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I SS U E N O. 32

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V OY A G E


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06-07

INTROD UCTION

34-35

INTRODUCING VOYAGE

08-09

STYLE R EPEA TS ITSELF

WRITTEN BY ABBY FRIBUSH

36-40

BON VOYA GE

42-43

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINA VITELLAS

16-17

CH ECKMATE

S WEET DR EAM S PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAGGIE SMERDEL

WRITTEN BY CAROLYNE CROY

10-15

VI N T AG E VOY AG ER

AN ODE T O AR T DEC O WRITTEN BY SOPHIE THOMPSON

44-47

WRITTEN BY EMMA NOLAN

C LOT H ES M AK i n g T H E VOY AG E T O Y OU R C LOS ET W R I T T E N BY N I N A S C H U M AN N

18-19

TH E ORIGINAL VOYAGE

48-49

WRITTEN BY SAMANTHA BAKER

20-21

LESS IS MOR E

50-55

WRITTEN BY EMMA BOGGESS

22-27

LA KESID E

A n Alumna ’s Voyage to Working in Fash ion

56-59

FA SH ION AS A VESSEL WRITTEN BY GRACE CALLAHAN

LA FEM M E P H OTOG R AP H E D BY AN N I E D AVI D

60-61

WRITTEN BY ALICE MOMANY

30-33

POOLS I DE PHOTOGRAPHED BY AVERY SALOMON

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMANDA PARMO

28-29

M AK I N G WAVES I N WAI K I K I WRITTEN BY GABRIELLA DOBSON

T H E AR T OF G OOD C R AFT S M AN S H I P W R I T T E N BY R E G AN O' BR I E N

62

LAS T WOR DS FROM THE EDITORS

COVER PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMANDA SCHWEDER MODELED BY TESSA ROBINSON & GABRIELLA FINDLEY ST YLED BY KATIE MCILROY MAKEUP BY LIV PANGRAZIO

