Page 1


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1

Table of Contents 

2

Letter from Upper New York Area Resident Bishop Mark J. Webb .............................................................. 3 

3

Pre‐Conference Worship: ............................................................................................................................. 4 

4

Holy Conferencing Principles ........................................................................................................................ 6 

5

Organizational Motion .................................................................................................................................. 7 

6

Consent Calendar .......................................................................................................................................... 9 

7

Annual Conference Session agenda ............................................................................................................ 10 

8

Endorsement of Episcopal Nominees by the Upper New York Conference ............................................... 11 

9

Recommendations ...................................................................................................................................... 13 

10

Proposed 2017 Ministry Shares Budget .................................................................................................. 14 

11

Recommendation of the Global Ministries – Conference Advance Specials .......................................... 20 

12

Recommendation of the Conference Board of Pension & Health Benefits ............................................ 22 

13

Recommendation of the Commission on Equitable Compensation ....................................................... 24 

14

Recommendation of the Older Adult Ministry Team ............................................................................. 26 

15

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Andover UMC ................................................................................ 30 

16

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Dorloo UMC .................................................................................. 31 

17

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Hyndsville UMC ............................................................................. 32 

18

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Mineral Spring UMC ...................................................................... 33 

19

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Talcottville UMC ............................................................................ 34 

20

Discontinuation of a Local Church – Watkins Glen UMC ........................................................................ 35 

21

Resolutions and Petitions ........................................................................................................................... 36 

22

UNYAC2016.1 – Local Church Right to Choose Insurance Provider ........................................................ 38 

23

UNYAC2016.2 – Change District Names ................................................................................................. 39 

24

UNYAC2016.3 – Restoration of Funding for Campus Ministries ............................................................. 40 

25

UNYAC2016.4 – Ensuring Support for All Ministries ............................................................................... 42 

26

UNYAC2016.5 – Restoration of Funding of the New York State Council of Churches ............................ 43 

27

UNYAC2016.6 ‐ A Call for Budget Transparency ..................................................................................... 45 

28

UNYAC2016.7 – The Many Shades of God’s Hands ................................................................................ 47 

29

UNYAC2016.8 – A Resolution to Study and Consider Endorsing Carbon Pricing .................................... 50 

30

UNYAC2016.9 – UNYUMC Responds To Gun Violence ........................................................................... 55 

31

Reports ‐ Conference Teams ....................................................................................................................... 58 

32

Africa 360 ................................................................................................................................................ 60 

33

Archives and History, Commission on..................................................................................................... 61  1   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1 

Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) ......................................................................................................... 63 

2

Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM) ....................................................................................................... 65 

3

Communications Report ......................................................................................................................... 69 

4

CORR – Conference Commission on Race and Religion .......................................................................... 71 

5

Commission on the Status and Role of Women (COSROW) ................................................................... 72 

6

Disaster Response ................................................................................................................................... 73 

7

Episcopacy Committee ............................................................................................................................ 74 

8

Finance and Administration, Council on ................................................................................................. 75 

9

Lay Servant Ministries ............................................................................................................................. 81 

10

Mission Oversight Team, Reaching Our Neighbors (RONMOT) .............................................................. 82 

11

Ministry Oversight Team, Spiritual Leadership ....................................................................................... 83 

12

Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on ........................................................................... 84 

13

New Faith Communities .......................................................................................................................... 85 

14

Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force on ..................................................................... 87 

15

Peace with Justice Grants ....................................................................................................................... 89 

16

Pension & Health Benefits, Board of ...................................................................................................... 90 

17

Sexual Ethics Committee/Safe Sanctuaries Team................................................................................... 93 

18

Social Holiness ......................................................................................................................................... 95 

19

Trustees, Board of ................................................................................................................................... 97 

20

United Methodist Men ........................................................................................................................... 99 

21

Vital Congregations ............................................................................................................................... 102 

22

Violet’s Garden Advance # 3075 (Garden for Young Disciples) ............................................................ 105 

23

Volunteers‐in‐Mission (UMVIM) ........................................................................................................... 107 

24

Youth Ministries (CCYM), Council on .................................................................................................... 109 

25

Reports – Connections Organizations ....................................................................................................... 110 

26

Albany United Methodist Society ......................................................................................................... 112 

27

Boston University School of Theology .................................................................................................. 113 

28

Drew University Theological School ...................................................................................................... 115 

29

Iliff School of Theology .......................................................................................................................... 117 

30

Methodist Theological School in Ohio .................................................................................................. 118 

31

New York Council of Churches .............................................................................................................. 119 

2   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51 

Letter from Upper New York Area Resident Bishop Mark J. Webb    Dear sisters and brothers of the Upper New York Area,     Greetings  to  you  in  the  wonderful  name  of  Jesus  Christ!  Soon  we  will  gather  together  to  give  thanks  as  we  celebrate  God’s  amazing  work  of  grace  in  our  lives,  and  the  lives  of  those  whom  God  has  called  us  to  offer  the  good news of Jesus Christ!     Our Annual Conference session is a time for us to proclaim in a fresh way our identity as followers of Jesus Christ. It  is a time for us to celebrate and commit in a renewed way to our mission of making disciples of Jesus Christ for the  transformation of the world, so that we might see more people living the Gospel of Jesus Christ and being God’s  love with neighbors in all places.     Annual  Conference  session  2016  will  be  filled  with  times  of  worship,  study,  mission,  fellowship,  and,  of  course,  some vital times of discernment, conversation, and decision. The days we spend together will allow us to grab hold  of  who  we  are  in  relation  to  God,  one  another,  and  the  world  around  us,  as  we  fully  understand  the  awesome  privilege and responsibility we have to boldly be the Church in the 21st century!     Our theme this year is Planting God’s Future in Hearts and Neighbors – Called to Give Thanks. Through all we do  during our time together, we will be guided by the truth and promise that we have been invited by God to accept  and  proclaim  in  a  fresh,  bold  way  the  transforming  work  of  God’s  amazing  grace  in  our  lives  and  in  the  lives  of  others.     We will be blessed to have the Rev. Adam Hamilton, pastor at Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, Kan., with  us  for  three  90‐minute  teaching  sessions  that  will  inspire  as  well  as  challenge  us  to  increase  our  capacity  in  leadership and in mission.     We will officially end our Africa 360 campaign, a $2 million‐commitment to provide eight endowed scholarships at  Africa University and join the global effort to end malaria. My hope is that each congregation will respond to the  Africa  360  challenge  by  bringing  its  gift  of  at  least  $1,000  to  be  presented  during  our  gathering  in  Syracuse.  In  addition,  we will  have  the opportunity  to  receive  offerings during  various  worship  services  that  will  support  our  “Clergy Care Fund” (financial assistance for clergy and families), our “Helping Hands Fund” (financial assistance for  laity of our congregations), and the NEJ Mission of Peace.     Finally, what would the Annual Conference session be without some reports, resolutions, and recommendations to  read, surround in holy conversation, and act upon. The pages in this first volume of the “Journal” will prepare you  to engage fully in all that we will consider when we gather. I hope you will take the time to read each report and  every page. I urge you to participate in one of the Pre‐Conference Briefings that have been scheduled.     I am grateful to be a part of this place called Upper New York, and to share a journey of ministry with each of you.  God is accomplishing amazing things in us and through us − there is much reason to Give Thanks! I know we are  ready to allow God to use us in ways we have not yet dreamed or imagined. So, come prepared for an amazing  experience of faith, community, and celebration, as we gather June 2‐4, 2016 at the OnCenter in Syracuse.     I look forward to greeting you, worshipping with you, and claiming what God is promising!      Bishop Mark J. Webb    Resident Bishop, Upper New York Area   

3  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35 

Pre‐Conference Worship:    Called to Give Thanks: Setting the Table      WELCOME AND PRAYER                     Setting the Table  Be present in our time here, Lord  Be here and everywhere adored  These creatures bless and grant that we  May commune and celebrate with thee. AMEN.    Adapted from John Wesley’s Teapot Table Blessing      OPENING MUSIC    Give Thanks (The Faith We Sing)       #2036        GATHERING        Gather in small discussion groups of up to five people and share:      Name, local church you represent, why you will be attending Annual Conference session    Psalm 100          The Message    SCRIPTURE READING      In your groups, share how this passage relates to your local church by answering one or  two of the following questions:        What has God done for you in the past year that deserves thanks?  How does your local church show gratitude to God?        How does your church share what Jesus has done/is doing for us?        What ways do you personally show gratitude to God?        What does “called to give thanks: setting the table” mean to you?      CLOSING IN PRAYER        We thank thee Lord for this meal      But more because of Jesus’ love.      Let manna to our Souls be given      The bread of Life sent down from heaven. Amen.        − John Wesley’s Teapot Table Prayer for thanks after the meal 

4  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2 

Psalm 100 (The Message)  A Thanksgiving Psalm 

3

On your feet now − applaud God! 

4

Bring a gift of laughter, 

5

sing yourselves into His presence. 

6

Know this: God is God, and God, God. 

7

He made us; we didn’t make Him. 

8

We’re His people, His well‐tended sheep. 

9

Enter with the password: “Thank you!” 

10

Make yourselves at home, talking praise. 

11

Thank Him. Worship Him. 

12

For God is sheer beauty, 

13

all‐generous in love, 

14

loyal always and ever. 

5  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11 

Holy Conferencing Principles 

of the Northeastern Jurisdiction of The United Methodist Church    Ephesians 4:3 “[Make] every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.”    • Every person is a child of God. Listen before speaking.  • Strive to understand from another’s point of view.  • Speak about issues; do not defame persons. Disagree without being disagreeable.  • Pray, in silence or aloud, before decisions. Let prayer interrupt your busyness.   Strive to accurately reflect the view of others.     

6  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Organizational Motion    1. This is the seventh session of the Upper New York Annual Conference held June 2‐4, 2016 at  the OnCenter, Syracuse.    2. The  session  shall  be  governed  by  the  rules  of  General  Conference  of  The  United  Methodist  Church. Roberts Rules of  Order, 11th  edition, shall  govern all procedural  questions when  the  rules of General Conference cannot be applied.    3. Holy  conferencing  affirms  our  covenant  with  God  and  one  another.  At  any  time  during  the  proceedings  the  bishop  may  call  for  a  moment  of  discernment  and  prayer  before  a  vote  is  taken.     4. The published agenda available on the Conference website shall be the official agenda for the  Annual  Conference  session.  Questions  about  the  agenda  may  be  directed  to  the  executive  assistant to the bishop.     5. All  reports  without  recommendations  shall  be  placed  on  the  consent  calendar.  The  bishop’s  address to the Conference, the report of the Conference lay leader and the superintendents’  report are exempt from this rule. Further, upon proper motion from the floor, any report may  be removed from the consent calendar and placed on the agenda by a one‐third vote of the  Conference body.    6. The  roll  call  of  attendance  shall  be  taken  from  credential  cards  presented  at  the  time  of  registration.    7. Lay members are those specified by “The 2012 Book of Discipline,” ¶32, Article I. Selection of  Lay  Equalization  Members,  as  required  in  ¶32,  Article  I.  was  determined  according  to  the  Rules  for  Determining  and  Selecting  Lay  members  to  the  Conference,  adopted  by  the  Committee on Sessions on Feb. 14, 2011.    8. Clergy entitled to vote are those specified by “The 2012 Book of Discipline,” ¶602, subject to  the limitations contained in the same paragraph.     9. The  voting  area  of  the  Conference  [“bar  of  the  Conference”]  shall  be  the  floor  area  of  the  convention  center.  Guest  and non‐members may be seated in the designated visitor seating  area.  Persons  standing  or  seated  outside  the  bar  of  the  Conference  shall  have  no  voice  on  legislative matters or balloting.     10. Securing the floor: Conference members wishing to speak to the Conference shall raise their  colored placard at their seat and wait to be recognized by the bishop. When recognized, they  shall  move  to  the  nearest  microphone.  Please  state  your  name  and  your  church  (laity)  or  appointment (clergy).    11. In order to ensure the accuracy of the minutes and faithfulness to the intention of the mover,  motions and amendments from the floor must be submitted in writing to the secretary of the  Conference on a form provided for this purpose. A copy of the written motion or amendment  7   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26 

will be  provided  by  the  author  to  the  secretary  after  the  amendment  has  been  made.  No  motion or amendment will be voted on unless it is  provided in  writing. In order to facilitate  this as a motion or amendment is made, members of the Conference staff or volunteers will  provide  the  speaker  with  the  proper  form  documenting  the  motion  or  amendment.  The  documented  motion  or  amendment  will  be  taken  to  the  Conference  secretary  by  the  Conference staff or volunteer. A copy will be provided to the author as soon as possible.     12. No  person  shall  speak  more  than  once  upon  the  same  question  and  shall  be  limited  to  not  more than three minutes, except the maker of the resolution or the chairperson of the agency  submitting  the  resolution,  who  shall  have  up  to  five  minutes  to  open  and  three  minutes  to  close debate.    13. The Journal editor shall have sole authority to edit, condense, organize, and print the Upper  New  York  Conference  Journal/yearbook.  All  material  from  this  session  must  be  submitted  in  writing no later than July 1, 2016.    14. The director of communications shall be responsible for reporting to the general periodicals of  The  United  Methodist  Church  and  secular  news  media.  All  references  for  printing  by  the  Conference official publication shall be subject to editing and condensing by the editor.    15. No material may be distributed within the bar of the Annual Conference session without prior  review  of  the  agenda  committee  of  the  UNY  Sessions  team:  Vicki  Putney  and  the  Rev.  Bill  Gottschalk‐Fielding.    16. Votes on all motions, resolutions, and petitions that refer to human sexuality will be taken by  ballot.   

8  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1

Consent Calendar 

2

Africa 360 Report 

3

Archives and History, Commission on 

4

Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) 

5

Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM) 

6

Communications Report 

7

Conference on Race and Religion (CORR) 

8

Commission on the Status and Role of Women (COSROW) 

9

Disaster Response 

   

10

Episcopacy Committee   

11

Finance and Administration, Council on   

12

Lay Servant Ministries   

13

Mission Oversight Team, Reaching Our Neighbors (RONMOT) 

14

Ministry Oversight Team, Spiritual Leadership   

15

Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on 

16

New Faith Communities  

17

Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force on 

18

Peace with Justice Grants 

19

Pension & Health Benefits, Board of 

20

Sexual Ethics Committee/Safe Sanctuaries Team  

21

Social Holiness   

22

United Methodist Men   

23

Vital Congregations 

24

Violet’s Garden Advance #3075 (Garden for Young Disciples) 

25

Albany United Methodist Society 

26

Boston University School of Theology 

27

Drew University Theological School 

28

Iliff School of Theology   

29

Methodist Theological School in Ohio   

30

New York Council of Churches 

 

9   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18 

Annual Conference Session agenda    Thursday, June 2, 2016  7:30 a.m.   Registration                8:15 a.m.  Blessing of the Space  9:15 a.m.  Clergy session (Clergy Care Fund Offering)            Laity session (Helping Hands Fund Offering)        11:30 a.m.  Lunch                  Extension Ministry luncheon (by invitation only)       1:30 p.m.  Opening worship, Bishop Mark J. Webb preaching (Africa 360 offering)        Short break  3 p.m.    Plenary                 5:45 p.m.  Dinner                  Memorial dinner (by invitation only)        7:15 p.m.  Memorial Service               8:30 p.m.  Plenary (if necessary)   

Friday, June 3, 2016 

19 20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32 

8:15 a.m.      10 a.m.   11:30 a.m.  12:30 p.m.      2:15 p.m.  4 p.m.    5:45 p.m.    7:15 p.m.  8:30 p.m.  9 p.m.     

Study leader: The Rev. Adam Hamilton            Short break  Plenary                 Lunch                  Study leader: The Rev. Adam Hamilton  Short break  Plenary                 Study leader: The Rev. Adam Hamilton  Dinner                  Board of Ordained Ministry dinner for retirees and ordinands (by invitation only)  Celebration of Ministry  (Mission of Peace offering)      Plenary (if necessary)              Ordination rehearsal             

33

Saturday, June 4, 2016 

34 35  36  37  38 

8:15 a.m.  9 a.m.        Noon    2 p.m.   

Worship led by Young People            Plenary                 Fixing of appointments              Lunch                  Ordination and Commissioning, Bishop Mark J. Webb preaching 

10  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Endorsement of Episcopal Nominees by the Upper New York  Conference    Total Number of Pages: 3    Book of Discipline: ¶¶ 46, 402, 403,405, 408  Conference  committee/agency  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed:  2016 General Conference and Jurisdictional delegates    Financial Implications: Minimal    Rationale:  Every four years, the five jurisdictions in the United States meet at the same time in July to elect bishops  to fill vacated positions. In July 2016, the Northeastern Jurisdiction will be meeting in Lancaster, Pa., to  fill two possible episcopacy vacancies – one due to retirement and one due to death.     Whereas,  in  accordance  with  the  constitution  and  The  Book  of  Discipline  of  The  United  Methodist  Church  (¶¶46  and  405),  the  responsibility  for  electing  persons  to  the  United  Methodist  Council  of  Bishops  and  the  respective  jurisdictional  Colleges  of  Bishops  rests  with  the  jurisdictional  conferences.  The  respective  conferences  may  nominate  candidates  for  election  to  the  episcopacy  by  their  jurisdictional  conferences.  The  purpose  of  this  appendix  is  to  establish  a  procedure  whereby  the  members of the Upper New York Conference, and the Conference itself, may participate in the process  of nominating candidates to the Northeastern Jurisdictional Conference. The Book of Discipline  (¶405)  specifically prohibits the binding of any delegate to vote for any specific candidate seeking election to  the episcopacy; and    Whereas,  during the year preceding the convening of the Jurisdictional Conference, the most recently  elected  delegates  to  the  Jurisdictional  Conference  shall  serve  as  a  “nominating  committee”  for  the  nomination  of  candidates  to  the  UNY  Conference  for  nomination  by  the  UNY  Conference  to  the  Jurisdictional  Conference.  The  jurisdictional  delegation  shall  solicit  the  membership  of  the  UNY  Conference  –  including  the  members  of  the  delegation  itself  –  for  recommendations  and  self‐ recommendations  of  persons  eligible  for  election  to  and  service  on  the  episcopacy  (¶¶402,  408).  The  delegation, guided by The Book of Discipline (¶403) and using procedures of its own design, shall discern  the  gifts  and  graces  of  each  and  every  person  so  recommended  and  shall  recommend  to  the  Annual  Conference  session  immediately  preceding  the  convening  of  the  Jurisdictional  Conference  the  nomination  of  persons  discerned  by  the  delegation  to  have  the  gifts  and  graces  for  episcopal  service.  The Conference may nominate none, any, and all of these persons recommended by the delegation; and     Whereas,  on  Nov.  6,  2015,  a  letter  was  sent  by  the  chairperson  of  the  delegation  to  solicit  recommendations from the membership of the Conference for nominees for the episcopacy. That letter  included  the  specific  nature  of  the  materials  to  be  included  (i.e.,  contact  information,  academic  preparation,  pastoral  appointments,  a  listing  of  past  and  present  church  responsibilities  (both  denominational and ecumenical), and reasons for the recommendation). There shall also be included a  brief statement of less than 200 words as to why the person being recommended feels that he/she will,  in his/her own words, bring the kind of episcopal leadership that the Church needs at this point in time;  and 

11  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41 

Whereas, those  persons  recommended  were  then  invited  to  submit  formal  documentation  either  rejecting or accepting their nomination and any pertinent information needed to continue the process;  and    Whereas, from Jan. 15‐16, 2016 the delegation met in Auburn and at the Casowasco Camp & Retreat  Center in Moravia to determine guidelines for the election of nominees and to interview those persons  who had accepted their nominations (guidelines are available upon request); and    Whereas, on the above dates four persons were interviewed and the committee recommended putting  forward two names.    Therefore, be it resolved that the 2016 jurisdictional delegates recommend the following elders of the  Upper New York Conference, the Rev. Dr. Cathy Hall Stengel and the Rev. Rebekah Sweet, be forwarded  to the Northeastern Jurisdiction as endorsed candidates for the episcopacy.     Dated: March 10, 2016    Submitted by:      Rev. Dr. William Allen, NEJ Delegation Chair  Electronic Signature:   Bill Allen  Address:    4954 Bemus‐Ellery Road  Bemus Point, N.Y. 14712   Phone number:    (716) 338‐5484  billallen@bpumc.org  Email address:     Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Conference serving the Bemus Point  United Methodist Church          Dr. Scott Johnson, NEJ Delegation Vice‐chair  Electronic Signature:   Scott Johnson  Address:    310 Baynes St.  Buffalo, N.Y. 14213  Phone number:    (716) 440‐7354  Email address:     scottphd@gmail.com  Confirmed Member of First UMC, Buffalo          Hudda Aswad, NEJ Delegation Secretary  Electronic Signature:   Hudda Aswad  Address:    17 Sunset Ave.  Binghamton, N.Y. 13904  Phone number:    (607) 724‐2568  Email address:     haswad@stny.rr.com  Confirmed Member of First UMC, Chenango Bridge   

12  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Recommendations  

13  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Proposed 2017 Ministry Shares Budget    The Upper New York Conference Council on Finance and Administration (CF&A) is proud to present our  proposed  2017  Ministry  Shares  budget  for  consideration  and  adoption  by  the  Conference.  The  preparation  of  the  budget  began  in  the  fall  of  2015  with  the  distribution  of  budget  worksheets  and  compensation information to the various Conference ministry teams. Each team drafted and submitted  a  preliminary  budget  request  for  its  area.  Conference  staff  worked  with  the  teams  to  compile  the  requests  for  review  by  Conference  CF&A  and  executive  staff.  CF&A  met  with  several  team  leaders  to  review requests and ensure our plan for 2017 was clear and in alignment with the Conference mission  and  strategies  to  make  disciples  of  Jesus  Christ  for  the  transformation  of  the  world  by  equipping  our  local churches for ministry and by providing a connection for ministry beyond the local church.    CF&A  and  the  Conference  Finance  Ministry  Area  would  like  to  acknowledge  and  thank  all  our  team  leaders and staff for their dedicated efforts to create our 2017 Ministry Shares plan. Our 2017 Ministry  Shares budget represents our primary operating plan for Conference ministry activities and participation  in the global initiatives of The United Methodist Church. The 2017 budget totals $10,078,432 compared  to  the  2016  budget  of  $10,079,236,  a  decrease  of  $804.  The  actual  expenditures  under  the  plan  are  dependent on the level of Ministry Share payments by churches throughout the year.     Our  priority  for  the  2017  plan  was  to  focus  Conference  efforts  to  support  and  develop  clergy  and  lay  leaders throughout the Conference. The total initial requests by teams for 2017 was significantly higher  than  the  final  proposed  2017  budget.  CF&A  and  Conference  staff  worked  with  Conference  teams  to  review priorities and revise initial requests to better align our work and reduce the financial impact on  our  churches.  Costs  were  lowered  by  re‐aligning  and  reducing  staff,  reducing  Conference  grants,  and  cutting  discretionary  costs.  Approximately  58  percent  of  the  proposed  2017  budget  covers  our  fixed  costs,  such  as  building  operations,  insurance  premiums,  staffing,  and  legal  fees.  The  balance  of  the  proposed budget funds a variety of Conference ministries and benevolences as well as General Church  apportionments.  Actual  expenditures  in  these  areas  will  depend  on  actual  receipts  of  Ministry  Share  payments. The budget does assume the relocation of the Conference Center with commensurate costs.  As  in  past  years,  the  Conference  will  develop  a  spending  plan  to  monitor  and  control  expenditures  as  2017 unfolds.     General Connectional Ministries represent the Conference’s financial commitment to fund the broader  initiatives  of  the  denomination  as  determined  by  the  General  Conference.  Our  Conference’s  ability  to  fulfill  these  commitments  is  directly  dependent  on  the  level  of  Ministry  Share  payments  made  by  our  churches.  The  General  Church  apportionments  increased  $28,273  compared  to  2016.  These  apportionments are approximately 22 percent of our 2017 budget.     Connectional Ministries support the work of staff and team volunteers seeking to:     Identify, train, deploy, and support leaders throughout the Conference.   Empower, resource, support, build, and connect our congregations and members.    Connect, support, and aid our neighbors in the Conference in need.    Ministerial  Support’s  primary  focus  is  to  identify,  recruit,  train,  credential,  deploy,  and  support  clergy  serving  our  nearly  900  local  churches.  The  work  of  the  Episcopal  Office,  the  Cabinet,  and  our  district  offices is also funded through Ministerial Support.  14   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

Administrative Ministries  include  the  Conference‐level  activities  to  manage  the  operations  of  the  Conference  to  enable  and  support  the  work  of  our  staff  and  teams  as  they  carry  out  our  mission  and  strategies. These costs decreased by $24,168 compared to 2016.     General budget explanations and descriptions:     The Conference staffing level in 2017 is expected to remain at the same level as in 2016.   Staff will receive no pay increase in 2017.   Medical insurance costs are anticipated to increase 5 percent above 2016 rates.   Payroll taxes and employee benefits are commensurate with compensation levels.   Lease  and  property  costs  are  budgeted  consistent  with  current  levels  except  for  Conference  office  costs  in  2016.  The  shift  from  a  lease  to  a  building  ownership  arrangement  will  increase  costs  approximately  $60,000  in  2017.  However,  the  new  building  represents  a  multi‐million  dollar asset to the Conference.    Line item budget explanations and descriptions as labeled:    A.  General  Church  apportionments  are  based  on  the  actual  amounts  assessed  for  2017.  The  2017  assessment increased 1.3 percent from 2016.    B.  The Congregational Revitalization budget was increased to provide higher levels of support by our  existing  staff  directly  to  our  churches.  Additional  funds  were  allocated  for  travel,  revitalization  resources, and meeting costs.    C.  The 2017 travel and meeting cost budgets were increased to provide for regional team meetings.    D.  Relocation of the Resource Center to the new Conference Center will eliminate rent costs.    E.  Represents a reallocation of Conference‐level funding to the district level by the elimination of the  MOTs.    F.  Funding for the Conference Disaster Response Team has been reduced based on previous spending  levels.    G.  The  Board  of  Ordained  Ministry  budget  was  reduced  to  recognize  non‐Ministry  Share  revenue    sources for fees, events, and donations to offset costs.    H.  Cabinet  meeting  expense  and  legal  cost  budget  lines  were  increased  to  reflect  recent  cost  trends.  The  reduction  in  district  operations  represents  a  variety  of  small  budget  adjustments  to  reflect  actual expense levels.    I.  The  overall  Administrative  Ministry  budget  decreased  by  a  net  amount  of  $18,168.  Payroll  costs  were  reduced  by  approximately  $38,000  including  the  elimination  of  a  finance  staff  position  and  changing  pay  level  of  the  computer  services  supervisor  from  director  level  to  manager.  Payroll  savings were somewhat offset by projected increases in benefit costs to reflect actual benefit levels  for existing staff.    J.  The increase represents funding for district parsonage repairs and maintenance costs.  15   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  Salaried staff compensation and benefits by position for 2017:    Position 

Salary & Housing  allowance per  position 

Director of Connectional Ministries / Assistant  to the Bishop  District Superintendent (12 individuals)  Treasurer  Benefits Officer  Director of Communications  Director of Camp & Retreat Ministries  Director of New Faith Communities   Director of Vital Congregations   Camp Directors (four full‐time)     

Benefits including health  insurance, pension, workers  compensation, disability, life  insurance, and FICA 

$                 104,244

$                     36,823

97,638 104,244 104,244 94,647 86,585 97,638 79,988 $  49,678  to 40,000

36,185 to 17,173 19,129 26,844 17,263 19,464 33,715 37,715 $   36,185  to 17,173

16  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Recommendation of the Global Ministries – Conference Advance  Specials    Whereas it is the responsibility of the Conference to approve ministries as Conference Advance Specials,  which gives these ministries permission to request support from churches in the Conference,    Therefore, be it resolved, that the 2016‐2017 list of Conference Advance Specials be approved.   

