follows: FTLP w/MDiv or Per Yr. FTE Full Provisional Associate COS FTLP service up to $348 $340 $336 $332 $320 23 years

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C. D. E.

Plus an additional $500 for each additional church on the pastoral charge (over one), not adjusted for part-time appointments. No pastor’s salary can be decreased as a result of this policy, as long as they retain their current appointment. All churches are encouraged to offer a salary increase of no less than the 10 year average increase in the Consumer Price Index (1.8% for 2018) in order to account for increases in the costs of living. Churches are encouraged to consider further raises based on exceptional service.

There are no changes to the Accountable Reimbursement Plan policy for 2018 The members of the Commission on Equitable Compensation for 2016-17 have included: Lauren Swanson (chair), Lynne Blake, Peggi J Eller, Robyn Wernham Hays, Patience D Kisakye, Pamela Klotzbach, Paula Kuempel, Ray Noell, Nancy Rhodes, and Mitchel Smith Ex Officio Members: Kevin Domanico, William Gottschalk-Fielding, Vicki Swanson, Conference Staff Support: Julie Valeski

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Finance and Administration, Council on Grace and peace to my sisters and brothers in Christ. Over the years we have heard from many voices asking for information and increased transparency concerning the development of our Ministry Share Budget. Last year at Annual Conference session, Conference members approved several resolutions that have helped CF&A develop numerous tools to address these needs. Some of these tools are available on the Finance page of the Conference website while others are made available as hard copy brochures and booklets. These tools outline the budget process, provide details of each ministry supported, and provide answers to your frequently asked questions, which will be updated as more become available. Significant milestones achieved this year included a work in process 2018 Ministry Shares Budget published for viewing in early January, and the development of a narrative budget which describes all ministry areas supported and also breaks down how your contributions support them. District listening sessions were developed where we were able to receive your feedback on these tools and information. As always, CF&A continues to work collaboratively with Conference teams, boards, and leadership to develop fiscally responsible policies and procedures that aid us in living within our means without compromising our vision to equip Conference leaders and congregations for the work of making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. We have much to celebrate as we look forward to the 2018 Ministry Share Budget proposal. Thanks to your generous giving, 2016 Ministry Share receipts came in at a higher level than anticipated; allowing the Annual Conference to remit 100% of our General Church Apportionment asking for 2016. In addition, we were able to restructure and reestablish ministries at Syracuse University and begin planning for contingencies if faced with financial hardship in the future. In proposing the 2018 Ministry Shares Budget, we face familiar challenges and concerns as in years past, but with renewed hope in the possibilities of what we can accomplish with God’s help. The final total of Conference Ministry Shares received for 2016 from local churches revealed that there is a positive move toward reducing the gap between the revenue needed for the ministries we have committed to accomplish and the revenue available to fund them. We are excited to report that over two-thirds of Upper New York churches paid at or above 100 percent of their Ministry Shares in 2016. Additionally, an increasing number of churches that were not able to pay 100 percent in 2015 worked diligently and continued to increase their level of support to the connection in 2016. This is all good news that we celebrate! As The Upper New York Annual Conference Council on Finance and Administration, we endeavor to meet our task of faithfully and prayerfully strengthening our financial resources through fervent prayer, fiscally sound policy, and faithful stewardship practices, but we do not labor alone. We are a connected people, as United Methodists and as Christians. We are God’s people called to share in keeping with Jesus’ models witnessed in the early church community. Together we can provide the revenue necessary for the financial support of vital ministries of The United Methodist Church here in The Upper New York Annual Conference and, through our connectional system, around the world. These ministry opportunities are the future of our church locally and around the world. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to offer a sincere and gracious “Thank You” to all the members of CF&A for their service and ministry and to Kevin Domanico, our Conference Treasurer and the financial staff for their continued excellent work for the Upper New York Annual Conference. I also thank the Board of Trustees, Pensions and Benefits, and the Conference Leadership Team for their continued aid and support in our ministry. Together in Christ, we are making a difference. Yours in Christ’s Service, Rev. Lawrence G. Lake, Co-President Upper New York Annual Conference Council on Finance and Administration

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Laity Report, Board of The Board of Laity (BOL) is a team of lay leaders for all 12 districts, the Conference Director of Lay Servant Ministries, officers from UMM and UMW, Young Adults, at-large members, officers of CCYM, a conference staff liaison, and the Conference Lay Leader and Associate Lay Leader. How does this team equip and connect leaders for ministry? January 2016 meeting: • Team members agree to offer training on particular competencies at District Leadership Days. • The NEJ Lay Leaders Association plans to connect in Buffalo on October 7-9, 2016, hosted by UNYAC. • Scott Johnson shares Legislative highlights for the 2016 General Conference. • Scott reveals that his term as CLL and that of Associate CLL, Ilah Walser, will conclude after 2016 AC. All present brainstorm a list of competencies and qualities to consider for future leaders. • Plans for Laity Session at AC 2016 include highlighting ministries in every district, and offering 34 TED talks by BOL volunteers on various competencies. June 2016 Annual Conference: • Scott Johnson, Susan Hardy, Drew Griffin, and Jessica White illustrate 4 leadership competencies at Laity Session. • Lay-led ministries in Cornerstone, Niagara Frontier, and Oneonta • are highlighted at Laity Session. • Susan Hardy is nominated and affirmed as Conference Lay Leader for 2016-20, with Drew Griffin serving as Associate CLL. Praise God for the gifts of all who serve on this team! Susan Hardy, CLL, Cornerstone DLL Drew Griffin, Associate CLL, Binghamton DLL Roger Ellis, Adirondack DLL Ellen Mall-John, Albany DLL Darlene Dennis, Crossroads DLL Shafeegh Habeeb, Finger Lakes DLL Patricia Van Vleck, Genesee Valley Co-DLL Mark Adsit, Mohawk DLL Robert Briggs and Elva Cornell, Mountain View Co-DLLs Jessica White, Niagara Frontier DLL Brenda Shelmidine, Northern Flow DLL Anna Buell, Oneonta DLL Lucina Hallagan, Conference Director of Lay Servant Ministries Steve Ranous, UMM Vice President Katie Allen and Elyse Muder, CCYM Co-Chairs Melissa Watkins, YA Ministries Blenda Smith and Deborah Clyde, At-large members Michael Huber, Conference Staff Liaison Special thanks and appreciation to Dr. Scott Johnson and Ilah Walser for their many years of grace-filled and eloquent leadership! 113


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Lay Servant Ministries Lay Servant Ministries is one of the most significant lay leadership development programs already available within the United Methodist connection. Through this system of equipping and empowering, lay servants have the opportunity to grow as disciples of Jesus Christ who then go and make other disciples. Lay Servants are to serve within and beyond the local church in any way that will inspire the laity to a deeper commitment to Christ and more effective discipleship, including the interpretation of Scriptures, doctrine, organization, and ministries of the church. They lead, assist and support the program emphases of the church, lead meetings, small groups, Sunday School, conduct or assist in conducting services of worship and present sermons, provide leadership for congregational and community life, and foster caregiving ministries. They are the leaders who serve through leading, caring, and communicating ministries in any given church. As we move forward into 2017 we are pleased to share there has been a noted increase in the understanding of the process and requirements for being a Certified Lay Servant along with the additional requirements for those Certified Lay Servants who are called and equipped to serve the church in pulpit supply, Certified Lay Speakers. The 2016 General Conference brought new legislation regarding the certification of Certified Lay Ministers and we are in process to bring our conference into compliance. In 2016, the Upper New York Annual Conference had over 800 active Lay Servants. We also affirmed four new Lay Servant Lay Speakers: From the Cornerstone District – Bonnie Larkin, Lori Brightman and Ernest Warren, from the Mohawk District – David Dudgeon, and from the Crossroads District – Robert Mueller. There were approximately 42 courses offered across our conference with almost 400 Lay Servants in attendance. These Lay Servants then go out and serve as disciples of Jesus Christ through a myriad of ministries including: VIM, small group leaders, trustees, SPRC members, Sunday school teachers, visitation coordinators, prayer leaders, pulpit fill … and the list goes on. We are dedicated disciples of Jesus Christ committed to serving in whatever ways we are called in the Upper New York Conference. Praise be to God. Respectfully Submitted, Lucina B. Hallagan - Conference Director of Lay Servant Ministries

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Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on The Upper New York Committee on Native American Ministries has experienced another year of advocacy for Native peoples within our Conference. An exciting time for us was the first ever retreat in September with all three Native American United Methodist Churches represented, including all three pastors. This was an important time of sharing and growing and enjoying the beautiful surroundings of Casowasco Camp & Retreat Center. The retreat concluded with a meeting with Bishop Webb and Director of Connectional Ministries, Bill Gottschalk-Fielding, focusing on the needs of Native pastors and how the conference can better offer trainings that will nurture the needs and interests of pastors both native and non-Native serving in the capacity of a Native community. All present agreed that future retreats bringing Native United Methodists together from within our Conference is important for spiritual nurturing and growth. CONAM is grateful for the generous support of the Upper New York Conference through the Special Sunday offerings. Through this offering we are able to grant gifts to Native people throughout the Conference. This last year’s grant money was gifted to Kanatsiohareke, a Mohawk community in Fonda N.Y., for their language immersion program. We also gifted the three Native American churches in UNY with $1,000 each to sustain their winter heat expenses and allow for gathering in their houses of worship to continue throughout the cold months. Onondaga Nation continues its Native American Outreach Transportation Program to transport those in need to doctor’s appointments and the pharmacy with financial support from the county and UNY CONAM. Onondaga Nation UMC Pastor, Roselynn Kingsbury, has taken over the administrative duties of the program. We thank Sharon Schmit for her many years of administering this worthy program. Hogansburg UMC hosted two Volunteers in Mission (VIM) teams, working on rejuvenating the cemetery area on the church property. The teams were equally delighted to visit the home territory of the Mohawk people and be immersed in their hospitality for the duration of their stay. Our advocacy work reaches beyond the Conference as we continue to monitor and pray for the struggles of other Native communities, particularly at this time, the Standing Rock Lakota people of North Dakota, resisting the building of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The CONAM sub-committee: Advocacy for Peace with Justice is active in reaching out to Native communities across the Conference. This group also is active in visiting each of the three Native American churches, a daunting task, considering the locations of the territories across the conference. These visitations are so important in Native communities and go a long way in building relationship. CONAM encourages other congregations to visit Native American churches during services or other church activities. Also important is to visit during powwow time or field days. The Committee on Native American Ministries continues to advocate, teach and support members of UNYAC in this life long journey of building relationships and honoring Native Americans. CONAM will continue to watch for fruits worthy of repentance. Submitted by Kae Woodruff Wilbert, Chair