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EDITOR-IN - CH I EF

S T YL I S T S

MA R K E T I N G

CORA HARTER

DANI SPENSIERO

EMILY AMBARGIS

HAILEY LOWE

LAUREN BALSTER

P UBLISHER

KATIE MCILROY

SARAH DAYAN

CAMI CICERO

KATIE ELLSWORTH

SOPHIE MCGAHAN

NINA GROT TO

ASHLEY KRAMER

CREATIVE D I R ECT O R

SARAH OLDFORD

BROOKE SHEFFLER

MAGGIE SMERDEL

SOPHIA SPINELL

CATE FISTER

MAT T ZELDIN

KATE HORVATH

D IRECTORS O F FA SH I O N

ALYSSA JONES

SARA JAMESON

BEN KRAUTHEIM & ALYSSA JONES

ANASTASIA MCDANIEL

SYDNEY BERNARD

HALLE MASKERY

D IRECTORS O F P H O TO G R A P HY

LILLY LANDENWICH

CHRISTINA VITELLAS & ANNIE DAVID

LINDSAY RUSSO MADDIE ZIMPFER RACHEL JOHNSON

CO PY EDIT O R S EMMA NOLAN & CAROLYNE CROY

W R IT E R S

H A I R & MA K E UP A R T I S T S

EMMA BOGGESS

DANI SPENSIERO

GRACE CALLAHAN

JULIANNA SPINA

MOLLY MONSON

LIV PANGRAZIO

NINA SCHUMANN

TORY NOBLE

REGAN O'BRIEN

SOPHIE MONE

SOPHIE THOMPSON

CHEYENNE SHRIEVE

ABBY FRIBUSH

LAUREN PINCIOT TI

ALICE MOMANY

SOPHIE MONE

GABRIELLA DOBSON SAMANTHA BAKER

L A YOUT D E S I GN E R S KATIE BUECKER

S OC I A L ME D I A PH OT OGR A PH E RS

BLOGGERS

CAROLINE CILLEY

EMMA BOGGESS

MOLLY MONSON

GRACIE GLICKMAN

JESSIE DOLBY

SHANNON KELLY

MEGAN GOHEEN

KELSEY LEWIS

SYDNEY NELSON

SARAH SORYAL

MAX RIONDA

ANAKA BRETZKE

GRACE CALLAHAN

AMANDA SCHWEDER

AVA SHAFFER

LAURIN MCNULT Y

KAITLYN LUCENTE

LAUREN BALSTER

MACEY CHAMBERLIN

MARINA CAREY

RACHEL RINEHART

MONET CAVANAUGH

D IRECTOR O F SO CI A L M ED I A

SAMANTHA BAKER

C OMMUN I C A T I ON S

ANASTASIA MCDANIEL

EMMA ENEBAK

JULIA LAGINESS

DEANNA HAY

ABBY FRIBUSH

ESTHER AMONOR

SAM CHRISTIE

D IRECTORS O F M A R K ET I NG

P HO T O G R APHE R S

ALEXA HOOVER

CLARE MAZZEI

ELIZABETH PHELPS & OLIVIA OWENS

AMANDA PARMO

CAROLINE EVANS

KAYEL PUGAZHENTHI

AVERY SALOMON

CHEYENNE SHRIEVE

D IRECTORS O F EV ENT P LA N N IN G

IVY RICHTER

ERIN LARNER

PAIGE BUCKINGHAM & KALENA PENDANG

RACHEL MACNEILL

MAURA GOINS

S OC I A L ME D I A S T YL I S T S

AMANDA SCHWEDER

SYDNEY BERNARD

HAILEY LOWE

D IRECTORS O F CO M M U NI CA T IO N

KATE HARTNER

JORDAN SAUNDERS

KELSEY LEWIS

NINA SCHUMANN & KATE BUCKLEY

KELSEY LEWIS

SOPHIE DORNSIFE

HALLE MASKERY

MONET CAVANAUGH

PEY TON PAWELZYCK

LINDSAY RUSSO

LAUREN SIMON

LUCY SOBEL

BLOG EDIT O R s E V E N T PL AN N E R S

LILLY LANDENWICH

ABBEY KOVACEVICH

PEY TON PAWELCYZK

ADVISO RS

LOUISE ALLISON

WILLIAM PREISS

ANNIE-LAURIE BLAIR & FRED REEDER JR.

MAKENZIE FIGHTMASTER

MILES WHEELER

CACHÉ ROBERTS & JAMIE SANTARELLA

ALEX WALKER MARISA SANDOVAL

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APRIL SHOWERS, BRING MAY FLOWERS. A SIMPLE POEM WITH INTRICATE MEANING. IT PROPOSES HOW A PERIOD OF DISCOMFORT CAN OFTEN STAND AS THE BASIS FOR HAPPINESS AND JOY. I CAN’T THINK OF A BET TER WAY TO INSPIRE OUR SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE; AND MORE IMPORTANTLY, HOLD MEANING FOR THE BREAKTHROUGHS MOTIVATING A SHIFT FORWARD IN 2021. VOYAGE DEFINES THE NEXT STEP IN EMBRACING ADVENTURE THAT MAYBE FELT LOST THIS TIME A YEAR AGO. WHETHER IT BE PHYSICAL TRAVEL OR PERSONAL EXPLORATION, VOYAGE CELEBRATES THE EXPERIENCES THAT WILL LEAD US TO NEW PLACES – THIS TIME, TOGETHER. SHOWCASING SKILLED PHOTOGRAPHY AND PURPOSEFUL ST YLING – THIS ISSUE ENCOMPASSES THE RECENT GROWTH TRANSPIRING IN FASHION, DRAWING US TO APPRECIATE BOTH OLD-TIME FAVORITES AND NEWFOUND LOVES. SHOT BY CHRISTINA VITELLAS ON PAGE 10, THE ENCHANTING PHOTO EDITORIAL “BON VOYAGE” OFFERS A WHIMSICAL, FRENCH-INSPIRED LOOK AT CURRENT SPRING TRENDS. NINA SCHUMANN’S PIECE, “HOW CLOTHES MAKE THE VOYAGE TO YOUR CLOSET,” ON PAGE 44, HIGHLIGHTS THE IMPRESSIVE JOURNEY OF A SMALL -BUSINESS OWNER AND HER UNIQUE PIECES THAT STAND OUT AMONG THE FLOODED SEA OF FAST FASHION. THE FEATURE ARTICLE TITLED “FASHION AS A VESSEL,” WRIT TEN BY GRACE CALLAHAN FOUND ON PAGE 30, CONSIDERS THE DEFINITION OF VOYAGE IN A THOUGHTFUL CONTEXT, INTERTWINING INNOVATION OF 18TH-CENTURY SHIPS WITH MODERN SELF -EXPRESSION. “POOLSIDE” PRESENTS A RETRO AND YET SOPHISTICATED SPIN ON A TIMELESS LOOK. PHOTOGRAPHED BY AVERY SALOMON ON PAGE 50, IT FEATURES CLASSIC COLORS AND A STUNNING SET. THE ARTICLE ON PAGE 34, WRIT TEN BY ABBY FRIBUSH, SPOTLIGHTS A THRIFT-STORE GEM LOCATED IN THE QUEEN CIT Y: CINCINNATI, OHIO. WITH THE ST YLING FEATURING PIECES FROM PIXEL 19 AND SWEET DALILAH VINTAGE, IT’S A MUST-SEE ODE TO LASTING CLASSICS. AS WE FINALLY BEGIN TO EMBRACE OUR TRANSITION INTO NEW FRONTIERS, I HOPE THAT THIS ISSUE PROMPTS YOU TO FIND YOUR OWN MEANING FOR VOYAGE, WHATEVER THAT MAY BE.