Upper New York Conference 2016‐17 Conference Advance Specials    Albany United Methodist Society (AUMS)    Anti‐Poverty Initiative (University UMC: Syracuse)    Beechwood Continuing Care/Pastoral Care     Brown Memorial UMC: Syracuse    Buffalo/Niagara Network of Religious Communities    Campership Fund    Campus Church ConneXion Buffalo    Chautauqua County Rural Ministry, Inc.    The Children’s Center for the Common Good    Children’s Home    Emmanuel Faith Community    Emmaus Refugee and Immigrant Family Support Services    Epworth Hall    Faithful Citizen    Folts Center Inc.    Friends of Zimbabwe    Gary Bergh Scholarship (Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel)    Gateway‐Longview, Inc.     Genesee Area Campus Ministries  20   

Code #3120   Code #3118  Code #3124  Code #3109  Code #3125  Code #3705  Code #3126   Code #3130  Code #3114  Code #3132  Code #3138  Code #3134  Code #3136  Code #3128  Code #3412  Code #3142  Code #3144  Code #3111  Code #3146 


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Geneseo Wesley Foundation    Haiti Partnership    Interfaith Caregivers, Inc.    InterFaith Works of Central New York    Kamina Friends    Lao United Methodist Church & Mission    Mutambara Mission Centre Water Project    Native American Mission, Onondaga Nation UMC    Native American Outreach/Transportation Program    The Neighborhood Center, Inc.    New York State Council of Churches    Niagara Frontier City Missions    Protestant Cooperative Ministry at Cornell    Samaritan Pastoral Counseling Center    Seneca Street UMC: Buffalo    Southern Sudan Health Projects     UMCOR Kits Shipment Dollars    United Methodist Homes’ Chaplaincy Program    Violet’s Garden: (The Bishop Violet Fisher Grants for Children’s and Youth Ministries)    VIVE La Casa, Inc.    Volunteers‐In‐Mission – Northeastern Jurisdiction    Volunteers‐In‐Mission Scholarship Fund    Watertown Urban Mission    Wesley Gardens               

21  

Code #3173  Code #3148  Code #3150  Code #3200  Code #3152  Code #3154  Code #3156  Code #3202  Code #3204  Code #3112  Code #3205  Code #3158  Code #3303  Code #3162  Code #3164  Code #3117  Code #3708  Code #3166  Code #3075  Code #3168  Code #3706  Code #3707      Code #3113  Code #3170 


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1

Recommendation of the Conference Board of Pension & Health  Benefits 

2 3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11 

1. The board recommends the 2017 Past Service Annuity Rate for pension payment to retired clergy of  the Upper New York Conference be set at $625 per qualified service year prior to 1982. This is an  increase of 2 percent over the 2016 rate in accordance with the board’s long‐term funding plan.     2. The  board  recommends  adopting  the  Housing/Rental  Exclusion  Resolution  which  designates  100  percent  of  United  Methodist  pension,  severance,  or  disability  income  as  housing  exclusion  in  accordance with IRS Code section 107 is approved for the year Jan. 1, 2017 through Dec. 31, 2017 as  follows:  

12 13  14  15 

Whereas the  religious  denomination  known  as  The  United  Methodist  Church  (The  “Church”),  of  which  this  Conference  is  a  part,  has  in  the  past  functioned  and  continues  to  function  through  Ministers of the Gospel (within the meaning of Internal Revenue Code section 107) who were or are  duly ordained, commissioned, or licensed ministers of the Church (“clergypersons”); and,  

16 17  18 

Whereas the  practice  of  The  Church  and  of  this  Conference  was  and  is  to  provide  active  clergypersons with a parsonage or a rental/housing allowance as part of their gross compensation;  and,  

19 20  21 

Whereas pensions or other amounts paid to active, retired, terminated, and disabled clergypersons  are  considered  to  be  deferred  compensation  and  are  paid  to  active,  retired,  terminated,  and  disabled clergypersons in consideration of previous active service; and, 

22 23  24 

Whereas the Internal Revenue Service has recognized that the Conference (or its predecessors) as  an appropriate organization to designate a rental/housing allowance for clergypersons who are or  were members of this Conference and are eligible to receive such deferred compensation;  

25

Therefore, be it resolved: 

26 27  28  29  30  31  32 

1. That an amount equal to 100 percent of the pension, severance, or disability payments received  from  plans  authorized  under  “The  Book  of  Discipline  of  The  United  Methodist  Church”  (the  “Discipline”), which includes all such payments from the  General Board of Pension and Health  Benefits  (“GBOPHB”),  during  the  period  Jan.  1,  2017  through  Dec.  31,  2017,  by  each  active,  retired, terminated, or disabled clergyperson who is or was a member of the Conference, or its  predecessors,  be  and  is  hereby  designated  as  a  rental/housing  allowance  for  each  such  clergyperson; and  

33 34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42 

2. That  the  pension,  severance,  or  disability  payments  to  which  this  rental/housing  allowance  designation  applies  shall  be  any  pension,  severance,  or  disability  payments  from  plans,  annuities,  or  funds  authorized  under  the  “Discipline,”  including  such  payments  from  the  GBOPHB  and  from  a  commercial  annuity  company  contracted  by  the  GBOPHB  to  provide  an  annuity arising from benefits accrued under a GBOPHB plan, annuity, or fund authorized under  the “Discipline,” that result from any service a clergyperson rendered to this Conference or that  an active, a retired, a terminated, or a disabled clergyperson of this Conference rendered to any  local church, Conference of The Church, general agency of The Church, other institution of The  Church,  former  denomination  that  is  now  a  part  of  The  Church,  or  any  other  employer  that  employed  the  clergyperson  to  perform  services  related  to  the  ministry  of  The  Church,  or  its  22   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3 

predecessors, and that elected to make contributions to, or accrue a benefit under, such a plan,  annuity, or fund for such an active, a retired, a terminated, or a disabled clergyperson’s pension,  severance, or disability plan benefit as part of his or her gross compensation.  

4 5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13 

NOTE: The rental/housing allowance that may be excluded from a clergyperson’s gross income  in any year for federal (and, in most cases, state) income tax purposes is limited under Internal  Revenue Code section 107(2), and regulations there under, to the lesser of: 1) the amount of the  rental/housing allowance designated by the clergyperson’s employer or other appropriate body  of  The  Church  (such  as  this  Conference  in  the  foregoing  resolutions)  for  such  year;  2)  the  amount actually expended by the clergyperson to rent or provide a home in such year; or, 3) the  fair rental value of the home, including furnishings and appurtenances (such as a garage), plus  the  cost of utilities in such year.  Each  clergyperson or former clergyperson is  urged  to consult  with  his  or  her  own  tax  advisor  to  determine  what  deferred  compensation  is  eligible  to  be  claimed as a housing allowance exclusion.  

14 15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

3. The board  is  recommending  a  change  in  the  eligibility  rules  for  the  Clergy  Retirement  Security  Program  (CRSP).  Because  CRSP  combines  a  Defined  Benefit  (DB)  component  and  a  Defined  Contribution  (DC)  component,  it  is  expensive  to  fund,  requiring  higher  annual  contributions  than  most  retirement  plans  offered  in  the  United  States.  DC  plans  are  the  norm  and  financial  analysts  indicate that generous plans provide an employer contribution of 6‐10 percent. The UNY Conference  offers a DC plan through the United Methodist Personal Investment Plan (UMPIP) to part‐time and  full‐time  lay  employees  of  the  Conference  at  an  employer  contribution  rate  of  9  percent  of  compensation.  Changing  to  UMPIP  for  certain  part‐time  clergy  (see  below)  would  save  their  local  churches  $875  per  year  on  average.  The  advantage  to  clergy  is  that  all  pension  contributions  are  deposited  into  an  individual’s  account  (providing  greater  flexibility),  versus  CRSP  where  currently  10.5 percent of the church contribution is held at the General Board to fund a defined benefit (years  x rate annuity) upon retirement. The disadvantage is that CRSP‐DB converts to a lifetime annuity at  retirement while the participant bears the risk of managing their funds in retirement with UMPIP.  The board felt there were more advantages than disadvantages to making the proposed change.     Therefore,  the  board  recommends  a  change  in  the  Clergy  Retirement  Security  Program  (CRSP)  eligibility  rules  effective  Jan.  1,  2017  to  include  only  those  licensed,  commissioned  or  ordained  clergy persons appointed 75 percent to 100 percent at local churches or as Conference staff. Those  clergy  that  would  lose  eligibility  for  CRSP  (appointed  50  percent  to  74  percent)  will  be  offered  enrollment in the United Methodist Personal Investment Plan (UMPIP) for church contributions at a  rate  of  nine  percent  of  compensation,  in  addition  to  optional  personal  contributions.  Church  contributions would not be dependent upon personal contributions (non‐matching). Eligible clergy  may enroll or waive this benefit and if waived, no pension contribution will  be expected  from the  local church.      

23  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39 

40 41  42  43 

Recommendation of the Commission on Equitable Compensation     The  mission  of  the  Commission  on  Equitable  Compensation  (CEC)  is  to  help  equip  struggling  local  churches  to  grow  in  their  ability  to  establish  sound  financial  footing,  build  leadership  capacity,  make  disciples,  and  transform  the  world.  The  CEC  administers  funds  used  to  support  clergy  salaries  for  churches  with  pastors  appointed  full‐time  where  the  churches  are  unable  to  meet  minimum  compensation standards.    It is our vision to see a shift in the use of this funding away from the support of declining churches and  toward providing salary support for pastors involved in  high  potential  new  ministry development. The  CEC  works  with  the  Upper  New  York  Cabinet  to  encourage  right‐sizing  appointments  and  other  local  church staffing in order to prevent the need for Conference support. It is our policy to support churches  that  demonstrate  the  potential  for  moving  back  to  full  self‐funding.  The  exception  to  this  is  in  our  support  of  mission  locations,  where  unique  demographics  mitigate  against  such  positive  trends,  but  where the Conference goal of reaching the underprivileged has potential.    In  2015  the  CEC  worked  to  improve  the  grant  application  process.  We  are  responsible  to  bring  to  the  Annual Conference session: a recommendation with respect to the Minimum Compensation Base, the  incremental  increase  for  years  of  service,  and  other  recommendations  to  insure  that  our  clergy  are  adequately supported in their work.    Commission on Equitable Compensation – Recommendations for 2017    Minimum Base Compensation – A standardized minimum base compensation is established for the Upper  New York Conference effective Jan. 1, 2017 as follows:    A. A minimum base salary, set according to credential level, for all full‐time clergy persons as  noted below. This represents a 2 percent increase.                    Base  Full connection (elders and deacons):    $39,984  Provisional (elders and deacons):    $38,556  Associate:          $37,842  FT LP completed Course of Study or M.Div.   $37,128  FT Local Pastor:         $35,700  (Less than full‐time appointments shall receive a base salary pro‐rated according to the  appointment.)    B. Plus an additional amount per full‐time equivalent year of service based on credentials as  follows:  FTLP w/MDiv or  Per Yr. FTE  Full  Provisional  Associate  COS  FTLP  service up to  $311  $305  $302  $299  $290  21 years    C.  Plus an additional $500 for each additional church on the pastoral charge (over one), not  adjusted for part‐time appointments.   

24  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39 

D. No  pastor’s  salary  can  be  decreased  as  a  result  of  this  policy,  as  long  as  they  retain  their  current appointment.   E.  All churches are encouraged to offer a salary increase of no less than the 10‐year average  increase in the Consumer Price Index (2 percent for 2017) in order to account for increases  in the costs of living. Churches are encouraged to consider further raises based on  exceptional service.    Accountable Reimbursement Plans   Recommendations related to Accountable Reimbursement Plans:     A. All  pastors  appointed  within  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  are  entitled  to  an  Accountable  Reimbursement Plan (ARP) for professional expenses incurred while performing pastoral duties.    B. A  minimum  annual  ARP  budget  for  a  full‐time  pastor  shall  be  $3,500  for  a  single  church  appointment and $4,500 for a multi‐church appointment.    C. Within  the  ARP  there  shall  be  a designated  amount  for  the  pastor’s  continuing  education.  If  the  amount  is  not  fully  used  in  the  current  fiscal  year,  a  pastor  may  request  to  roll  over  the  remainder of the ARP Continuing Education amount with a PSPRC approved plan for the use of  the  funds.  This  plan  and  specific  amount  is  to  be  reported  to  the  local  church/charge  conference at year’s end. No more than three successive years of funding or $2,000 (whichever  is less)  can be rolled over in this manner. This maximum dollar amount should relate to full‐ time  clergy.  The  amount  for  part‐time  clergy  shall  be  prorated. In  the  event  of  pastoral  change,  the  roll  over  amount  will  be  a  part  of  the  appointment  conversation  among  the  pastor, the churches, and district superintendent(s) involved.    D. Pastoral appointments of three quarter‐time, half‐time, or quarter‐time shall budget and pay an  ARP proportionally to the standard for full‐time appointments as noted above.     E. Congregations are encouraged to budget ARP above the required minimum in consideration of  location‐specific mileage needs and other factors.    F. ARP resolution form is available at: www.unyumc.org/resources/forms    The members of the CEC for 2015 have included the Rev. Lauren Swanson (chair), Al Kidd,the Rev. Bill  Pattison, the Rev. Carmen Perry, Lynne Blake, Mitchell Smith, the Rev. Patience Kisakye, Paula Kuempel,  the Rev. Peggi Eller, the Rev. Ray Noell, the Rev. Rich Weihing, Terry Wilbert, Ex Officio: Vicki Putney,  Julie Valeski, and Kevin Domanico.     

25  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Recommendation of the Older Adult Ministry Team     New approach for equipping local churches for Older Adult Ministry  The next decade will witness the greatest increase of older adults in the history of the United States. As  baby boomers begin to turn 70, this massive and influential cohort will be responsible for the growth of  the  older  adult  population  from  35  million  to  more  than  75  million  people  by  2022.  The  Older  Adult  Ministry Area of the Upper New York Conference (OAM‐UNYC) has shifted its focus toward developing  and training leaders for the support of local churches to make disciples for Jesus Christ amongst this very  significant grouping, including those who claim to be “spiritual but not religious.”     New leadership for the OAM Team:  The mantle of OAM leadership was passed from retiring chair Dr. Tom DeLoughry to the Rev. Rebecca  Naber. She is a deacon in the Upper New York Conference, coming to the OAM‐UNYC Team with 17  years of experience in pastoral care‐giving, including palliative care chaplaincy at Roswell Park Cancer  Institute, serving as a Stephen Minister and Leader, and author and teacher of “Sharing Your Hope:  Visitation Ministry for the Local Church.” She is currently appointed as Pastor of Congregational Care at  Baker Memorial UMC in East Aurora.    “We sought to build upon the good works of our two previous chairs, Winona Stonebraker followed by  Tom DeLoughry,” said Rev. Naber, “and reshape our charter and activities for the incredible opportunity  The UMC has for reaching out to retiring boomers. Thus, our goal is to identify and equip OAM leaders  to engage this enormous cohort of aging boomers in meaningful programs and ministry with older  adults with the intent of making disciples for Jesus Christ.”    New mission and goals:  Our first task was to form an OAM Executive Council. In September 2015, OAM leaders from across the  Conference  gathered  at  Rush  UMC  for  a  “Revisioning  Day.”  The  Rev.  Bill  Gottschalk‐Fielding  reviewed  the Conference’s objectives for Connectional Ministries. Suggestions were made on how the OAM team  could  better  utilize  the  Conference’s  resources  to  reach  OAM  leaders  across  the  districts  to  support  older  adult/intergenerational  ministries  in  the  local  churches.  Upon  re‐visioning  our  methods  and  message,  a  mission  statement,  goals,  and  action  plans  were  drawn  up  to  reflect  the  team’s  new  approach for the upcoming 2016‐2017 seasons:    Mission: The Older Adult Ministry Area of the Upper New York Conference will train leaders to  enhance the mind/body/spirit of older adults through Christ‐centered ministries.    Goals: Our goals towards accomplishing our mission in the next years (2015‐2017) are:     To identify potential OAM champions within each district across the Conference to  communicate and support the local churches in the development of intergenerational/older  adult ministries.   To  educate  and  inspire  these  champions  in  three  or  more  best  practices  of  older  adult  ministry.   To  utilize  Conference  communication  channels  to  promote  OAM  opportunities,  and  programs.    26   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

Successful retreat  leads  to  new  district  champions  and  best  practices:  Thirty‐two  OAM  leaders  from  across the Conference’s 12 districts and 900 local churches met in November 2015 for a two‐day retreat  at the Casowasco Camp & Retreat Center in Moravia. Based on participant feedback we can report that:     We  have  recruited  or  re‐energized  more  than  32  OAM  champions  who  will  assist  local  churches in eight districts.  ● Of these champions, 85 percent said they are likely or very likely to use some elements from  each of our “best practice programs” in their local church or community.    These best practices, endorsed by the OAM champions who attended include:  ■ “Why Older Adult Ministry? Why Now?” by Barbara Bruce  ■ “Respite Care for the Memory Impaired” by Lisa Rood  ■ “Sharing Your Hope: Visitation in the Local Church” by Rev. Naber  ■ “The Gift of Peace of Mind for You and Your Family” by Rev. Dr. Don Weaver  ■ “Living Well: Help for Three Generations” by DeLoughry    ● In addition, 50 percent of our participants said they would be likely or very likely to use some  elements  from  one  additional  presentation:  Aging  LGBT  in  The  UMC  by  Jamie  Breedlove‐ Crouch, who serves on the UNYUMC Task Force on Human Sexuality.    A new OAM team presence to support local church ministries  Leveraging  the  Conference’s  connectionalism  is  the  key  to  disseminating  relevant,  time‐sensitive,  and  best practices information to our OAM champions and their respective local churches. The challenge is  to provide both online and personal communication that is consistently available for local churches as  they  seek  to  engage  retiring  boomers  (both  within  and  outside  the  church)  in  ministries  with  older  adults. The OAM‐UNY Conference Team proposes the following approaches/actions for 2017:    A.  Newly  designed  online  presence:  A  new  Older  Adult  Ministry  website  is  underway  to  rapidly  disseminate  information,  services,  and  training  for  local  clergy  and  the  members  of  their  church.  In  collaborating  with  the  Conference’s  Communications  and  Information  Technology  staff,  a  new  web  presence  will  include  videos,  PowerPoint  presentations,  and  free  downloadable  print  materials  to  stimulate the adoption of our one or more of our six Best Practices programs.    B. Older adult champions – More than 30 people attended the retreat in November at the Casowasco  Camp  &  Retreat  Center,  all  of  which  shared  their  passion  for  older  adult  ministry.  To  further  their  personal promotion of OAM in the local churches and at district meetings, they will be provided with a  standardized  “Why  OAM;  Why  Now”  presentation  designed  by  “Successful  Aging”  advocate  and  educator, Barbara Bruce.    C.  Regional  meetings  –  Personal  connection  and  relationships  foster  networking  and  leadership  building.  They  also  allow  for  consistency  and  organization  toward  reaching  goals.  The  overriding  majority  of  new  OAM  champions  have  requested  four  one‐day  regionally‐based  meetings  across  the  UNY  Conference  toward  attaining  our  goals  for  2016  and  2017.  These  would  replace  one  Conference‐ wide retreat at Casowasco.     D.  Best  practices  expertise  –  Several  of  the  best  practices  presented  at  the  retreat  at  Casowasco  are  program  offerings  by  individual  topic  experts  within  our  Conference.  The  OAM  Team  would  like  to  encourage  and  support  the  furtherance  of  these  ministries  by  featuring  these  best  practices  on  our  27   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

website along  with  the  manner  by  which  a  district  or  local  church  can  engage  them  for  consulting,  teaching, or speaking.     E. Grants – An OAM‐UNYC grants sub‐committee has been formed to develop a formalized process for  requesting  proposals,  evaluating  applications,  and  follow‐up  on  their  implementation.  Focus  will  be  upon innovative proposals that integrate community volunteers for intergenerational ministries.     F. Enhanced connection with UMC Discipleship Ministries – The OAM Team seeks to disseminate the  plethora  of  older  adult/intergenerational  ministry  information  available  from  the  UMC  Discipleship  Ministries, including webinars, conferences, and worship and Bible study resources. In addition, Barbara  Bruce, Northeastern Jurisdiction representative to the UMC Discipleship Ministries Board of Aging and  Older Adult Ministry and chair of the Intergenerational Task Force, will continue to provide leadership to  the OAM‐UNY Team.     G. OAM certification at the Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School (CRCDS) – OAM‐UNYC Executive  Council  members  Barbara  Bruce  and  the  Rev.  Rebecca  Naber  are  serving  as  liaisons  with  Colgate  Rochester  Crozer  Divinity  School  (CRCDS)  and  UMC  Discipleship  Ministries  in  their  new  older  adult  ministry alliance. Working with UMC Discipleship Ministries, CRCDS has announced its new Certification  program  in  OAM  to  foster  older  adult/intergenerational  ministry  across  Upstate  New  York.  Bruce  and  Rev. Naber have been enlisted as OAM instructors for the introductory class in this certification (through  GBHEM) for the fall of 2016.     H.  Cross‐denominational  partnerships  –  Our  partnership  with  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  in  America (ELCA) will continue through a liaison with Patsy Glista, Assistant to the Bishop for Operations in  the Upstate New York Synod. Tom DeLoughry is serving as the OAM‐UNYC ambassador.    2016/2017 PRIORITIES:  ● OAM Champion support – personal spiritual growth and leadership development to promote  OAM/intergenerational  ministry  in  the  local  churches  through  webinars,  newsletters,  conferences, and/or workshops.  ● Website design and development  ● Four regional OAM meetings across the Conference   ● Best practices promotion – the OAM Team will promote these practices on our website and at  retreats/meetings/workshops.  It  is  our  belief  that  these  practices  should  be  self‐sustaining  and self‐funded by the topic expert as far as mileage, travel, and materials are concerned.  ● Grants  –  to  foster  new  best  practices  in  older  adult/intergenerational  ministries  across  the  UNY Conference, including development of a bi‐annual grant application process.  ● Volunteer  recruitment,  development  and  support  of  ministers,  lay  servants, and  others  who  express interest in any of the above topics so they can be guided to use – and improve – any  of the resource materials associated with the above topics.  ● Increased  integration  with  resources  available  through  The  UMC’s  General  Board  of  Discipleship    The 2015/2016 Older Adult Ministry Executive Council includes: Chair the Rev. Rebecca Naber, Barbara  Bruce,  Dr.  Tom  DeLoughry,  Becky  Guthrie,  Cassandra  Jordan,  Rev.  Cathy  Lee,  Lisa  Rood,  and  Barbara  Saltarella.     

28  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27 

The 2015/2016  OAM‐UNY  Conference  Team  includes:  Pastor  Denise  Gisotti,  Rev.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Don  Weaver, Kathy Thiel, Rhea Kapprodt, Kathy Stewart, Sandy Houck, Lorraine Fusare, Joni Lincoln, Dewey  Lincoln, Marilyn Wood, Pat Hubman, the Rev. Denise Bowen, Trish Johnson, Sandi Perl, Terry Finger, and  Jamie Breedlove‐Crouch.    Respectfully submitted,     The Rev. Rebecca Naber  Chair, Older Adult Ministry Area of the Upper New York Conference   

2016 Annual Conference Resolution Proposal  We propose that annual statistics collected from local churches should include a count of how many  older adults reside in our congregations. We would ask for a tally based on the United Nation’s  resolution 35/129 that categorizes older adults as:          Young Old: 65 to 74        Middle Old: 75 to 84        Old Old: 85‐plus    Supporting Arguments:    1.  Build greater awareness of older adults both within the local churches and across the Conference to  better support their needs and outreach efforts.    2.   Highlight  the  potential  to  engage  the  young  old  (mostly  boomers)  both  within  and  outside  The  Church in ministries/community programs with their older cohorts, thus seizing upon this incredible  opportunity to make disciples for Jesus Christ.     

29  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

Upper New York Annual Conference Session   Resolutions Relating to the   Discontinuation of a Local Church – Andover UMC    Whereas,  the  Andover  United  Methodist  Church  was  organized  in  1849,  and  faithfully  served  its  community in ministry for more than 166 years;    Whereas, the Rev. Nancy Adams, the Mountain View District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed  the Andover UMC’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with,  listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas, the district superintendent determined that the Andover UMC no longer serves the purpose  for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of “The  Book of Discipline” of The UMC;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control  and  possession  of  all  real  and  personal  property  of  the  Andover  UMC  vest  in  the  Annual Conference Board of Trustees, and that the membership of the Andover UMC be transferred to  other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Mountain  View  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore, be it resolved, that the Andover UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by  the  Andover  UMC  is  hereby  vested  in  the  Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  Conference  Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions;  and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Andover UMC, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance  with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Conference; and    Be it further resolved, that the membership of the Andover UMC is hereby transferred to other United  Methodist churches as the individual members select.     

30  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41 

Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church  Session Resolutions Relating to the  Discontinuation of a Local Church – Dorloo UMC    Whereas,  the  Dorloo  United  Methodist  Church  was  organized  in  1928,  and  faithfully  served  its  community in ministry for over 87 years;    Whereas,  the  Rev.  Jan  Rowell,  the  Oneonta  District Superintendent,  comprehensively  assessed  the  Dorloo  UMC’s  past,  present,  and  potential  ministry,  after  prayerfully  and  extensively  meeting  with,  listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas, the district superintendent determined that the Dorloo UMC no longer serves the purpose for  which  it  was  organized  and  recommended  that  it  be  discontinued  pursuant  to  the  provisions  of  “The  Book of Discipline” of The UMC;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control  and  possession  of  all  real  and  personal  property  of  the  Dorloo  UMC  vest  in  the  Annual Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  membership  of  the  Dorloo  UMC  be  transferred  to  the Richmondville UMC or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Oneonta  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore, be it resolved, that the Dorloo UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by  the  Dorloo  UMC  is  hereby  vested  in  the  Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  Conference  Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions;  and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Dorloo  UMC,  including  the  net  sale  proceeds  up  to  $100,000  be  designated  to,  and  administered  in  accordance with, the Schoharie Region Ministry Plan; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  any  funds  relating  to  the  former  Dorloo  UMC  remaining  in  the  Schoharie  Region Ministry Plan as of Dec. 31, 2019 shall be transferred to, and administered in accordance with,  the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  the  membership  of  the  Dorloo  UMC  is  hereby  transferred  to  the  Richmondville UMC, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.     

31  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41 

Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church  Session Resolutions Relating to the  Discontinuation of a Local Church – Hyndsville UMC    Whereas,  the  Hyndsville  United  Methodist  Church  was  organized  in  1928,  and  faithfully  served  its  community in ministry for over 87 years;    Whereas,  the  Rev.  Jan  Rowell,  the  Oneonta  District Superintendent,  comprehensively  assessed  the  Hyndsville UMC’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with,  listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas, the district superintendent determined that the Hyndsville UMC no longer serves the purpose  for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of “The  Book of Discipline” of The UMC;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control  and  possession  of  all  real  and  personal  property  of  the  Hyndsville  UMC  vest  in  the  Annual Conference Board of Trustees, and that the membership of the Hyndsville UMC be transferred to  the Richmondville UMC or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Oneonta  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore, be it resolved, that the Hyndsville UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by the Hyndsville UMC is hereby vested in the Conference Board of Trustees, and that the Conference  Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with market conditions;  and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Hyndsville UMC, including the net sale proceeds up to $100,000 be designated to, and administered in  accordance with, the Schoharie Region Ministry Plan; and    Be it further resolved, that any funds relating to the former Hyndsville UMC remaining in the Schoharie  Region Ministry Plan as of Dec. 31, 2019 shall be transferred to, and administered in accordance with,  the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  the  membership  of  the  Hyndsville  UMC  is  hereby  transferred  to  the  Richmondville UMC, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.       

32  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41 

Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church  Session Resolutions Relating to the  Discontinuation of a Local Church – Mineral Spring UMC    Whereas, the Mineral Spring United Methodist Church was organized in 1845, and faithfully served its  community in ministry for over 170 years;    Whereas,  the  Rev.  Jan  Rowell,  the  Oneonta  District Superintendent,  comprehensively  assessed  the  Mineral  Spring  UMC’s  past,  present,  and  potential  ministry,  after  prayerfully  and  extensively  meeting  with, listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas,  the  district  superintendent  determined  that  the  Mineral  Spring  UMC  no  longer  serves  the  purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions  of “The Book of Discipline” of The UMC;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control  and  possession  of  all  real  and  personal  property  of  the  Mineral  Spring  UMC  vest  in  the  Conference Board of Trustees, and that the membership of the Mineral Spring UMC be transferred to  the Barnerville UMC or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Oneonta  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore, be it resolved, that the Mineral Spring UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by the Mineral Spring UMC is hereby vested in the Annual Conference Board of Trustees, and that the  Annual Conference Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with  market conditions; and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Mineral Spring UMC, including the net sale proceeds up to $100,000 be designated to, and administered  in accordance with, the Schoharie Region Ministry Plan; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  any  funds  relating  to  the  former  Mineral  Springs  UMC  remaining  in  the  Schoharie  Region  Ministry  Plan  as  of  Dec.  31,  2019  shall  be  transferred  to,  and  administered  in  accordance with, the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  the  membership  of  the  Mineral  Spring  UMC  is  hereby  transferred  to  the  Barnerville UMC, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.     

33  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church  Session Resolutions Relating to the   Discontinuation of a Local Church – Talcottville UMC    Whereas,  the  Talcottville  United  Methodist  Church  was  organized  in  1872,  and  faithfully  served  its  community in ministry for over 143 years;    Whereas,  the  Rev.  Abel  Roy,  the  Mohawk  District Superintendent,  comprehensively  assessed  the  Talcottville UMC’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting with,  listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas, the district superintendent determined that the Talcottville UMC no longer serves the purpose  for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions of “The  Book of Discipline” of The UMC;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control and possession of all real and personal property of the Talcottville UMC vest in the Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  membership  of  the  Talcottville  UMC  be  transferred  to  the  Boonville  UMC or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Mohawk  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore be it resolved, that the Talcottville UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by  the  Talcottville  UMC  is  hereby  vested  in  the  Annual  Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  Annual Conference Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with  market conditions; and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Talcottville UMC, including the net sale proceeds, shall be transferred to and administered in accordance  with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  the  membership  of  the  Talcottville  UMC  is  hereby  transferred  to  the  Boonville UMC, or other United Methodist churches as the individual members select.     

34  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

Upper New York Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church  Session Resolutions Relating to the   Discontinuation of a Local Church – Watkins Glen UMC    Whereas,  the  Watkins  Glen  United  Methodist  Church  was  organized  in  1843,  and  faithfully  served  its  community in ministry for over 172 years;    Whereas, the Rev. Nancy Adams, the Mountain View District Superintendent, comprehensively assessed  the Watkins Glen UMC’s past, present, and potential ministry, after prayerfully and extensively meeting  with, listening to, and guiding the congregation;    Whereas,  the  district  superintendent  determined  that  the  Watkins  Glen  UMC  no  longer  serves  the  purpose for which it was organized and recommended that it be discontinued pursuant to the provisions  of “The Book of Discipline” of The United Methodist Church;    Whereas,  in  relation  to  the  proposed  discontinuation,  the  district  superintendent  recommended  that  control and possession of all real and personal property of the Watkins Glen UMC vest in the Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  membership  of  the  Watkins  Glen  UMC  be  transferred  to  other  United Methodist churches as the individual members select; and    Whereas,  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  a  majority  of  the  district  superintendents,  and  the  Mountain  View  District  Board  of  Church  Location  and  Building  received  and  consented to the district superintendent’s discontinuation recommendations;    Therefore, be is resolved, that the Watkins Glen UMC is discontinued; and    Be it further resolved, that control and possession of all real and personal property formerly held in trust  by  the  Watkins  Glen  UMC  is  hereby  vested  in  the  Annual  Conference  Board  of  Trustees,  and  that  the  Annual Conference Board of Trustees is authorized to sell and convey the real estate in accordance with  market conditions; and    Be it further resolved, that following the sale of the real estate, the balance of the assets formerly of the  Watkins  Glen  UMC,  including  the  net  sale  proceeds,  shall  be  transferred  to  and  administered  in  accordance with the New Beginnings Fund of the Upper New York Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved,  that  the  membership  of  the  Watkins  Glen  UMC  is  hereby  transferred  to  other  United Methodist churches as the individual members select.     