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New Faith Communities Current Reality If I had to choose one word to describe the movement toward planting new faith communities in Upper New York, I would choose MULTIPLICATION! God’s spirit continues to move, inspiring and equipping new groups of people all across upstate New York to find new ways to reach new people! The growth is astounding! When Upper New York was born, we cast an ambitious vision: To nurture a planting culture where everyone feels freed up to plant a new faith community. Our desire was to allow the Holy Spirit to move freely in the hearts of women and men, and to unleash all the gifts of our people to reach new people! We set what seemed like an outrageous goal, to plant 100 new faith communities by 2020. By God’s grace, it is possible we will surpass that goal sometime in 2017! As of February 2017, the people of Upper New York Conference have launched a total of 85 new faith communities over the past 4+ years! And, 70 of those were currently active. This means that 15 of our efforts at planting New Faith Communities have now ceased to gather. This happens for a variety of reasons. However, we have discovered that none of these closed NFCs are “failures,” but rather are learning experiences for future planting work. Lest you think this is the whole picture, there are more than 20 additional groups of people discerning and planning for future planting projects in new mission fields! This is why we are confident that we will surpass our goal of 100 new faith communities soon! Thanks be to God! Our 70 active new faith communities take on all shapes and sizes. Some are being planted by small groups of like-minded people gathered around a vision. Others are being planted by existing churches as they seek to extend their reach by starting an additional site or worshipping community. Some look a lot like a traditional church, with weekly worship and small groups, and are designed to grow by adding numbers to these activities. Others look more like Wesleyan class meetings, but they gather in places like homes, malls, coffee shops, bars, and cafes. All of them are designed to reach a particular group of people in a particular mission field and, all of them have as their ultimate goal, to make disciples of Jesus Christ! Our 70 NFCs also reflect the full spectrum of God’s creation! Among them all there are eight-nine different languages spoken, and around 20 native cultures being reached. There are now eight Hispanic/Latino new faith communities being planted in our Conference, and they are reaching people from at least 10 different cultures/nations. We have teams of people building new relationships with and spreading Wesleyan ethos Christianity to people from Korea, China, Laos, the Congo, Myanmar, Japan, and India. We have new faith communities that are targeting people over the age of 70, and others that are aimed at reaching teenagers and college students. Our Conference is becoming more diverse by the day! What Supports this Work? There are now seven teams of people supporting the work of our planters, representing around forty people who are volunteering their time to make sure each group of planters has the training, information and resources they need to thrive. Excellent training and coaching of lead planters and their teams is vital to creating sustainable new faith communities that make disciples of Jesus Christ. Our Conference is now hosting a Launchpad event 116


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every February… a kind of boot camp for Church Planters, and is open to all from other Conferences. This year we had a young couple from Oklahoma join us! We also hold an Annual NFC Event in April that gathers planters and curious people for training, networking and inspiration. Throughout the year, planters gather in groups for support and ongoing learning and sharpening of their skills in coaching groups. In addition, many of our planters have regular coaching conversations with our own trained coaches. The primary funding source to enable our planting work continues to be a percentage of the income from sold UM church properties. This fund is called the “New Beginnings Fund” and in 2016 approximately $325,000 was spent from this fund to support our work. Decisions about expenditure of these funds are made by three groups: the Grant Team, the Hispanic Planting Team, and the Director of New Faith Communities in consultation with the appointive cabinet. In addition, our Conference Budget supports the work by providing a full time Director of New Faith Communities (not every Conference does so!), as well as an Administrative Assistant. There is also a line item called “Equitable Compensation for Church Planting”.... all of which is used to support the work of planting ethnicminority churches. What is Next? The New Faith Community Balcony Team works with the Director to help steer the current and future course of our Conference in the area of planting. In 2015-16 they helped discern the fact that we need a slight course correction. With the support of Bishop Webb and the cabinet, we have shifted our stated goal as follows: “We desire to launch 150 attempts at New Faith Communities in order to establish 100 sustainable, vital new faith communities by 2020.” The changes in our stated goal create clarity. We do not just want to start new places for new people. We want to start new places that are effectively changing lives and neighborhoods in sustainable ways. We want new faith communities that are making new disciples, that in turn are transforming the communities in which they live, work and play. Everything we do is intended to help us make this come to reality in Upper New York.

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Older Adult Ministries (OAM) 2016 HIGHLIGHTS • Dementia Respite Care Programs Expanding Around the Conference. Lisa Rood, Hamburg UMC, is a consultant to five New York State County Offices of Aging and is tasked to establish faith based respite care programs. Under Lisa’s direction, over a dozen programs have already been established. OAM Team Representatives, including Becky Guthrie (Maynard UMC), and Lisa are working with the Health Care Foundation of WNY/CNY to develop more programs across our local churches and provide associated start-up funding where applicable. • $5,000 Dementia Respite Care Grant Awarded - in the second year of their free Dementia Respite Care program and with over half their 34 volunteers being Baby Boomers from outside the church, Baker Memorial UMC received a $5k grant for expansion of their current program from the New York State Coalition of Respite Caregivers (NYSCRC). The grant allows Baker’s Community Respite Care Board to move from offering services 1 day a month to 2 days a month. It will also expand the geographical outreach of the program to include caregivers and their loved ones within the surrounding rural areas and seeks to include the United Methodist local churches in these areas towards establishing their own free Respite Care programs. • UMC Older Adult Concentration & Certificate Program at CRCDS – spearheaded by the efforts of OAM Team Representatives Barbara Bruce, Rush UMC, and Rev. Becky Naber, Baker Memorial UMC, Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School (CRCDS) offers a concentration for M.Div. and M.S. students in Older Adult Studies and a Continuing Education certification for non-degree students. For graduate level United Methodist students, the UMC General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM) has approved CRCDS to offer a UMC certification in Older Adult Studies towards GBHEM and the UNY Conference BOMs approval of program award. • UMC OAM Team Representatives serve as Adjunct Professors of Older Adult Studies at CRCDS. Celebrating Aging is CRCDS’ new introductory course in their older adult studies curriculum and was taught to M.Div. and M.S. students during the 2016 Fall Semester by Barbara Bruce and Rev. Becky Naber. Last spring, Rev. Naber taught a workshop as part of the school’s new certificate for Life Long Learning. • End of Life Care Workshops– OAM Team representative and Pastoral Assistant for Nurture and Visitation at Williamsville UMC, Barbara Saltarella has been teaching workshops across the Niagara Frontier District on care and nurture of persons at the end of their lives. • WHY OAM & Booming Older Adult Presentations – numerous aging and older adult ministry presentations were given by OAM Team representatives at the UNY Conference level and District Days workshops. The Rev. Cathie Lee (McGraw UMC) and Becky Guthrie (Booneville UMC) have been presenting to the Finger Lakes and Mohawk Districts respectively. Pastor Denise Gisotti is working closely with the Albany District and Rev. Becky Naber has presented to the Niagara Frontier District, at the Syracuse Christian Leadership Conference, and at the Bishop’s Retreat in Niagara Falls. OAM Team representatives are available to present Why Booming Older Adult Ministries are essential for a vital church, How to Design a Booming Older Adult Ministry, and Best Older Adult Ministries and Practices in the UNY Conference. • Visitation Ministry Teams Develop Across the Conference – Sharing Your Hope: Visitation Ministry is a course written and taught across the Conference by Rev. Becky Naber. Over 140 people were trained and certified in 2016 for a total of 200+ since its introduction in 2015. • Albany’s Older Adult Ministries - under the leadership of OAM Team representative Pastor Denise Gisotti, the Albany District has brought awareness and the importance of Older Adult Ministries to local churches across the district. In 2016, over 80+ people were trained in Sharing 118