MUCH UP LOVE,

CORA HARTER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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V OYAG E

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TO E M B A R K O N A J O U R N E Y; S E E K I N G N E W C O N V E N T I O N & E M B R AC I N G OUT-OF-COMFORT EXPERIENCE

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STYLE REPEATS ITSELF

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W RITTEN BY CAROLYNE CROY

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AVERY SALOMON / MODELED BY MARY ANDERSON & MILANA YARBROUGH / ST YLED BY HALLE MASKERY / MAKEUP BY JULIANNA SPINA

Romance. It’s a term we’re all familiar with, whether we welcome it as an old friend or avoid it at all costs. While the word is most often associated with a relationship, romance can be found in nearly every aspect of life – art, music, cinema, and of course, fashion. Billowing skirts, puffed sleeves and exaggerated bodily proportions were all defining characteristics of the Romantic era of fashion in the mid-1800s. This whimsical style has recently reappeared in the wildly successful “Bridgerton” series, reviving the passionate and picturesque trends of nearly two centuries ago. Vogue, who describes the show’s fashion as “fantastical,” reports that since the series’ debut, corset sales have risen by 123%. Of course, the fluctuation and reappearance of trends from the past extend far beyond the confines of “Bridgerton,” as fashion in its nature is cyclical. The cycle that trends experience from the time they are at the height of popularity to deemed out-of-style follows a five-step process: introduction, increase, peak, decline and obscurance.

endured modifications to reflect the beauty standards of the time. And just like the fashion cycle, body types and society’s idea of the “perfect figure” has also had rises and falls in popularity. The question as to whether ideal body types influence fashion – or if fashion influences the ideal body type – is constantly debated. In the ‘20s, a slim and boyish figure championed the beauty standard. The full-skirt silhouette of the ‘50s accentuated the ideal womanly figure with birthing hips. However, classic styles maintained their status and reputation because of constant innovation to reflect standards. The surplus of time we’ve spent in confinement this past year has intensified our longing for a time of indulgence and luxury. Shows like “Bridgerton” amplify our appreciation for long-forgotten silhouettes and bring back old trends like the corset. Perhaps the reason we as a society recycled a trend from such a magnificent era traces back to human appreciation of nostalgia and romanticization of a resplendent past.