35  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

  Resolutions and Petitions 

36  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

37  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.1 – Local Church Right to Choose Insurance Provider  Total Number of Pages: 1    “Book of Discipline”: ¶2533.2    Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Board of Trustees, Local Church Board of Trustees    Financial Implications: Conference Board of Trustees and staff will incur costs to review, verify, and track  insurance coverage and risk management for those churches seeking insurance outside the Conference  Insurance  Program.  The  amount  of  additional  costs  will  depend  on  the  number  of  churches  seeking  other insurance.    Whereas,  “The  Book  of  Discipline”  (¶2533.2)  gives  the  Board  of  Trustees  at  the  local  church  level  the  responsibility each year to review “the adequacy of the property, liability, and crime insurance coverage  on church‐owned property, buildings, and equipment. The board of trustees shall also review annually  the  adequacy  of  personnel  insurance.  The  purpose  of  these  reviews  is  to  ensure  that  the  church,  its  properties, and its personnel are properly protected against risks. The board shall include in its report to  the  charge  conference  (¶2550.7)  the  results  of  its  review  and  any  recommendations  it  deems  necessary”; and    Whereas,  each  local  church  is  able  to  assess  its  insurance  needs  more  accurately  in  a  geographically  diverse conference; and    Whereas,  the risk assumption by one insurance company for an entire conference influences its ability  to provide just resolutions to claims; and    Whereas, each local church may be able to receive better customer service, timely response to claims,  and realize savings on insurance premiums.    Therefore, be it resolved  that each local church within the Upper New York Conference of The United  Methodist Church be given the opportunity to seek and contract with its own insurance provider with  the provision that coverage recommendations be provided by the Conference Board of Trustees at each  district’s charge conference orientation or that each local church may use its current policy as a guide  for adequate coverage should they decide to insure with a company of their own choosing.     Dated: Feb. 9, 2016      Submitted by:    The Rev. Gregory Stierheim  The Rev. Heather Stierheim    187 Main St.  Mailing Address:  187 Main St.          Massena, NY 13662    Massena, NY 13662  Electronic Signature:  Phone:       (315) 705‐6104      (315) 705‐6104  Email Address:     pastorgreggumc@gmail.com  hstierheim@pts.edu    Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Conference serving the Norfolk/Brasher Falls and Massena:  First/Massena: Grace United Methodist Churches respectively.  38   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42 

UNYAC2016.2 – Change District Names  Total Number of Pages: 1    “Book of Discipline”: ¶none    Conference Committee/Agency that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if passed: The  Upper New York Cabinet and the six newly named districts listed below.    Financial Implications: Minimal    Whereas, since the merger into the Upper New York Conference, it has been challenging for clergy and  laity to fully understand the geographical boundaries of the districts within our Conference; and     Whereas, any new pastor, district superintendent, and even new bishop must accept a learning curve to  discern which district names belong with individual geographical areas; and    Whereas,  it  would  bring  clarity  to  the  district  boundaries  if  they  were  associated  primarily  with  the  larger county seats in their district and/or the geographical description of their region.    Therefore,  be  it  resolved  that  effective  July  1,  2016  or  deferred  to  the  Cabinet  to  determine  the  appropriate change date the following name changes occur:    Cornerstone becomes the Jamestown/Olean District  Crossroads becomes the Syracuse District  Genesee Valley becomes the Rochester District  Mountain View becomes the Corning/Elmira District  Niagara Frontier becomes the Buffalo/Niagara District  Northern Flow becomes the Watertown District; and    Be it further resolved that the following districts remain as currently named:  Adirondack, Albany, Binghamton, Finger Lakes, Mohawk, Oneonta since they already describe their  geographic locale.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:     The Rev. Rick LaDue  Electronic Signature:   Richard A. LaDue  Address:    169 E. Main St.  Webster, NY 14580  (585) 265‐9720  Phone number:    Email address:     rladue@umcwebster.org  Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Conference serving the Webster United Methodist Church.

39  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.3 – Restoration of Funding for Campus Ministries  Total Number of Pages: 2    “Book of Discipline”:     Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Treasurer, Conference Council of Finance and Administration    Financial Implications:     Whereas, the United Methodist Church has long had a presence to minister with and to the students at  many college and university campuses; and     Whereas, the FACT Report calls for a return to our Wesleyan ethos, and in an age when young adults are  turning away from the church and finding other ways to connect to their spirituality; and    Whereas,  funding  for  many  of  our  college  chaplain  ministries  has  become  non‐existent  for  many  campuses as a means of balancing the Annual Conference budget; and    Whereas, in the past few years, Campus Ministry support has been reduced from $125,000 in 2011 to  $72,800 in 2016, with even deeper cuts announced recently; and    Whereas, the spiritual formation for the next generation of United Methodist laity, clergy, missionaries,  and educators has been left unfunded and can be interpreted as unimportant to the Upper New York  Annual Conference.     Therefore,  be  it  resolved  that  in  response  to  this  grave  situation  we  call  upon  the  Upper  New  York  Conference to increase the budget for campus ministries beginning in 2018. We request that the 2018  budget  include  $80,000,  restoration  of  the  chaplain  position  at  Syracuse  University,  and  that  this  amount  be  increased  by  $15,000  each  of  the  following  three  budget  years,  to  more  fully  fund  other  campus ministries. We call on the Council of Finance & Administration to incorporate these funds to be  listed as “must pay” expenses; and    Be it further resolved that the Conference Board of Higher Education clarify and develop a process by  which colleges and universities would apply to receive these funds and to advertise and promote said  process.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:    Heather Smith, Peace with Justice Coordinator    Electronic Signature:  Heather Smith  Mailing Address:  10 Arthur Road        Newtonville, NY 12110  Phone number:   (518) 785‐7383            peacewithjustice@unyumc.org    Confirmed Member of Newtonville UMC, Newtonville      40   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 

and     Electronic Signature:  Mailing Address:        Phone Number:  

The Rev. Alan D. Kinney, Social Holiness Committee  Alan D. Kinney  877 Cunningham Court  Schenectady, NY 12309  (518) 390‐0883  akinney3@twcny.rr.com  Clergy  in  full  connection  of  Upper  New  York  Annual  Conference  serving  the  Schenectady:  Eastern  Parkway UMC.   

41  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

UNYAC2016.4 – Ensuring Support for All Ministries  Total Number of Pages: 1    “Book of Discipline”: ¶    Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Treasurer, Conference Council of Finance & Administration    Financial Implications:    Whereas, we are called to minister to and with people both within our own denomination and outside  our denomination; and    Whereas, we, as a denomination, call for the local churches to reach out to their neighbors and be in  ministry beyond their own walls; and    Whereas,  we  are  called  to  feed  the  hungry  and  house  the  homeless  no  matter  under  what  name  or  denomination; and    Whereas, leadership models the examples we hope others will see and follow; and    Whereas, the Upper New York Conference has reduced, suspended, or eliminated support for ministries  that do not bear our name or are not under our Conference in order to balance our own budget.    Therefore, be it resolved that when a budget item includes a salary for persons involved in such ministry  is approved by the Conference the amount of the salary support be placed in the “must pay” portion of  the budget of the Upper New York Annual conference.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:    Heather Smith,  Peace with Justice Coordinator    Electronic Signature:  Heather Smith  Mailing Address:  10 Arthur Road        Newtonville, NY 12110  (518) 785‐7383      Phone number:         peacewithjustice@unyumc.rorg   Confirmed Member of Newtonville UMC, Newtonville    and      The Rev. Alan D. Kinney, Social Holiness Committee  Electronic Signature:  Alan D. Kinney  Mailing Address:  877 Cunningham Court        Schenectady, NY 12309  Phone Number:   (518) 390–0883  akinney3@twcny.rr.com  Clergy  in  full  connection  of  Upper  New  York  Annual  Conference  serving  the  Schenectady:  Eastern  Parkway UMC. 

42  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.5 – Restoration of Funding of the New York State Council  of Churches  Total Number of Pages: 2    “Book of Discipline”: ¶    Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Treasurer, Conference Council of Finance & Administration    Financial Implications:    Whereas,  the  former  North  Central,  Troy,  Western,  and  Wyoming  annual  conferences  had  always  strongly supported the ministries of the New York State Council Churches in spirit and financially; and    Whereas, the Upper New York Conference has historically supported and participated in the ministries  of the New York State Council of Churches financially, in prayer, and in participation; and    Whereas,  as  a  church  of  Jesus  Christ  we  are  called  to  minister  and  support  not  only  those  within  our  singular denomination but also those who have common concerns and share similar Biblical values; and    Whereas,  prior  to  2015  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  had  pledged  approximately  $31,000  to  New  York State Council of Churches which this roughly the total that the four former annual conferences had  previously pledged. However, the Conference only paid approximately $18,000 of this commitment and  did not send an explanation to the council; and    Whereas, at present all financial support has been eliminated from our operating budget to balance our  own financial needs.    Therefore, be it resolved that while we realize that work on the 2017 budget has been completed, we  call  on  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  to  renew  its  financial  support  of  New  York  State  Council  of  Churches  by  making  a  minimal  commitment  of  $10,000  to  be  taken  by  a  special  conference‐wide  offering; and    Be it further resolved that we call on the Upper New York Conference to make a pledge of $20,000 for  2018 and increasing this amount by $2,750 each of the following four budget years in an effort to return  to our previous level of giving; and    Be it further resolved that we call on the Council of Finance & Administration to incorporate these funds  into the budget in a “must‐pay” category.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:    Heather Smith,  Peace with Justice Coordinator    Electronic Signature:  Heather Smith  Mailing Address:  10 Arthur Road        Newtonville, NY 12110  Phone number:   (518) 785‐7383      43   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11 

    peacewithjustice@unyumc.org  Confirmed Member of Newtonville UMC, Newtonville, NY    and      The Rev. Alan D. Kinney        Social Holiness Committee  Electronic Signature:  Alan D. Kinney  Mailing Address:  877 Cunningham Court        Schenectady, NY 12309  Phone Number:   (518) 390–0883  akinney3@twcny.rr.com  Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Conference serving the Schenectady: Eastern Parkway UMC.

44  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.6 ‐ A Call for Budget Transparency  Total Number of Pages: 2    “Book of Discipline”: ¶    Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Treasurer, Conference Council of Finance and Administration    Financial Implications: none    Whereas, we are dependent upon the faithful support of the laity and clergy in mind, body, spirit, and  finances to support and further the ministries of the Upper New York Conference; and    Whereas,  the  support  of  ministry  is  often  dependent  upon  the  faithful  communication  between  all  parties involved in planning, supporting, and executing said ministries; and     Whereas, trust is often dependent upon clear and concise communications; and    Whereas, the FACT Report called for greater transparency in order to elicit more trust in the Upper New  York Conference.    Therefore,  be  it  resolved  that  beginning  with  the  2018  budget  proposal  we  call  on  the  Conference  Council on Finance & Administration to provide the Conference members with a detailed accounting of  the proposed budget. We call for the pay and benefits packages of each salaried employee,* to be listed  individually and separately from other operating costs; and    Be it further resolved that we call for all “must pay” items to be marked as such and all “second tier”  commitments to be noted.    *Salaried employees to include the Directors of Connectional Ministries, Vital Congregations, Camping  and  Retreat  Ministries,  Communications,  New  Faith  Communities,  Human  Resources  &  Benefits,  Technology, District Superintendents, Executive Directors of each camp, and the Treasurer.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:    Heather Smith,  Peace with Justice Coordinator    Electronic Signature:  Heather Smith  Mailing Address:  10 Arthur Road        Newtonville, NY 12110  (518) 785‐7383      Phone number:         peacewithjustice@unyumc.org  Confirmed Member of Newtonville UMC, Newtonville    and      The Rev. Alan D. Kinney        Social Holiness Committee  Electronic Signature:  Alan D. Kinney  Mailing Address:  877 Cunningham Court  45   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4 

    Phone Number:  

Schenectady, NY 12309  (518) 390–0883  akinney3@twcny.rr.com  Clergy in full connection of Upper New York Conference serving the Schenectady: Eastern Parkway UMC.

46  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44 

UNYAC2016.7 – The Many Shades of God’s Hands  Total Number of Pages: 3    “Book of Discipline”: ¶649.2    Conference  Committee/Agency,  et  al.  that  would  be  affected  by/responsible  for  implementation  if  passed: Conference Treasurer, Conference Council of Finance & Administration, Conference Council on  Youth Ministry    Financial  Implications:  There  will  be  expenses  for  the  year  of  2016‐2017  for  meetings  and  trainings.  Some of these expenses may be able to be covered by grants, but the Conference will need to invest its  own money in the future of its youth ministry program.    Rationale:   The makeup of the membership of the Upper New York Conference Council on Youth Ministry (CCYM)  does not represent the broad scope of ethic groupings that exist within its borders and worship within  its congregations as called for by “The Discipline” despite efforts to increase its diversity. This petition  requests  the  creation  a  task  force to  develop  a  five‐year  plan  to  increase  the  diversity  in  district  and  Conference  youth  ministries  so  that  our  church  reflects  our  current  world  and  our  future  reality  by  creating culturally competent disciples of Christ.     Whereas, “The Discipline” in ¶649.2 regarding membership of the CCYM states, “It is recommended that  the council be composed of 50 percent racial and ethnic group members.”; and    Whereas, the Upper New York Conference currently has youth of color attending many local churches,  and these churches are located in culturally and racially diverse neighborhoods where additional youth  of color could be reached; and    Whereas, the CCYM is an active and vital ministry of the Conference, and while it serves in conjunction  with local church, district ministries and the camping program, it provides the major programming for  youth of the Conference; and    Whereas, the CCYM provides an effective platform from which youth can be in ministry advocating for  the free expression of the convictions of youth on vital issues, and be leaders within the Church of today  as well as of tomorrow; and    Whereas, the world we live in is rapidly becoming more diverse; and     Whereas, the youth leadership of the Conference needs to reflect the diversity of its congregants and  the field in which its ministry reaches out thus allowing all stakeholders to have a voice in the future of  youth and young adult ministry within the Conference; and    Whereas, the CCYM does not reflect the recommended diversity of being at least 50 percent members  who are racial and ethnic group members; and     

47  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  29  28  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

Whereas, it is important to be intentional about becoming culturally competent and being deliberate,  but wise regarding any change so that good intentions do not do more harm than good; and    Whereas, God calls us to not simply be passive in an unjust world but serve as God’s hands for  transformation, and acknowledging that it is the desire of the people of the Conference for those hands  to be of all ages and shades of skin; and    Whereas, the Conference has historically struggled to achieve diversity to the extent as recommended  by “The Discipline.”    Therefore, be it resolved that the Conference shall form a task force to develop a five‐year plan for  youth ministry in the Conference to reach or surpass the recommendations of “The Discipline;” and    Be it further resolved that the plan shall include a process to ensure that all races and cultural  backgrounds within the Conference are represented and involved in youth ministry at the Conference  and district levels; and    Be it further resolved that the task force shall identify problem areas and obstacles in achieving these  goals; and    Be it further resolved that all members of the task force shall:   commit to a period of at least two years: one year to develop the plan and a second year to begin  implementation; and   commit to increasing their cultural competency by participating in training, reading books, being in  prayerful meditation, and listening to others; and    Be  it  further  resolved  that  the  membership  of  the  task  force  shall  meet  the  following  guidelines:    At least three‐quarters shall be people of color      At least one‐third of membership shall be youth     At least one‐quarter shall be young adults; and    Be  it  further  resolved  that  there  shall  be  representation  from  the  following:  CCYM,  Commission  on  Religion  and  Race,  Committee  on  Native  American  Ministry,  any  existing  ethnic  caucuses,  Camp  and  Retreat Ministries, Campus Ministries, youth of color from a local church not on CCYM but active in local  or district ministry; and     Be it further resolvedthat it is recommended that as many groups be represented including, but not  limited to, youth, young adults or adults who work with youth who represent Native American, Black or  African American, White or European American, Hispanic, Asian, Pakistani, Indian, Korean, Chinese,  Burmese, Karen and other races or cultures within the Conference. Additionally, considerations should  be given to immigrant, urban, suburban, and rural youth; and    Be  it  further  resolved  that  the  task  force  not  contain  so  many  people  that  it  become  too  large  to  function.  The  size  must  reflect  a  serious  attempt  at  a  solution  and  provide  a  safe  place  to  experience  God’s presence; and    Be it further resolved that the first meeting of the task force shall be no later than October 2016; and  48   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34 

Be it  further  resolved  that  the  task  force  shall  work  with  Eric  Law  and  the  Kaleidoscope  Institute,  the  Committee  on  Religion  and  Race,  and  use  other  consultants  as  needed  for  both  guidance  and  accountability; and      Be it further resolved that the membership of the task force shall be nominated by the representatives  from the Cabinet, two representatives from the Commission on Religion and Race, one of the youth co‐ coordinators of CCYM, CCYM youth chair or vice chair, two representatives from Committee of Native  American Ministries, two pastors of color, two laity of color and two youth of color. (This is not the task  force  but  the  nominating  committee.)  The  nominating  committee  shall  meet  immediately  after  the  approval  of  this  petition  to  nominate  and  invite  task  force  members.  Whoever  is  on  the  nominating  committee  should  have  the  availability  to  meet  at  Annual  Conference  or  shortly  thereafter.  The  nominators can meet without the full group, provided more than 50 percent are people of color and a  person of color is to lead the nominations process; and     Be  it  further  resolved  that  people  interested  in  being  on  the  task  force  can  self‐nominate  to  be  considered at Annual Conference; and    Be  it  further  resolved  that  the  nominating  committee  is  free  to  look  beyond  the  above  description  to  include  others  such  as  people  outside  The  UMC  who  may  have  valuable  input  to  the  process;  and     Be it further resolved that the task force shall report back to the 2017 session of the Upper New York  Annual  Conference  with  a  proposed  five‐year  plan  for  creating  a  culturally  competent  vital  youth  ministry program in our Conference  composed of at least 50 percent youth of color in leadership and  transformational  programming  for  all  youth  celebrating  God’s  gift  of  diversity  and  creating  culturally  competent disciples of Christ.    Dated: Feb. 16, 2016    Submitted by:     Sandra Allen  Electronic Signature:  Mailing Address   PO Box 8381  Albany, NY 12208   Phone Number:   (518) 496‐4543   E‐mail Address:   sandraallenesq@yahoo.com  Confirmed Member of Calvary UMC, Latham, attending Emmaus UMC of Albany     

49  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.8 – A Resolution to Study and Consider Endorsing Carbon  Pricing   Total Number of Pages: 5    “Book of Discipline”: ¶649.2    Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if  passed:    Financial Implications: None known    Brief Rationale:     A Biblical Call for Climate Action  In the book of Genesis 1:1, the Lord God created the heavens and the earth. In the books of  Deuteronomy 6:4; Matthew 22:37; Mark 12:29, and Luke 10:27, our Savior Jesus commands us to love  the Lord God with all our heart and soul and mind and spirit. Then who, but all of God’s Creation, is our  neighbor? In Leviticus 19:18; Matthew 22:38; Mark 12:31; Luke 10:27, 10:29 and 10:37; and 1 John 4:20‐ 21 our Savior Jesus commands us to love our neighbor as ourselves.     A Resolution to Study and Consider Endorsing Carbon Pricing  Whereas, global warming is causing calamitous change to our climate and the life inhabiting our planet,  and;    Whereas, a task force, formed by action of the Cal‐Nevada 2014 Annual Conference session,  recommended that The United Methodist Church take action on behalf of current and future victims of  climate change1, and;    Whereas, in order to arrest the alarming rate of global warming and climate change, urgent action is  needed to smoothly and rapidly move away from artificially cheap fossil fuels whose prices do not  include the environmental and health costs of their use²; and    Whereas, all people around the world, but particularly those unable to protect themselves from the  negative effects of climate change, will benefit if the United States quickly moves away from fossil fuels  use; and    Whereas, divestment from fossil fuels is a morally appropriate and courageous action consistent with  our spiritual values³; and    Whereas, divestment alone will not have a strong enough and quick enough impact on fossil fuel  extraction and use to prevent a catastrophic accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere⁴; and    Whereas, to allow our economy to “freely” and smoothly withdraw from fossil fuels, economists  advocate putting a price on carbon pollution (CO2e emissions) in a predictable, structured way. This is  done one of two ways. First, the quantity of emissions allowed can be restricted, and emissions  allowances can be auctioned to fossil fuels suppliers. In this case, the price paid at auction, for an  “allowance” (right to emit a ton of CO2e) is the “price on carbon.” Second, a fee or tax can be assessed  on fossil fuels as they are imported, extracted, or drilled. This option is favored by most economists  because it is simple, transparent, and easier to administer. In this case, the “price on carbon” is the fee  50   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

or tax. Suppliers of fossil fuels will adjust prices to incorporate some or all of the fee. Producers of fossil  fuel‐intensive goods will adjust prices to incorporate some or all of their increased costs. Consumers will  adjust their purchasing decisions as they confront higher prices for fossil fuels and fossil fuels‐intensive  goods; and    Whereas, without pricing carbon pollution, suppliers and consumers of fossil fuels are able to pollute  and send carbon into the atmosphere without financial consequences. Shouldn’t our choices to  consume fossil fuels and fossil fuels‐intensive products be met with a fee that reflects the cost of our  fuel use to our health and our planet?; and    Whereas, economists recommend a carbon price be set at a modest level during the first year and  increase at a brisk, predictable pace in following years⁵; and    Whereas, persons of low income will suffer disproportionately from increased costs arising from an  effective carbon price. Economists recommend a portion of revenues from pricing carbon be used to  “offset unfair burdens on lower income households”⁶; and    Whereas, economists recommend the removal of subsidies that “reward” fossil fuels extraction⁷; and    Whereas, as imperfect human beings, it is natural that our highest expression of love for creation is our  love for our children.    Therefore, be it resolved for the sake of our children and our Creator, to study within our congregations  and our Conference, the issue of carbon pricing and to consider endorsing, at the 2017 session of Annual  Conference, carbon pricing within the United States that is implemented in a structured, predictable  way, in a manner that does not hurt persons of low income, and in conjunction with removal of fossil  fuels subsidies.    Dated: Feb. 17, 2016  Revised: March 3, 2016    Submitted by:     Katherine Barnum Skura  Mailing address:  405 state Route 38        Dryden, NY 13053  Electronic Signature:  Katherine Barnum Skura  Phone number:   (607) 330‐0645  Email:      katherinebarnum@gmail.com  Confirmed member at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Ithaca    Submitted by:    Sara Culotta  Mailing address   802 N. Tioga St.        Ithaca, NY 14850  Electronic Signature:  Phone number:   (607) 229‐4439  Email:      sara.culotta@gmail.com  UNY membership: Member at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Ithaca   

51  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34 

Submitted by:    Mailing address:        Electronic Signature:  Phone number:   Email:     

Patricia Sipman  306 E. Yates Street  Ithaca, NY 14850  Patricia Sipman  (607) 227‐8818  Plsipman@twcny.rr.com 

UNY membership: Church Council Chair, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Ithaca      ¹Recommendation to Petition 2016 General Conference to Amend UMC Book of Resolutions, 4071 Investment  Strategies, p. 47. Prepared by the Natural World Interagency Task Force as required by action of Cal‐Nevada  Annual Conference, June 2014.   ² Ackerman, Frank, Kenneth J. Arrow, Jim Barrett, Alan S. Blinder, Dallas Burtraw, Steven Chu, Richard N. Cooper,   Robert H. Frank, Shi‐Ling Hsu, Charles Komanoff, N. Gregory Mankiw, Donald B. Marron, Jr., Aparna Mathur,   Warwick McKibbon, Gilbert Metcalf, Adele C. Morris, Robert Reich, John Reilly, Mark Reynolds, Alice M. Rivlin,   James Rydge, Thomas C. Schelling, Robert Shapiro, George P. Shultz, Joseph Stiglitz, Steven Stoft, Chad Stone, Jerry  Taylor, Richard Thaler, Eric Toder, Martin Weitzman, Gary Yohe, “A Call to Paris Negotiators: Tax Carbon.” 11 29  2015. carbontax.org. 8 2 2016.  ³United States. Congressional Budget Office. Microeconomic Studies Division. Offsetting a Carbon Tax’s Costs on  Low‐Income Households. By Terry Dinan. Washington, D.C.: CBO, November, 2012. Print. Working Paper 2012‐16;  On‐line at: https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/11‐13LowIncomeOptions.pdf  ⁴Williams, Robert C., III, Hal Gordon, Dallas Burtraw, Jared C. Carbone, and Richard D. Morgenstern. The Initial  Incidence of a Carbon Tax across Income Groups. Publication no. RFF DP 14‐24. Washington, D.C.: Resources for  the Future, 2014. Print.  ⁵Nystrom, Scott, and Patrick Luckow. The Economic, Climate, Fiscal, Power, and Demographic Impact of a National  Fee‐and‐Dividend Carbon Tax: p. 2. Rep. Washington, D.C.: Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI), 2012.  Cambridge, MA: Synapse Energy Economics, Inc. (Synapse) Print. Prepared for Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL),  Coronado, CA. On‐line at: http://citizensclimatelobby.org/wp‐content/uploads/2014/06/REMI‐carbon‐tax‐report‐ 62141.pdf  ⁶Ibid., p. 51.  ⁷Tollefson, Jeff. “Fossil‐fuel Divestment Campaign Hits Resistance.” Nature 521.5 (2015): 16‐17. Print.   1  Ibid., Ackerman, “Call to Paris Negotiators”, p. 1  1  Ibid.  1  Ibid. 

   

52  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34 

327 Sage Hall  Ithaca, New York 14850  607‐255‐8501  www.robert‐h‐frank.com            Feb. 26, 2016    Ms. Hudda Aswad, Chair,   Committee on Petitions and Resolutions  Upper New York Conference of  The United Methodist Church  324 University Ave., 3rd Floor  Syracuse, N.Y. 13210    Dear Ms. Aswad,    I enthusiastically support the above Resolution to Study and Consider Endorsing Carbon Pricing. Carbon  pricing – explicitly using prices within existing markets to shift investment and behavior across all sectors  – offers greater potential to combat global warming than any other policy, with minimal regulatory and  enforcement costs.    All good wishes,          Dr. Robert H. Frank  H. J. Louis Professor of Management and Professor of Economics  Johnson Graduate School of Management  Cornell University

53  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43 

Links to Supporting Documents, for Study    http://e2e.haas.berkeley.edu/pdf/Christopher%20Knittel%20MA%20Legislature.pdf Statement of  Christopher Knittel, William Barton Rogers Professor of Energy Economics, Sloan School of  Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology & Director, Center for Energy and Environmental  Policy Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology to the Massachusetts Joint Committee on  Telecommunications, Utilities, and Energy on S 1747, “An Act Combatting Climate Change”     http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/19/opinion/proof‐that‐a‐price‐on‐carbon‐works.html?_r=0 New  York Times editorial board endorsement of carbon pricing    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTSDNET/Resources/carbon‐pricing‐supporters‐list‐UPDATED‐ 110614.pdf “Seventy‐four countries, 23 subnational jurisdictions, and more than 1,000 companies and  investors expressed support for a price on carbon ahead of the UN Secretary‐General’s Climate Summit”  [Updated 11/06/2014]    http://www.sfbos.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/bdsupvrs/resolutions14/r0336‐14.pdf City and County of San  Francisco Resolution urging the United States Congress to enact a revenue‐neutral carbon tax.    https://citizensclimatelobby.org/wp‐content/uploads/2014/10/Carbon‐Fee‐and‐Dividend‐July‐ 2015.pdf July 2015 Citizens Climate Lobby’s Carbon Fee and Dividend legislative proposal    http://citizensclimatelobby.org/wp‐content/uploads/2014/06/REMI‐carbon‐tax‐report‐62141.pdf In‐ depth regional and national report on estimated economic, climate, and health effects of CCL’s Carbon  Fee and Dividend legislative proposal.    http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?default_fld=&bn=A08372&term=2015&Summary=Y&Actions=Y&Me mo=Y&Text=Y Text of NYS Carbon Tax Bill A08372/S06037 (Be sure to include “Text=Y”)    http://www.sierraclub.org/sites/www.sierraclub.org/files/sce‐ authors/u1997/Carbon%20Pricing%20Fact%20Sheet%209.8.15.pdf  Massachusetts Sierra Club Chapter fact sheet on carbon pricing    https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/11‐13LowIncomeOptions.pdf  “Offsetting a Carbon Tax’s Costs on Low‐Income Households”    http://www.carbontax.org/blogarchives/2015/11/29/a‐call‐to‐paris‐climate‐negotiators‐tax‐carbon/   & http://www.carbontax.org/wp‐ content/uploads/2015/11/CTC_carbon_tax_sign_on_letter_28_Nov_2015_posted.pdf 31 of the  world’s most respected economists jointly endorse pricing carbon, and set forth four principles a carbon  tax should incorporate: (1) upstream, (2) structured and predictable, (3) portion of revenues used to  mitigate the disproportionate cost burden on low income households (from pass‐through of the CO2e  fee), (4) subsidies on fossil fuels should be removed.     