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Your Hope. This resulted in churches actively providing visitation and communion to the ill and homebound. 2017 PROPOSED NEW PROJECTS/INITIATIVES • District Presenters – One of the primary goals of the OAM Team is to identify one (two as a subsequent goal) older adult ministry speaker in each of the Conference’s 12 Districts. These individuals will be trained and provided with OAM Team materials to work with their District’s staff and to provide OAM presentations and the promotion of booming older adult ministries among the local churches. • Equal Access for Older Adults and Persons with Disabilities - Many churches do not have sufficient handicap accessibility and therefore can only offer limited or no older adult ministries or even have seniors attend worship services. This is also applicable for persons under the age of 65 who have disabilities. Efforts are under way by the OAM Team to build awareness of equal access for all in our local churches and to investigate the possibility of grant monies to help local churches make adaptations. Accessibility is paramount for an inclusive church so that all generation can worship and engage in ministry. • Safe Sanctuaries for Older Adults – the OAM Team is looking to build upon our Safe Sanctuaries program and bring awareness to the need for safe sanctuaries for vulnerable older adults. Part of the OAM Team’s efforts will be the introduction of topic experts on senior adult abuse to the each District’s awareness. • Updated UNY Conference OAM Webpages – Tom DeLoughry, Grand Island UMC, will be spearheading the OAM Team’s efforts at updating their portion of the UNY Conference website. Tom will oversee the design the General Info Page, OAM Team Contacts, and Best Practices pages (including a listing of best practices experts). • OAM Workshops at The Silver Lake Experience – Back by popular demand, Barbara Bruce will be teaching workshops on aging and older adult ministry as part of the Silver Lake Experience this summer at Camp Asbury. • Older Adult Focus Groups – Becky Guthrie (Maynard UMC) will be presenting to the Mohawk District for approval to form older adult focus groups to better help churches identify their older adult needs and develop programs that specifically address these. The proposal will include Dementia Respite Care as one program among many other possibilities. UNY OLDER ADULT EXECUTIVE COUNCIL: Rev. Becky Naber – Chair (Baker Memorial UMC), Barbara Bruce (Rush UMC), Tom DeLoughry (Grand Island UMC), Pastor Denise Gisotti (Delmar UMC) Becky Guthrie (Maynard UMC), Rev. Cathie Lee (McGraw UMC), Lisa Rood (Hamburg UMC), Barbara Saltarella (Williamsville UMC)

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Peace with Justice I’d like to thank those congregations who took the 2016 Peace with Justice Sunday offering! While our participation rate has not increased significantly, I am confident that the word is getting out there. Half of the Peace with Justice offering stays right here in the Upper New York Conference to support justice ministries and programs through a grant process. This year, the Social Holiness team approved five Peace with Justice Grants to help fund a wide variety of ministries. ● ● ● ● ●

NYSCoC - event with speaker from the prison ministry Labor-Religion Coalition of NYS - conference on poverty issues NYSCoC - Congregations for Justice Initiative NYSCoC - Protestant Chaplain Care Program Brown Memorial Church - Adult Life Skills Program

We will be reconsidering the way we handle Peace with Justice grant applications in the coming months as the fund has been depleted considerably over the past few years. The Peace with Justice application can be found on the Conference website or by contacting me. I would love to speak with your congregation, district meeting, or conference team about Peace with Justice ministries. I hope that we can all come to see Peace with Justice Sunday as a giving opportunity instead of just another time we have to talk about money. It is important that I remind you of the other Special Sunday offerings that are Disciplinary and that there are resources available to you for free. This information is from umc.org: Church-wide Special Sundays with offerings enable United Methodists like you to offer refuge in times of disaster, promote peace and justice, provide scholarships and student loans, reach out to the community, teach skills to encourage self-sufficiency and share the love of Jesus Christ with God's people everywhere. Human Relations Native American Ministries World Communion

UMCOR (formerly One Great Hour Of Sharing) Peace With Justice United Methodist Student

By supporting these offerings, we can improve our Connection in order to “make disciples for the transformation of the world.” Committing to all of these offerings helps everyone.

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Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force On Following are some of the 2016 efforts by the 25-member Task Force: •

Contacts and information-sharing with General Conference 2016 members on the Palestinian situation and on the UNY Annual Conference-approved divestment resolutions being forwarded to General Conference. • Holy Land Study tour with the former United Methodist liaison in Bethlehem, arranged for General Conference members Carmen Vianese and John Martin with supporting Peace w/Justice scholarships, sponsorship by the Task Force, and report-backs by the General Conference members. • Three-person Task Force presentation and conversation with the General Conference members at their Casowasco info-meeting, explaining the need to end the Israeli Occupation and emphasizing the role of divestment as a non-violent tool in that accomplishment. • CCYM's Up!Word In April - Task Force presentations at two workshops on "Detaining Dreams", a video depicting interviews with Palestinian youth picked up and imprisoned for supposed stonethrowing, their mistreatment and trauma, their thoughts of the future. Discussion followed. • Skaneateles UMC program by Elaine Doupe and Dianne Roe, requested by pastor, Rev. Joellyn Tuttle, to complete a study group's six-week study with videos on Palestine. • Palestinian Dinner at Annual Conference, with 150 attendees, including Annual Conference and community members and Palestinian guests. Rev. Bill Gottschalk-Fielding brought greetings from the bishop, and Rev. Gary Kubitz spoke of his Olive Harvest trip experience with InterFaith Peace Builders, along with comments from his wife, Sarah and Elaine Doupe, who were also on the trip. An extra mission offering purchased "Luci-lights" for electricity-deprived students in Gaza. An information table at Conference, hosted by Beth Woolever, provided conversation and literature. • Miko Peled, an Israeli peace activist for Palestinians and author of "The General's Son", spoke at University UMC, Syracuse and at Cazenovia UMC last fall. These public gatherings were sponsored by the Task Force and the Syracuse Peace Council's "Justice for Palestine" group. • United Methodists for Kairos Response held a re-visioning and planning meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, attended by the three Task Force co-chairs. New ideas/actions for annual conferences contributed to formats for the resolutions the Task Force is offering. Resolutions drafted at the end of the year and now being offered by the Task Force: 1) Avoid Purchase of Hewlett Packard Products 2) Protecting the Right to Peacefully Address Injustice through Boycotts, Divestment, and Sanctions 3) Consider Investing in Wespath's "Equity Social Values Plus Fund" (ESVPF) •

It is recommended that all United Methodists visiting the Holy Land spend time with the "living stones", the Palestinians, by joining them in conversation and worship.

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New members have joined the Task Force this year, but more are welcome. Meetings are monthly by Conference call, with two "face to face" meetings yearly. Respectfully submitted, Linda Bergh, Leah Mae Carlisle, Karen Peterson Co-chairs, UNYAC Task Force on Peace w/ Justice in Palestine/Israel

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Pension and Health Benefits, Conference Board of The Board of Pensions and Health Benefits of the Upper New York Annual Conference is an active group of lay and clergy that is dedicated to faithfully serve the people and churches with compassion and responsibility. Our work is directed by the Book of Discipline, the laws of the Federal and State governments as well as the actions of this Conference. Board members have a wonderful mix of attention for details and vision for present and future needs for pension and health benefits. We have representatives from the Cabinet and the Commission on Equitable Compensation, as well as the knowledge and skill of Kevin Domanico, Conference Treasurer, Vicki Swanson, Director of HR/Benefits, the Benefits staff, and Ron Coleman, Wespath (General Board of Pension and Health Benefits) Liaison. The Board works to provide stability around essential matters of health and pension for the valued clergy and employees of UNY. There were few changes in our benefit plans during the past year as we maintain the quality services that have been afforded to Conference members in the past years. Attention continues to be given to these major areas: • • • • • • •

Developing and supporting effective leaders The Comprehensive Benefit Funding Plan Funding of the Pre-82 plan Arrearages from the lack of 100% funding from churches and clergy Benefits education and information for churches, clergy and employees Future health care plans that serve the needs of those covered with equitable funding from all parties Updating policies and practices as needed to meet changing needs

Please note that elsewhere in these pre-Conference materials you will find the recommendations of the Board. The report of the director of HR/Benefits, along with the summary of the Comprehensive Benefits Funding plan will be published in the Conference materials. With gratitude to an amazing group of leaders, with trust in the wisdom of the members of the UNY AC, and with deep faith in the Holy One, this report is presented to the Conference. Stephen Deckard Chair of the Board of Pensions and Health Benefits

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Refugee and Immigrant Support Services of Emmaus, Inc. (RISSE) RISSE serves primarily refugees, but also other immigrant families in Albany. Many of these families arrive from places of war and genocide. Some have lived in refugee camps for a dozen years or more. Most speak little or no English. Some are illiterate in their native language. The realities of urban life – bus lines, apartment leases, school services, health services and even kitchen appliances are overwhelming. RISSE is a center for family-based education and support to neighbors in extreme life transition. Clients come from 22 different countries, speaking diverse languages. Youth: The young people often enter the school system with lesser academic skills than their U.S. counterparts, and with little or no English proficiency. RISSE offers an after-school program for youth in pre-K through eighth grade by providing professional English language tutoring, homework help and enrichment activities. RISSE is licensed under capital district child care council to serve 100 youth Monday through Friday. RISSE provides a hot meal and healthy snack daily. Enrollment remains consistent at approximately 80 students. During the summer, RISSE offers a six week, full-day program for youth providing an important continuity of learning for students as well as an important jump start for newly arrived children. Enrichment activities include field trips, swimming and diverse recreational opportunities as well as opportunities for vacation Bible school. RISSE partners with the City of Albany through the summer youth employment program, employing and supervising refugee and immigrant teenagers (many who have come through the RISSE program themselves) as counselors for their younger peers. Summer enrollment is 80 youth with 22 counselors as well as ESL teachers. Adult: RISSE offers the only full-day, year-round English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL) classes for adults in the Albany area. Enrollment ranges from 80 - 100 adults from a diverse variety of countries. Classes provide a place of community and mutual support as adults gain skills and confidence. Daily life skills are integrated into the learning. RISSE integrates job search and placement services. Family: The RISSE goal is to assist the entire family in assimilation. The concurrent programming for both youth and adults provides a dependable and affordable child-care option for parents attending ESOL classes as well as for employed parents. Other services include assistance in various aspects of navigating access to social services, in finding housing, in interacting with schools, in obtaining legal and medical services, and in obtaining household necessities. All of these services would not be possible without an important network of partners. Local colleges, the community, and UNYAC have been consistent supporters with key support coming from local United Methodist congregations. Emmaus United Methodist church continues its key partnership role. In late fall, 2014, RISSE suffered the loss of the adult services building it rents from Emmaus Methodist Church through a suspicious fire. The Emmaus United Methodist church rebuilt the building for RISSE and it opened again in May 2016 for adult services. Expenses for rent of the building and for the after school program have increased. Donations are essential to the program. RISSE staff and the Board are continually grateful for the faithful support of the network of congregations and generous individuals who volunteer, send supplies and donate through the UNYAC Advance #3134. 124