In this cycle, timing plays an integral role. If a trend moves into any stage preemptively, it’s deemed a fad and burns out almost instantly. If a particular trend experiences an increase or decline, without ever reaching its full potential, it’s considered basic or boring. When a trend doesn’t lag in one area of the cycle, but also doesn’t move too quickly through the stages themselves, it becomes a classic and timeless look. Anna Wintour, the editor-in-chief of Vogue, precisely sums up these inner workings, stating, “It’s always about timing. If it’s too soon, no one understands. If it’s too late, everyone’s forgotten.” A trend that’s had impeccable timing is the little black dress. Commonly referred to as the LBD, it first came into the fashion cycle in the 1920s and is still considered a staple 100 years later. Though in the digital age we live in today, new trends appear daily. Social media and society are systematically fast-paced. Innovation is necessary to be successful, and looking to the past for inspiration generates unique content. But just as the LBD has maintained its essential status, it’s

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B ON VOYAGE V

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINA VITELLAS MODELED BY ELLIE LYON & ESTHER AMONOR ST YLED BY ALYSSA JONES & MADDIE ZIMPFER MAKEUP BY LAUREN PINCIOT TI

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(IN COLLABORATION WITH MUSE MANAGEMENT)

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C HEC KMATE

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY IVY RICHTER / MODELED BY KENNEDY SULTON & BEN FINFROCK / ST YLED BY KATIE ELLSWORTH / MAKEUP BY JULIANNA SPINA

WRITT EN BY EMMA N OL AN

than a way to pass the time; it’s an experience.

After dinner throughout the first months of quarantine, my family and I would meet in our living room to end the night with a board game. Long nights of Sorry and Cards Against Humanity brought laughter and excitement to a long day of stress, turning faces warmer with amusement.

As Piecework sales began to soar, other companies and beloved brands started to take their creative spin on romanticizing the old-fashioned board game. Anthropologie started to sell rainbow Jenga and cocktail-themed Gin Rummy. Urban Outfitters created Jane Austen-themed Tarot cards and beautifully painted playing decks.

Not only were games a pastime for both my family and others across the globe, but the art of DIY projects also garnered attention. While staying inside, people began to take on interior design to revive the aesthetic of their homes. From painting walls to renovating bathrooms, the need for change inspired creativity. Social media and trending Netflix shows not only prompted these renovations but encouraged purchases of new items to amplify the ambiance of the home. Beautifully designed board games and cards unexpectedly became decorative pieces. Now, not only is Backgammon a great game, but also an elegant centerpiece. One brand, Piecework, pioneered the desire for these delightfully designed games. Launching in 2019, it began to market puzzles ranging from 100 to 1,000 pieces – with the final product displaying disco-inspired party scenes and fabulous fruit displays. Each puzzle serves as the perfect coffee table decor or book end with a simple box design and color-specific theme. The puzzles are fun excursions on their own, but the company also creates corresponding Spotify playlists to listen to while completing them. The “Champagne Problems” set features female anthems by Lizzo and Britney Spears – while “Gone Fishin’” gives players Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash. Combining art, entertainment and music all in one place shows how the modern puzzle is more

Conversation games like We’re Not Really Strangers, Let’s Get Deep and Holstee gained wide popularity for fostering the importance of human connection. With hundreds of cards asking questions about dreams and life goals, players’ responses are reminders about the importance of relationships and contact during a time when many feel isolated. A device for both design and connection, these games have served as a tool of unity during the past 12 months of the pandemic. Alongside board and card games inspiring new aesthetics, Netflix’s release of The Queen’s Gambit sparked re-interest in the timeless game of chess – and the return of the muchloved checkered print. With its debut last October, the limited series brought light back into the love of this classic pattern. As we saw in the fall, checkered pants and high-waisted jeans flooded Instagram and online shopping sites. Popular Tik Tok fashion accounts featured videos sharing their favorite outfits inspired by the show. Fashion Week featured the ‘70s inspired checkered fur coats and Tom Ford skirts, and it seemed like fashion mirrored the way we spent our time at home. Despite the repetition of long days indoors, there’s no doubt that quarantine has provided us with an opportunity to make unconventional memories with family and friends. And now, many of us have long nights of beautifully crafted puzzles and Monopoly to look forward to.