54  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

UNYAC2016.9 – UNYUMC Responds To Gun Violence  Total Number of Pages: 3    “Book of Resolutions”: #3426 (revised and readopted in 2008)    Conference Committee/Agency, et al. that would be affected by/responsible for implementation if  passed:     Financial Implications: none    Rationale: United Methodists across the Upper New York Conference seek to follow the Spirit of Jesus  who cares about the wellbeing of communities and all of their members. Therefore, we are deeply  concerned about the suffering and human loss caused by reliance on violence to solve conflicts and the  minimally regulated availability of fire arms. As faithful Christians we take action, both individual and  sociopolitical, to immerse ourselves and our culture in Jesus’ compassionate way.       Whereas,  “Violence,  and  more  particularly  violence  to  children  and  youths,  is  a  primary  concern  of  United Methodists. We recognize and deplore violence which kills and injures children and youths. In the  name of Christ, who came ‘and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were  near’ (Ephesians 2:17) and challenged all his disciples to be peacemakers (Matthew 5:9), we call upon  the  church  to affirm its faith through  vigorous efforts to curb and eliminate  gun violence.” (Resolution  #3426, Gun Violence, Adopted 2000, Revised and Readopted in 2008); and     Whereas,  there  is  manifest  documentation  of  the  breadth  and  scope  of  individual,  family,  and  community  disaster  caused  by  the  use  of  small  arms  provided  by  reports  of  the  Brady  Campaign  to  Prevent Gun Violence, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, Mayors Against Illegal Guns, Law  Center  for  Prevention  of  Gun  Violence,  Small  Arms  Survey,  The  World  Health  Organization,  The  UN  Studies of Small Arms Violence and similar agencies, as well as our personal experience, supporting the  significantly  high  incidence  of  death  and  severe  injury  in  places  where  guns  are  readily  available  compared to places where guns are not readily available; and    Whereas, by word and example, Jesus embraced non‐violence as a way of life. He took up a cross rather  than  a  sword.  He  admonished  His  disciples  to  put  away  their  swords.  He  embraced  the  practice  of  hospitality and a creative love of one’s enemies.    Therefore, be it resolved that the Upper New York Conference of The United Methodist Church lift up in  each congregation a vision of “a more excellent way” by calling on appropriate bodies within the church  to recall and adhere to resolution #3426 [or its successors] from “The Book of Resolutions” which states,  “reflecting  that  the  traditional  role  of  The  United  Methodist  Church  has  been  one  of  safety  and  sanctuary,  every  United  Methodist  Church  is  officially  declared  a  weapon‐free  zone,”  [no  matter  what  local legislation may provide to the contrary] (see also ¶162, “Social Principles”); and    Be it further resolved that the Upper New York Conference begin in 2016 to provide materials for local  congregations to prayerfully and actively make preventing gun violence a regular part of congregational  worship,  conversation  and  prayer  times.  Jesus’  compassionate  love  calls  for  gun  violence  to  be  worshipfully  and  theologically  reflected  on,  and  we  encourage  congregations  to  frame  conversations  theologically  by  utilizing  resources  such  as  “Kingdom  Dreams,  Violent  Realities:  Reflections  on  Gun  55   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

Violence from Micah 4:1‐4” produced by the General Board of Church and Society; and    Be it further resolved that the Upper New York Conference provide guidance for local congregations to  assist those affected by gun violence through prayer, pastoral care, creating space, encouraging survivors  to share their stories as they are ready, financial assistance, and through identifying other resources in  their communities as victims of gun violence and their families walk through the process of grieving and  healing; and    Be  it  further  resolved  that  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  encourage  all  congregations  within  its  boundaries to annually participate in the National Gun Violence Prevention Sabbath Weekend; and    Be it further  resolved that the  Upper  New  York Conference Social Holiness Team provide  material and  personnel leadership and guidance to local congregations to begin to implement the following:   For individual United Methodists who own guns to safely and securely use and store their guns and  to teach the importance of practicing gun safety;   For  United  Methodists  who  have  not  experienced  gun  violence  to  form  ecumenical  and  interfaith  partnerships  with  faith  communities that have experienced gun  violence in order  to support them  and to learn from their experiences;   For United Methodist congregations to lead or join in ecumenical and interfaith gatherings for public  prayer, and actions of solidarity, at sites where gun violence has occurred;   For United Methodist congregations to partner with local law enforcement agencies and community  groups to identify gun retailers who engage in retail practices designed to circumvent laws on gun  sales and ownership; and    For United Methodist congregations to advocate at the local, state, and national level for laws that  prevent or reduce gun violence. Some of these measures include:  o Universal background checks on all gun purchases  o Ratification of the Arms Trade Treaty  o Ensuring all guns are sold through licensed gun retailers  o Prohibiting persons convicted of violent crimes from purchasing a gun for a fixed time period  o Prohibiting all individuals under restraining order due to threat of violence from purchasing  a gun  o Prohibiting persons with serious mental illness, who pose a danger to themselves and their  communities, from purchasing a gun  o Ensuring greater access to services for those suffering from mental illness  o Establishing a minimum age of 21 years for a gun purchase or possession  o Banning large capacity ammunition magazines and weapons designed to fire multiple rounds  each time the trigger is pulled  o Promotion  of  new  technologies  to  aid  law‐enforcement  agencies  to  trace  crime  guns  and  promote public safety; and    Be it further resolved that the secretary of the Upper New York Conference send a copy of this resolution  to  United  States  senators  representing  its  boundaries  and  all  United  States  Congress  people  whose  districts reside within the bounds of the Upper New York Conference.    Submitted by:    The Rev. Robert Long, Albany District Coordinator of Global Ministries  Electronic Signature:  Robert Long  Mailing Address:  833 Oregon Ave.  Niskayuna, NY 12309‐6423  56   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36 

Phone Number:   (516) 372‐1083   Email:       bikealong2@nycap.rr.com  UNY local church membership: Retired member of UNY, located at First UMC, Schenectady    Additional Sponsors:  Heather Smith,  Peace with Justice Coordinator, UNYUMC    Electronic Signature:  Heather Smith  Mailing Address:  10 Arthur Road  Newtonville, NY 12110  Phone number:   (518) 785‐7383            beezermcgee@yahoo.com    Confirmed Member of Newtonville UMC, Newtonville          The Rev. Steven C. Clunn  Electronic Signature:  Steven C. Clunn  Mailing address:   307 Yoakum Parkway #225  Alexandria, VA 22304  (518) 878‐6737  Phone number:    Email address:     sclunn@yahoo.com  UNY local church membership: Extension Ministry appointment to the Methodist Federation for Social  Action          Shirley Readdean, Albany District UYNUMC Lay Leader   Electronic Signature:  Shirley Readdean  Mailing Address:  2232 Turner Ave.        Schenectady, NY 12306  Phone number:   (518) 372‐7065  Email:       whirly@earthlink.net  Confirmed Member of First UMC Schenectady, Schenectady           James Troy, Chair, Church Council  Electronic Signature:  James Troy  Mailing Address:            Schenectady, NY 12306  Phone number:   (518) 356‐2687  Email:       jtroy@nycap.rr.com  Confirmed Member of First UMC Schenectady, Schenectady

57  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Reports ‐ Conference Teams  

58  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

59  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42 

Africa 360     After the 2014 Annual Conference session, the Africa 360 initiative kicked into high gear with another  bold  challenge  from  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb:  For  each  church  to  raise  $1,000. Thus, the Africa 360 Challenge 2.0 was born.    Much  of  the  summer  was  spent  pulling  together  new  resources  for  churches  that  combined  the  information about Imagine No Malaria and Africa University into one cohesive narrative about working  toward  health  and  education  for  our  sisters  and  brothers  in  Africa.  An  online  portal  was  created  for  churches to electronically request brochures, bookmarks, envelopes, and more; videos, printable liturgy,  and children’s resources were created through collaboration with churches all across the Conference.    The Africa 360 Steering Team has been hard at work this year staying connected to local churches and  being a resource in their home districts. The team has worked as prayer partners across the Conference,  been a wellspring of creative ideas, and helped give vision and direction to Africa 360.    A few major undertakings have come together this past year that should be noted. An unprecedented  Lenten  Devotional  was  written  by  clergy  and  laity  across  the  Conference,  bringing  together  faith,  Scripture, and mission with stories about Africa and missionary work. Africa 360 Sunday was celebrated  by churches all across the Conference on April 17, sharing in prayer and celebration leading up to the  Annual  Conference  session.  There  have  also  been  designated  Africa  University  scholarships  created  to  honor several persons in the Conference; for more information on those, please contact Africa 360 Field  Coordinator Laurel O’Connor by emailing Africa360@unyumc.org.    Since the Upper New York Conference decided to bring together the stories of Imagine No Malaria and  Africa University, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. Churches from across the Conference  have been creative in discerning how they might participate and bring the story of Africa 360 out of their  church walls and into the community. Africa 360 is a great way to show the community what the Church  is doing in the world: saving lives and educating new generations of leaders.     The work The United Methodist Church is doing is making a huge difference, with the Upper New York  Conference as an important piece of the initiative. Just in the past year, the World Health Organization  has reported that the death rate from malaria has been once again cut in half: One child dies every two  minutes from malaria, a statistic that was every 30 seconds only years ago. Malaria is beatable in this  lifetime and working across the United Methodist connection has made that possibility all the more real.  The scholarships that go to Africa University educate the next generation of peacemakers, theologians,  nurses, administrators, and entrepreneurs that have built bridges across nations. Without the graduates  of Africa University, many of the health boards of Imagine No Malaria would not have the support and  infrastructure  they  need  to  save  lives.  The  stories  are  connected,  and  Africa  360  creates  a  holistic  picture of what health and education can do in the world.    Submitted by Laurel O’Connor, Africa 360 field coordinator   

60  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Archives and History, Commission on       The Conference Commission on Archives and History continues to maintain three archival locations. One  in  Buffalo  –  which  holds  records  from  the  former  Western  New  York  Conference,  one  in  Syracuse  –  which hold records from the former North Central New York Conference, and one in Saratoga Springs –  which holds the New York portions of the former Troy and Wyoming conferences. We anxiously await  the  renovation  of  the  new  Conference  Center  Building  at  7481  Henry  Clay  Blvd.,  Liverpool.  All  three  archival locations will be moved to this location and will be all under one roof. This will be a great thing  for  researchers  and  other  Conference  personnel  to  have  all  the  materials  in  one  location.  The  commission is very much looking forward to the move. It is also noted that all three archival locations  have received many boxes of records over the past year from recently closed churches.      The pastor grave marking program is running smoothly. Each district office has a supply of three markers  that  are  replenished  as  needed.  Ken  Summers  was  able  to  secure  a  foundry  in  Pennsylvania  that  will  make  our  markers  for  us.  The  commission  is  looking  for  some  creative  ways  to  continue  funding  this  program.  It  is  noted  that  Summers  has  recently  resigned  from  this  commission  and  was  made  an  emeritus member.      As the Rev. James Barnes was appointed to serve in Clarence, he is handling research requests for the  Western New York archive location. Rev. Barnes has an almost complete set of journals for the former  North Central New York Conference and its predecessor conferences – back to the 1880s – and the Black  River memoirs dating to the early 19th century. He can assist with many of the NCNY research questions.  The Rev. Marcia Wickert is handling those for the former North Central New York Conference and Karen  Staulters continues to handle requests for the former Troy and Wyoming conferences.      Eight  members  of  the  commission  attended  the  annual  NEJ  Commission  on  Archives  and  History  meeting located in Westport, Conn., hosted by the New York Annual Conference. This was held May 12‐ 14, 2015. The theme was “Telling Our Stories.”    A resolution was presented at the 2015 Annual Conference session for the formation of the Upper New  York Conference Historical Society. The resolution was passed, and the commission is in the process of  getting this up and running.     The 2015 Annual Conference session display featured pictures and history of the “oldest, still being used  for Methodist/EUB worship, churches” in each district within the UNY Conference. It was prepared by  the Rev. Barnes and Adam Barnes, who have prepared the past five Annual Conference session displays.    In  November  2015,  Rev.  Barnes,  Adam  Barnes,  Rev.  Wickert,  James  Lesch,  and  Karen  Staulters  met  at  the  Syracuse  archival  location  to  pick  up,  sort,  and  tidy  the  location,  as  many  boxes  from  closed  churches  have  accumulated  there  over  the  past  several  years.  There  is  a sense  of  order  there  now  so  research can be done as needed.    We are looking forward to preparing and moving the archival materials to the new Conference Center  after  the  renovation  is  done.  Once  all  is  moved  and  organized,  we  can  work  on  getting  the  whole  collection  catalogued.  The  former  Troy  Conference  materials  are  already  done,  and  they  are  in  an  electronic format. The hope is to be able to get the entire collection catalogued electronically to make  researching easier for all.  61   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15 

It is  noted  that  we  have  had  some  resignations  from  our  commission:  Ken  Summers,  the  Rev.  Jacob  Denny,  and  Marcia  Focht.  At  the  end  of  the  year,  we  examined  from  which  districts  the  rest  of  our  members were from as we felt that each district should be represented on the commission.    Members  of  the  commission:  Rev.  James  Barnes,  Karen  Staulters,  Rev.  Marcia  Wickert,  Ken  Summers  (Emeritus), Adam Barnes, Merle and Catharine Doud (Emeritus), Joyce Ellis, Margaret and Lee Flanders,  Jim  Lesch,  Rev.  Betsye  Mowry,  Nancy  Rutenber,  Richard  Ward,  Ray  Leonard  (Emeritus),  and  Gilbert  Smith (Emeritus).    Respectfully submitted by:  Rev. James Barnes II              Co‐Chair of the Commission on Archives and History            Karen Staulters   Co‐ Chair of the Commission on Archives and History   

62  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25 

The Board of Ordained Ministry (BOM) is privileged to have the ministry of caring for the clergy of the  Upper New York Conference from the first perception of a call through retirement. We work through the  12  district  Committees  on  Ordained  Ministry  (dCOMs)  and  in  close  partnership  with  the  appointive  Cabinet.  The  board  is  the  credentialing  body  for  clergy  seeking  commissioning  and  ordination  in  the  Upper New York Conference. The BOM has a wide scope of responsibilities in cultivating and supporting  excellent clergy leadership; these tasks are outlined in ¶635 of the 2012 Book of Discipline.    The board’s members (clergy and at least 20 percent laypersons, appointed by the Bishop) work in six  broad areas: standards and qualifications (of ordination candidates); clergy status; clergy effectiveness;  dCOM  support  and  direction;  recruitment/enlistment;  and  oversight  of  the  provisional  members  program.    The co‐chairs of the BOM serve overlapping four‐year terms (e.g. 2012‐16 and 2014‐18). Currently, the  co‐chairs are the Rev. Holly Nye, whose term is ending this year, and the Rev. Matthew Stengel, who will  continue. Elections will be held for another co‐chair and other officers when the new class is appointed  at  the  Annual  Conference  session.  The  Rev.  Alice  Priset  has  served  as  vice‐chair,  and  the  Rev.  David  Cooke  as  secretary.  The  Rev.  Michelle  Bogue‐Trost  has  served  as  our  registrar  and  has  been  working  with the Rev. Tom Pullyblank to succeed her. The Rev. Eleanor Collinsworth has assisted the registrar in  preparing  the  BOM  section  of  the  “Business  of  Annual  Conference”  which  is  the  official  record  of  the  status of every clergy person in the Conference and is published annually in the Conference’s Journal.   Leading  the  board’s  division  this  year  are:  the  Rev.  Sue  Russell,  standards  and  qualifications;  the  Rev.  Carmen Perry, clergy status; the Rev. Rhonda Kouterick, clergy effectiveness; the Rev. Tom Pullyblank,  dCOM; the Rev. Brooke Newell, provisional program; and the Rev. Mike Smith, recruitment. 

26 27  28  29  30  31  32  33 

Much of  our  work  during  the  year  builds  toward  the  February‐March  retreat,  when  we  interview  candidates, and engage in discerning God’s movement and guidance in raising up future leaders for our  Church.  As  we  write  this  in  February,  board  members  are  hard  at  work  reading  candidate  materials,  watching sermon videos, and praying for the candidates and the board. Those who are approved by the  BOM  for  commissioning,  associate  membership,  and  ordination  as  deacons  and  elders  are  recommended  to  the  full  members  of  the  Conference  for  approval.  The  culmination  of  each  Annual  Conference session is the Service of Commissioning  and Ordination through the laying on of hands by  the Bishop and other full members of the Conference. 

34 35  36  37  38  39  40 

In September  and  January,  the  provisional  division  offers  a  retreat  for  those  on  the  path  to  full  ordination.  This  past  August,  we  were  able  to  offer  an  extended  retreat  in  New  York  City.  Provisional  members and BOM members stayed at the historic Alma Matthews House, a mission residence of the  United  Methodist  Women.  While  there,  they  were  able  to  visit  ministries  of  the  General  UMC:  the  General Board of Global Ministries, United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR), the headquarters  of  the  UMW,  the  General  Board  of  Church  and  Society’s  mission  to  the  United  Nations,  and  a  guided  tour of the United Nations. They were led by the seminar program of the Board of Church and Society. 

41 42 

BOM members  participated  in  the  “See,  Know,  Love”  Conference  in  October  in  Hershey,  Pa.  Special  sessions were held for BOM officers and conference cabinets. 

43 44  45 

In November, board members accompany district superintendents to visit students at seminaries across  the connection. This is part of the work of the recruitment division, supporting and enlisting excellent  candidates for ministry in our Conference.  63   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6 

The board executive committee meets with the Cabinet at least twice a year. This is an excellent way to  build community and communication as we work in our different, yet complementary, ministry areas. In  the  spring,  we  work  with  the  Cabinet  to  prepare  the  “Business  of  Annual  Conference.”  This  task  is  handled ably and  cooperatively between the  board registrar and the Bishop’s office.  Many thanks are  due  to  Episcopal  Office  Manager  Mary  Bradley  who  is  a  tremendous  help  to  both  the  BOM  and  the  Cabinet. 

7 8  9 

The Rev.  Matthew  Stengel  participates  as  the  representative  of  UNY  Conference  in  the  Northeastern  Jurisdiction Board of Ordained Ministry. This body shares best practices of the nine conferences’ BOMs  and approaches to common struggles. 

10 11  12  13 

During the past year, the BOM provided boundaries training for all persons under appointment by the  Bishop or serving as a lay supply. These were held in nine sessions in eight sites across the Conference,  north,  south,  west,  east,  and  central.  Participation  was  at  high  levels.  Those  who  did  not  attend  are  being held accountable by their district superintendents. 

14 15  16 

In the  coming  year,  officers  of  the  BOM  will  attend  the  quadrennial  training  provided  by  the  General  Board  of  Higher  Education  and  Ministry,  highlighting  the  changes  that  may  have  been  made  to  the  “BOD” at General Conference this May.  

17 18  19 

We, the  co‐chairs,  are  immensely  grateful  for  the  time,  energy,  prayer,  and  faithful  service  given  by  every member of the board. It is holy and humbling work that we share, and it is only possibly through  the loving effort of many faithful people working together. Thanks be to God!  

20 21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28 

Holly Nye and Matthew Stengel, UNYAC Board of Ordained Ministry Co‐Chairs UNY Board of Ordained  Ministry  members,  as  of  February  2016:  Kristen  Allen,  Nola  Anderson,  Marilyn  Baissa,  Bill  Barber,  Michelle Bogue‐Trost, Lee Carlson, Yohang Chun, Anne Cole, Eleanor Collinsworth, David Cooke, Jennifer  Delahoy,  Greg  DeSalvatore,  Christine  Doran,  Brian  Ethington,  Brian  Fellows,  Vonda  Fossitt,  Bill  Gottschalk‐Fielding,  Keith  Grinnell,  Youngjae  Jee,  Noel  John,  Ann  Kemper,  David  Kofahl,  Bob  Kolvik‐Campbell, Rhonda Kouterick, , Jeff Losey, Crystal Martin, Pam Mikel‐Hayes, Wayne Mort, Brooke  Newell,  Holly  Nye,  Carmen  Perry,  Colleen  Preuninger,  Sheila  Price,  Alice  Priset,  Tom  Pullyblank,  Sherri  Rood,  Sue  Russell,  Sundar  Samuel,  Jane  Sautter,  Lynn  Shipe,  Michael  Smith,  Steven  Smith,  Matthew  Stengel, Beckie Sweet, Michael Terrell, Leon VanWie, Denise Walling, Heather Williams. 

29

64  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Camp and Retreat Ministries (CRM)    My friends,     There are times when it becomes much more important to hear what we need to hear than what we  might want to hear. I offer the following Committee on Camp & Retreat Ministries (CRM) Annual Report  in that spirit.    During the course of the past year, Camp and Retreat Ministries successfully led a great many people to  Christ,  through  providing  both  the  space  and  the  experiences  they  needed  to  connect  to  God  in  meaningful  and  powerful  ways.  We  continued  to  work  efficiently  in  the  face  of  decreased  resources.  CRM worked collaboratively and cooperatively to unify ourselves and our outlook, as we strove to offer  a  new  generation  of  participants  experiences  that  are  relevant  and  attractive.  We  also  addressed  a  number of serious and complex challenges.     Now  that  our  financial  condition  has  been  more  clearly  identified,  we  have  worked  hard  to  address  deficits.  Staff  positions  were  reorganized  and  the  number  of  staff  decreased.  Those  remaining  were  asked  to  do  more,  and  we  fear  for  their  long‐term  ability  to  operate  at  such  a  pace  and  range  of  demands. They are to be commended for their herculean effort, while providing a clarion call as to the  need for our wise assignment of resources toward the making of disciples. Fundamental programmatic  decisions and decisions relating to the future of properties are being made within a constricting financial  environment. Long‐term goals are currently ceding to short‐term financial realities.    The  strategic  plan  forms  the  basis  of many  decisions  this  year. It  was  a  monumental  undertaking  that  will  inform  decisions  well  into  our  future.  Decisions  about  program  and  land  use  needed  to  be  made  prior to its publication. We are heartened that we now have its benefit in those types of decisions. The  process of creating the strategic plan was inclusive and comprehensive: It was also protracted, which at  times  forced  us  to  act  on  information  on  hand  at  the  time.  Given  the  issues  facing  this  ministry,  undergoing the strategic planning process and having the benefit of external evaluation was absolutely  necessary  for  sound  decision  making.  The  combination  of  having  a  clearer  financial  picture  and  a  strategic plan allows CRM to face our challenges from an informed perspective.     During this year, we also completed a comprehensive forest management plan. As each of our sites has  a varying level of forest resources, CRM needed to know:    A. What was the value and potential use of the forest at each location?  B. What was required for sound stewardship of those resources?  C. What degree of those resources might be utilized to provide revenue for the support of CRM?     The report was extremely professionally presented and thorough. It documented types and number of  trees in computer generated plots at each site. Each of those stands can now be managed according to  what  is  ecologically  required  for  healthy  growth  and  harvested  for  optimal  revenue.  The  final  result  should  be  a  healthier  resource  for  the  next  generation,  with  some  degree  of  revenue  to  support  programs  and  facilities.  However,  the  report  was  clear  in  stating  that  stewardship  would  require  recycling  the  lion’s  share  of  revenue  generated  from  harvesting  back  into  forest  and  property  management. What awaits CRM’s decision (and a recommendation to the trustees) is a plan for how we  intend to harvest and how we intend to use the revenue generated from that effort.  65   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

I have alluded to the significant fiscal decisions confronting this vital ministry, and this report would be  remiss if it failed to elaborate. Specifically, since the unification of the former conferences, three of the  six  sites  have  essentially  ceased  their  summer  camp  programs.  One  has  been  converted  to  a  full‐time  retreat center and, as such, is very successfully rebuilding its outreach. It is a success story on how we  need  sound  and  innovative  decisions  to  meet  a  new  generation’s  needs.  One  facility  holds  summer  camp for a week and a half during the summer and is seeking partnerships with other organizations to  offer Christian hospitality to their camp programs. Another facility is in the process of being evaluated  for sale or lease. Regularly addressing significant challenges and changes is a circumstance and a trend  that cannot be ignored.    Fiscal analysis by Conference staff has revealed a structural deficit in the CRM of the six sites. Sites were  formerly subsidized by their conference in varying degrees, leaving structural deficits embedded in the  current  financial  plan.  CRM,  working  with  Conference  staff,  has  decreased  this  deficit  by  hundreds  of  thousands of dollars. However, the effort has left a skeleton crew of CRM staff to perform the needed  work to support the ministry, and the current staff is hard pressed to build a new and relevant program  were support levels to continue to decrease.    There  is  a  fundamental  challenge  facing  the  UNY  Conference:  We  have  to  utilize  the  facilities  and  resources  owned  by  the  Conference  to  create  a  powerful  and  transformative  movement  to  make  disciples of Christ. That effort requires  programs and facilities that are regularly improved  so they are  relevant, meaningful, and attractive to all ages. It cannot be undertaken utilizing only efficiencies gained  through centralized administration and methods. We must walk the tightrope of honoring traditions of  volunteers  and  participants,  while  building  something  entirely  exciting  and  new.  Today’s  potential  participant in all likelihood comes without previous camping experience and perhaps without a cultural  reference point for such an activity. Participation may come with a degree of trepidation for both the  activity and the providers. When they come, their needs and expectations will be different than those of  previous generations of campers and retreat participants.     CRM  needs  to  harness  this  generation’s  enthusiasm  for  outdoor  activities  and  merge  those  activities  with the message of the Spirit’s liberation. Imagine coming home from a camp or retreat not only having  engaged in rock climbing, mountain biking, kayaking, and horseback riding (to name only a few), but also  to  have  a  deep  and  personal  interaction  with  the  Maker  of  the  environment  you  used  for  those  activities?  More  than  ever,  CRM  has  the  opportunity  to  transform  lives  for  Christ,  and  local  churches  desperately  need  members  who  have  had  those  experiences  and  use  that  inspiration  for  the  work  of  their church in their local community.    When  put  in  the  context  of  today’s  potential  participants  (and  given  our  fiscal  resources)  it  can  be  difficult to see the growth of that vision into some of our existing programs. Despite the well‐meaning  and seemingly tireless work of those involved, a drastic reimagining awaits. The strategic plan is helpful  in that regard, but additional hard choices will need to be made. For example, it may well be that the  Findley Camp & Retreat Center is best suited to host a fitness‐oriented ministry or a recreational vehicle  family  outreach  program.  It  may  be  that  Skye  Farm  Camp  &  Retreat  Center  should  partner  with  the  outdoor  adventure,  horseback  riding,  and  boating  opportunities  adjacent  to  the  property  to  create  a  dynamic  new  attraction  for  young  Christians  and  potential  Christians,  etc.  Each  site  has  the  ability  to  deliver programs that are viscerally attractive to today’s camp and retreat participant. Each of our sites  provides us the property and most structures to create a vibrant new effort for Christ.   

66  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

If we are to reach our potential and avoid the alternative of slow demise, together, we must determine  our course and marshal our resources to support that transformation.    CRM is looking at two scenarios:    1. Developing each site based on its unique strengths and ability to deliver “missionally‐effective,”  sustainable  programs.  This  requires  continued,  or  increased,  Conference  support,  timber  harvesting,  potential  sale  of  properties  (unused  church  buildings  and  perhaps  camp  sites),  bequests,  and  other  donations.  The  sites  must  be  transformed  into  impressive  outdoor  recreational  opportunities  for  youth,  young  adults,  and  adults.  There  must  be  comfortable,  affordable,  and  inspirational  opportunities  for  older  adults,  too.  Careful  stewardship  of  resources, as well as development and marketing of these programs and facilities will allow the  UNY  Conference  to  lead  the  way  in  linking  a  new  generation  of  people  to  a  more  regular  and  meaningful relationship to their local church and, more importantly, their Lord.    2. Alternatively,  if  support  decreases,  we  run  the  risk  of  registrations  steadily  declining,  a  diminishing cadre of volunteers, and facility decline. The relationship between existing programs  and potential participants becomes increasingly attenuated. Secular attractive opportunities and  obligations  may  siphon  off  traditional  participants.  Declining  enrollment  in  our  churches  and  declining  population  in  the  areas  surrounding  our  current  sites  may  lead  to  declining  participation and a decreasing ability of the UNY Conference to subsidize the administration and  marketing of existing programs.  Ultimately, lack of support leads to a level of participation that  creates a financial condition that is unrecoverable.     Either scenario will have a dramatic – perhaps life‐altering – impact on the Conference as a whole. While  events to date would suggest that, despite best efforts, we may be pointed toward the latter scenario,  we have the structure, the information, and the faith to create the former. This report could provide a  compendium  of  accomplishments,  focus  on  praising  our  success,  and  inspiring  general  support,  but  instead,  it  is  this  seminal  decision  that  most  demands  your  awareness.  I  could  describe  the  many  wonderful  programs  and  ways  in  which  we  engage  participants  at  present,  but  the  fact  remains  that  awe‐inspiring as they are, in total the camp and retreat centers are no longer, and perhaps never were,  financially self‐sustaining under our current approach.     The  question,  my  friends,  is  what  will  we  decide  to  do?  It  is  heart‐wrenching  to  learn  that  what  you  came to love and value as a child, the path that may well have led you personally to Christ, no longer  attracts people in sufficient numbers to remain financially viable. It hurts to recognize that prior support  from  smaller  conferences  cannot  be  carried  over  to  the  new,  larger  administrative  structure  and  that  collectively,  we  cannot  do  what  we  were  once  able  to  do  individually.  Perhaps  most  disturbing  is  the  realization that having discerned the level of financial deficit and responded with dramatic reductions in  spending, it is not enough to support what has always been. Simply put, we believe that our collective  resources must be marshalled to support a new and different undertaking that is operated more leanly  and that provides experiences that are attuned to today’s population. Only then can we build a bridge  between their current existence and the love that awaits them.     In the coming year, CRM will review the entire strategic plan, assess the strengths and potential of each  site,  and  recommend  new,  timely,  and  relevant  programs.  I  ask  for  your  prayerful,  intellectually  directed,  creatively‐inspired  help  in  designing  the  future  of  Camp  and  Retreat  Ministries  in  the  Upper  New  York  Conference.  Thousands  of  souls  that  will  either  know  Christ  or  live  their  lives  without  67   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5 

knowledge of His grace, hinge on the result. I believe that we must listen for His voice and then be His  hands.    Yours in Christ,     David A. Little, Chair 

68  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Communications Report    The  past  year  has  seen  continued  improvement  in  the  way  we  share  our  story  in  Upper  New  York.  Leading  up  to  the  Annual  Conference  session  in  2015,  several  new  and  revamped  communications  channels  were  launched,  including  the  new  Conference  website,  the  Bridge  bi‐monthly  bulletin  insert,  and  a  new  incarnation  of  the  Advocate  as  a  ministry  magazine.  These  new  communications  channels,  along with some strategic planning and decision‐making, greatly increased our capacity to tell the story.   One key decision made was to replace a full‐time writer/editor position with two part‐time positions of  writer/editor and a video specialist. The video specialist position enabled video ministry in Upper New  York to move to an unprecedented level. Videos such as the story of Buffalo’s Seneca Street UMC have  been  used  throughout  the  Conference  to  tell  the  story  of  the  United  Methodist  connection.  Furthermore,  strategically  creating  opportunities  for  video  ministry  to  support  and  enhance  other  communications channels has greatly increased the impact and effectiveness of those channels.     The Advocate is a great example of how video ministry can be used to enhance another communication  channel. With the revamp of the Advocate, the audience that it targets has also changed. Rather than  being a tool for people “in the know” to stay informed, the new audience is “people in local churches  who want to go deeper into The UMC connection.” This could be first‐time visitors to a church or people  who have been there for a long time, but need to be re‐inspired or excited.     While video and print may not seem like a natural match, they provides two opportunities to pique the  interest  of  individuals  –  first  through  the  print  Advocate  and  then  taking  the  story  to  the  next  level  through  a  video.  This  approach  –  of  the  same  story  being  told  in  different  ways  though  different  mediums – was undertaken many times over the past year.    Of course, those stories were also shared through the Conference website and through other mediums.  The end goal is to let people get the story in the way they want to absorb it, not the way we want them  to.     Over the past year, some initial bugs that persisted following the launch of the new website have been  fixed,  and  the  website  has  grown  both  as  a  means  of  sharing  our  story  –  as  shared  above  –  and  as  a  ready source of tools and resources for local churches.     One  of  the  most  useful  resources  on  the  website  is  the  Ministry  Shares  Toolbox.  Accessible  from  the  front  page  of  the  website,  this  area  of  the  website  hosts  a  growing  number  of  resources  for  local  churches that details what Ministry Shares are and why they are important.     While many Conference communications channels were only tweaked over the past year, there was one  that was completely revamped. The Weekly Digest continues to be sent though Constant Contact, but  the  layout  has  changed  significantly  in  terms  of  better  readability,  and  the  look  has  been  adjusted  to  reflect the Conference website.     The Conference also did a soft launch of a new logo over the past year to come in line with the branding  standards set by the General Church. This change is slowly being reflected in all Conference media.     One more change comes to the Conference Journal itself, in which you are reading this report. To avoid  double‐printing reports and information, the former Pre‐Conference Workbook has been renamed Vol. 1  69   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14 

of the  Journal.  This  is  not  only  a  change  in  name,  it  also  means  that  reports  and  other  information  published in Vol. 1 of the Journal that do not change during the Annual Conference session will not be  reprinted in Vol. 2, which will be published later in the year. Individuals will have the option of getting  Vol. 2 as a standalone addendum to Vol. 1 they used for the Annual Conference session, or getting Vol. 1  and  Vol.  2  of  the  Journal  as  a  package  once  Vol.  2  has  been  completed.  This  change  will  yield  cost  savings as well as require less printed resources.     Overall, it has been a good year for telling our story in Upper New York. The communications channels  and tools are all starting to fall into place and information is flowing nicely. The coming year is likely to  see more tweaks, and there will be a renewed focus on using social media to promote conversation and  dialog amongst the people of Upper New York. The future is bright!     Submitted  by  the  Rev.  Phillip  Phaneuf,  Chair  of  the  Communications  Commission,  and  Stephen  J.  Hustedt, Conference Director of Communications   

70  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 3  2  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26 

CORR – Conference Commission on Race and Religion     The Conference Commission on Religion & Race (CCORR) has many responsibilities stated in The Book of  Discipline, including “supporting and providing programs of education in areas of cultural competency,  racial  justice,  and  reconciliation  at  every  level  of  the  Conference.”  (¶643,  3  i).  Therefore,  CCORR  continues  its  relationship  with  the  Rev.  Eric  Law,  Executive  Director  at  the  Kaleidoscope  Institute,  for  “competent leadership in  a diverse, changing world.” Through phone consultations with Rev. Law and  his  staff,  we  strive  to  finalize  ways  of  continuing  the  journey  of  anti‐racism  and  inclusion  awareness  training within our Conference. Our goal is continued learning for our leaders and eventually members  of all local churches. Valued books by Rev. Law will be available at Cokesbury’s book sale. Please check  out the Kaleidoscope Institute web page at www.kscopeinstitute.org.   CCORR  was  pleased  to  be  represented  by  two  of  its  members  at  the  Black  Methodists  for  Church  Renewal  (BMCR)  Conference  2015.  The  Holy  Spirit  and  a  strong  sense  of  community  blessed  all  those  who attended. The work of BMCR includes sharing diversity interests, challenges, and solutions for The  United Methodist Church.     Finally,  CCORR  coordinated  the  monitoring  and  reporting  of  diversity  in  the  Annual  Conference  2015  conversations. This year, we are requesting diversity statistics in advance for those attending the 2016  Annual Conference session so that we may give a clearer picture of ratios for majority/minority speakers  at microphones.    CCORR members are: Blenda Smith, Convener of CCORR, Sandra Allen, Julius and Anola Archibald,  Desiree Chaires, the Rev. David Heise, Barbara Heise, Linda Hughes, Mildred Mason, Shirley Readdean,  and the Rev. Evelyn Woodring.   