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Executive Director: Rifat Filkins Operations Director: Francis Sengabo The RISSE board of Directors: Rev. G. Ewart Morris ( Emmaus UMC Pastor), Deborah Richards, Lynn Siebert, Judith Bonds, David Liebschutz, Irene Rosenthal, Charles Seagle, Joyce Sohotra, Stephanie Schechter, Solange Mandevu, Hilary Yeager. Submitted by Rev. G. Ewart Morris, Pastor, Emmaus & Deborah Richards, President of RISSE Board of Directors

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Religion & Race (CCORR), Conference Commission on At Annual Conference 2016 CCORR announced plans to begin a process of training & education to equip UNY clergy and laity for leadership in intercultural competency. We began by organizing a day long workshop with Kaleidoscope Institute for the entire Cabinet, executive staff, adult leaders of the Conference Council on Youth Ministry (CCYM) and CCORR members. This day of learning and introspection culminated in a very strong commitment to move forward to overcome racism. CCORR members and the UNY Cabinet took the Intercultural Development Inventory as a first step in self-awareness and identifying areas for personal growth. Some CCORR members participated in the UNY Leadership Academy on May 9-11, 2017 with the Rev. F. Willis Johnson, pastor in Ferguson, MO, a GCORR member and author of Hold Up Your Corner. CCORR (Linda Hughes) has written numerous articles for the communication Weekly Digest and the Conference website to continue to highlight aspects of racism to which we need to be sensitized. CCORR wrote an article for The Advocate on the history of why Pan-Methodist Churches (AME, AMEZ, CMC etc.) left Methodism because of racist practices. Two major quadrennial goals for CCORR in UNYAC were developed with many specific action items identified for each goal. 1. Facilitate healthy relationships among all people by increasing cultural competencies. 2. Develop shared & supportive partnership relationships with UNY’s two African American United Methodist Churches [Lincoln Memorial UMC and Metropolitan UMC], other communities of color within the UMC, and the Pan-Methodist family in our geographic area as we seek to be led into conversations that will empower all in the struggle to identify and effectively resist racism. Finally, a profound experience occurred at the Northeast Jurisdictional Conference 2016. All 10 Annual Conferences from New England to West Virginia unanimously and enthusiastically approved the NEJ Call to Action to overcome racism in our churches and communities. The Bishop’s Task Force on Racism has been convened. CCORR will interface with the task force to strategize solutions. CCORR members: Blenda Smith (Convener), Sandra Allen, Julius and Anola Archibald, Linda Hughes, David Heise, Aaron Moore, Shirley Readdean, Evelyn Woodring, Jay Yang [& support from Scott Johnson, Becky Sweet, Harold Wheat, and Georgia Whitney]

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Safe-Sanctuaries® In the Upper New York Annual Conference the Safe Sanctuaries® Team addresses issues of policy making, training and accountability as related to Safe Sanctuaries®. The SST establishes the minimum standards and procedures, provides training programs, and assists local churches and Conference ministry programs in reducing the risk of abuse to children, youth and vulnerable adults (2011 AC Safe Sanctuaries Resolution). The implementation of revised Safe Sanctuaries® Minimum Standards was a major accomplishment in 2016. The current mandate from UMC’s Discipleship Ministries is that all adults working with children, youth and vulnerable adults be screened with background checks every two years. UNYAC’s standards now include this. Education standard was expanded to include topics to be included in a basic training as well as the need for an annual orientation that includes the ministry’s policies and procedure. The Safe Sanctuaries® Compliance Report that was part of fall 2016 charge conference reports reflected the changes. These reports have been reviewed by team members. UNYAC’s standardized Safe Sanctuaries® Training program is a large part of the SST’s work. The training consistently receives very positive evaluations from participants. Several updates have been made to the training’s activity stations as well as to the training supplies. The goal is to have a 5-6 member training team in each district. Four Training of Trainers opportunities were available in 2016 preparing 51 individuals to facilitate the standard, 3-hour Safe Sanctuaries® Training; we are closer to this goal now than we were a year ago. There have been two TOT opportunities early in 2017 with two more in planning stages. Members of District training teams are recertified every year. In 2017, those who provide training in their local church/charge will also be recertified. Completing the Safe Sanctuaries® Training of Trainers course plus a “practicum” is now an accepted Advanced Lay Servant module. Discipleship Ministries’ booklet, Special Events and Traveling with Youth-Abuse Prevention Strategies, was distributed in UP!WORDS registration packets. The SST had a display at AC2016 which included resources, some handouts to take away, and door prizes (Melton’s Safe Sanctuaries: The Church Responds to Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of Older Adults) provided by Church Mutual. Carol Barnes, team chairperson, attended at Safe Sanctuaries® Gathering in September. This was an opportunities to network with team chairs from other annual conferences and Discipleship Ministries Safe Sanctuaries® staff. An attorney from GCFA presented information on registered sex offenders in the church and mandatory reporting. The Safe Sanctuaries® Team’s initiatives for 2017 include but are not limited to the following: • • •

Visibility at annual conference with a display and a workshop for Safe Sanctuaries® and Older Adults. Production of a video on the topics of responding to and reporting abuse that will replace the dated video currently used in training (individuals with gifts and talents that would be helpful, please contact the team). Exploring on-line training possibilities (individuals interest in working on this project, please contact the team). 127


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• Making resources on safe use of social media in ministry available • Searching for a volunteer training coordinator (Interested? Please contact the team)! Current team members: Carol Barnes (chair), Deanna Finch, Glenda Schuessler, Charles Syms, Matthew Williams, and Ex-officio: Rev. Vonda Fossitt, Cabinet Rep. Rev. William Gottschalk-Fielding, DCOM, and Cherish McGowan, Assistant to DCOM. Carol Doucette, Jack Keating and Rev. Janice McClary Rowell, Cabinet Representative, were on the team from January – June, 2016. We thank them for their service.

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Social Holiness The Social Holiness Committee consists of representatives from five different Conference Committees which are: Peace with Justice, Task force on Peace with Justice in Israel and Palestine, Commission of Religion and Race, Committee on Native American Ministries, the Committee on the Role and Status of Women, and a representative of the New York State Council of Churches, we also have members at large. We have met primarily on a monthly basis using a phone conference call. For the first four years we have focused on hearing reports from each area and finding ways we can be supportive of each area of ministry. We are beginning to move in a new and rather unique direction of finding ways we can best facilitate social ministries in the local congregations of the Upper New York Annual Conference. It is a new area of focus and we expect to find some difficulties along with some wonderful experiences. The new approach to our primary purpose will not eliminate or replace our support of each area of ministry, but should help bring each of the areas of ministry into a more direct and meaningful relationship with the people of our Annual conference. We began this new path with the realization that many of the people of certain age groups, who use to be a part of our Sunday Schools and our Sunday worship, are no longer present in our congregations and no longer find the weekly worship service and Sunday School to be “enough” or possibly even relevant to their lives. Many reports have shown that people who are in the Millennial or Gen Next, those born between 1980 – 1995, and the Gen Z, those born between 1996 – 2010, are looking more towards ways to have a direct impact on the world rather than attending a weekly worship service. A Huffington Press survey tells us: “So you think they’re the “Me Me Me” Generation? Three-fourths of millennials ages 20 to 35 responding to an online survey said they had donated money to charity in 2011, and 63 percent said they’d spent time volunteering. (To be fair, the respondents may have had more time and money than the average millennial: More than 9 in 10 had a bachelor’s degree and the vast majority did not have kids.) Before you say they’re just donating to things that are hip, note that 9 out of 10 said they did research on an organization before giving money or time.” For the Social Holiness Committee the question becomes how can the Congregations of the Upper New York Annual Conference develop meaningful relationships with the people of these generations? We feel one response can be found within our history as United Methodists and in our understanding of who we are. The earliest forms of Methodism always included more than weekly worship and weekly study groups. They most always included involvement in mission areas as a means of answering the call of Jesus found in Matthew 25. (“When was it we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you drink? And when was it we saw you a stranger and welcomed you or naked and gave you clothing. And when was it we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?”) The mission societies of Methodism have been the very roots and foundation of our denomination. These have helped change the lives of people who were without much in their lives to discover and develop a relationship with God through Christ. To this end we will offer the local churches opportunities to examine the areas geographically around their church buildings to see where there may be social ministries taking place. This may be in the form of regional food banks, shelters for the homeless, food pantries, tutoring in the local school system, respite care for families with members on the autism spectrum, and much more. Once these have been identified the church can become a linking source for people who want to make a difference in the world and the areas of service.