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YAGE: O V

RE M E M B E RIN G TH E O RIGIN A L

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W RITTEN BY SAMANTHA BAKE R

Large online markets, like eBay and Etsy, are hosts to a few Voyage pieces, but you’ll have better luck on smaller online consignment sites like Isabella’s Wardrobe.

Even if you weren’t there, you’ve probably seen the photos — denim on denim, chokers and JNCO jeans. Not everything from the ‘90s has had its come back. However, some trends have inevitably lasted the test of time – like Kate Moss’ iconic brand: Voyage.

You can never truly pinpoint when nostalgia will rear its head. Some argue it’s a 20-year cycle (things that were popular in the ‘90s will be nostalgic in the 2000s) and others say it’s more or less.

Voyage’s fleeting reign resulted in scarce information about the label – a lost shipwreck in the sea of forgotten brands. Evidence of its existence now lies in old British magazines like The Guardian and Daily Mail.

Even if you weren’t alive to experience something for yourself, the internet has become an excellent archive for all things worthy of nostalgia. Stars like Kendall Jenner and trendy teens on TikTok and Instagram sport this vintage ‘90s and 2000s inspired fashion.

Voyage was born in England and run by a single, Italian fashion family: the Mazillis. The brand prided itself on being completely handmade; no two pieces were exactly the same. Even when partnering with Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman, everything was still handcrafted and given a tag that read, “Voyage: Invest in the original.” Everything about Voyage was exclusive – including door policy. According to a Vogue article, the London boutique required a “privilege pass” to shop, famously turning away Madonna and Naomi Campbell.

With its colorful patterns and textures, a Voyage item may be seen as a statement piece next to today's monochromatic street fashion. And yet, that’s how it all started: by standing out. Ultimately, the brand didn’t have a long voyage, but it had a memorable one. PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAGGIE SMERDEL MODELED BY HAYES BURK ST YLED BY SARAH OLDFORD

In a few short years, Voyage became a well-known name (thanks to some help from Moss!) In addition to being one of the ‘90s biggest supermodels, Moss was a style icon. It was a perfect fit: The London-born model and the Londonborn brand. Soon, Voyage was seen on Cher, Gwyneth Paltrow and Nicole Kidman. Thanks to its unique pieces and A-list clientele, Voyage is credited with kick-starting the boho-chic craze. But this story isn’t without its setbacks. The Voyage shop closed in 2002, but many critics say Voyage’s fashion moment was over before that. By the late ‘90s, Voyage-inspired pieces were nearly everywhere and with a much more affordable price tag. Though, at the end of the day, nothing beats the original. Today, you can find Voyage pieces online going for well over $100. As the trends of the ‘90s continue to come back, why buy cheap imitations when you can invest in the one-of-a-kind original?

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LESS

W R I T T E N BY SA M A N T H A BA K E R

IS

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Have you ever looked at the ingredients label on your skincare products? You’ll probably notice plenty of indecipherable scientific jargon at first glance. In order to make ingredient lists more understandable, the clean beauty trend is working to simplify what goes into these products. Specifically by omitting chemical and synthetic ingredients and labeling them as “toxic.” Since the emergence of clean beauty, a plethora of brands have sprung up, touting the labels “chemical-free,” “all-natural” and emphasizing products derived from nature. Prime examples include: goop (Gwyneth Paltrow’s clean lifestyle/ beauty brand) and the CLEAN at Sephora marketing campaign. In addition to natural ingredients, clean beauty also emphasizes vegan and cruelty-free products. In the New York Times article “Why You Should Care About Vegan Beauty,” Andrea Cheng addresses the difference between vegan and cruelty-free. “Vegan beauty means the absence of animal ingredients, while cruelty-free refers to a product that doesn’t test on animals. In other words, it’s possible for a vegan item to have been tested on an animal and a cruelty-free product to contain animal ingredients.” There are some brands, however, that are both vegan and cruelty-free, such as ELF, Lush, The Ordinary and Biossance. Veganism isn’t simply healthier for animals and the planet but also for your skin. An article in Vogue Australia asserts, “The truth is, without animal ingredients, vegan products are actually better for your skin, especially if you’re someone with sensitive or condition-prone skin. Animal ingredients can be harsh and clog pores, so vegan products are a soothing alternative.” Customers have single-handedly upended the conventions of the industry. Prior to the movement’s demands, there was little to no regulation or accountability within most corporations. So how exactly have consumers contributed to the changing beauty landscape? The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is one platform that has fought for increased regulation. The EWG pushed the Cosmetic Safety Enhancement Act, which passed in March 2020. According to its website, “The bill would, among other provisions, require cosmetics companies to substantiate the safety of their products...give the FDA the power to conduct its own safety reviews, and man