71  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45 

Commission on the Status and Role of Women (COSROW)    Jesus  said,  “Whatever  you  do  to  one  of  these,  you  have  done  to  me.”  These  words  remind  us  that  although the mandate of the Commission on the Status and Role of Women (COSROW) is to “educate,  advocate, and monitor for the full participation of women in the life of the Church,” it is neither possible  nor  desirable  to  separate  women,  or  anyone,  from  their  life  in  the  workplace.  The  policies,  attitudes,  and practices of the workplace are very much the business of the Church. It matters to God how women  are thought of or given no thought, addressed or dismissed, listened to or ignored, fairly compensated  or cheated, respected or infantilized, given opportunities or passed over, believed or doubted, or have  their autonomy recognized or challenged. If it matters to God, it should matter to us.    In addition  to monitoring at the Annual Conference session, COSROW’s thrust this past year has been  designing  and  planning  a  Conference‐wide  education  event,  with  the  working  title,  “Strategies  for  Recognizing and Countering Sexism in the Workplace.” Several notices placed in “The Voice” requested  that  people  contact  us  if  they  were  considering  attending.  To  our  disappointment,  there  were  no  responses. As a result, we decided that it might be too great an expectation to assume that busy people  would be eager to travel and give up a day. We agreed, instead, to give input through occasional short  pieces in “The Voice.”    As we look to the work of 2016, we are concerned about reports that General Conference is proposing  that  COSROW  be  joined  with  the  Commission  on  Religion  and  Race  to  form  a  new  Committee  on  Inclusiveness. Our concern is two‐fold:     1. Women make up the majority of the Church and, in this Conference, have been represented in  both the superintendency and the episcopacy. On the other hand, racial and ethnic minorities,  especially  in  the  Upper  New  York  Conference,  make  up  a  minority  and  have  not  been  well  represented in the superintendency and episcopacy. Thus, issues of gender inclusiveness might  well be eclipsed by those of racial and ethnic minorities.    2. Our second concern is that both COSROW and CCORR are commissions, mandated by “The Book  of  Discipline,”  not  committees.  The  proposed  new  entity  is  for  a  committee,  a  definite  downgrade.    We  live  amid  a  culture  where  it  is  necessary  to  remind  people  that  women’s  rights  are  human  rights;  that women, equally with men, are created in the image of God; that a woman’s place is wherever God’s  Holy  Spirit  calls  her  to  be;  that  the  most  basic  fundamental  human  right  is  the  right  over  one’s  own  body; and that God expects women, equally with men, to use their God‐given talents to better human  life. Now, more than ever, COSROW is needed.    I  would  like  to  express  my  appreciation  for  the  time  and  dedication  of  the  members  of  COSROW.  Together we are so much more than any of us is alone.    In Christ’s Service,  Rev. Judith Johnson‐Siebold, Ph.D., Chair  Tom Blake, Rev. Carl Chamberlain, Ellen Koch, Mary Jane Russell, Rev. Deborah O’Connor‐Slater     

72  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35 

Disaster Response    VISION: To be the heart, ears, eyes, hands, and feet of Christ evident to those in need at time of crisis.    In 2015, our Conference experienced new, along with continuing, disasters to our communities. There  had  been  ongoing  disaster  relief  to  the  July  2014  Yates  County  flood  and  the  July  2013  Oneida,  Herkimer, Fort Plain, New York flood as we began the year. Then came June and July of 2015, when we  had two additional disasters to respond to.    The  Yates  County  flood  disaster  recovery  project  has  been  completed  through  the  efforts  of  many  people,  both  paid  and  volunteers.  Financially,  the  Conference  and  UMCOR  participated  in  bringing  people’s lives back to normal. With more than 220 households reached and more than 4,000 volunteer  hours given, that community was helped.     Currently,  the  Oneida,  Herkimer,  Fort  Plain,  New  York  recovery  is  still  in  progress,  with  the  hopes  of  completing the work by June 2016.    In June 2015, the Southern Finger Lakes area of Upper New York was struck with a flash flood. The Rev.  Mike Kelly at the Newfield UMC came forward to help that community recover. With the assistance of  an  UMCOR  grant  of  $10,000,  14  families  were  assisted  in  putting  their  lives  back  together  after  the  flood.    In  July  2015,  there  was  a  flood  in  Chautauqua  County.  We  were  fortunate  to  have  the  Rev.  Matthew  Golibersuch of the Westfield UMC give permission to use the church as a staging area and the Rev. Molly  Golando step up to assist in the immediate response to this flood. Currently, this disaster is close to the  end of the response, with many volunteer’s help and assistance.    We  are  in  the  process  of  putting  together  response  teams  from  each  district.  They  will  be  trained  to  interact  with  the  local  churches  and  communities  along  with  the  Conference.  There  is  an  UMCOR  training coming out in spring 2016 that will help local churches to prepare for disasters. Once we have  this in hand, we will set up training for the churches.     The Rev. Joseph H. Auslander  Conference Disaster Response Coordinator  Upper New York Conference of The United Methodist Church   

73  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35 

Episcopacy Committee      The  Conference  Committee  on  Episcopacy  (COE)  over  the  course  of  this  Conference  year  has  worked  with  the  Episcopacy  Residence  Committee  to  ensure  the  upkeep  of  the  episcopal  residence.  We  have  met  with  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  and  we  have  worked  to  support  his  ministry  in  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  and  his  commitments  in  the  General  Church.  We  have  continued  to  perfect  the  new  evaluation  process  the  Northeastern  Jurisdiction  Committee  on  Episcopacy (NEJ COE) has required all conferences in the NEJ to use as a tool to evaluate the ministry of  its  assigned  bishop.  The  committee  has  worked  with  Bishop  Webb,  the  NEJ  COE,  and  our  Communications  Department  to  help  make  the  process  as  effective  as  possible.  We  are  still  making  changes as we live into this new process to help perfect it in a way that it will be as useful as possible to  Bishop Webb, the COE, and the NEJ COE. We have used this process and a survey of the entire voting  body  of  the  Conference  to  fill  out  the  final  evaluation  that  was  submitted  to  the  NEJ  COE.  This  final  evaluation  helps  the  Jurisdictional  Committee  prepare  for  its  work  at  Jurisdictional  Conference.  This  process  has  involved  receiving  information  from  leadership  across  the  Conference  who  work  directly  with Bishop Webb; it has required the committee to meet quarterly to assess the information we have  received and involves working with the Appointive Cabinet and other bishops to evaluate those areas of  Bishop  Webb’s  ministry  that  only  they  would  be  able  to  speak  to.  Throughout  the  year,  we  have  also  helped to show hospitality and care to Bishop Webb and his family on behalf of our Conference.      In the year to come, we plan to support Bishop Webb and his continued ministry in the Upper New York  Conference,  the  General  Church,  and  fulfill  our  responsibilities  as  explained  in  the  2012  Book  of  Discipline.  We  will  continue  to  work  with  the  NEJ  COE  evaluation  process  and  continue  to  work  to  perfect  the  process  in  consultation  with  the  NEJ  COE.  We  ask  that  you  would  join  us  in  holding  our  Bishop,  Mark  Webb,  and  his  family  in  prayer  throughout  the  coming  Conference  year,  as  we  join  in  ministry together.    Respectfully Submitted by,  The Rev. Rebecca L. Laird, Chair, Upper New York Episcopacy Committee    Members of UNY Committee on Episcopacy: Peter Abdella, Katie Allen, Rev. Alan Delamater, Rev. Bill  Gottschalk‐Fielding (NEJ COE member), Stephanie Henry (NEJ COE member), Scott Johnson (Conference  Lay Leader), Rev. Rebecca Laird, Rev. Sung Ho Lee, Joyce Miller, David Morales, Paul Patinka, and Blenda  Smith.     

74  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Finance and Administration, Council on  First, I would like to offer a sincere and gracious “thank you” to all the members of the Upper New York  Conference  Council  on  Finance  &  Administration  (CF&A)  for  their  service  and  ministry,  and  to  Conference Treasurer Kevin Domanico and the Conference Financial staff for their continued excellent  work for the Upper New York Conference.     Over  the  past  year,  CF&A  has  embraced  a  broader  role  beyond  that  of  developing  fiscally  responsible  financial  policies  for  the  Ministry  Shares  budget  and  other  finances  of  the  Conference  to  include  developing  new  ways  to  tell  the  story  behind  Ministry  Shares  and  living  into  CF&A’s  vision  of  building  stronger collaborative relationships with other leadership teams of the Conference.    We continue to break down silos, as opportunities to work together are identified that strengthen the  connections that bind us into one body in Christ. Part of this work has begun through sub‐teams, whose  members work closely with the Conference Board of Trustees, the FACT Team, Human  Resources and  Benefits, Communications, Operations, Camp and Retreat Ministries, Leadership Team, Executive Staff,  and Cabinet to coordinate efforts across the Conference.    We  have  been  steadily  improving  our  financial  reporting  tools  to  aid  in  monitoring  receipts  and  disbursements of Ministry Share funds on a monthly basis. This allows for real‐time assessment of how  adequately our ministries are being funded.       CF&A, in appreciation of your efforts, conveys blessings and “well done” to all churches that faithfully  participated in our connectional ministry through 100 percent payment of their Ministry Shares. CF&A  also conveys blessings and sincere appreciation to the many churches that had to make difficult financial  decisions over the past year and supported their Ministry Shares to the best of their ability. Thanks be to  God for all you have done.    Report on 2015 Ministry Shares  Our total 2015 Ministry Shares request was $10,340,438. Approximately 67 percent of our churches paid  their Ministry Shares in full. That’s 602 churches out of 896. While we are extremely thankful, we are  aware  there  is  more  stewardship  work  to  be  done  across  the  connection.  Nearly  178  of  our  churches  paid  little  or  no  Ministry  Shares  for  2015.  The  total  Ministry  Shares  received  for  2015  amounted  to  $7,872,681.  The  Conference  was  only  able  to  pay  65  percent  of  its  General  Church  apportionments.  Unfortunately,  this  meant  that  after  fixed  costs  and  General  Church  Apportionments,  many  ministries  had to limit their work and spending to 44 percent of the funds approved in their 2015 budget lines.    We understand that sometimes circumstances prevent 100 percent participation. We also believe that  lack of clear understanding of what is funded by your Ministry Shares may lead to less than 100 percent  participation.  We  firmly  believe  that  when  the  people  of  God  see  and  understand  the  needs  they  respond.     Our goal is to provide transparency and clarity of what your Ministry Shares support. In turn, we hope  this  will  illuminate  the  importance  of  your  Ministry  Shares  and  how  they  allow  us  all  to  live  out  our  purpose as United Methodist Christians. CF&A and Conference staff recently expanded our efforts at the  district  level  to  assist  local  church  congregations  to  address  financial  stewardship  with  assessment,  training, and support. We will work with congregations to develop ministry plans to allow our churches  to pay 100 percent of their Ministry Shares.  75   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26 

2017 Ministry Shares Budget  CF&A  has  worked  hard  to  be  good  stewards  of  the  financial  resources  of  the  Upper  New  York  Conference.  Many  hours  of  prayerful  consideration  and  collaborative  cost‐controlling  efforts  with  Conference ministry teams and Conference staff have resulted in a proposed 2017 Conference Ministry  Shares budget of $10,078,432. This represents a decrease from the 2016 budget of $804.    In  an  effort  to  reflect  the  Conference’s  developing  priorities,  the  2017  budget  categorized  funds  into  fixed  costs,  General  Church  apportionments,  variable/discretionary  costs,  and  contingent  costs.  A  spending plan will be developed based on these categories and historical Ministry Share payment levels.     Fixed costs primarily represent operating costs of $5,839,000 or 58 percent of the budget   General Church apportionments were set at approximately 75 percent of what was apportioned  by General Conference, for a total of $1,765,000   Variable/discretionary costs of $1,280,000 would be funded after fixed and GC apportionment  goals were met  Contingent costs represent ministries that are important but generally have less direct impact  on local church ministry. These budgeted costs of $1,203,000 would only be paid after the first  three budget categories are adequately funded.     Spending Plans for 2017 and 2016  Our  actual  expenditures  will  depend  on  the  levels  of  Ministry  Shares  actually  paid  by  our  churches.  Ministry  Share  payments  received  in  2015  were  $7,872,681;  in  2014  they  were  $7,921,437.  As  good  stewards, CF&A is estimating Ministry Share collections for 2016 at $7,800,000.    At this level of receipts, our 2016 budget of $10,079,236 will be limited to spending as follows:    Fixed costs  General Church apportionments  Variable/discretionary  Contingent costs  Total 

27 28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40 

$   5,652,154 1,644,199 503,648                    0  $   7,800,000

100 percent of budget 70 percent of budget 34 percent of budget 0

Ministry Share collection levels for 2017 have been conservatively estimated at $7,800,000. A spending  plan based on this level of collections would have a significant and serious impact on the Conference’s  ability to carry out its mission and purpose. The hope and plan is that our current efforts to work with  congregations  will  bear  fruit  with  Ministry  Share  payments  exceeding  the  $7,800,000  estimate.  Additional collections of between $200,000 and $300,000 in 2017 would allow the Conference to work  close to the minimal levels in 2016 and 2015. These additional collections represent a small part of the  nearly $2,500,000 unpaid Ministry Shares in 2015.    Conference Fiscal Realities  Our challenge continues to be how to bridge the gap between the ministries and activities we agree to  support and provide and our available resources. The following information sheet, titled “The Challenge  in the Upper New York Conference” is provided for your review. The information included describes our  current realities, steps undertaken thus far, and our plans for moving forward. 

76  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32 

The Challenge in  the Upper New  York Conference  Since its formation  in 2010, the Upper  New York  Conference has  struggled to fully  fund its  Connectional  Ministries through  the Ministry Share  giving of its local  churches. Each year,  more than $2 million  is left uncollected,  forcing the  Conference to scale  back ministry plans  and underpay its  commitments to the  General Church and  other ministry  partners. The  Conference continues to explore and implement strategies to address this challenge by reducing  conference spending and increasing local church giving. The graph at right illustrates this challenge:    How has the Conference reduced spending? The Conference has sought to do this in three ways:     1. Staffing:  The  largest  Conference  expenditure  is  for  staffing  (salaries  and  benefits).  Since  2013,  the Conference has reduced staffing by 13 full‐time equivalents – a 17 percent reduction   

33 34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41 

2. Spending  Plan:  The  Conference  has  controlled  expenditures  in  other  areas  by  limiting  or  suspending spending by teams and programs:     Since  2013  the  Conference  Executive  Staff  Team  and  District  Superintendents  have  only  received 1 pay increase. Additionally, there will not be an increase in 2017.   Ministry Share allocations to Camp & Retreat Ministries were reduced by $75,000 for 2016  and will be reduced by $86,000 in 2017 through the realignment of summer camp programs 

77  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20 

and reducing staff at multiple sites. Actual spending by Camp & Retreat Ministries decreased  by $130,000 in 2015.   Conference  team  spending  has  been  capped  at  approximately  35‐40  percent  of  budgeted  amounts since 2013.   Equitable Compensation grants to assist struggling churches to meet minimum clergy salary  requirements have decreased since 2013, from $425,000 to $225,000 in 2016.   Spending in 2016 will be reduced by $448,000 by suspending funding to Conference support  of  campus  ministries,  ministry  oversight  team  grants  and  the  New  York  State  Council  of  Churches. New ways to continue these ministries are being explored.    Utilizing  the  new  District  Leadership  Team  structure,  district  grants  in  the  amount  of  $10,000 per district are now being used to support ministry at the local church level.   General Church Apportionment payment levels are set annually to reflect expected Ministry  Share collection levels. Payments were set at 70 percent for 2016 and 65 percent for 2015  resulting in reduced payments of apportioned amounts by $582,000 in 2016 and $676,000  in 2015. That has resulted in the Upper New York Conference not meeting its commitment  to the General Church.     3. Ministry Share Budget: The Conference Ministry Share budget has also decreased by $639,970  or 6 percent since 2013:    Year  2013  2014  2015  2016  2017, proposed 

21 22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

Ministry Share Budget  $10,718,402  10,323,781  10,340,348  10,079,236  10,078,432 

$ difference from previous year    ‐$394,621  +16,567  ‐261,112  ‐804 

% change    ‐3.68%  0.16%  ‐2.53%  0% 

Why are we buying and renovating a Conference Center when we can’t afford to fund the ministries  we agreed to support?  The  funds  that  are  being  used  to  buy  and  renovate  the  new  Conference  Center  in  Liverpool  are  designated funds resulting from the sale of buildings from Upper New York’s predecessor Conferences.  These  funds  cannot  be  used  towards  the  Ministry  Shares  budget,  and  over  time  this  new  Conference  Center will realize a cost‐savings for the Conference versus the other options explored.    What does the revenue picture look like? Since 2010, the Conference has received between 76 percent  and 78 percent of the Ministry Shares apportioned to local churches. Below are the results for 2015:    Ministry Share  Ask  $5,869,670 

Paid

Balance Due 

100% Paid or More 

# of  Churches  602 

$5,906,160

($36,490)

Paid 99% to 50% 

116

$2,111,736

$1,454,139

$657,597

Paid 49% to 25% 

68

$1,120,488

$399,024

$721,464

Paid 24% to 1%  Did Not Make a  Payment  Totals 

59

$750,216

$113,359

$636,857

51

$488,328

$488,328

896

$10,340,438

$7,872,681

$2,467,757

% Ministry Shares Paid 

78   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39 

What is being done to increase local church giving?   District Superintendents have undertaken group and one‐on‐one meetings with church leaders to  explore  ways  to  support  and  advise  congregations  to  promote,  sustain,  and  improve  Ministry  Share giving.   CF&A, Board of Pensions, and Trustee Teams have directed special attention to understand and  develop strategies to improve the financial health of our churches.   The  Ministry  Shares  Toolbox,  available  at  www.unyumc.org/resources/ministry‐shares‐toolbox,  continues to be improved and expanded to help local churches share the story of ministry done  though connectional giving.   Every congregation not paying 100 percent of its ministry share will develop a one‐ to three‐year  plan to pay 100 percent.   Conference staff are available to assist churches in their understanding and questions that may  arise.   Efforts  are  being  made  toward  better  use  of  our  statistical  information  to  understand  how  churches are prioritizing their financial resources.    What can local churches do to restore ministry funding?  The  most  important  initiative  churches  can  undertake  is  to  fulfill  100  percent  of  their  Ministry  Share  benevolence. The ministries reduced or cut in the spending plan are still in the budget.  The funds are  just not there to support them. If your church can even make a modest percent increase, it makes a real  difference when combined with other churches doing the same.     If those churches that paid less than 100 percent in 2015 can improve their giving by a minimum  of 10 percent this year, which would yield a minimum of $505,897 in additional dollars.   If those churches that faithfully gave 100 percent can increase their giving between 3‐10 percent,  which would yield between $152,000 and $506,389 in additional dollars.    In closing   The  ministry  of  CF&A  across  the  Conference  is  to  faithfully  and  prayerfully  strengthen  our  financial  resources  through  fervent  prayer,  good  policy,  and  faithful  stewardship  practices  to  provide  for  the  financial support of our ministries here in the Upper New York Conference and around the world. These  ministry opportunities are the future of our church locally and at large. Our work will not be easy, but  we do not labor alone. We are connected as United Methodists and as Christians. Together, we seek to  discern the word of hope God speaks to us as Christ’s Church and God’s beloved children. May we all be  strengthened in the knowledge that the Lord will provide.     Yours in Christ’s service,  Rev. Lawrence G. Lake, President  Council on Finance and Administration   

79  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Hispanic/Latino Committee  

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44 

The Upper New York Conference Hispanic/Latino Committee has been working hard to keep the mandate of  making disciples for Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. The Hispanic/Latino Committee consists  of several pastors and laity of the Conference. We also work closely with the Episcopal office, director of New  Faith Communities, director of Vital Congregations, and the director of Connectional Ministries to plant vital  Hispanic/Latino  churches  in  the  Conference.  We  are  aligned  with  the  General  Commission  on  Religion  and  Race in keeping with the mandate to continue to stand for racial justice in our Church.     We  stand  in  solidarity  with  the  racial/ethnic  groups  who  face  inequalities  and  injustices  in  the  Church  and  throughout the world. We have been challenged by our Upper New York Area Resident Bishop Mark J. Webb  to  make  disciples  wherever  we  are.  We  want  to  celebrate  the  work  that  has  been  accomplished  by  the  committee  during  2015.  The  committee  representing  the  Conference  met  and  continued  working  and  planning towards meeting the goals as described in our strategic plan.     We have worked on and completed:    The positions of the New Hispanic Faith Community coordinators were named and appointed: The  Rev. Carlos M. Rosa‐Laguer (Rochester: Emmanuel) and Jose L. Rodriguez (Casa de Dios, Syracuse).   Training for new planters is under way this year.   Two faith communities have been started: one in Buffalo and one in Utica.   Evangelistic and holistic trainings are been offered and well‐attended.   Four pastors have been trained as coaches for new faith community church planter.   Once a month, workshops are conducted for planters and future planters.   Once a month meetings are held for accountability.   Outreach/fed/supplied Thanksgiving dinners to 40 Mexican families who are farm workers in Batavia.  South Park UMC in Buffalo (Pastor Evelyn Woodring) and a New Faith Community plant (Pastor Luis  Rivera) are working together with a fresh vision to reach the unchurched.   Two other cities are opening new faith communities.   In addition, the Hispanic faith community at Rochester: Aldersgate (Pastor Hector Rivera) and  Rochester: Aldersgate United Methodist Church (the Rev. Anne O’Connor) continues to work closely  and successfully together as one church in reaching their neighbors and making disciples.      We  have  planned  for  2016  and  carried  out  evangelistic  and  holistic  training  events  for  the  Hispanic/Latino  churches  during  2015.  We  have  plans  to  initiate  the  opening  of  at  least  two  new  faith  communities  in  Amsterdam and Dunkirk, targeting the Hispanic/Latino population. We are determined to continue planting  churches and targeting the highest growing ethnic group in the United States. We need, as a Conference, to  take seriously the mission and vision of The Church to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of  the world, and these disciples include members of the Hispanic/Latino cultural groups. As a Conference, we  need to understand that we are “better together.”    Clergy members: Pastor Mariana Rodriguez, Pastor Jose Rodriguez, Rev. Carlos Rosa‐Laguer, Pastor Hector  Rivera, Pastor Jose Cotto, Pastor Giovanna Cotto, Pastor Olga Gonzalez‐Santiago, Pastor Geraldine Rapino,  Laity members: Ben Matta, Juanita Matta, Carmen Lanzot, Andres Gonzalez, David Rodriguez, Marta Roas,  Maria S. Rivera. 

45 46  47 

Many blessings,  Rev. Dr. Alberto Lanzot  For Peace and Justice  

80  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45 

Lay Servant Ministries    Lay Servant Ministries (LSM) is the laity‐led and Discipline‐supported lay ministry program of The United  Methodist  Church.  It  offers  all  laity  the  opportunity  to  search  out,  discern,  and  further  their  personal  understanding as well as grow through educational courses on specific topics of interest that ultimately  help lead laity into deeper and stronger service within their called ministry.    The LSM program is designed to raise up, support, educate, and inspire laity of The United Methodist  Church to discern their specific ministry gifts of leading, teaching, caring, and communicating.    The Conference LSM director and all 12 district directors/co‐director teams are dedicated to serving the  laity members of the Upper New York Conference as they go out in ministry across our Conference and  throughout the world. Each and every lay member is valued, and their ministries are vital to the mission  of Jesus Christ. Our hope is to enable all lay people to use their gifts in service.    As we have moved forward into 2016, we are pleased to share with you that we have more than 852  active lay servants throughout the Conference. They are laity leaders who have chosen to intentionally  take  courses  that  further  their  own  spiritual  growth,  while  building  personal  skills  in  the  caring  and  leading  ministries,  so  they  more  effectively  further  the  work  of  the  Church  and  God’s  mission  in  their  communities and around the world.    We are also pleased to share that there has been a noted increase in the understanding of the process  and  requirements  for  being  a  certified  lay  servant,  along  with  the  specifics  regarding  the  extra  entitlement  of  lay  speaker.  In  fact,  for  the  2016  year,  the  Conference  LSM  team  was  able  to  “affirm”  nine new certified lay servant‐lay speakers of the Upper New York Conference: Darlene Suto, Judith M.  Davis,  Jill  C.  Erhardt,  Shirley  M.  Jay,  David  Wadd,  Marcial  Reyes,  and  Alden  “Audie”  Miller  from  the  Albany  District,  Susan  Hardy  from  the  Cornerstone  District,  and  Della  Ludwig  from  the  Finger  Lakes  District. We know there are others currently in the process of completing the requirements, and we look  forward to affirming more servants called to that specific branch of ministry in the coming year. The laity  of  our  Conference  continue  to  inspire  me.  Your  commitment  to  Christ‐like  service  is  palpable  and  refreshing.    As  we  all  continue  to  grow  together  within  the  lay  servant  ministries,  do  not  hesitate  to  contact  your  district LSM directors, their teams, your district superintendent, or me, your Conference Director of Lay  Servant  Ministries,  with  questions,  concerns,  ideas,  and  assistance.  It  is  will  take  all  of  us  to  move  forward and make a difference in Jesus’ name.    I am honored to serve with each and every one of you as we all answer our individual calls of service and  ministry.    Blessings always: Carmen FS Vianese, UNY Conference Director of Lay Servant Ministries  vianese4@frontiernet.net or 585‐468‐5935     “Therefore, since it is by God’s mercy that we are engaged in this ministry, we shall not lose heart!!”   (2 Corinthians 4:1) 

81  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38 

Mission Oversight Team, Reaching Our Neighbors (RONMOT)    The  Reaching  Our  Neighbors  Mission  Oversight  Team  has  six  active  members:  Chair  Susan  G.  Hardy,  Secretary Phyllis Doane, and the Rev. Sara Baron, the Rev. Robert Sherburne, the Rev. Thomas Fassett,  and Jan Witter.    This  team’s  role  is  to  align  Conference  resources  with  ministries  designed  to  work  with  neighbors  in  poverty.  Poverty  is  viewed  in  diverse  ways,  such  as  financial  constraints,  prejudices,  isolation,  food  scarcity,  etc.  RONMOT  is  also  designed  to  coordinate  with  Mission  Action  Teams,  such  as  Global  Ministries,  Disaster  Response,  Volunteers‐in‐Mission,  and  Social  Holiness.  These  connections  support  the  mission  and  purpose  of  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  in  two  ways:  Funded  ministries  exercise  active discipleship practices of local church members, and when leadership capacities of both neighbors  being served and those serving their neighbors are increased.    In 2015, RONMOT discovered that more than half of the successful grant applications received between  July  and  August  had  been  written  by  someone  who  attended  a  grant  writing  event  led  by  the  Rev.  Jeffrey Hodge. This suggested that both Rev. Hodge and Conference funds represented resources able to  grow leadership capacities for both clergy and laity. Therefore, RONMOT chose to fund a grant writing  event on Nov. 14, 2015 at the University UMC in Buffalo. That event was attended by 28 persons.    As  an  annual  and  routine  practice,  RONMOT  strives  to  balance  Conference  grant  resources  amongst  both  larger  city  ministries  and  small,  rural  ministries.  From  funding  a  second  summer  mobile  lunch  ministry for Schenectady Inner City Ministry in the Albany District to supporting lay leaders working with  children at the Seneca Street Community Development Corporation in the Niagara Frontier District and  resourcing food pantries, after school programs, thrift stores, pastoral mentoring, backpack projects in  tiny  communities  in  the  Northern  Flow,  Cornerstone,  Crossroads,  Mohawk,  and  Finger  Lakes  Districts,  RONMOT grants represented the open hands of Jesus Christ for our Conference.    At each on‐site evaluation by a RONMOT member, active discipleship practices and leadership shared by  laity  and  clergy  were  witnessed.  Those  who  pack  food  into  backpacks  for  hungry  children,  those  who  supervise homework, those who offer safe places before and after school, those who train community  members  for  leadership  roles,  those  who  write  and  receive  grant  funds,  everyone  ministering  to  neighbors is alive to Christ and the workings of the Holy Spirit.    Blessings and thanks to those who have served this team with their gifts.    Grace and peace be with you always,  Susan G. Hardy   