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Beyond that, the local church can provide training for persons who want to have direct contact with people in need in their areas. This is where the different committees of Social Holiness will be called upon. If we are to be a means of God’s grace for others we need to learn how to do this without being offensive to different people because of their ethnicity, race, sexual identity, or nationality. We will be asking the members of CONAM, CORR, COSROW, and others to provide training for people looking to make a difference. We will also be asking the Rev. Dana Horrell to provide training for people who are looking to be in ministry and interact with people that are not regularly a part of the congregation. Rev. Horrell has developed a series of videos on this topic, Ministry with the Marginalized, that was funded in part by grants from the Church and Society offerings through Social Holiness. We believe that by becoming a linking source and a training source we will be able to develop relationships that will demonstrate to people, who are not presently a part of our congregations, that the Church and especially United Methodism is relevant and have much to offer the world around us. We hope to be able to demonstrate our concern is not just about putting people in our pews but rather to live out our faith beyond the walls of the local churches then we may be able to earn the right to share our faith with the people who do not always see the Church in a positive light. This is not a “quick fix� or an instant solution to finding a means of becoming relevant to the people of the Millennial, Gen Next and Gen Z generations. It will take time and effort for this to become a reality. But we feel this is where God is calling the people of Methodism of the Upper New York Annual Conference. It also does not suggest that we abandon finding ways to make worship meaningful or that our worship experiences have become less important. This is not about an either/or; but a both/and approach. This is a broad view of the vision Social Holiness has for our ministries over the next few years. We have endorsed the three resolutions brought by the Task Force on Peace with Justice in Israel and Palestine. This was done unanimously at our February meeting. We are also bringing one resolution pertaining to seeking permission to sponsor a special all Conference offering to support the certification of prison chaplains in New York State. This too was approved unanimously at our February meeting. Respectfully submitted Rev. Alan D. Kinney - Chair

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Status and Role of Women (COSROW), Commission on COSROW’s mandate is to “educate, advocate, and monitor for the full participation of women in the life of the Church,” and to “eradicate sexism in the Church.” All of the members of COSROW are fully committed to this goal. We are also painfully aware, now more than ever, that this is a huge task that is not getting any easier. There are many causes of sexism in the Church of Jesus Christ, and it is an affront to the Gospel. The causes are as varied as the bias against strong women and girls that has been woven into the fabric of the Christian faith, in some ways since its inception, to the continued feeling among many Church members that to receive a female minister is to be given a less-than-desirable pastoral appointment. Into these realities COSROW attempts to make inroads every year, and this year has been no exception. However, in addition to monitoring at Annual Conference, COSROW’s thrust this past year has been asking questions, these among them: 1. What is the point of serving as a Listening Post, when COSROW has no power to do anything about the victims of sexism who report to us? 2. How do we interest people in eliminating sexism if they don’t see the problem because they believe it hasn’t affected them personally? 3. How do we make changes, when the steps we’ve already taken (designing a conference-wide workshop addressing sexism and soliciting people’s interest) have lead nowhere? Last year we were concerned about reports that General Conference was proposing that the Commission on the Status and Role of Women join with the Commission on Religion and Race to form a new Committee on Inclusiveness. Our concern was two-fold: 1. Women make up the majority of the Church and, in this conference, have been represented in both the superintendency and the episcopacy. On the other hand, racial and ethnic minorities, especially in the Upper New York Conference, make up a minority and have not been well represented in the superintendency and episcopacy. Thus, issues of gender inclusiveness might well be eclipsed by those of racial and ethnic minorities. 2. Our second concern was that both COSROW and CoRR are commissions, mandated by the Discipline, not committees. The proposed new entity was for a committee, a definite downgrade. We were gratified that the proposal did not go through, but we recognize that no decision is forever, so we are concerned about COSROW’s future. The Church continues to live amid a culture where it is necessary to remind people that women’s rights are human rights; that women, equally with men, are created in the image of God; that woman’s place is wherever God’s Holy Spirit calls them to be; that the most basic fundamental human right is the right over one’s own body; and that God expects women, equally with men, to use their God-given talents to better human life. Now, more than ever, COSROW is needed. I would like to express my appreciation for the time and dedication of the members of COSROW. Together we are so much more than any of us is alone. In Christ’s Service, Rev. Judith Johnson-Siebold, Ph.D., Chair, Tom Blake, Rev. Carl Chamberlain, Ellen Koch, Mary Jane Russell, and Rev. Deborah O’Connor-Slater 131


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Trustees, Board of Since our last Annual Conference, the Board of Trustees has undergone a change in leadership in all of its officers. Rev. Richard Barling serves as President of the Board, Mr. Peter Abdella is Vice President, Ms. Kathy King-Griswold is our Treasurer and Rev. Jack Keating serves as our Secretary. During this year we have worked in five major areas on behalf of the Annual Conference: •

Property Management The Board of Trustees currently oversees 18 closed churches, two cemeteries, two land only properties, four legacy-issue properties, 10 district parsonages, and one episcopal residence. We have reviewed and updated the policies for our District parsonages and Episcopal residence this year and each one of the properties listed now has two assigned Trustees who oversee the condition of each property. We have continued our attempts to market and sell these closed and abandoned properties and this year saw quite a bit or progress in those efforts.

Insurance Program Our insurance sub-committee secured the services of an insurance consultant this year and successfully renegotiated the 2017 renewal with our insurance carrier, Church Mutual Insurance Company. This renewal resulted in increased property and liability coverages for each church and conference property with no increase in premium. We addressed issues with claims management and believe we have designed a control system with our consultant’s help to prevent unnecessary delays in claims processing. In 2017 we will continue to look at further enhancing our Conference-wide insurance program by investigating possible coverage changes and possible adjustments in coverage levels.

New Methodist Center The Trustees appointed a design/oversight team made up of Trustees, Conference Staff and contractors and engineers who have guided the refurbishment and remodeling of our new United Methodist Center. After some unavoidable construction delays, the conference will relocate to our new Methodist Center in late March of this year. With close management of cost control methods, we anticipate completing the building project within the proposed budget established for this work.

Camp Findley Following action taken at Annual Conference in 2016, the Board of Trustees have worked with CRM, conference staff and representatives of the Findley Lake UMC and other interested parties to attempt to develop a stewardship agreement regarding possible future use of the Camp Findley property. As this report is being submitted, these discussions continue and we hope to be able to report further during our report at Annual Conference.

Budget/Financial Management In the budget and financial management area we have worked on these three projects this year: 1. Loan Program: As this report is being written our Conference Loan Program has been suspended and is under review by a subcommittee of Trustees and conference staff. This review is investigating both existing loans from our predecessor conferences and whether adequate funding will allow us to re-open a conference loan program in the future.

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2. New Beginnings Fund: We updated the previously approved and existing fund policy through this quadrennium (1/1/17-12/31/20) to continue good stewardship and the prudent use of funds realized from the sale of closed and abandoned properties. 3. Earnings Allocation to Conference Teams: Following the auditing of all our investment funds from 2010-2015, the Board of Trustees are ready to work with our Conference CF&A to develop a Conference-wide investment policy allowing for allocation of earnings to our Conference teams and ministries. This work will continue in 2017. The work of our Conference Board of Trustees continues to be challenging work. This board of twelve volunteer individuals continues to try and practice good stewardship as we have legal responsibility for more than 800 properties, millions of dollars of investments and developing policies to provide for the safe operation of the programs and ministries of our Annual Conference. This year we were able to secure the valuable assistance of many of our district committees on Church and Locations and we are very grateful for that assistance. We are also very grateful for the help of our Conference Treasurer, Kevin Domanico, Conference property specialist Pat Toukatly, Conference Chancellor, Scott DelConte and Director of Connectional Ministries, Rev. Bill Gottschalk-Fielding. The Trustees continue to covet your prayers as we do the important work to which you have called us. Respectfully submitted, Rev. Richard Barling, President

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Summary of Trustee Financial Activity Book of Discipline, 2016, ¶2512.6 provides: “The board shall make to each session of the annual conference a full, true, and faithful report of its doings, of all funds, monies, securities, and property held in trust by it, and of its receipts and disbursements during the conference year.” The activities of the Trustees for 2016 include the purchase, sale and maintenance of Conference properties. The Trustees also manage the Conference’s Master Insurance Program. A brief explanation of each of the Trustees’ activities for the past year follows: Purchase, Sale, and Maintenance of Properties Trustees are responsible for maintaining and selling closed churches. The net proceeds from the sale of closed churches are transferred to New Beginnings Fund. Properties include churches, cemeteries, and land. Two district superintendent parsonages were acquired in 2016; two parsonages remain to be purchased in 2017 to complete the purchase for all district superintendents. Summary of property inventory: End of 2015 property count Add churches closed Less properties sold

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End of 2016 property count

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Insurance The Conference property insurance program continues in good standing. Trustees have renewed the program with enhancements with Church Mutual. The details of the insurance program renewal can be found on the Upper NY Annual Conference web site. Financial Report Trustee financial activity is accounted for and reported as a separate Fund in the Conference. The following financial statements report Trustee fund activity for 2015 and 2016 prepared according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. At this time, the reports are unaudited. Notes to the Trustee Financial Statements Fund Accounting - To insure observance of limitations and restrictions placed on the use of resources available within the Conference, the accounts of the Conference are maintained in accordance with the principles of fund accounting. This is the procedure by which resources for various purposes are classified for accounting and reporting purposes into funds established according to their nature and purpose. Investments - Investments in marketable securities with readily determinable fair values and all investments in debt securities are reported at their fair values in the statement of assets, liabilities and net assets. Inter-fund Accounts - During the course of a year, funds are sometimes paid from bank or investment accounts from one fund on behalf of another fund as well as revenues that are deposited into some bank or investment accounts of a fund that are truly the resources of another. At the time these funds 134


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are paid or deposited, inter-fund accounting is employed, whereby a liability is recorded as "Due to" another fund and also as an asset of "Due from" the respective fund. Loans Receivable - The Conference maintains a Church Loan Fund for the purpose of extending grants and low interest loans. The loans have various periodic payment terms and are charged interest ranging from 2 % to 5% The Conference maintains a reserve for potential uncollectible church loans. Bulson and Seminary student loans are repayable in equal monthly installments beginning after a student leaves school. Net A s s e t s – Net assets are categorized in accordance with Conference or donor designations as follows: • • • •

Unrestricted Net Assets: Net assets that are not subject to donor- imposed restrictions. Designated Unrestricted Net Assets: Net assets that are internally designated for a specific purpose or activity by the Conference. Temporarily Restricted Net Assets: Net assets subject to donor-imposed stipulations that may or will be met either by actions of the Conference and/or the passage of time. Also includes camps, retreat centers, conference centers and parsonages. Permanently Restricted Net Assets: Net assets subject to donor-imposed stipulations that may be maintained permanently by the Conference. Generally, the donors of these assets permit the Conference to use all or part of the income earned on related investments for program operations

Commitments – There are currently 3 member churches with loan guarantees provided by the Conference with an outstanding loan balance of approximately $1,050,000.