date that manufacturers provide more transparency about ingredients on their labels.” Dermatologists and chemists of the scientific skincare community have questioned some of the notions set forth by the clean beauty community, such as the validity of its claims about toxic ingredients. While there are still arguments around legitimacy, both sides can agree on increased accountability within the beauty landscape. Accountability allows for trust between customers and the companies they buy from. According to an article by Beauty Independent, transparency is not just listing each ingredient on the label but including where ingredients are sourced and what function they serve in the final product. Explanations on the role of each ingredient are an integral component. One common misbelief is that synthetic ingredients are harmful to the body. Skincare by Hyram, a skincare specialist and influencer, explains why some clean beauty brands have created unnecessary fear toward certain ingredients in his video “The Problem with ‘Clean’ Beauty.” He claims that the movement vilifies safe ingredients, such as parabens, silicones and chemical preservatives. There is no scientific evidence that these ingredients are toxic; only an extremely high concentration would be potentially dangerous, which would never occur in a beauty product. This misinformation can be avoided when businesses are clear about what each ingredient does in their product. A brand can be safe, ethical and sustainable even if it does include synthetic ingredients. One skincare brand that emphasizes ethicality and sustainability alongside quality ingredients is Youth to the People. According to Skincare by Hyram, common ingredients in Youth to the People’s products are Vitamin B5, Vitamin C and Alfalfa Extract, which are incredibly good for the skin. Youth to the People is also vegan and cruelty-free, and they use entirely recyclable and reusable glass containers that even have vegetable-based ink for the print. A multitude of other companies are actively combining transparent and ethical practices to make quality skincare products. Some of these include The Ordinary, The Body Shop and Krave Beauty. Customers deserve to know why an ingredient is included in a product, whether naturally derived or synthetically made. With consumers’ continuing efforts, the beauty industry is evolving for the health of people and the planet.

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Photographed by Amanda Parmo Styling by Gianni Rosa & Christian Wurzelbacher Modeled by Jaylen Perkins & Dante Rossi

side

lake

AN EDITORIAL

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l ake


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PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMANDA PARMO / MODELED BY GRACE CALLAHAN, MAC HIPPENHAMMER & GRACE CARLOS / ST YLED BY LILLY LANDENWICH, HAILEY LOWE & DANI SPENSIERO / MAKEUP BY DANI SPENSIERO


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FRO M OHIO T O NEW Y ORK

AN ALUMNI’S VOYAGE TO WORKING IN LUXURY FASHION

W RITTEN BY ALICE MOMANY

A typical workday for Kendall Erickson consists of collaborating on photoshoots, pitching design ideas in team meetings and creating promotions for email pushes. As a graphic designer working for Coach’s Creative Studio in New York City, there’s never a dull moment. After graduating from Miami University in 2019, Erickson had no intention of moving to the Big Apple. The summer before, she interned in Philadelphia and planned to return the following year. However, when she received a second interview at Coach,