82  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Ministry Oversight Team, Spiritual Leadership    The Spiritual Leadership Ministry Oversight Team (MOT) met regularly during 2015. Our initial focus was  to review and revise the grant request form that the team had previously used. We sought to provide  greater  clarity  with  regard  to  the  specific  work  of  this  MOT,  the  expectations  of  a  grant  that  would  address this work, and some sense of accountability for those who would be awarded grant monies. In  the  spring,  we  prepared  an  announcement  about  the  grant  request  process  with  deadlines  for  submitting those grants. As we began to discuss the criteria for evaluating the grants, it became clear  that  it  was  likely  some  of  the  grant  requests  would  cross  into  the  arenas  of  the  other  two  MOTs.  We  began a discussion with the conveners of the other two MOTs as to how we might work together as we  began to review and evaluate the requests that we received.       Following  the  deadline  for  the  grant  requests,  we  met  to  review  and  evaluate  those  requests.  We  received five grant requests; two of the grants were awarded funding with the understanding that the  funds would be matched in some way by the requesting organization. Two of the grants were partially  funded and then referred to the other two MOTs since both of them clearly addressed the stated goals  of all three MOTs to some degree. One grant did not address the intent of spiritual leadership, and they  were  referred  to  the  appropriate  MOT.  We  also  spent  considerable  time  determining  accountability  guidelines so we would have a clear understanding of how the funds had been used and some ability to  evaluate the success of the grant.      The team had intended to offer an opportunity to submit grant requests in the fall, but we were unable  to do so due to budget constraints. Since the level of Ministry Shares paid to the Conference was at a  lower  level  than  anticipated,  our  budget  was  reduced.  Given  a  relatively  small  amount  of  money  available, we discussed how we might have the most impact with those funds. It was decided to offer  scholarships  for  Lay  Servant  Ministry  fall  training  programs.  The  scholarships  would  be  for  $100  each  and  intended  for  individuals  participating  in  training  programs  that  required  an  overnight  stay  at  a  retreat center. We provided scholarships to 23 individuals.      We spent time reviewing our purpose as defined by the Conference Leadership Team and continued to  be in conversation about how we might best live into the vision for the Ministry Oversight Teams. We  began to explore how we might best support and nurture the existing Conference Ministry Action Teams  (CMATs) under the auspices of Spiritual Leadership as well as discussing how we might encourage the  formation of new CMATs. One of the areas under consideration was an action team that would focus on  training for districts and local congregations that would be specific to the area of spiritual formation and  leadership development.       As  2015  came  to  a  close,  the  team  was  made  aware  of  the  decision  to  eliminate  Ministry  Oversight  Teams as part of the overall Conference structure.     Submitted by,  Nancy E. Dibelius, Convener  Ann Chatfield (laity)  Barbara Heise (laity)  Pastor Larry Russell (clergy)  Rev. Natalie Scholl (clergy) 

83  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42 

Native American Ministries (CONAM), Committee on    The  Committee  on  Native  American  Ministries  (CONAM)  was  deeply  moved  by  the  Act  of  Repentance  that the Upper New York Conference experienced in May 2015. The Rev. Dr. Thom White Wolf Fassett’s  comprehensive message – warm, funny, poignant, and educational – spoke not only to the hearts of all  CONAM  members,  but  also  to  all  present.  The  Seneca  Hymn  Singers,  Sharon  Schmit’s  story  “Echo,”  joining waters from all across Upper New York into one pool as a symbol of coming together, all were  moving testimonies to the importance of turning in new directions through repentance.    Thanks to Upper New York’s generous giving to Native American Ministries Sunday, CONAM was able to  give  many  grants:  Mohawk  Language  Immersion  weekend;  Native  American  healing  through  the  arts  administered  by  the  Native  American  Cultural  Center;  support  of  the  Ganienkeh  Territorial  School;  sharing language and cultural knowledge at Kanatsiohareke. We also gifted the three Native American  churches  in  Upper  New  York  with  $1,000  each  to  sustain  their  winter  heat  expenses  and  allow  for  gathering in their houses of worship to continue through the cold months. Onondaga Nation continues  its van ministry to transport those in need to doctor appointments and the pharmacy with support from  the county and CONAM.    To  begin  awareness  and  follow  up  of  the  UNY  Resolution  “Ending  the  Observance  of  Columbus  Day,”  CONAM developed a bulletin insert and liturgy for moving away from honoring Christopher Columbus.     A  task  force  of  CONAM,  the  Advocacy  for  Peace  and  Justice  Team,  visited  with  three  Native  communities. At Kanatsiohareke, the team attended the strawberry festival and spoke with Tom Porter,  who expressed appreciation for the CONAM grant. VIM members with Jan and Pete Huston and a team  of 18 people, including three CONAM members, worked to replace an old, narrow entrance ramp with a  wide, sturdy one for the Hogansburg UMC on the St. Regis Reservation. Numerous members visited the  Ganienkeh  Territory;  they  were  treated  to  warm  hospitality,  good  food,  and  a  tour  of  the  new  hydroelectric  facility.  The  community  expressed  appreciation  for  the  Conference  resolution  and  the  CONAM grant.    CONAM was well represented at the Northeastern Jurisdiction Native American Ministries Conference.  The  conference  was  very  interested  to  hear  about  Upper  New  York’s  experience  of  the  Act  of  Repentance service. We led worship the last day, and many wanted copies of that service.    Exciting  developments  around  the  country  include  the  development  of  Native  American  local  pastor  licensing  schools  and  lay  servant  ministry  classes.  We  celebrated  the  United  States  Senate  voting  unanimously  to  confirm  Diane  Humetewa,  Hopi,  to  become  a  judge  for  the  U.S.  District  Court  for  Arizona.     The Committee on Native American  Ministries continues to advocate, teach, and support members of  the Conference in this lifelong journey of building relationships and honoring Native Americans. CONAM    will continue to watch for fruits worthy of repentance. 

84  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

New Faith Communities      God  continues  to  do  amazing  things  among  us  in  our  efforts  to  plant  new  faith  communities  in  the  Upper New York Conference! All across the Conference, people are imagining new ways of reaching new  people  and  experimenting  in  their  own  unique  context.  God’s  Spirit  continues  to  bring  energy  and  growth in all kinds of places.    As of March 1, we had 52 groups of people actively planting and developing new places for new people!  Each of them is reaching  out, connecting with loads of new people, casting their vision for a different  kind  of  church,  inviting  new  people  to  come  and  see  Jesus,  and  helping  anyone  who  will  join  as  they  seek to follow Jesus as a disciple in the world!     In  addition,  we  have  16  other  groups  who  are  working  on  plans  to  launch  a  new  faith  community  sometime in the future. So, many new things are on the horizon!    Our new churches take many shapes and are being planted by a variety of people. The majority of our  NFCs  are  being  planted  by  existing  churches  as  they  add  more  services,  start  new  ministries  in  public  spaces, or create a new worshipping congregation at a second or third site. Others are being planted by  small groups of friends who are working in partnership with other churches.     A  best  practice  for  every  NFC  is  to  choose  a  focused  target  group,  a  demographic  that  is  largely  unreached in their community or a group that aligns with their affinities. Seven of our active new faith  communities  seek  to  reach  Hispanic/Latino  neighbors.  Six  others  are  aimed  at  reaching  people  of  various Asian cultures. Three of our NFCs are connecting specifically with African immigrants. Five are  intentionally multi‐ethnic, trying to match the ethnic diversity of their neighborhood. The good news is  through  the  efforts  of  our  new  faith  communities,  our  Conference  is  becoming  more  diverse  in  every  way!    Of our 52 active NFCs, more than 30 are designed to make disciples (worship, discipleship development,  and service in the world) through small groups and seek to grow by adding new small groups. There are  21 others that are designed to become more traditional churches and are working towards worshipping  in  groups  greater  than  50  in  number.  In  fact,  10  of  them  have  already  grown  to  this  point  and  are  worshipping at 50‐plus. Praise God!    As of March 1, we had collected statistics from all of our new faith communities.     Since we, as a Conference, started the work of planting in earnest more than three years ago, eight new  faith communities – in addition to the 52 that are now active – were started and have since ended their  work.  Some  ended  because  they  tried  a  new  approach  for  a  time  and  found  that  it  was  not  fruitful.  Some stopped because their key visionary had to step away due to health concerns. One came to an end  because  a  gym  they  used  was  no  longer  available,  and  a  primary  target  demographic  was  no  longer  present. None of these endings is seen as a failure in any sense. All of them were learning experiences  for the planters and for the Conference.    As  we  look  to  the  future,  we  anticipate  a  continued  increase  in  energy  and  activity  in  the  area  of  planting.  We  expect  more  and  more  healthy  DNA  churches  to  catch  the  vision  of  planting  additional  sites  in  neighboring  communities.  We  anticipate  that  God  will  continue  to  raise  up  uniquely  gifted  85   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38 

people for starting new missional communities in public spaces. We expect continued expansion of our  planting among Hispanic/Latino people, as the Hispanic  Team continues  to grow their movement. We  are  constantly  on  the  lookout  for  uniquely  gifted  people  to  be  the  next  planters  in  the  communities  where  our  UM  presence  is  weak.  Each  district  now  has  “Leadership  Teams,”  that  are  joining  their  superintendents in imagining what new things God is calling them to do together to reach new people  with the good news of God’s grace in Jesus Christ.     We continue to say as loudly and clearly as we can, “We want everyone to feel freed up to plant a new  faith community in their neighborhoods!” The Conference’s role and commitment is to provide a system  to support each planter as they discern their call, sharpen and cast their vision, gather new people, build  their teams, launch their new churches, and grow their disciple‐making systems.    All of us are working for one thing: transformed lives and neighborhoods as new people come to know,  love and follow Jesus Christ! Will you join the movement?    Submitted by the Rev. David Masland, Director of the Upper New York New Faith Communities   

New Faith Community Teams ‐ 2016‐17  Hispanic/Latino Planting Team:  Jose and Gio Cotto, Alexis and Olga Gonzalez, Rev. Alberto Lanzot, Ben and Juanita Matta, David  Morales, Rev. Geraldine Rapino, Hector Rivera, Jose Rodriguez, Marianna Rodriguez, and Rev. Carlos  Rosa‐Laguer  Coaching Network Team:  Rev. Debbie Earthrowl, Rev. Alan Howe, Rev. Pam Klotzbach, Rev. Alberto Lanzot, Rev. Rebekah Sweet,  and Rev. Chris Wylie  Grant Processing Team:  Laverne Ampadu, Rev. Darryl Barrow, Rev. Peggi Eller, and Dion Marquit  NFC Event Planning Team:   Lynnette Cole, Patrick DuPont, Rev. Debbie Earthrowl, Rev. Nancy Raca, Rev. Jan Rowell, and Alicia  Wood  Planter Retreat Groups Team:  Rev. Rachel Morse, Bianca Podesta, and Rev. Natalie Scholl  Fund‐Raising Team:  Darryl Forsythe, Kevin Domanico  Balcony Team:  Bishop Mark. J. Webb, Rev. Bill Gottshalk‐Fielding, and the Appointive Cabinet  Story‐Telling Team:  Conference Communications Staff 

86  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel, UNY Task Force on    It is time! Kairos is a time when we are called to express our faith by joining in God’s “kingdom activity.”  That  is  the  hope  of  Palestinian  Christians  who  authored  the  “Kairos  Palestine”  document  in  2009,  declaring  “a  moment  of  truth”  when  “a  word  of  faith  and  hope”  must  be  spoken  “from  the  heart  of  Palestinian suffering” and heard by the Church.1 In solidarity with this call, the Task Force on Peace with  Justice  in  Palestine/Israel  follows  its  purpose  to  educate,  advocate,  and  support  efforts  for  peace  and  justice in Palestine/Israel.    Activities/outreach during Annual Conference 2015:  The  fifth  annual  Palestinian  Dinner  (with  a  20‐plus  year  history)  was  attended  by  150  persons  and  featured Jewish Voice for Peace speaker Ariel Gold. She shared her month‐long experience in the West  Bank  with  her  young  children  and  their  experience  of  living  with  and  attending  school  alongside  Palestinians. Gold’s son said a noon‐time Hebrew prayer at the 2015 Annual Conference session.    A workshop showed “Where Should the Birds Fly?,” a documentary by a Palestinian woman from Gaza  about the 2008‐2009 Israeli “Operation Cast Led” that followed the life of a 9‐year‐old Palestinian girl  caught in the conflict. The child’s witness of the killing of many family members and her mourning and  resiliency  in  the  aftermath  were  caught  in  the  filmmaker’s  interviews;  this  is  available  from  the  task  force or online. Attendance was approximately 50‐60 people.    A  special  mission  offering  for  the  children  of  Gaza,  the  “Gaza  Backpack”  program,  sponsored  by  Rebuilding  Alliance,  yielded  $500  and  resulted  in  shared  sponsorship  of  3,888  backpacks  delivered  to  Gazan children.    Two resolutions offered for vote and affirmed by the Conference by written ballot in August 2015:    1. Requesting  the  General  Board  of  Pensions  (GBOPHB)  to  “Divest  from  Caterpillar,  Motorola  Solutions, and Hewlett Packard after years of corporate engagement”  2. Asking  for  “Establishing  a  screen  to  remove  and  avoid  investments  in  illegal  settlements  on  occupied land.”    These were submitted to General Conference for consideration and vote.    Further efforts:   Itineration  of  Alex  Awad,  newly‐retired  UM  missionary,  who  was  a  Palestinian  Baptist  pastor  in  Jerusalem  and  a  dean  at  Bethlehem  Bible  College.  He  and  his  wife,  Brenda,  spoke  at  the  Saratoga  Springs UMC and the surrounding area as well as visited with Conference staff in Syracuse.    The Rev. Gary and Sarah Kubitz from the Binghamton District, Gary Bergh Scholarship recipients, along  with  Elaine  Cichowski,  traveled  to  the  Holy  Land  with  the  InterFaith  Peace  Builders’  Olive  Harvest  delegation in October 2015 and are available as speakers about their “justice‐seeking” trip.    General Conference members the Rev. John Martin and Carmen Vianese traveled with Janet Lahr Lewis,  General Board of Global Ministries Advocacy Coordinator for the Middle East, on a February 2016 Holy  Land Study tour.   

1

Paraphrased summary ‐ Presbyterian resource ‐ Kairos Palestine: a moment of truth (three‐week study plan) ‐ p. 1 

87  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21 

This was at the invitation  of the task force and funded by a Peace with Justice grant, plus Gary Bergh  Scholarship funds.    CCYM  UP!WORD  workshop  participation  as  part  of  Social  Holiness  presenting  peace  with  justice  concerns in Palestine/Israel. Task force members Dianne Roe and Karen Peterson introduced the topic,  showed “Detaining Dreams: Palestinian Children in Israeli Detention,” and led discussion of “What Can  We Do?” in keeping with the “Do Something” theme.    Ongoing  efforts  to  reach  out  to  Conference  members  to  “do  something”  for  Palestinian  justice,  with  ongoing support for the General Church’s call to boycott products of illegal Israeli settlements and the  reminder  to  practice  responsible  Holy  Land  travel  per  the  Book  of  Resolutions.  Networking  continues  with United Methodist Kairos Response (UMKR).    Please visit: Task force (UM‐palestine‐israel‐tf.org)  UMKR (www.kairosresponse.org)    Respectfully submitted,   Linda Bergh, Co‐Chair, UNY Task Force on Peace w/Justice in Palestine/Israel    ANNOUNCEMENT: 2016 Palestinian Dinner post session on Friday, June 3, at Plymouth Congregational    Church, Syracuse. 

88  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Peace with Justice Grants    I’d like to thank all the congregations who took the 2015 Peace with Justice Sunday offering! While our  participation  rate  has  not  increased  significantly,  I  am  confident  that  the  word  is  getting  out  there.  Please  let  me  know  if  you’d  like  me  to  speak  with  your  congregation,  or  if  I  can  help  get  your  church  interested in another way. I hope that we can all see Peace with Justice Sunday as a giving opportunity  in the years to come.     As I hope you are aware, 50 percent of the Peace with Justice offering stays right here in the Upper New  York  Conference  to  support  justice  ministries  and  programs.  This  year,  the  Social  Holiness  Team  approved six Peace with Justice Grants to help fund a wide variety of ministries, including:     Albany United Methodist Society to enhance and expand inner‐city youth programming   Emmaus United Methodist Church to support International Reconciliation Conference   Pastor Dion Marquit to develop a workshop to help congregations understand transgender issues   Task Force on Peace with Justice in Palestine/Israel to send two General Conference delegates to  see the situation firsthand   Aldersgate UMC Hispanic Ministry to support church‐based English as a second language class and  outreach ministry   Faithful  Citizen,  Inc.  to  fund  seven  workshops  across  the  Conference  about  ministry  with  the  marginalized    I hope you will explore the possibilities in your area for a new ministry and apply for a Conference Peace  with Justice Grant. The application can be found on the Conference website or contact me.    It is also my pleasure to remind you of the other Special Sunday offerings and make sure you are aware  of  the  resources  available  to  you  for  free.  Church‐wide  Special  Sundays  with  offerings  enable  United  Methodists like you to offer refuge in times of disaster, promote peace and justice, provide scholarships  and student loans, reach out to the community, teach skills to encourage self‐sufficiency, and share the  love of Jesus Christ with God’s people everywhere. This information is from UMC.org.    Human  Relations  Day (Sunday  before  the  national  observance  of  Dr.  Martin  Luther  King  Jr.’s  birthday)  strengthens  United  Methodist  outreach  to  communities  in  the  United  States  and  Puerto  Rico, encouraging social justice and work with at‐risk youth.  One  Great  Hour  Of  Sharing (fourth  Sunday  in  Lent)  enables  the  United  Methodist  Committee  on  Relief (UMCOR) to reach out through worldwide ministries of food, shelter, health, and peace.  Native American Ministries Sunday (third Sunday of Easter) nurtures mission with Native Americans  and provides scholarships for United Methodist Native American seminarians.   Peace  With  Justice  Sunday (first  Sunday  after  Pentecost)  enables  The  United  Methodist  Church  to  have a voice in advocating for peace and justice through a broad spectrum of global programs.  World Communion Sunday (first Sunday of October) provides scholarships for U.S. racial‐ and ethnic‐ minority students and international students, on both undergraduate and graduate levels.  United  Methodist  Student  Day (last  Sunday  of  November)  furnishes  scholarships  and  loans  for  students attending United Methodist‐related and other accredited colleges and universities.    Working together, we can change the world.  Heather Smith, Peace with Justice Coordinator, peacewithjustice@unyumc.org  89   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26 

Pension & Health Benefits, Board of  This report will highlight the main areas of the work of the Board of Pensions and Health Benefits during  the 2015 year.    Our  board  worked  with  the  Conference  Board  of  Trustees  to  identify  and  consolidate  the  funds  that  have been designated by the donors and the Conference – both present and previous – for support of  health and pension. We continue to work to clarify pooled funds from the former conferences that are  the responsibility of the Board of Pensions & Health Benefits. The board’s authority and responsibility is  stated in The Book of Discipline; our investment policy follows the fiduciary responsibility given in The  Book of Discipline and is modeled on the best practices of conferences across the country.    The  board  followed  up  on  the  2015  Annual  Conference  resolution  on  health  insurance.  A  survey  was  made available to all local church clergy on the Clergy Compensation Report Form, which is to be filled  out annually. The survey results are included below. Of the 628 reports received, 338 made no response  to the survey, and 36 part‐time clergy provided health insurance cost information ranging from $300 to  $8,000 as the church’s contribution to cover the premium.     HealthFlex will allow us to adopt eligibility rules that allow half‐time clergy in the plan. Hypothetically, if  part‐time  clergy  were  enrolled,  the  churches  of  those  clergy  would  be  billed  $1,000  per  month  for  coverage.  As  of  Jan.  1  of  this  year,  we  have  a  deficit  in  payment  by  local  churches  of  2015  health  insurance  premiums  of  $171,600.  This  amount  is  typical  year‐to‐year,  thus  creating  an  arrearage  of  approximately $900,000 since 2010, paid by reserve funds that are decreasing annually. Given that our  full‐time churches are in arrears, it is the conclusion of the board that our Conference and churches –  despite  our  desire  to  do  so  –  cannot  afford  to  increase  the  potential  for  non‐payment  of  benefits  by  changing our eligibility rules.     Full‐Time Pastors Surveyed  

258

Part‐Time Pastors Surveyed 

370

TOTAL 628 No Response 

338

Spouse’s Plan 

79

Other Employer Plan 

7

NYS Exchange  

18

Medicare

14

Medicare + a supplemental plan

50

Medicaid HealthFlex (full time only)   27  28 

 

6 139

(Please note that more than one option could be selected.) 

90  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

The board met with representatives from Wespath, the investment management division of the General  Board of Pension and Health Benefits of The United Methodist Church. Topics included: overview of  accounts, fund specifics, and market observations.    The board also contracted with OneGroup, Inc., an independent benefits consulting group, to research  and  provide  education  and  feedback  to  us  on  health  care  options  for  the  Conference.  They  explored  these  potential  paths:  1)  Bidding  a  plan  similar  to  our  current  offerings  through  a  local  insurer,  2)  continuing  to  insure  through  HealthFlex,  3)  bidding  a  “richer”  benefit  plan  through  a  local  insurer,  4)  inclusion of part‐time clergy, and 5) discontinuing the group health plan to allow clergy to secure their  own coverage.     OneGroup presented its report at the February meeting of the board, and the executive summary can  be found on the benefits web page at www.unyumc.org/about/health‐and‐wellness‐benefits. In brief, it  was stated that, “Given the size of the group and the rates reflected in the stand‐alone option and the  exchange options, we believe the current scenario of using HealthFlex is the most prudent approach, not  only in the immediate term but also in the long‐term as well.” The board subsequently determined to  continue with HealthFlex.     The  board  regularly  handles  the  following  matters,  and  others,  on  behalf  of  the  Upper  New  York  Conference:     Health Insurance – for active members, the Medicare eligible group, and retirees:   rates,  quality  of  service,  and  availability  across  the  Conference,  additional  coverage  such as eye care and dental   Pension – for retirees and eligible family members   CRSP‐CPP, recommend changes to the pre‐82 PSR (Past Service Rate). Funding of the  Pre‐82 Plan, Annual CPP policy and premium.   Review of policies for lay, clergy, and dependents for all aspects related to current and future  benefits   Recommend annual budgets for these ministries of the Conference   Comprehensive Benefit Funding Plan, as required by the General Board of Pensions and Health  Benefits, is reviewed, approved and submitted annually.   Pension service requests    Retirement moves   Provide  board  members  with  orientation  and  training  for  fiduciary  duties  of  the  Conference  board.  These  duties  relate  to  retirement,  welfare,  and  health  plans.  This  includes  periodic  review and updates on new regulations and information.   Review  and  implement  best  practices  for  CBOBHP  workflow  related  to  the  work  of  the  board  and the functions of the benefits’ staff roles and duties.    Finally, let me summarize, the board spends time in discussion of the quality and availability of health  insurance  and  in  making  wise  decisions  related  to  the  long‐term  sustainability  of  pensions  and  health  insurance.     The  most  important  topic  I  need  to  share  with  the  churches  and  pastors  of  the  Conference  is:  The  pastors  and  churches  are  not  funding  health  and  pensions  in  full  –  not  paying  100  percent  for  these  benefits. The consequence of this lack of 100 percent funding means that each year significant funds are  91   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35 

withdrawn from investments designated for providing these future benefits. The Board of Pensions and  Health Benefits carries this responsibility on behalf of the Conference. The Upper New York Conference  – you, me, all the churches, and members – has legal and fiduciary responsibilities to the employees and  clergy: past, present, and future.      We  have  communicated,  educated,  and  studied  the  arrearages  and  non‐payment  from  churches.  We  have worked with the Cabinet to develop arrearage communications in 2015, along with a brochure on  what  is  funded  by  direct  billed  benefits;  these  communications  will  continue  in  2016.  In  2015  alone,  there  was  a  shortfall  of  $95,000  in  pension  payments,  $171,000  in  health  insurance  payments,  and  $58,000 in the local churches’ retiree premium payments.     This board, other Conference leadership, and the Conference must pray and work to solve this annual  financial loss. The shortfall is in both pension and health insurance, with the major loss in lack of funding  by our churches for health insurance provided to employees, clergy, and their dependents.       In  conclusion,  the  board  has  respectfully  submitted  three  recommendations  for  action  by  the  Conference, which can be found elsewhere in this volume of the Journal.     Membership of the Board of Pensions and Health Benefits  Mr. Edward Bartholomew      Mrs. Becky Keating  Rev. Ann Blair          Mrs. Kathy King‐Griswold  Rev. Steve Deckard        Dr. Grace Holmes  Mr. Dennis Hill          Mr. Michael Turner  Rev. John Hill           Mr. Michael Virgil   Ms. Tracy Jackson‐Adams      Rev. Kenneth Wood   Ex‐Officio:   Ms. Vicki Putney, Benefits Officer       Mr. Kevin Domanico, Conference Treasurer       Rev. William Gottschalk‐Fielding, Executive Assistant to the Bishop/DCM      Rev. Nancy Adams, Cabinet Representative       Rev. Lauren Swanson, Equitable Compensation Liaison       Mrs. Debi Marshall, Human Resources Generalist        Mr. Ronald Coleman, General Board Conference Liaison     Respectfully submitted,  Steve Deckard, Chair   

92  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1

Sexual Ethics Committee/Safe Sanctuaries Team   

2 3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34 

Safe Sanctuaries began in 1996, when the General Conference of The United Methodist Church adopted  a resolution aimed at reducing the risk of child sexual abuse in the Church. Today, these efforts include  reducing the risk of all types of abuse and as related to children, youth, and vulnerable adults.     In 2015, it was determined that a name change for the Sexual Ethics Committee was appropriate. The  2011  Safe  Sanctuaries  Resolution  established  the  Sexual  Ethics  Committee  (SEC)  with  three  responsibilities: Sexual Ethics, Safe Sanctuaries, and Crisis Response. Sexual Ethics is now being cared for  by the Board of Ordained Ministries. Crisis Response is now being cared for by the Bishop’s Office. Safe  Sanctuaries is the responsibility that remains with the Sexual Ethics Committee. At the SEC’s November  2015 meeting, it was agreed that Safe Sanctuaries Team (SST) is a more accurate name for this team –  hence, the name has changed.     The focus of the Safe Sanctuaries Team addresses issues of policy‐making, training, and accountability as  related  to  Safe  Sanctuaries.  The  SST  establishes  the  minimum  standards  and  procedures,  provides  training programs, and assists local churches and Conference ministry programs in reducing the risk of  abuse to children, youth, and vulnerable adults. (2011 AC Safe Sanctuaries Resolution)    The definition of vulnerable adults has been reviewed and is now stated as follows: A vulnerable adult is  someone age 18 and above, who due to age, illness, or a mental or physical condition is less able to take  care of himself/herself or less able to protect himself/herself against harm or exploitation, including but  not limited to physical and sexual abuse, neglect by self or other, financial or material exploitation, and  emotional  or  psychological  mistreatment.  Vulnerable  adults  are  also  those  adults  who  work  with  children and youth who can be in a position where accusations of abuse could mistakenly arise or adults  who have been abused either as a child or an adult.    The work done in 2015 that has the greatest impact was the review and revision of “The Minimum  Standards” that were presented in 2011. Some revisions are for clarification. Best practices for including  sex offenders in a church’s ministry have been added. The current mandate from The UMC’s Discipleship  Ministries is that all adults working with children and youth be screened with background checks every  two years. The UNY Conference’s standards now include this. An addition of information related to use  of technology has been added. The “2016 Minimum Standards” are on the Conference website at  www.unyumc.org/images/uploads/SS_Minimum_Standards_03152016.pdf. 

35 36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Efforts have been made to increase visibility and understanding of Safe Sanctuaries in Upper New York.  A  team  member  was  able  to  meet  with  newly  appointed  district  superintendents  and  district  administrative  assistants.  The  team’s  display  at  the  2015  AC  session  was  more  accessible  than  in  the  past and included a banner, door prizes, and resources.    The Safe Sanctuaries Compliance  Reports submitted at Charge Conferences in 2014 were reviewed by  the  team.  It  is  alarming  that  some  churches  still  did  not  have  up‐to‐date  policies  on  file  in  their  respective district offices. (These were due December 2012.)    One  area  where  we  saw  the  need  to  provide  more  resources  was  ministries  with  older  adults.  In  cooperation with Church Mutual, the book Safe Sanctuaries – The Church Responds to Abuse, Neglect,  and  Exploitation  of  Older  Adults  by  Joy  Thornburg  Melton  was  made  available  as  a  door  prize  at  the  93   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

2015 Annual  Conference  session.  Want  to  Know  about  Safe  Sanctuaries  and  Ministries  with  Older  Adults? was researched and developed. “The Minimum Standards” are especially important in reducing  the risks to all of God’s children – no matter their age. Several activities in the Conference’s standardized  Safe Sanctuaries Training have been revised to include information on ministries with older adults.     Resources were made available for situations where a sex offender wishes to participate in a church. A  covenant  between  the  offender  and  the  church  is  imperative.  These  documents  can  be  found  on  the  Conference website at www.unyumc.org/resources/safe‐sanctuaries.    The Conference’s standardized Safe Sanctuaries Training program is a significant part of the SST’s work.  While  the  goal  is  to  have  a  five‐  to  six‐member  training  team  in  each  district  and  four  district‐wide  training opportunities each year, this varies across the districts. Three Training of Trainers opportunities  were available in 2015, and there will be opportunities in 2016 as well.     The Conference was represented at The United Methodist Church’s sexual ethics summit, “Do No Harm  2015: Best Practices for Health, Accountability and Wholeness” by Carol Barnes, the Rev. Robert Kolvik‐ Campbell, the Rev. Cathy Hall‐Stengel, and Glenda Schuessler.     The Safe Sanctuaries Teams initiatives for 2016 include but are not limited to the following:   Increase Safe Sanctuaries visibility in the Conference by updating resources and presence on the  Conference website and communications   Increase the number of districts that have active training teams   Continue to explore online training possibilities   Make available resources on the safe use of social media in ministry   Have representatives attend and have representation at the national Safe Sanctuaries Gathering   Search for a volunteer training coordinator   Inclusion of Safe Sanctuaries Training of Trainers as an advanced lay servants course    Committee  members:  Carol  Barnes  (chair),  Carol  Doucette,  Jack  Keating,  Glenda  Schuessler,  Matthew  Williams,  Charles  Syms  Ex‐officio:  Rev.  William  Gottschalk‐Fielding,  DCOM,  and  Rev.  Janice  McClary  Rowell, Cabinet Representative.   