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United Methodist Men (UMM) The Upper New York Conference United Methodist Men (UNYUMM) has undergone significant growth in leadership this past year, so our sub-title "Men growing in Christ, so others will know Him" has been so accurate! God has blessed us with men that love God and have a passion to serve Him through United Methodist Men's ministry. As of January 14, 2017 we have added to our UNYUMM leadership team: • • • • •

(2) At-Large Executive Board members (1) District Vice President (1) District Prayer Advocate (1) Conference Communication Manager (1) Conference Media Manager

Officers are as follows: President - Mark Jones 475 Shortlots Rd, Frankfort, N.Y. 13340 Phone: 315-749-3700 Email: msjwelshman@yahoo. com Vice President - Buddy Heit 2374 Bixby Rd, Savannah, N.Y. 13146-9677 Phone: 315-945-4388 Email: apefeast@tds.net Vice President - Steve Ranous 201 Candee Ave, Syracuse N.Y. 13224 Phone: 315-427-3515 Email: ummsteve@twcny. rr.com Secretary - George Ramseyer 18 Edgewood Drive Baldwinsville N.Y. 13027 Phone: 315-638-8177 Email: ramseyerg@gmail. com Director of Communications - Scott Stumpf 123 Washington Blvd, Fayetteville, N.Y. 13066 Phone: 315-637-5567 Email: srstumpf@ieee. org Treasurer - Dave Greer 221 Golfcrest Circle, Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 Phone: 315-635-6629 Email: daveranda221@verizon.net

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Prayer Adv./Facebook Manager - Mark Hediger 9817 Pronevitch Rd, Westernville, N.Y. 13486 Phone: 315-571-4467 Email: UN.Y.UMM@yahoo. com Scouting Coordinator – Gary Bogner – Sr. Dist. Exec. Seneca Waterways Council Boy Scouts of America, Rochester, N.Y. 225 Leopold Blvd, Syracuse, N.Y. 13209 Phone: 315-506-8110 Email: gary.bogner@scouting. org Manager of Communications - Sanjay Solomon Endwell N.Y. Phone: 937-626-5247 Email: sanjsol@aol.com Media Manager - Tony Indilicato 5638 Compound Lane, Altamont N.Y. 12009 Phone: 518-366-9878 Email: AlbanyDistrict@ unyumm.org Hunger Relief Advocate - Dean Burdick 1255 CO RT 11, Central Square, N.Y. 13036 Phone: 315-668-2923 Email: HungerRelief@unyumm.org


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Additional positions to complete our Executive leadership team as outlined in our GCUMM by-laws are filled at the discretion of the President. This leadership of the UN.Y.UMM is committed to reaching out to all parts of the Conference to disciple men and women into a personal relationship with Jesus Christ through prayer and mission. The UNYUMM are "Men growing in Christ, so other will know Him." To date , we have (6) District Presidents and are in immediate need of (6) more to provide each Upper New York Conference District with leadership to oversee United Methodist Men's ministry and mission. We serve a vast area of New York State and we are in need of committed men with a passion for their God to spiritually lead other men by their words and actions. The leadership team is committed to bringing REVIVAL to Upper New York! We continue to focus on putting God first in all we do!! We have, in the past year, added more spiritual content to our Conference website. Our opening page features a YouTube video of a personal witness to the saving grace of Jesus Christ by Clayton Jennings. Please take time to check out this 9-minute video testimony. It is powerful and moving as he cries out to God to wake me up!! And God listens!! Conference Director of Communications, Scott Stumpf, keeps our website updated and relevant for God's use. We have recently added a Conference Communication Manager, Sanjay Solomon and a Conference Media Manager, Tony Indilicato. They are working to better communicate the mission and ministry of the UN.Y.UMM by live-streaming UMM events and board meetings, making them available to all Methodist men and women throughout Upper New York Conference. The website address is www.unyumm.org. 2017 Scheduled UMM Conference/District/local events can be found on our website. Please take time to visit our website. Come and See the revival taking place within the Upper New York United Methodist Men! "Men growing in Christ, so others will know Him United Methodist Men along with the United Methodist Church is a connectional organization that depends on relationships to grow and prosper spiritually. The United Methodist Men receive no other centralized funds. Except for those fellowships that charter, donate directly or individuals who participate as EMS (Every Man Shares) members; there are no means of financial support from our GCUMM. Although stewardship is vital to growing as a disciple, our purpose is not raising funds; our purpose is to lead men to a personal relationship with Jesus Christ through hands-on mission and discipleship. The United Methodist Men of Upper New York are dedicated to helping men and women grow spiritually through a personal relationship with God. This is done through strengthening our own Christian relationships with each other. Our Conference-wide March mission was collecting shoes. Throughout the month we successfully collected approximately 6,500 pairs of shoes to raise funds for an Autism Support dog for a 5-year old boy here within Upper New York. We then came together to in the first weekend in April to collect the shoes in the new Conference Center, and to celebrate with a pizza and chicken wing party! The EJ Thomas UMM of our Crossroads District worked hard this past year to obtain the funding needed to purchase a transport vehicle for use by Disabled American Veterans (DAV). The 2017 Ford vehicle will be used to transport veterans to and from the VA hospital in Syracuse. Thanks to all who donated to this worthy cause!

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The Methodist Men have been involved with hunger relief here in Upper N.Y. over the past year. Thanks to our Conference Hunger Relief Advocate, Dean Burdick, the UN.Y.UMM with the help of Society of St. Andrews, this past fall facilitated four Potato Drops in Central N.Y. and the Southern Tier. Approx. 180,000 pounds or 3,600 fifty pound bags of potatoes were distributed to food banks, pantries and churches during four consecutive weekends, in the fall of 2016. We continue to work with Society of St. Andrew to provide fresh produce for those in need of basic food in our communities by fund-raising. We plan to do five drops total in 2017! The Annual UN.Y.UMM Conference gathering at Sky Lake Camp, Windsor, N.Y. on September 6-7, 2016, was hosted by the Binghamton/Oneonta UMM; thank you President John Conklin. Isaiah Kacyvenski, a former Seattle Seahawk linebacker, spoke at this year's event and the theme was: "Give It All You Got." Pastor Brad Chesebro of First UMC New Hartford was powerful in challenging all in attendance to "GIVE IT ALL TO GOD!!" We enjoyed a Punt, Pass & Kick contest, wheelchair ramp building, skits, and good food and fellowship, as well as an opportunity to connect with other Methodist Men from all parts of the Conference. The highlight of this year’s annual event was the presentation of our John Wesley Fellow Award to our UMM Brother in Christ, Ken Summers - Congratulations Kenny!! 70 men attended the retreat! The Mohawk District UMM again partnered with the churches to initiate our 3rd Annual "Feed Our Vets February." This district-wide food collection benefited veterans and their families in need. Thank you to all our Methodist brothers and sisters throughout the Mohawk District for their help in feeding our veterans and their families. 1,800 pounds of non-perishable food was collected! The annual men's spring gathering at Aldersgate Camp was held May 6-7, and was led by keynote speaker Pastor Jack Ford. The theme was "Give In, Give Up, or...GIVE IT ALL YOU GOT!!" During this 24hour men's retreat, Pastor Jack talked to the men about putting their faith into action!! The event featured musical guest "Northern Grace," an all-night prayer vigil, and plenty of food, fellowship, and laughter! Thirty-five men attended. The United Methodist Men continue to "Grow in Christ, so others will know Him" through our daily commitment to prayer and spending time with God; putting Him first in our lives. We are seeing God raise up leaders throughout this Conference. Currently we have district leadership in 6 of the 12 Districts. We have 25 United Methodist Men in leadership roles throughout our Conference and Districts!! The Upper New York United Methodist Men are represented by 54 official chartered men's groups throughout Upper New York. Our goal is to add a minimum of one official UMM charter per district, while maintaining our current charters. We are committed to work in ministry/mission together for God's glory; bringing men and women to Christ one heart at a time. "We love, because God loved us first." 1 JOHN 4:19 Respectfully Submitted, In Chris, Mark Jones, Conference President, UN.Y.UMM

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Violet’s Garden (Garden for Young Disciples - Advance # 3075) The Violet’s Garden grants were established in 2008 as an expression of appreciation for Bishop Violet L. Fisher's compassion for children and youth. Initially the fund totaled $17,000. Since then every November and May the task force has solicited and reviewed applications from local congregations looking for start-up funding for new spiritual growth experiences for children and youth. Due to our limited level of funding available, the task force decided to put out a call for grant applications only in May beginning in the year 2016. The task force is pleased to report the following grant funding during the 2016 fiscal year. •

missionU at Cazenovia College for the children and youth programs: $1200.