94  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Social Holiness    Social Holiness is a grouping of seven committees of the Upper New York Conference who meet monthly  to share the work their area is involved in and to support and provide varied insights into the ministries.  These  committees  include  the  Committee  on  Religion  and  Race,  Committee  on  Native  American  Ministries, the New York State Council of Churches, Peace with Justice for Peace in Palestine/Israel, the  United  Methodist  Women’s  Committee  on  Social  Action,  and  representatives  of  the  General  Board  of  Church and Society. Together, we have provided support and varied perspectives to the ministries and  have formed a common foundation from which we can grow. This foundation is not to be taken lightly  or to be assumed to exist. When the new Conference came into existence few of us knew all the other  members. Through the monthly meetings and the shared interests in ministries that are often outside  the walls of our local churches, we have developed what I feel is a more cohesive and positive team that  helps bring the ministries of God through Christ to the people not only within the area of the Upper New  York  Conference,  but  also  throughout  the  world.  We  have  shared  in  the  times  of  joy  and  have  been  supportive in times of struggle and despair.    When  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  was  founded  there  was  a  good  amount  of  excitement  and  energy in the area of what we call “social ministries.” These are ministries that reach out to people who  may or may not be members of United Methodist churches, but whose life conditions may benefit from  the ministries we’ve planned to offer. This was built upon the very words Jesus is quoted to have read  directly after his time in the wilderness and as he started his public ministry when handed a scroll in the  temple. “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because the Lord has anointed me to preach good news to  the  poor.  The  Lord  has  sent  me  to  proclaim  freedom  for  the  prisoners,  and  recovery  of  sight  for  the  blind, to release the oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” (Luke 4: 17‐21). Many feel this  was how he defined his ministry from the beginning. I feel that this needs to be the heart and very soul  of the ministries found under the umbrella of Social Holiness and needs to be the core for our ministries  of the Conference.    In recent years, we have struggled with a decline in the support of the ministries that are not directly  related  to  the  structure  of  the  Conference.  There  has  been  not  only  a  decrease  in  the  Conference  budget  to  certain  areas,  but  also  the  elimination  of  financial  support  for  the  New  York  Council  of  Churches, a striking decrease to the chaplaincies on college campuses, and a decline of financial support  in all the areas that are in the arena of social ministries. In the local church, when the financial support is  in decline, we too often see what has been called a “survival approach to ministry.” This means the local  church  often  will  “circle  the  wagons”  and  focus  only  on  the  ministries  that  are  familiar  and  within  its  own walls. Have we, as a Conference, adopted a survival mentality by drastically reducing our support  for social ministries and eliminating our support for other ministries found in Social Holiness? Have we  considered the difficult questions of the effects this may have? By eliminating our chaplaincies have we  asked,  “Who  will  care  for  our  college  students  and  the  next  generation  of  United  Methodists?”  How  many laity and clergy have benefited because of the ministry of a college chaplain who was there at a  critical time in our lives?     People  who  work  with  local  churches  that  are  struggling  often  encourage  the  members  of  these  struggling churches to look beyond their own walls and to become involved in ministries that will help  change people’s lives in their neighborhood or town. Do we as a Conference plan to live into our mission  statement?  “To  live  the  Gospel  of  Jesus  Christ  and  to  be  God’s  love  with  our  neighbors  in  all  places.”  How can we do this if we curtail or eliminate our financial support for most areas of ministry that are not  95   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40 

found within the Conference structure? If the leadership of the Conference does not model the example  of making disciples for Jesus Christ to change the world in their financial, social, and spiritual decisions,  how are the local churches to follow? We find the spending plan enacted by the Conference Leadership  Team and the Finance leaders to be unacceptable and the unbalanced reductions for spending for 2016  to be counterproductive to the ministries that help change lives and make disciples. The reductions are  from  the  very  ministries  that  may  help  reverse  the  downward  spiral  of  support  while  much  smaller  reductions  to  the  existing  Conference  structure  that  our  local  churches  are  not  fully  supporting  have  been put into place.    The new spending plan for 2016 shows a decrease of 23 percent in the total budget. Within this, there is  a  decrease  of  21  percent  in  the  area  of  administrative  ministries  and  a  decrease  of  20  percent  in  the  area  of  connectional  ministries.  This  compares  to  a  decrease  of  84  percent  in  the  area  labeled  “neighbors.”  Within  neighbors  are  Reaching  Our  Neighbors,  Global  Ministry  Team,  Disaster  Response,  Social Holiness, and Volunteers‐in‐Mission. The decreases in other social ministries include a decrease of  72  percent  for  college  ministries,  a  decrease  of  65  percent  for  Commission  of  Religion  and  Race,  a  decrease of 63 percent in the area of Commission on Status and Role of Women, and 64 percent of the  Committee on Accessibilities. These cuts in our spending plan appear to maintain as much of the status  quo  as  possible  at  the  expense  of  the  ministries  that  help  make  disciples  and  bring  the  good  news  to  people outside our present walls.    In closing, we call upon the leadership of the Conference, the employees of the Conference, and all of  our congregations that comprise the Upper New York Conference to be bold in our faith by living into  the vision for ministry that God has called us to. This Conference was founded on a strong belief shared  by  all  of  the  former  conferences  that  this  area  of  being  present  to  the  lost,  the  least,  and  the  lonely  needs to be a priority for our ministries. Let us not retreat in a sense of survival to supporting primarily  the structure and not the ministries that are out in the communities that comprise our Conference. This  will mean sacrifice and being bold in our support of ministries that will make new disciples. Let us move  into the vision that this Conference was founded upon and restore funding to the ministries that are not  found solely within the structure of the Conference but that reach out to people throughout New York  state and beyond to bring the proclamation and demonstration of the new life God offers all people of  all ages and all stations. In the words of John Wesley:    “Do you not know that God entrusted you with that money (all above what buys necessities for  your  families)  to  feed  the  hungry,  to  clothe  the  naked,  to  help  the  stranger,  the  widow,  the  fatherless;  and,  indeed,  as  far as  it  will  go,  to  relieve  the  wants  of  all  mankind?  How  can  you,  how dare you, defraud the Lord, by applying it to any other purpose?”    Respectfully Submitted,  Rev. Alan D. Kinney  Social Holiness Chair 

41

96  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Trustees, Board of    Your  Upper  New  York  Conference  Board  of  Trustees  works  very  hard  for  the  Conference  and  many  groups within our Conference. It has many responsibilities, from overseeing the buildings we use, own,  or rent to the financial areas we have to balance while we continue to work hard at providing a safe and  clean location for our teams to work in.     The team consists of 12 volunteers who work day after day to watch over many of our churches under  our  care.  We  have  to  make  sure  they  are  maintained  and,  depending  on  the  work  that  is  needed,  oversee its progress. We also cover the insurance for the Conference and make sure it is the policy that  we need to cover all of us.    Conference Center  One of the biggest projects we are working on is the renovations of the Henry Clay building. We have  completed the layout of the building and made sure that it has a very good working environment to help  the teams complete the work we are asking them to do for each of us. It has been a special task and one  that we have had to look at many times to make sure this becomes a center that will be beneficial to all  of us. King + King Architects has been working on the design for us with the Build Out Team, and we are  working on the next phase in the final details. At the time of this report, we are working to secure the  general contractor who will do the actual work on the building. Our hope is to have the building in use  by the end of this year, if possible. We will also make sure this is a building that we all can be proud of,  and the work we do there will benefit the glory of God.    Property  The trustees have a lot of work in this area, upkeep on the buildings, watching over the homes we have  for  the  Bishop  and  our  district  superintendents.  Each  property  has  two  trustees  that  are  assigned  to  watch over it and take care of any legal work that needs to be done. We have found that this work takes  up  most  of  our  time  because  each  building  has  its  own  needs  or  work  to  be  done.  We  are  hoping  to  work with the district committees on location and building to help with each home.     We also have been working on many locations that after the review and recommendation of the Cabinet  are  turned  over  to  the  trustees.  We  are  then  put  to  the  task  of  following  the  recommendation  and  completing  the  work  on  each  building  and  property.  We  have  24  churches,  10  parsonages,  three  cemeteries, and three unimproved land parcels. We have sold 11 properties over the past year.     Insurance  The insurance subcommittee of the trustees has met several times this past year, mainly focusing on the  Church  Mutual  coverage  and  making  sure  that  we  have  the  right  coverage  for  the  churches,  the  Conference,  and  camp  properties.  At  our  meeting  in  January,  representatives  from  Church  Mutual’s  offices  in  Tennessee  and  Wisconsin  met  with  us  to  go  over  safety  issues  and  our  claims  history  since  Church Mutual took over as our insurer in January 2014. Church Mutual is providing our insurance under  a three‐year program.    Financial resources  In the fall of 2015, the trustees voted to create and fill the position of trustee treasurer, an office that is  provided  for  in  The  Book  of  Discipline  (¶2512.2).  The  Rev.  Wendy  Deichmann  was  elected  to  fill  this  position through June 2016. Your trustees are charged with the oversight of a significant amount of both  97   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27 

financial and  property  resources.  This  created  a  pressing  need  for  a  long‐term  plan  for  financial  sustainability for the ministries of the trustees in relationship with the ministries of the Conference. It  includes a continuing stream of discontinued and/or abandoned church properties, a growing number of  district  parsonages,  the  addition  of  a  new  Conference  Center,  and  the  investment  of  dedicated  resources needed to fund certain ministries of the Conference. Previously, the trustees engaged Upper  New York Conference Treasurer Kevin Domanico to function as treasurer of the trustees, a practice that  is also allowed in The Book of Discipline. The trustees continue to work closely with Domanico, and are  grateful to him for the vital assistance he provides to our work.    CCRM   The trustees work with Mike Huber, Conference Director of Camp & Retreat Ministries, and the camp  committee  on  property  and  insurance  issues  for  the  camp  properties.  Two  trustees  are  assigned  to  liaison with the Conference Camp & Retreat Ministries (CCRM) and Huber to provide support on these  ongoing issues.    I would like to thank all the trustees that have been working so hard on all this work and would ask for  not just your prayers for this team, but also to each of you for your help in each area of our work that  you have been so helpful.     If  anyone  has  any  questions,  please  feel  free  to  contact  me  at  richard.barling@yahoo.com,  and  I  will  work to get back to you as soon as I can.    May God bless each of you in the work He has called you to minister to the people all over the world.    Submitted by,  Richard C. Barling, President  Upper New York Conference Board of Trustees   

98  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

United Methodist Men     The Upper New York United Methodist Men (UNYUMM) has undergone significant growth in leadership  this past year. God has blessed us with men that love God and have a passion to serve Him through the  United Methodist Men (UMM) ministry. Since the past annual report as of Jan. 1, 2016, we have added  to our UNYUMM leadership team two at‐large executive board members, two district presidents, three  district vice presidents, and two district prayer advocates!    Additional positions to complete our executive board leadership team as outlined in our UNYUMM by‐ laws  and  constitution  are  filled  at  the  discretion  of  the  president.  This  leadership  of  the  UNYUMM  is  committed  to  reaching  all  parts  of  our  Conference  to  disciple  men  and  women  into  a  personal  relationship  with Jesus Christ through prayer and mission. The  UNYUMM is  “men growing in Christ so  others  will  know  Him.”  To  date,  we  have  eight  district  presidents  and  are  in  immediate  need  of  four  more to be able to provide each UNY district with leadership to oversee UMM’s ministry and mission.  We  serve  a  vast  area  of  New  York  state,  and  we  are  in  need  of  committed  men  with  a  passion  to  spiritually  lead  other  district  men  by  their  words  and  actions.  The  executive  board  is  committed  to  putting our faith in action! We continue to focus on putting God first in all that we do! In the past year  we  have  added  more  spiritual  content  to  our  Conference  website  at  www.unyumm.org.  Our  opening  page features a YouTube video of a personal witness to the saving grace of Jesus Christ as described by  Clayton Jennings. Please take the time to view this nine‐minute video testimony. It is both powerful and  moving  as  he  cries  out  to  God  to  wake  him  up.  And  God  listens!  Special  thanks  to  our  Director  of  Communications Scott Stumpf for his creativity and computer skills in keeping our website updated and  relevant for God’s use. The 2016 scheduled UMM Conference/district/local men’s group events can be  found there. Please take time to visit our site. Witness the revival taking place within the UNYUMM!    “Men growing in Christ, so others will know Him”    The  United  Methodist  Men,  similar  in  organization  to  The  United  Methodist  Church,  is  a  connectional  organization  that  depends  on  relationships  to  grow  and  prosper  spiritually.  The  UNYUMM  receive  no  centralized funds from the General Commission on United Methodist Men (GCUMM). Our budget comes  from  a  share  of  the  local  church  units’  memberships  (charters),  from  a  share  of  the  individual  men’s  memberships  (Every  Man  Shares  –  formerly  evangelism  –  and  Mission  and  Spiritual  life),  and  from  donations. Although stewardship is vital to growing as a disciple, our purpose is not as a fundraising unit,  but  instead  to  lead  men  to  a  personal  relationship  with  Jesus  Christ  through  hands‐on  mission  and  through discipleship. The UNYUMM is dedicated to helping men and women grow spiritually through a  personal  relationship  with  God.  This  is  accomplished  through  strengthening  our  own  Christian  relationships with each other. Here are some examples from the past year:    The Crossroads District UMM partnered with churches in their district to obtain the funding needed to  purchase – with the Disabled American Veterans’ charity – a patient transport vehicle for the Syracuse  Veterans Hospital DAV branch. The 2015 Ford Flex with the United Methodist cross and flame logo and  district name was dedicated at a Veteran’s Day ceremony at the New York State Fairgrounds, officiated  by  Upper  New  York  Area  Resident  Bishop  Mark  J.  Webb,  Crossroads  District  Superintendent  the  Rev.  Nola  Anderson,  and  Fayetteville  UMM  President  –  and  DAV/district  originator  –  Scott  Stumpf.  Several  other UMM board members attended as well. Thanks to all who contributed to this worthy cause!   

99  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

The UNYUMM  have  been  involved  in  hunger  relief  in  many  ways.  Thanks  to  Hunger  Relief  Advocate  Dean Burdick’s leadership, the UNYUMM organized four Society of St. Andrew (SOSA)‐sponsored Potato  Drops, where approximately 180,000 pounds of potatoes were distributed to food banks, pantries, and  church kitchens over four consecutive Saturdays in the fall. We continue to work with the Society of St.  Andrew  to  provide  fresh  produce  to  those  in  need  in  our  communities  and  plan  to  have  four  similar  events this fall. SOSA underwrites the majority of the expenses of the Potato Drops, so please consider a  generous donation to SOSA at (800) 333‐4597 or www.endhunger.org.     The  UNYUMM  annual  gathering  was  Sept.  18‐19,  2015  at  Camp  Hickory  Hill  in  Varysburg.  Thank  you,  Niagara  Frontier  District  UMM  team  (President  Doug  Hendershott,  Vice  President  Ron  Mullen,  and  Prayer Advocate Jim McMoil) for hosting and organizing UMM from across the Conference!    The Mohawk District UMM partnered with their district churches in February for the third annual “Feed  Our  Vets”  district‐wide  food  collection  that  benefited  area  veterans  and  their  families.  Thank  you,  Mohawk District churches!    The UNYUMM will gather May 6‐7 at the Aldersgate Camp & Retreat Center in Greig for the 11th annual  gathering sponsored by the Mohawk District UMM. Guest speaker Pastor Jack Ford will lead us in this  year’s theme: “Give In, Give Up, or Give It All You’ve Got!” Pastor Ford will ask the men to put their faith  into action, the musical act Northern Grace will perform, and there will be an all‐night prayer vigil, food,  fellowship, and laughter.    The members of the UNYUMM continue to “Grow in Christ, so others will know Him” through our daily  commitment  to  prayer,  spending  time  with  God,  and  putting  Him  first  in  our  lives.  We  have  district  leadership  in  eight  of  the  12  districts.  We  have  25  UMM  on  our  executive  board  from  across  the  Conference.  The  UNYUMM  are  represented  by  55  official  chartered  units  and  many  more  unofficial  men’s groups. We are all committed to work in ministry and mission together for God’s glory, bringing  men and women to Christ one heart at a time! “We love, because God loved us first.” 1 John 4:19    In Christ,  Mark Jones, President, UNYUMM    Officers are as follows:  Mark Jones, President  475 Shortlots Road  Frankfort, N.Y. 13440  (315) 749‐3700  msjwelshman@yahoo.com    Buddy Heit, Vice President  2374 Bixby Road  Savannah, N.Y. 13146‐9677  (315) 945‐4388  agapefeast@tds.net    Steve Ranous, Vice President  201 Candee Ave.  Syracuse, N.Y. 13224  100   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

(315) 427‐3515  ummsteve@twcny. rr.com  George Ramseyer, Secretary  18 Edgewood Dr.  Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027  (315) 720‐6184  ramseyerg@gmail.com    Dave Greer, Treasurer/Disaster Relief Coord   221 Golfcrest Circle  Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027  (315) 720‐4840  daveranda221@verizon.net    Scott Stumpf, Director of Communications  123 Washington Blvd.  Fayetteville, N.Y. 13066  (315) 637‐5567  srstumpg@ieee.org    Mark Hediger, Prayer Advocate/Facebook & Twitter Manager   9817 Pronevitch Road  Westernville, N.Y. 13486  (315) 571‐4467  UNYUMM@yahoo.com    Gary Bogner, Scouting Coordinator  2803 Brewerton Road  Syracuse, N.Y. 13211  (315) 463‐0201  gary.bogner@scouting.org     Dean Burdick, Hunger Relief Advocate/Society of St Andrew Coordinator   1255 County Route 11  Central Square, N.Y. 13036  (315) 420‐9859    hungerrelief@umcchurches.org 

101  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Vital Congregations    It has been another busy year for the Vital Congregations office. Many of the initiatives have continued  to be shared with the Upper New York Conference as well as the development of additional strategies to  come  alongside  local  congregations  and  to  develop  Christ‐following  leaders.  Below  are  the  various  processes, programs, and resources currently being offered along with some that are in development.    Readiness 360: We have access to the readiness survey for a set fee of $169 per congregation, which is a  great deal when we look at larger congregations. Readiness 360 is an assessment designed for new faith  communities,  however  is  very  helpful  in  assessing  a  congregation’s  readiness  to  enter  into  change.  Check out the website www.readiness360.org for more information. It is relatively easy to get this set up  for a congregation, and there is staff support to help interpret the information as needed. The Readiness  360 survey is used as part of the Hand to Plow consultations and has proven to be helpful.    Lewis  Pastoral  Leadership  Inventory:  This  360‐degree  survey  helps  pastors  not  only  assess  their  own  leadership understanding, but also allows for input from several people in the congregation. This tool is  used as part of the Leadership Academy. Each person participating in the academy has taken the survey  in  the  past  month.  In  18‐24  months,  each  person  will  use  the  survey  again  to  measure  change  in  leadership impact. This great assessment tool is available to anyone who would like to participate. Sign  up can happen directly through the Lewis Center website, or the Vital Congregations office can assist.  Lewis Center’s website is www.lpli.org.    Tending the Fire: According to the Tending the Fire website, “Tending the Fire offers the perspective and  tools  to  be  a  more  focused,  effective  leader.”  Using  a  family  systems  understanding,  Christ‐following  leaders are developed through a greater awareness of their own place in the multiple systems as well as  through greater awareness of how systems impact the life of the leader and congregation. The Upper  New York Conference will offer two opportunities to participate.      Opening Intensive  Western New York, Oct. 2‐4, 2016  Eastern New York, Oct. 5‐7, 2016    Deepening Retreat      Western New York, Nov. 13‐15, 2016      Eastern New York, Nov. 16‐18, 2016    Sending Retreat      Western New York, Jan. 22‐24, 2017      Eastern New York, Jan. 25‐27, 2017    Watch for exact locations along with registration coming soon. For more information, visit the website  at http://tending‐the‐fire.com.    Tending the Soul: This program is designed to train individuals in spiritual direction and formation and  to provide skills for leadership within their local congregations as well as district‐ and Conference‐wide.  The  Tending  the  Soul  program  will  offer  training  in  both  one‐on‐one  spiritual  direction  and  group/congregational  direction  and  formation.  By  the  end  of  the  first  year,  participants  will  be  encouraged  to  discern  the  unique  way  in  which  they  are  being  called  to  live  out  this  ministry.  The  102   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48 

training will  occur  during  six  retreats,  each  four  days  in  duration,  spread  over  a  two‐year  period.  The  next opportunity for participation begins in October 2016 on the following dates:    1. Oct. 24‐27, 2016  2. Feb. 24‐27, 2017  3. May 19‐22, 2017  4. Oct. 23‐26, 2017  5. Feb. 23‐26, 2018  6. May 18‐21, 2018    All  retreats  are  held  at  the  Casowasco  Camp  &  Retreat  Center  in  Moravia.  Applications  are  available  through the brochure in the Annual Conference session packet, the Vital Congregations section of the  website, or by contacting the Director of Vital Congregations.    EQ‐HR Workshops: Emotional Quotient is our ability to recognize our own emotions and the emotions  of others in order to enhance social relationships and leadership capacity. The first workshop is a week‐ long experience that several in our Conference have engaged in. You can find more information on the  website at www.eqhrcenter.org. Upper New York has entered into an agreement with the EQ‐HR Center  to have the training in our area this fall, Nov. 14‐18 in Latham. Registration is currently open through the  EQ‐HR Center, and it would be great to see more people share this journey of leadership development.    Coaching: Last year the Conference made a significant investment in training coaches to come alongside  leaders  to  increase  their  effectiveness.  Coaching  is  a  great  way  to  work  with  leaders  to  help  create  forward action. A coach fulfills a different role than a mentor, counselor, or spiritual director. All of the  roles  are  needed,  and  a  coach  is  often  key  to  helping  move  the  realizations  of  other  disciples  as  they  move toward concrete action steps. Currently, coaching is used in the Hand to Plow process, Leadership  Academy,  and  on  an  arranged  basis.  If  you  would  like  to  learn  more  about  having  a  coach,  or  becoming a coach, contact the Rev. Dr. Aaron Bouwens, Director of Vital Congregations at  aaronabouwens@unyumc.org.     Vital Signs: The number remains small, however, we do have congregations that are tracking weekly on  the Vital Signs website. Congregations can join in at any time, and it would be great to grow the number  of  congregations  who  are  sharing  in  this  tool.  Congregations  that  would  like  to  begin  using  the  Vital  Signs system should contact Rev. Bouwens at aaronbouwens@unyumc.org.     Compass  Project:  In  partnership  with  the  District  Leadership  Team  of  the  Oneonta  District,  an  adaptation of the Hand to Plow process has been developed. A small group‐style engagement has been  developed to walk alongside teams of clergy and laity. Each group will spend an hour using “A Disciples  Path”  for  spiritual  growth  and  development.  The  second  hour  will  be  conversation  based  on  a  brief  video clip and a series of provided questions. The first groups begin in spring 2016 through the ministry  of  the  Oneonta  District  Leadership  Team.  In  the  future,  the  Compass  Project  will  be  available  to  all  districts in conjunction with the District Leadership Teams.    Leadership Academy: The first group journeying  through the Leadership Academy is about to  have its  third gathering. The first two have been very fruitful according to those participating. The first session  began with a 24‐hour retreat to focus on the spiritual life of the leader and to develop a rule of life led  by Betsey Heavner, retired staff member from Discipleship Ministries. The second session had Dr. Scott  Kisker as our guest faculty. His focus was our Wesleyan ethos and theology. Our third session will bring  103   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

Barbara Lemmel to us for an introduction to family systems and leadership. In April, the group will travel  to the Ginghamsburg United Methodist Church for two conferences and some time with various leaders.  The academy will conclude in June with a visit from Bob Farr. Along the way the group members have  focused  on  the  16  competencies  for  their  development  as  Christ‐following  leaders.  Additionally,  each  participant  has  employed  the  services  of  a  coach  to  deepen  their  learning  and  move  to  a  greater  application of the content. Based on the feedback from the current cohort, plans are already underway  for a 2016‐2017 cohort; watch for details, dates, and registration information in the coming weeks.    Illuminate  Preaching  Academy:  Illuminate  is  offered  as  a  way  to  help  good  preachers  become  great  preachers. Past participants have shared how helpful the sessions have been in developing their ability  to better communicate the good news of Jesus. One person commented, “I was expecting to be taught  there  was  only  one  way  to  be  a  great  preacher.  What  I  found  was  there  were  better  ways  for  me  to  claim my voice without having to copy another person’s style.” Moving forward, the way the Illuminate  Preaching  Academy  has  been  adapted  allows  for  easier  engagement  and  better  development  of  the  preacher.  The  next  cohort  will  begin  fall  2016  with  all  the  sessions  at  the  Casowasco  Camp  &  Retreat  Center. The dates are:     Oct. 11‐13, 2016   Nov. 8‐10, 2016   Jan. 17‐19, 2017   March 7‐9, 2017    Registration will be available soon, so watch for your opportunity to join the group.    It  continues  to  be  a  great  honor  to  serve  the  life  of  our  Conference  through  the  ministry  of  Vital  Congregations.  If  there  are  questions  about  any  of  our  existing  opportunities  or  ideas  about  possible  opportunities,  please  contact  Rev.  Bouwens  by  phone  (315)  424‐7878  ext.  338  or  by  email  at  aaronbouwens@unyumc.org.     Grace and Peace,  Rev. Dr. Aaron M. Bouwens   

104  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Violet’s Garden Advance # 3075 (Garden for Young Disciples)    The Violet’s Garden grants were established in 2008 as an expression of appreciation for Bishop Violet L.  Fisher’s compassion  for  children  and  youth.  Initially,  the  fund  totaled  $17,000.  Since  then,  every  May  and November, the task force has solicited and reviewed applications from local congregations looking  for start‐up funding for new spiritual growth experiences for children and youth. Due to our limited level  of funding available, the  task force decided to put out a call for  grant applications only in  May during  2015.  The  task  force  is  pleased  to  report  the  following  local  churches  received  grant  funding during the 2015 fiscal year:     Bergen UMC: “Youth New Believer’s Class and Children’s Worship Center”  – $1,025    Bemus Point UMC: “Summer “E – Team (Evangelism) Ministry” – $1,000   Owls Head UMC: “Vacation Bible School Start‐up” – $300     The fund has been sustained over the years by donations made to the Advance #3075 by individuals and  local churches. We will follow the same model for 2016, calling for applications only for the May 1 grant  period.  We  appeal  to  every  local  congregation  in  our  Conference  that  values  and  cherishes  their  ministries with children and youth to consider making a donation to Violet’s Garden.      The ministries that can happen due to the grants awarded this year showed a wide variety of ways to  reach  new  children  and  youth  with  the  Gospel  and  deepen  the  faith  experience  of  the  ministries’  participants.     Bemus Point UMC created an “E‐Team” ministry, which engaged middle school and high school youth in  sharing their faith with others at local parks, engaging persons they met through skits, music, and one‐ on‐one  discussion  to  consider  a  relationship  with  Jesus  Christ.  The  participating  youth  deepened  their  own relationship with Christ through this process and through their time of preparation with adult and  college aged‐mentors.     Over the summer, Bergen UMC prepared its building to greet the youth of its community in September  with an afterschool ministry, including a “café area” of their very own and a “new believers” class. The  youth  of  the  congregation  were  excited  to  invite  their  friends  from  the  community  into  this  safe  and  welcoming setting and to invite these friends to participate in the new believer’s class. The congregation  also  created  a  more  child‐  and  youth‐friendly  environment  for  their  Sunday  school  opening  worship  experience.       Owls  Head  UMC  held  its  first  Vacation  Bible  School.  Not  only  did  the  children  from  the  congregation  attend, but children from the community who had not experienced “church” before joined in the week  of evening sessions of scripture, crafts, music, and fun!       These models of providing the means and opportunity for children and youth to get to know Jesus and  to develop their faith only needed some seed money to blossom. And that is what Violet’s Garden has  been able to provide over the  past seven years. We would like to continue being a source of start‐up  funding to facilitate new ministries of spiritual formation with children and youth, but can only do so if  churches  and  individuals  continue  to  donate  to  our  Violet’s  Garden  Advance  #3075.  Faithful  disciples  who have invested their time and talents as well as their visions for these new ministries should turn to  Violet’s Garden to help equip and advance these ministries on behalf of the Upper New York Conference  105   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 

as a  whole.  Our  Conference’s  emphasis  on  making  disciples  of  Jesus  Christ  should  not  focus  only  on  persons older than 18. Financial support is needed for the intentional spiritual formation of children and  youth.     Please take the time to visit our display table along with the other advances and ministries of the Board  of Global Ministries to see accounts of our local congregations inviting and engaging children and youth  in meaningful relationships with Jesus Christ.     Respectfully submitted,     Rev. Joellyn Tuttle, Violet’s Garden Task Force Convener 

106  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Volunteers‐in‐Mission (UMVIM)     Vision   Encourage  and  enable  local  congregations  and  districts  within  the  Upper  New  York  Conference  to  effectively engage in the mission of being God’s love to our neighbors in all places.     VIM efforts   Response  to  extensive  flooding  along  the  shore  of  Lake  Erie  is  close  to  complete.  Hurricane  Sandy  recovery continues with teams working in the New York, Greater New Jersey, and Peninsula‐Delaware  conferences.  Haiti  Partnership  (HP)  trains  and  sends  teams  to  partner  villages  within  and  outside  the  quake affected areas. HP teams of 36 adults and eight youth formed in 2015. Upper New  York’s Early  Response Teams (ERT) responded to flooding in West Virginia. A team formed out of the Albany District  worked with the Hogansburg UMC to install a ramp at the church. The Findley Camp & Retreat Center  hosted  a  VIM  team  that  replaced  a  bathroom,  installed  showers,  and  patched  and  painted  various  building  interiors.  International  efforts  included  teams  to  Costa  Rica,  Zimbabwe,  Nicaragua,  Haiti,  Uganda, and Ireland.     Education    Team  Leader  Training  (TLT)  –  We  had  18  newly  trained  leaders  in  2015.  Teams  led  by  trained  leaders qualify for Northeastern Jurisdiction (NEJ) accident insurance and Conference funding   Early Response Training (ERT) – Training sessions resulted in 17 persons being UMCOR certified  or recertified for early response   Connecting Neighbors – 22 people participated in this UMCOR training   ERT Train the Trainer – Two people completed the requirements to become ERT trainers   NEJ UMVIM/UMCOR Training Academy – 17 individuals from Upper New York have been trained    FEMA training on volunteer and donations management completed by five individuals   Safe Sanctuary Trainer certification and Mission u training completed by two people    The  cumulative  lists  of  trained  volunteers  are  sent  to  the  district  representatives  and  to  each  district  superintendent.  Our  aim  is  to  provide  local  missions  chairpersons  this  district‐based  information  to  provide better connections among those active in mission.    UMVIM teams and outreach   Analysis  of  the  VIM  reports  reveals  inconsistent  interpretation  of  the  forms.  We  revamped  the  2015  form to improve the data collection. Half of the Conference – or six districts – provided reports for their  churches.  Reporting  from  109  mission  teams  included  668/161  adults  and  184/80  youth  on  sponsored/non‐sponsored  teams.  The  amount  of  money  spent  on  VIM  projects  has  easily  exceeded  $200,000.     Grants and scholarships   UNYVIM has provided two grants to 2015 teams. In addition, 15 individual, 13 international, and two  domestic scholarships were given. Six of the grants were to Haiti Partnership. Requirements for  receiving a grant include: having a VIM or equivalent trained team leader, having appropriate insurance  for the team, being open to participation beyond the local church, and serving in a VIM‐approved  project site (not necessarily UMC). Requirements for scholarships are the same, with preference given to  youth or first‐time missioners. Team leaders are also eligible for support.