While this program is not officially locally church based, it encourages children and youth from our local churches to engage in deepening their faith life in an intensive setting, and to return to their local churches willing to share their experience with their congregations. This model for faith formation is one that local churches might not be able to provide on their own, but the local church will benefit from the increased faith life of their participating children and youth. The fund has been sustained over the years by donations made to the Advance (# 3075) by individuals and local churches. We will follow the same model for 2017, calling for applications only for the May 1 grant period. We appeal to every local congregation in our Annual Conference that values and cherishes their ministries with children and youth, to make a donation to Violet’s Garden to continue this source of support for the spiritual formation of children and youth. Our Conference’s emphasis on making disciples of Jesus Christ, should not focus only on persons older than 18. Financial support, such as minigrants from Violet’s Garden, are needed for the intentional spiritual formation of children and youth. Respectfully Submitted, Rev. Dr. Joellyn Tuttle, Violet’s Garden Task Force Convener

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Vital Congregations The Vital Congregations ministry area continues making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world by coming alongside districts and local churches to provide resource and direction so that greater vitality will be experienced. Vital Congregations is reaching toward living the Gospel of Jesus Christ and being God’s love with our neighbor in all places. Through the ongoing effort to work toward the mission and vision, the three outcomes of increasing the number of transformational leaders, increasing the vitality of existing congregations, and increasing the number of vital and sustainable new faith communities have been established. Two of the three outcomes for reaching the vision draw a considerable focus in Vital Congregations; increase the number of transformational leaders, and increase the vitality of existing congregations. The third outcome, increase the number of vital and sustainable New Faith Communities, informs the work as well. At this time in the life of the Annual Conference the focus of greatest importance is developing the capacity of Christ-following leaders, and Vital Congregations shares this ministry focus with all the ministries in Upper New York. Currently the programming being offered by Vital Congregations includes, Leadership Academy, Illuminate Preaching Academy, Hand to Plow, Tending the Fire, Tending the Soul, and EQ-HR Workshops. In addition ministry is being engaged with District Leadership Teams, Board of Ordained Ministry, and the UNY Cabinet. In the midst of the programs and key relationships, there is continued work with local congregations through preaching, teaching, coaching, and other forms of support as needed. Moving forward many of the ministry activities of Vital Congregations will continue while additional strategies and opportunities to serve the local congregations, as they share the ministry of making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. This means being in conversation with District Leadership Teams to hear what the needs are of local congregations in their context, and developing ways to come alongside through programming and training. To accomplish this ministry the ongoing development of teams and relationships will remain essential. We are beginning to see more local congregations experience health, and growth. There is every reason to hope and believe more is to come as together we stretch to catch up to what God is already doing in our midst. If you have questions, or would like to have a conversation about Vital Congregations, contact Rev. Dr. Aaron M. Bouwens, Director of Vital Congregations, at 315-898-2014, or by email aaronbouwens@unyumc.org. If your congregation would like to host a training opportunity through Vital Congregations, or if you would like to have Aaron guest preach for worship, please contact Karen Campolieto at 315-898-2015 or KarenCampolieto@unyumc.org for details and scheduling.

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Young Adult Council Throughout 2016, the young adults of Upper New York have explored what it means to put faith into action, stemming from the CCYM year theme of “Do Something.” We implemented this into the Young People’s Worship Service held at Annual Conference on Saturday morning, as well as planning a trip to Washington, D.C. in the early part of 2017. We have also spent time dreaming and evaluating the needs of young adults within Upper New York, as it relates to increasing leadership capacity. This dreaming and evaluation led to asking for an increase in our budget for 2018, a desire to collaborate with other ministries focused on working with young people, and how we care for one another at different stages of young adulthood and within our calls to ministry, whether as clergy or laity. We were excited to continue our leadership with the Young People’s Service at the 2016 Annual Conference Session, and open the day with worship. Many months of planning lead up to the day. As part of the service, we invited CCYM members and youth from around the Conference to participate, as to truly bring in all young people who were present. We incorporated many styles into worship including traditional and contemporary music, call and respond, and a spoken word-style sermon. In order to engage those present, we invited everyone forward to fill out a card and focus on what they were going to do between the 2016 and 2017 Annual Conference Sessions. Worship was closed out singing, “Draw the Circle Wide,” as we invited all to stand and sing together in a circle around the plenary space. (Read more about worship here: bit.ly/UNYyoungadults. Also in response to our theme in 2016 of “Do Something,” we held our first annual “Do Something” trip. While we realize the trip took place in early 2017, we wanted to share about the experience which stemmed from plans that began in early 2016. The planning was a collaborative effort among several Young Adult Council members. From January 11-15, 2017, 15 young adults from around our Annual Conference traveled to Washington, DC for a time of fellowship, education, action, and worship. We attended a seminar put on by the General Board of Church and Society in the United Methodist building—literally across the street from the U.S. Capitol—on the intersection of faith and civic life through the lens of poverty. We learned how poverty affects countless families across the country in a multitude of settings and contexts, and we walked away with some concrete tools on how to address the challenges that poverty presents from engaging with elected officials to learning how to get involved with community organizing initiatives. On Saturday, our group broke off to participate in three different action initiatives and organizations. The first organization was The Campus Kitchen Project of Northwest Washington, D.C. Located in the Saint Luke’s Mission Center Campus of National United Methodist Church, Campus Kitchen is an organization that reclaims surplus food from a variety of local distributors and transforms them into nutritious meals that are delivered across the D.C. community, especially into areas that are designated as food deserts or swamps. The second organization was the Georgetown Ministry Center, an organization that seeks to put an end to chronic and systemic homelessness in the District of Columbia one person at a time. The third action was attending a rally for immigrant and refugee rights which was sponsored by the Washington Interfaith Network and hosted at Metropolitan Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown DC. On Sunday, our group traveled to the Metropolitan Memorial campus of

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National United Methodist Church to worship and from there we embarked on our journey back to New York. (Read reflections from participants who attended at bit.ly/UNYyoungadults. We will continue to grow our plans for Annual Conference Worship and our “Do Something� trip in 2017, and hope to expand as we navigate the ebb and flow of the young adults in Upper New York. We aim to implement a mentoring program, strengthen our relationship and care for seminary students, and find and support programs to increase leadership capacity of our young people. Respectfully Submitted, The Upper New York Young Adult Council Members

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Youth Ministries (CCYM), Conference Council on The Conference Council on Youth Ministries is pleased to report an excellent year filled with God’s love and blessings. Our theme, “God is,” has helped us to grow in our understanding and awe of how amazing the God we worship is, and how we can work together as a community to further his kingdom. CCYM made several changes this year. The location of the East Fall Gathering was moved to Saratoga Springs United Methodist Church in order to attract new youth groups and grow our events! As a CCYM we are always trying to include new people and give them opportunities to be drawn even closer to the heart of God. CCYM also added the new leadership position of Administrative Coordinator! This person will organize and report about financials, attendance, and any additionally necessary tasks. Our hope for the next year is to continue to grow our events and fill all the youth spots in the districts on the committee. We were also given the eye-opening opportunity to go through diversity training with Aaron Moore. Learning how to love and share God’s word effectively with all people is such an important task and we were so thankful for the chance to learn more about how we can achieve that goal. CCYM is also excited to announce that all of our speakers at Up!Word this year will be young adults! We are striving to create an accessible and relatable atmosphere for teens to come closer to Jesus, and are hoping and praying that lives will be touched through this experience! Again, we have been so blessed by God and cannot wait to see what he has in store for us the coming year! Respectfully, Elyse Muder and Katie Allen Participants: Elyse Muder, Katie Allen, Ellegra Nier, Sam Smith, Emily Lasher, Rachel John, Connor Crowell, Maria Schermerhorn, Garrett Warren, Zach Aiosa, Bri Jose, Rae Bohling, Julio Guity, Eliana Mora, Ushuaia Diaz, Julia McGaugh, Abby Hauf, Gabrielle Bailey, Cameron Graney, Connor Nelson, Kennedy Mitchell, Anna Clark, Clairmar Galarza, Kristina Sweat, Ali Mann, Lily Whiting, Amanda Zwetsch, Ethan Steirheim, Syble Billings, Ian Crowell, Owen Noreau, Meredith Forbes, Larissa Wiltse, Nicholas Hernandez, Taylor Heath, Talia Vaughn, Joshua Daley, Daniel Youngs, Pauline Patton, Will Allen, Luke Stephenson, Gabi Wilson, Tom Schmidt, Bill Allen, Gregg Steirheim, Julie Maciejewski, Debbie Earthrowl, Debby Acker-Cole, Jeff Aiosa, Cory Jones, Don Reto, Judy Hipes, Eleanor Collinsworth, Rachel Jordan, Ted Anderson, Tony Hipes, and Dee Finch.

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Boston University School of Theology Greetings in the Spirit of Jesus Christ! The Boston University School of Theology (BUSTH) travels with you in the vital journey of seeking God, building knowledge, and equipping leaders for the church and society. We celebrate our students, alums, and church partners, who join hands in serving God and building toward transformed communities. BREAKING NEWS: • Congregations: We welcomed Jonathan Calvillo as a new faculty member in sociology of religion, leading us toward better understanding of congregations and faith identity. See also our website of congregational resources: http://www.bu.edu/cpt/current-projects2/congregational-research-and-development/. • Doctor of Ministry: The DMin program in Transformational Leadership is soaring with deeply committed student cohorts who are widely ecumenical, culturally diverse, and increasingly global. The blended model includes intensives, online courses, and close work with faculty mentors. • Scholarships: We multiplied funding for student scholarships and housing, including the Vincent Machozi Scholarship for African students who seek to cultivate ministries of compassion, justice, & peace in their homelands. • Religion and Arts Initiative: The Initiative sponsored a hymn-writing contest this year, complementing the photography contest last year and STH’s rotating art exhibits. The current exhibit focuses on ecological healing: “Sense of Place” by women print-makers from Ecuador and Maine. PARTNERING FOR MINISTRY AND TRANSFORMATION: Preparing students for ministry means meaningful partnerships with the local spiritual community. • Congregational courses: Courses in congregations with church leaders and students learning together. • Religion and Conflict Transformation Clinic: Internships, workshops, and projects that foster justice and reconciliation. • Travel seminars: Courses engaging local communities on Arizona-Mexican border and in Cuba, Germany, and Indonesia. • Ecumenical partnerships: Continuing close work with UMC, AME and other Wesleyan denominations, while building strong programs with the Episcopal Church and United Church of Christ. • Partnership with Hebrew College: Joint courses and public events, plus co-sponsoring The Journal of Interreligious Studies. The focus is on enriching theological education and developing religious leaders who are faithful and wise. TAKING ACTION GLOBALLY AND LOCALLY: • Campus action: Work with Boston University to improve accessibility and sustainability: to provide full access for all persons (a work in progress) and to live sustainably with the planet. • Internships in global service and peacemaking: Student-initiated internships for service with communities across the world, and for just peacemaking projects with international organizations.

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RENEWED COMMITMENT TO JUSTICE: Celebrating differences while joining together for action. • Standing with Standing Rock: Several BUSTH students and alums joined indigenous peoples at the Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota to protest the pipeline on sacred Sioux land. • Deep conversations: Faculty, students and administrators have led deep conversations on issues that divide, but with respectful listening that builds community life and communal action. OTHER NOTABLE HEADLINES: • Our own Associate Dean Pamela Lightsey was featured in Boston University’s 2016 Annual Report for her pursuit of justice, empowerment, and change. • Our graduating senior, Rev. Mariama White-Hammond (AME) led the Boston Women’s March, and some 75 STH faculty and students marched, calling for social and ecological justice as we build new futures in the United States. • Students of all theological and social orientations are asking and then acting: “What can I do to make this world better?” “How can I witness to my Christian faith?” As BUSTH looks back on 2016, it celebrates transformational leaders who have loved God and cared mightily for God’s world. Their living legacy gives us hope and courage for the future. Blessings and gratitude, Mary Elizabeth Moore, Dean

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General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM) The agency launched a new mission and vision at the start of 2017. The updated mission and vision simplify our role as the primary leadership development agency for The United Methodist Church. Mission Our mission is to lead and connect the educational and ministerial life of The United Methodist Church. Vision We will continue to transform the world through the power of education and ministry in the Methodist tradition. We will serve God and the worldwide Church in recruiting, nurturing, and educating lay and clergy leaders who seek wisdom and live ethically as God’s peacemakers. Education The Collegiate Ministry Office at GBHEM hosted Imagine What’s NEXT, a three-day event for young adults ages 18-26 to discern their call of lay or clergy leadership and learn ways to connect that Godgiven call through the work of the church. Nearly 700 students participated in NEXT, an increase of nearly 40 percent from prior years. The Young Clergy Initiative funds innovative projects across the church to attract young people to ordained ministry. The $7 million initiative has funded more than 75 projects. A biennial event, Exploration provides a platform for young adults ages 18-26 to hear, discern, and respond to God’s call to ordained ministry. In 2015, 475 attended Exploration. The 2017 event will take place in Portland, Oregon, November 3 – 5. The agency has a Global Methodist Education Network that includes more than 1,000 institutions of higher education around the world. GBHEM supports Schools, Colleges and Universities across the U.S. The Schools, Colleges, and Universities Office at GBHEM hosted 30 of the school’s presidents at the CEO Meeting of the Council of Independent Colleges in Orlando, Florida in January 2017. In addition, the office hosted 35 presidents at the National Association of Schools & Colleges of The United Methodist Church (NASCUMC) winter meeting in Washington, D.C. Global Education and New Initiatives at GBHEM provides technical assistance, financial support, scholarships and recruitment aids for five target regions across the globe: Africa, Asia Pacific, Latin America, Europe and the U.S. Global Education works with the United-Methodist related schools, particularly institutions of higher education and theology schools. In addition to schools, the office supports international and regional associations, as well as oversees the Methodist Global Education Fund for Leadership Development. The Black College Fund invests in the hopes and dreams of those students attending United Methodistrelated historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The Black College Fund distributes 95 percent (on average more than $9 million) of all funds received equally to the 11 HBCUs. The fund provides for faculty development, infrastructure maintenance, and for students who need financial support and scholarship, helping the HBCUs to keep tuition and fees competitive. The Black College Fund was pleased to announce that five of its HBCU’s enrolled 22 Hispanic students as part of the Latino student access program in 2016.

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The agency works with the Commission on Central Conference Theological Education (CCTE) to distribute grants for the theological education of pastoral leaders in the Central Conferences. The 2012 General Conference established a $5 million CCTE fund, and more than 250 grants have been awarded across 22 countries to date. Due to its impact, the fund was doubled at the 2016 General Conference. New grant recipients were announced in March 2017. In 2016, GBHEM’s Office of Loans and Scholarships awarded 2,025 students with more than $3.1 million in scholarships and 406 students with more than $1.9 million in loans. The loans and scholarships are open to United Methodist students and seminarians who are seeking to further their education. GBHEM reestablished its publishing ministry in 2016 to engage, nurture, and advocate for the intellectual life of The United Methodist Church. Through this ministry, GBHEM produces academic resources for the constituencies of the agency, including single-author and multi-author works, as well as edited volumes. More than 10 new and revised books have been released under the publishing ministry. Ministry In partnership with Discipleship Ministries, GBHEM provides e-readers to theological schools in remote areas of Africa and Asia, offering access to the latest textbooks and references books. The E-Reader Project has distributed nearly 1,500 devices to 22 theological seminaries, loaded with publications in English, French, and Portuguese. Individuals pursing licensed and ordained ministry find the resources they need to overcome challenges and barriers sometimes encountered when responding to God’s call in GBHEM’s Candidacy Office. The office coordinated a successful Board of Ordained Ministry Quadrennial Leadership Development in fall 2016. In addition, the office revised the BOM Handbook following General Conference along with the conference relations resources for the 2016 Book of Discipline. The Candidacy Office is also developing an eight-year Clergy Assessment Process and GBHEM’s Effective Ministry Assessment (EMA) leadership development tool. Course of Study and Specialized Theological Education provides resources for local pastors to gain the education and training needed for service across the church, with courses available in Spanish. The office launched Portuguese Course Study programs in 2016 and will continue to expand. GBHEM launched three new education options for part-time pastors in December 2016: an Extension of the Course of Study School of Ohio (COSSO) located at United Theological Seminary, a satellite Course of Study program with Saint Paul School of Theology in Hays, Kansas, and a pilot Escuela de Cursos de Estudios (ECE), a Spanish Course of Study, in Denver, Colorado. Chaplains and pastoral counselors are credentialed through the United Methodist Endorsing Agency, which provides resources for chaplains and counselors serving inside and outside the walls of the church. UMEA supports those working in 25 ministry settings such health care, military, prison, workplace, marriage and family, specialized and more. The office is completing the second pilot initiative to evaluate the effectiveness of a hybrid Clinical Pastoral Education program sponsored by GBHEM. GBHEM leads clergy continuing education programs, providing resources for spiritual formation and professional development to help ensure an effective clergy for the church. Clergy Lifelong Learning provides an innovative platform for ministry through the multilingual UMC Cyber Campus. In addition, the office organized the 60th anniversary celebration of full clergy rights for women in August 2016 at the United Methodist Clergywomen gathering, which included 450 attendees from 27 countries, 151


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speaking six languages. This office continues to provide guidance in cross-cultural/cross-racial leadership development throughout the denomination. The agency supports deacons and diaconal ministers as they lead the people of God into ministries of compassion and justice, and interpret the needs of the world to the church. The Office of Deacon Ministry Development and Provisional Membership led the celebrations for the 20th anniversary of the “recovery� of full-member clergy deacons for the church. In addition, a new certification in parish nursing was created, and the certification in camping and retreat ministries was updated (in collaboration with Discipleship Ministries).

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United Theological Seminary Where Dreams Take Flight United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio, was founded in 1871 by Milton Wright, a Bishop in The Church of the United Brethren in Christ and father of aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright. The Wright brothers had a passionate dream of developing the first successful "flying machine." They experienced great difficulties, hardships and setbacks in achieving their dream. Through their determination and commitment, however, their dream eventually was fulfilled, and they were the first human beings to achieve sustained flight. God often plants a vision or dream in someone's heart to become a full-time servant of Jesus Christ. In St. Peter's sermon on Pentecost, Peter quotes the prophet Joel who said, "God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions and your old men shall dream dreams" (Acts 2:17). When God pours out the Spirit on someone and calls them into ministry, United seeks to partner with that person in helping them to grow spiritually and intellectually in achieving their God-given call and dream. In the fall of 2016, 418 students enrolled at United to answer God's call and vision for their lives.1 Our prayer is that God will use United to prepare these students to become faithful, fruitful and effective pastors and church leaders who make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. According to a recent survey, 86% of our graduates are either currently serving in local congregations or are retired from serving in local congregations.2 United alumni/ae are making an impact. On January 1, 2017, United celebrated the beginning of a new partnership in ministry with Methodist Theological School in Ohio (MTSO). United has become an extension site for the Course of Study School of Ohio located at MTSO, providing a convenient hybrid program for part-time pastors pursuing a local pastor’s license. Through United’s Course of Study, pastors experience a Friday-Saturday weekend on campus and finish coursework online over the weeks that follow. Courses are offered four times per year. If you feel God calling you to serve in any form of Christian ministry, we encourage you to go online to united.edu to discover the option that fits your ministry and calling. May God bless you as you respond to God's dream for your life to serve in either the ordained, commissioned or lay ministry. Grace and Peace, Dr. Kent Millard President, United Theological Seminary 1 2

Fall 2016 headcount of masters’ and doctoral students enrolled in courses. According to the 2014 United alumni/ae survey.

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2017 Journal Vol. I  
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