107  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34 

Administration   The 12 districts are represented on the steering committee. The committee has two team meetings  annually held in late fall and just before Annual Conference session. The membership list is at  www.unyumc.org/mission/vim‐steering‐committee.    The UNYVIM coordinators meet annually with the Northeastern Jurisdiction UMVIM Board and GBGM  leadership,  sharing  insights  and  planning  training.  UNY’s  Volunteers‐in‐Mission  Co‐Coordinator  Donna  Cullen  reviewed  web  management  tools.  With  the  resignation  of  the  NEJ  VIM  coordinator,  Donna  manages the NEJ VIM Facebook and co‐manages the website, email, and Constant Contact. An overhaul  of insurance‐related pages and forms resulted in more accurate applications and more timely payments.  With the NEJ coordinator resignation, we rewrote the NEJ VIM coordinator job description to align with  the  purpose  of  the  position.  Donna  serves  on  the  recruitment,  interview,  and  hiring  team,  creating  evaluation tools, interview questions, and procedures for the team. The goal is to have the coordinator  in place for the NEJ UMVIM/UMCOR Training Academy in April 2016. The Upper New York VIM steering  committee is serving as host for the academy. Additional NEJ website advisory work is planned for 2016.    Communications   An  invitation  to  the  Bishop’s  Retreat  provided  an  opportunity  to  share  Conference  VIM  efforts  with  clergy in the Conference. The VIM website is being kept up to date. Use the VIM page to find UMVIM  projects  requesting  teams,  register  teams  and  file  reports,  apply  for  team  grants  and  individual  scholarships,  obtain  forms,  and  link  to  more  information.  The  UNYVIM  Facebook  page  is  your  connection  to  timely  updates  for  upcoming  teams  and  events  as  well  as  team  reports,  photos,  and  videos.  Like  us  on  Facebook  at  www.facebook.com/UpperNewYorkVolunteersInMission  to  stay  connected.     Goals   Our  prayers  for  the  future  include  teams  serving  and  increased  inclusion  of  trained  team  leaders  and  early response teams in responding to calls for assistance. We look forward to enhanced coordination  with the Northeastern Jurisdiction and the Board of Global Ministries. The steering committee is looking  to  include  VIM  activities  (training,  depot)  at  the  new  Conference  center.  Honoring  outreach  efforts  at  the local church fosters inclusion of various age groups and skill sets in becoming the hands and feet of  Christ. The goal is to make a wider demographic engage in mission.    Roger and Donna Cullen, Volunteers‐in‐Mission Coordinators

108  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37 

Youth Ministries (CCYM), Council on     Hello Upper New York Conference, and happy Conference session!!    The Conference Council on Youth Ministries, comprised of youth from all the districts of the Upper New  York  Conference,  had  a  year  of  change  and  excitement.  With  the  theme,  “Do  Something:  Disciples  Edition,”  our  leadership  team  –  made  up  of  Maya  Smith  and  Emily  Allen  (Co‐Chairs),  Katie  Shumway  (Secretary, Power Point and Publicity), Elyse Muder (Gathering and Organization), Emily Lasher (Worship  Team), and John Church (Youth Service Fund) – along with the rest of the CCYM, have been encouraging  youth  from  all  across  the  Conference  to  do  something  in  the  name  of  Christ.  By  branching  out  within  their  churches,  reaching  out  within  their  communities  and  growing  through  experiences  across  the  world, youth of the Conference have been directly involved in “making disciples of Jesus Christ for the  transformation  of  the  world.”  James  2:20  states  that,  “faith  without  works  is  dead.”  We  truly  believe  that as Christians it is our duty to live out our faith and to take initiative to do something daily for Christ.    This  year’s  fall  gatherings  were  hosted  by  Rochester’s  Aldersgate  UMC  (West)  and  Schenectady  UMC  (East).  Both  the  times  of  worship  and  the  workshops,  or  disciple  editions,  centered  on  our  theme  by  giving youth and adults who attended hands‐on ways to reach out to others and live out their faith. Our  spring event, UP!WORD is always an amazing opportunity for youth to grow in their faith. This year, we  are  featuring  some  exciting  ways  to  “Do  Something:  Disciples  Edition,”  including  participating  in  a  national  day  of  awareness  for  those  who  make  our  clothes  and  praying  for  General  Conference.  The  times  of  worship,  workshops,  and  late‐night  options  will  feature  speakers  and  activities  to  help  youth  cultivate their faith and discover new ways to put that faith into action. The Casowasco Band InsideOut  who  appeared  as  the  house  band  at  last  year’s  UP!WORD  will  join  us  again.  By  connecting  with  and  hearing  from  people  their  age  who  share  the  truth  of  the  Gospel,  youth  will  hopefully  make  a  commitment to serve Christ and to do something in their own churches and communities.     CCYM’s  goal  has  always  been  to  empower  youth  to  grow  closer  to  God,  and  this  year  has  been  no  exception. We have been putting a strong emphasis on outreach. Every CCYM member was encouraged  to reach out to churches throughout their districts, sharing about our ministries and events and inviting  them to join us. We, as the youth of the Upper New York Conference, thank you for our Conference’s  consistent  appreciation  and  dedication  to  our  ministries  and  the  voice  of  youth.  Together  we  can  do  something by living out our faith and making disciples of Jesus Christ!    Blessings,  Maya Smith and Emily Allen  2015‐2016 UNY CCYM Co‐Chairs 

109  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Reports – Connections Organizations 

110  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

111  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

Albany United Methodist Society 

1   2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33    34   35  36  37  38  39 

The Albany  United  Methodist  Society  (AUMS)  serves  the  families  of  the  West  Hill  neighborhood  of  Albany  with  numerous  ministries,  referrals,  and  partners  with  many  interests  throughout  Albany  to  strengthen our effectiveness. Our home is at 340 First Family Community Center, whose impact in the  community  we  continually  seek  to  expand  and  improve.  Our  Albany  District  United  Methodist  family  helps sustain our work, for which we are very grateful. Among our ministries are:     AUMS afterschool enrichment program offers youth ages 5‐12 homework assistance, gym  recreation, and a healthy snack 2:30‐5 p.m. Monday through Friday during the school year.  Student volunteers from SUNY Albany assist and workshop leaders join us weekly.   AUMS Summer Enrichment Camp spans five weeks in July and August and hosts 30 youth ages  6‐12 in workshops, games, presentations, and field trips to UM churches for outdoor recreation.  Twenty  teens  age  14‐18  enrolled  in  the  Albany  Summer  Youth  Program  and  serve  20  hours  a  week as counselors, receiving one day of in‐service training per week.   AUMS Food Pantry serves Albany’s West Hill neighborhood with monthly emergency food and  benefits  from  UM  volunteers’  weekly  deliveries  of  food.  AUMS  holiday  activities  include  providing  Thanksgiving  Baskets  and  Christmas  toys.  Youth  are  invited  one  evening  to  pick  out  gifts for their parents and caregivers. Many churches provide toys, as does the Marines Toys For  Tots program.   AUMS  Kindred  Spirits  United  senior  program  meets  for  fellowship  and  choral  rehearsal  in  preparation for performances in the region at churches, nursing homes, and competitions.   High School Equivalency (HSE) classes (formerly GED) are conducted in partnership with BOCES.    AUMS  Neighborhood  Garden  provides  hands‐on  vegetable  cultivation  for  neighbors  and  program youth, with guidance from area master gardeners and board members. The harvested  bounty gets distributed through the food pantry.    Boys and girls AAU basketball programs occupy our gym during evenings and include home and  away tournaments.   Team  Infinity  girls  step  dancing  practice  continues  evenings  in  preparation  for  a  busy  performance schedule around town.  Men’s basketball programs access our gym weekdays during lunch hours.   AUMS has been active with the Albany District Urban Ministry Team developing an urban  ministry curriculum for new clergy and lay leaders.    AUMS’ governing boards  AUMS Board of Directors: Janet Foster, Rev. Jane Baker  AUMS  Core  Urban  Ministry  Team:  Ellen  Foster,  Chair,  Rev.  Joy  Lowenthal,  Marilyn  Pendergast,  Gerri  Smalls, David Riegert, and Annie Dyess  340 First St. (Mailing: PO Box 6896), Albany, N.Y. 12206 / Phone: (518) 432‐0818, Fax: (518) 432‐0819   www.aumsny.org    112   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Boston University School of Theology     Dear Colleagues in the Upper New York Conference:     Greetings in the Spirit of Jesus Christ! The Boston University School of Theology (STH) walks with you on  the  journey  of  discipleship,  seeking  to  love  God  and  to  love  our  neighbors  with  all  our  hearts,  souls,  minds, and strength. Thank you for your prayers that inspire and support the STH mission to love God,  build knowledge, and equip leaders for the church and society.   NEWS   

New faculty:  This  year,  Boston  University  welcomed  new  faculty  in  ethics,  psychology,  theologies  of  spirituality,  comparative  theology,  church  renewal,  Black  church  leadership,  and  mission studies. We welcomed: Nimi Wariboko (Walter G. Muelder Professor of Social Ethics);  David  Decosimo  (Theology);  Theodore  Hickman‐Maynard  (Evangelism  and  Church  Renewal);  Andrea  Hollingsworth  (Theology);  Barbod  Salimi  (Psychology  and  Peace  Studies);  and  Daryl  Ireland (Associate Director of the Center for Global Christianity and Mission).    Spiritual  life:  STH  continued  to  expand  and  deepen  its  spiritual  life  program,  led  by  Charlene  Zuill,  Spiritual  Life  Coordinator  and  United  Methodist  elder.  Bishop  Susan  Hassinger,  Claire  Wolfteich, and many others also offer a rich selection of courses in spirituality and leadership.    Chaplaincy  track:  STH  added  a  chaplaincy  track  to  the  MDiv  degree,  preparing  students  for  hospitals, prisons, and military settings.    Engaging in Dialogue: STH spent a large amount of energy this year in hard conversations on violence,  racism and injustice, seeking to be honest, and vigorously open to change, while honoring the dignity of  all persons.      Power,  Privilege  and  Prophetic  Witness  is  the  STH  theme  for  2015‐2017.  We  engaged  the  theme  in  classes,  lectures,  retreats,  and  workshops,  seeking  to  stretch  our  capacities  to  do  justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with our God.   Examining  the  intersection  of  theology  and  race.  The  opportunities  this  year  included:  a  brilliant new documentary about North Korea; a dialogical viewing of Selma; dialogues on racism  with  Thandeka  and  Andrew  Sung  Park;  a  retreat  on  building  race  relations;  circle  worship;  a  student‐led  event  Missing  Voices,  Daunting  Choices:  The  Erasure  of  Black  Women  in  Black  American Movements; and events on interfaith understanding.     Caring for the Church through leadership and service.      Serving  The  United  Methodist  Church.  Students  served  local  churches  and  church  bodies  as  interns,  staff,  and  volunteers.  Faculty  served  with  such  bodies  as:  United  Methodist  Women,  World  Methodist  Council,  Ministry  Study  Commission,  Women  of  Color  Scholars  and  Mentors  program,  Pan  Methodist  Commission  on  Children  in  Poverty,  and  boards  and  agencies  of  the  general church and annual conferences.   Empowering young Latino/leaders. Young leaders gathered with seasoned mentors to enhance  their  gifts  and  service  as  Christian  leaders:  Hispanic  Youth  Leadership  Initiative  (HYLA)  and  Raíces Latinas Leadership Institute.   Facilitating  dialogues  on  church  renewal.  We  launched  a  new  initiative  on  evangelism  and  church renewal.   113   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19 

Reflecting on worship. We contributed to a special issue of Worship Arts Magazine, edited and  written  by  STH  faculty,  alumni/ae,  and  students,  and  published  by  the  fellowship  of  United  Methodists in music and worship arts.     Caring for the World      Offering  opportunities  for  engaged  learning.  Opportunities  included  the  Doctor  of  Ministry  program in Transformational Leadership; an urban ministry course; travel seminars to India, the  Arizona‐Mexico  border,  Israel‐Palestine,  Mexico,  and  Turkey  (Ephesus);  work  with  leaders  in  Ferguson,  Mo.;  and  a  travel  seminar  for  UMC  clergywomen  to  Cuba,  co‐sponsored  by  GBHEM  and STH.    Collaborating with the global church. Collaborations included sponsorship of the “Dictionary of  African Christian Biography;” events and art exhibits on local and global ecology; and dialogues  with global church leaders.     As we at STH seek to be faithful and to partner with you in ministry, we give thanks for your witness.  Thank you or your continuing inspiration and contributions to our shared journey.     Blessings and gratitude,  

20 21  22 

Mary Elizabeth Moore   Dean of Boston University School of Theology 

114  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46 

Drew University Theological School    A Cohering Vision: Curriculum, Community, Co‐Curricular Initiatives  After  much  collaborative  discussion,  discernment,  and  evaluation  of  the  current  state  of  theological  education,  those  of  us  who  lead,  teach,  and  support  Drew  Theological  School  have  launched  on  an  ambitious course. Nearly 150 years after our founding, we envision a future as bright as the best eras in  our past. I am pleased to share with you here the concrete steps we have taken— and are taking— to  bring this future to light.    First, our efforts have been attentive  to the history of Drew, in particular its Methodist roots, its long  commitment  to  the  Church  and  its  ministries,  and  draw  from  this  wellspring  for  inspiration  and  direction.  Also,  we  have  honored  our  progress  to  achieve  denominational,  ethnic,  gender,  and  racial  diversity in our faculty and student body. This rich diversity has become both a hallmark of Drew and an  expansion  of  our  wellspring.  Forces  beyond  our  campus  –  notably,  that  the  reasons  for  pursuing  a  theological education and expected outcomes are shifting dramatically – further press the need for us to  align our vision and its supporting systems with our communal reality.     Given  this  imperative,  we  are  focused  on  the  three  “Cs”  of  our  cohering  vision:  redesigning  our  curriculum,  strengthening  our  community  of  learning,  and  deepening  training  through  revived  co‐ curricular  initiatives.  These  three  aspect  of  a  Drew  Theological  School  education  work  together  to  enable  us  to  empower  creative  thought  and  courageous  action  to  advance  justice,  peace,  and  love  of  God, neighbor, and the earth as well as uniquely position us to lead evolving expressions of Christianity.    Designing distinct pathways from curriculum to vocation  To remain meaningful and offer the greatest value to our students, each of the six degree paths that we  offer must be as distinct as the ministry to which it leads. For example, our Master of Arts in Ministry  program,  which  forms  students  for  the  broadest  spectrum  of  theologically‐informed  advocacy  and  ministry,  or  our  DMin  program,  which  has  become  the  “new”  terminal  vocational  degree,  must  be  custom  rebuilt  for  current  and  emerging  student  needs  and  outcomes.  This  also  holds  true  for  our  Master of Arts, Master of Sacred Theology, PhD, and, most critically, our Master of Divinity programs.     We  have  achieved  our  roadmap  for  curricular  change  through  a  period  of  intentional  discernment,  which included discussion with consultants, and with colleagues at peer institutions, who led a curricular  formation retreats with our faculty; through the discernment and guidance of our faculty, and with the  generous  financial  support  of  the  Jesse  Ball  duPont  Fund.  Our  next  steps  include  a  comprehensive  analysis  of  pedagogical  and  technological  trends  in  theological  education,  enrollment,  and  outcomes.  Our  redesigned  curricular  paths  will  be  announced  in  the  fall  of  2017,  concurrent  with  the  150th  anniversary  of  the  founding  of  Drew  Theological  School  and  the  500th  anniversary  of  the  Protestant  Reformation.     Student experiences rooted in community  Despite  the  increase  in  students  pursuing  their  education  through  evening  classes  and  online  enrollment,  we  remain  committed  to  the  on‐campus  experience  of  community.  This  begins  with  a  student‐centered educational experience that better attends  to the scheduling needs of  our students,  offers  broader  course  content  and  availability,  and  more  intentionally  integrates  vocational  or  career  aspirations with coursework.   115   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43 

The successes  of  these  efforts  are  inextricably  linked  to  scholarship  support.  Only  by  removing  the  financial barriers for students pursuing vocations can we hope to attract and retain the most promising  students and free them to learn and grow in community. Related to tuition support is the need for more  affordable  and  modernized  housing  for  those  students  who  choose  to  live  on  campus.  Together,  scholarship support and housing relief will also unburden our students from unsustainable debt.    Fostering innovation in ministry and the work of spirit‐filled justice  To round out changes in our curriculum and on‐campus learning experiences, we are also reviving co‐ curricular  initiatives.  The  existing  Center  for  Lifelong  Learning  will  be  recast  as  the  new  Center  for  Innovation  and  Leadership  in  Ministry  and  serve  students,  alumni,  and  others  seeking  to  find  creative  and  courageous  approaches  to  revitalizing  ministry.  Here,  programming  will  train  pastoral  leaders,  in  particular,  for  service  in  rapidly  changing  church  environments,  as  well  as  position  them  to  lead  fearlessly and prophetically.     Our  second  co‐curricular  center  will  be  an  expansion  of  the  current  Communities  of  Shalom.  This  initiative will focus on action, advocacy, and social justice work in both pastoral and lay environments.  Projects will range from student interns supporting the work of “A Future with Hope” in our home state  of New Jersey, advancing social justice in non‐profit settings across the country and around the world,  initiatives which seek to transform and end systemic poverty, expansion of our Partnership for Religion  and Education in Prisons (PREP) program, and teaching residencies at Drew for prophetic leaders.     Success so far through our One and All Campaign  As  the  14th  dean  at  Drew  Theological  School,  I  am  deeply  committed  to  continuing  our  long  and  distinguished legacy. To this end, our vision is innovative, forward‐looking, and grounded in the practical  needs of our students – we hope, too, that it is an inspiration to the various constituencies we serve. I  fully subscribe to the inimitable words of Antonio Machado, that “we make the road by walking.” The  road to this bright future, we envision, will be made by the dedication, determination, and generosity of  those who love Drew and believe in its future.    Our vision is coming to light, in part, because of the generosity of our many alumni donors and friends.  Our “One and All” fundraising campaign has raised more than $12 million to date for the Theological  School and has seed‐funded many of our burgeoning efforts.     Also, I encourage our alumni to embrace your power of influence to help grow philanthropic support for  Drew Theological School. Many of our largest gifts have come from the influence of alumni, particularly  pastors who serve in our church communities.    Yes, the needs ahead are many, yet our hope is high for a bright future for Drew Theological School. The  road is made by walking. Let’s walk it together.    The Rev. Dr. Javier A. Viera  Dean of the Theological School  Professor of Pastoral Theology   

116  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47 

Iliff School of Theology    Greetings from the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colo. We wish you blessings as together we share  the work of strengthening The Church and offering a compassionate presence to the world.     The  Iliff  School  of  Theology’s  commitment  to  the  Wesleyan  ethos  of  providing  hopeful,  intellectually  alive and spiritually grounded theological education for each and every student over the course of their  lifetime  continues.  Iliff’s  identity  is  focused  on  educating  leaders  for  three  primary  publics:  the  world,  The  Church,  and  the  academy.  At  Iliff,  we  refuse  to  choose  between  being  a  training  home  only  for  ministerial  candidates,  a  center  only  for  activists  and  scholar‐activists,  or  a  school  only  for  academics.  We  believe  all  three  are  inseparable  and  enhance  one  another  as  we  deliberately  situate  ourselves  in  the world and critically operate out of the world’s complexities.    As such, we recognize that the world’s religious landscape is changing, and there is much at stake. Iliff  recently  completed  its  strategic  plan,  revised  its  curriculum,  transformed  its  library,  and  initiated  new  relationships  with  other  institutions.  In  collaboration  with  the  people  of  Africa,  we’ve  started  a  discussion  with  Africa  University  (AU)  to  foster  an  educational  alliance  that  will  benefit  Iliff  and  AU  students.  We  have  also  joined  a  multi‐institutional  collaboration  facilitated  by  the  General  Board  of  Higher Education and Ministry and the HANA Scholarship to create a pipeline for Hispanic students from  United  Methodist‐related  secondary  schools  and  historically  black  colleges  leading  to  graduate  level  theological education.     Iliff’s  enrollment  continues  to  be  strong  with  365  students  joining  us  this  academic  year,  60  percent  female and 40 percent male, 35 percent Methodist – all actively engaged in a host of ministry contexts.  Their  interest  continues  to  be  strong  in  Iliff’s  online  and  hybrid  classes.  A  concerted  move  by  Iliff  to  reduce  student  debt  and  grow  the  ability  of  students  to  lead  financially‐sound,  engaged  communities  continues  with  many  M.Div.  students  participating  in  the  Spiritually‐Integrated  Financial  Resiliency  Program, funded by a $250,000 grant from the Lilly Endowment.     Iliff’s  numerous  events  for  area  clergy  and  supporters  remains  part  of  our  foundation  via  forums  and  conferences  on  social  justice,  food  justice,  the  role  of  faith  in  politics,  environmental  stewardship,  theology  and  disability  inclusion,  and  more.  Campus  speakers  included  Rev.  Gerald  Durley,  nationally‐ known civil rights leader and this year’s Jameson Jones Preacher, Heather Jarvis, student debt reduction  advocate, and more. Our efforts were duly noted by McCormick Theological Seminary’s Center for Faith  and Service when we were named as one of the nation’s “seminaries that change the world” and our  Master of Theology program was ranked seventh in the nation by OnlineColleges.net.    We welcomed two new scholars to our faculty this year, Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, assistant professor of  religion and social justice and ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and Rev. Michelle  Watkins‐Branch, Gerald L. Schlessman professor in Methodist studies, assistant professor of theology,  and ordained in The United Methodist Church.    We continue to look forward with a courageous theological imagination. We  are sincerely grateful for  your support of theological education and the Ministerial Education Fund.     Submitted by the Rev. Dr. Thomas V. Wolfe, President and Chief Executive Officer  www.iliff.edu  1‐800‐678‐3360  117   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

Methodist Theological School in Ohio    Thank you for this opportunity to bring you an update from Methodist Theological School in Ohio.     Keeping seminary affordable  As  part  of  MTSO’s  continuing  commitment  to  make  theological  education  a  financial  reality  for  promising  students,  we  announced  the  creation  of  the  Bishop  Judith  Craig  Scholarship  Endowment.  Bishop Craig, who led conferences in the Michigan and Ohio West areas, is MTSO’s bishop‐in‐residence  and  visiting  professor  of  church  leadership.  One  in  three  full‐time  MTSO  master’s  students  receives  a  full‐tuition scholarship, and our average non‐load aid award is $8,600 per year.     Working for sustainable justice  This  year  offered  continuing  evidence  that  social  justice  and  the  care  of  creation  are  core  values  for  MTSO.  We  hosted  “Faithful  Justice:  Confronting  Mass  Incarceration”  in  February  and  the  Institute  on  Organizing and Preaching for Social Justice in April. A newly installed solar array began providing energy  to  Gault  Hall,  our  main  academic  facility.  And  the  Interfaith  Center  for  Sustainable  Development  identified  Methodist  Theological  School  in  Ohio  as  one  of  25  exceptional  North  American  seminaries  (out  of  231  surveyed)  for  faith  and  ecology.  MTSO  courses  addressing  eco‐theology  and  sustainability  include  Ecological  Religious  Education;  Food,  Land,  and  Faith  Formation;  and  Dialogues  in  Faith  and  Science.      Celebrating 30 years of educating counselors  Over the past three decades, hundreds of men and women  have earned graduate  counseling degrees  with  unique  depth  from  MTSO.  Our  Master  of  Arts  in  counseling  ministries  degree  integrates  psychological  and  behavioral  sciences  with  wisdom  from  religious  tradition.  The  second  most  popular  MTSO  degree,  the  MACM  offers  tracks  in  pastoral  and  professional  counseling,  pastoral  care  and  counseling, and addiction counseling.    Respectfully submitted,    Danny Russell, Director of Communications 

118  


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1 

New York Council of Churches 

1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40 

1580 Central Ave., Albany, N.Y. 12205         www.nyscoc.org   (518) 436‐9319 Fax (518) 427‐6705         E‐mail: nyscoc@aol.com       Report for 2016 Assemblies    After  serving  the  council  with  care  and  distinction,  the  Rev.  Dr.  Paula  Gravelle  retired  as  Executive  Director  in  August  2015  and  moved  to  Tennessee.  In  January,  I  began  my  duties  as  the  full‐time  executive director. After serving as a local church pastor in the United Church of Christ for 25 years, I felt  called  to  embrace  the  distinct  mission  of  the  council  to  help  denominations  and  the  local  churches  embrace the power and wonder of the ecumenical movement. I enthusiastically support the mission of  the council to offer an organized voice on behalf of the poor and disenfranchised in the halls of power  and in our state prison and mental health institutions. It is my view that, as local churches, our pastoral  care must not just be about charity but about how we change laws and structures as a way to embrace  the hope that the risen Christ offers to people in despair and in need of encouragement.     Since  1889,  the  New  York  State  Council  of  Churches  (NYSCC)  has  enabled  Protestant  denominations  across the state to offer a distinct Christian voice in the public square and in some of the most forgotten  places of our society. The eight founding bodies of the NYSCC (American Baptist Churches, The Episcopal  Church,  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  in  America,  The  Presbyterian  Church  (USA),  New  York  Yearly  Meeting  of  the  Religious  Society  of  Friends,  The  Reformed  Church  in  America,  The  United  Church  of  Christ,  and  The  United  Methodist  Church)  as  well  as  the  Empire  Baptist  Missionary  Convention  (a  member  denomination),  work  together  in  areas  of  public  policy,  state  institutional  chaplaincy,  education, worship, and witness.    I like to use the acronym “ACCE” to describe the four‐fold work of the Council:    ADVOCACY   Participated in Moral Mondays at the state capitol to support a just and moral budget for the  people of New York state.   Participated in Ecumenical Advocacy Days in Washington, D.C., with a focus on racism, class, and  power.   In partnership with Faith for a Fair New York, sponsored a two‐day teach‐in in which participants  looked  at  economic  and  social  justice  issues  and  had  the  opportunity  to  network  with  others  from across state as we prepared to advocate for just laws for the 2016 legislative session.   We have been working systematically to advocate for a living wage of $15 for all New Yorkers.  The Council felt this was an unprecedented opportunity for us to work together to lift over two  million workers out of poverty.    Adopted  a  statement  in  support  of  campaign  finance  reform  including  the  repeal  of  Citizens  United.   119   


7th Session of the Upper New York Conference June 2‐4: Journal Vol. 1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38 

CHAPLAINCY  Continued certifying chaplains for ministry in our state institutions.   In partnership with our chaplains, the Council organized a three‐day retreat for chaplains doing  ministry in state and county prisons. A goal is to expand this retreat to include chaplains in any  institutional ministry throughout the state.   Visited  chaplains  and  preached  in  several  prisons  including  the  Good  Friday  service  at  Albion  Correctional Facility.    Advocated for changes in our prison system including raising the age for criminal responsibility  to 18. New York is one of only two states that still prosecutes 16‐ and 17‐year‐olds as adults. We  also advocate for the lessening the use of solitary confinement, addressing injustices in parole  boards and support for family of inmates.     EDUCATION AND WORSHIP    Coordinated  a  youth  leadership  forum  at  the  United  Nations  for  25  senior  high  youth  from  across the state. They studied Christianity and race relations.   Increased  effective  communication  through  improved  use  of  social  media.  We  are  revamping  our website: www.nyscoc.org and made it possible for people to donate online. We invite you to  “like” us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. We also reinstituted a newsletter, which will be  published at least six times a year.     ECUMENICISM   On May 12, we plan to hold our first annual awards luncheon and fundraiser at First Lutheran  Church in Albany.    Met  with  leaders  of  state  councils  of  churches  from  across  the  United  States  to  share  best  practices and better understand the obstacles and opportunities for people of faith desiring to  have a voice in public policy – who yearn to do justice as part of their Christian calling.   We  seek  to  be  a  resource  for  denominations  and  councils  of  churches  to  help  them  work  ecumenically.     We  give  thanks  for  the  financial  support  we  receive  from  local  churches  and  denominations  and  encourage all to give generously. We will continue to reach out to invite Christians throughout the state  to join us in the work we are called to do as the body of Christ in this time and this place. If you would  like to be in touch with the Council and how we can be supportive, feel free to call me at (508) 380‐8289  or Pcook@nyscoc.org.    Thank you for your partnership with us.    Sincerely, 

39 40  41  42  43 

The Rev. Peter Cook  Executive Director   

120  

2016 Journal Vol. I  
2016 Journal Vol. I