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she found herself placing a deposit on a tiny apartment in the heart of Manhattan. Although she’s been a proud New Yorker for almost two years now, her transition from a small rural college town to the most populated city in the United States wasn’t easy. From learning to navigate the subway to living in an apartment the size of a dorm room, she felt overwhelmed trying to establish herself in a place that’s already home to millions of people. “I never really thought about New York, but I just started applying to a bunch of different stuff just to see where things would go,” Erickson said. After Erickson left Oxford, Ohio, she moved to the city a few months later. Even though she felt lost amongst the tourists and skyscrapers, her greatest obstacle wasn’t the location. She left the driven student who was safe in the confines of campus. “I think the most challenging thing was coming to terms with the fact I was becoming someone new,” Erickson said. “I was definitely changing in terms of who I was and what I valued, what I wanted to do on the weekends and what I wanted to experience.” So what did a day in her new life look like? It started bright and early at 6 a.m. – a quick workout before making breakfast and packing her lunch. She either walked 40 minutes to the Coach office or endured a 30-minute subway ride from her apartment. Once she arrived, she attended a daily meeting with the graphic design department to discuss anything from advertising and marketing strategies to photoshoot inspiration. After brainstorming with her team, she headed to her desk to design the layout for upcoming promotional emails.

that it’s starting to get better. “I feel like [New York] is so much more lively, there’s a new energy that’s restarting, people are hopeful and excited,” Erickson said. Erickson optimistically looks forward to her future voyage and what that means for her graphic design career. In her free time, she enjoys creating pieces for her portfolio and freelancing on the side. She believes having interest projects are essential to preventing feeling burnt out at work. “Once you get into your career, it’s hard sometimes to go into something you really like to do,” Erickson said. “Because graphic design is one of my passions, but now it’s my job, it’s really easy for it to feel like a job.” In ten years, she hopes to further her career at Coach – either advancing into an art direction or production role. She also wants to get involved with the photography aspect of advertising. As for NYC, which she initially deemed dirty and crowded, she can’t imagine herself living anywhere else. “I think I fell in love with New York,” Erickson said. “The people come together in the city like more than any other that I’ve seen. I remember when we were in the horrible midst of March last year, and every night people would open their windows and clap and bang pots and pans to support the healthcare workers.” After two years of adapting to the city that once towered over her, Erickson anticipates what the future of her career holds. She recognizes the opportunities and growth that Coach can offer her.

After less than a year working in NYC, Erickson found herself having to navigate a new journey. Early into March, Coach began discussing the possibility of transitioning to working remotely.

“It was the biggest learning experience of my life and the biggest push that made me who I am today.”

The company planned to stay virtual for two weeks but ultimately decided to keep employees working at home for three months. The company went through a series of reorganizations, and Erickson logged on every day unsure if she still had a job.

C O U R TE S Y O F KE N DA L L E R I C KS O N

For now, she still works remotely and plans to until September. After a year of quarantining in an empty city, she recognizes

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fashion as a vessel

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There was a time where making your way from point A to point B was possible only by foot. So, people stayed put. Communities remained uniform, and discovery was insubstantial. However, around 4000 BC the ancient Egyptians built what are thought to be the first sailing boats in the world. These sailing boats, made from reeds, were used to travel the lengths of the Nile River. From here, boats remained the only man-made method of transportation until the invention of the hot air balloon in the 18th century. These inventions changed the course of history, opening the gate to worldwide expeditions. From fishing and water transport, to global commerce and migration, boats and ships have remained a pinnacle of exploration and discovery. As water transportation evolved, the world flourished into a sophisticated web of global travel and trade. Finally, the wonders of the Earth could be fully expressed without inhibition, from the depths of every valley to the peak of every mountain. How do we feel this same level of uninhibited discovery within ourselves? While there’s no roadmap for self-expression, the clothes we wear are among the foundational ways we tell the world who we are. Therefore, fashion is one of the most powerful tools we have for exploring our identity and expressing who we are or want to become. Fashion is entangled with our constructions and reconstructions of identity and how we represent the nuance within our lives. Our constant evolution of self-expression and sense of style are destined to ebb and flow as fluid ways of understanding ourselves. In turn, our appearance and personal style is a complex metaphor for identity representing the many folds of our values, culture and character. One of the designers involved in Miami University Fashion and Design (MUF&D), Ilsa Shaikh, believes fashion has served as an incredible way to express her Pakistani heritage and Muslim faith. “Modesty, in my culture, was a means for me to channel fashion

and a way of expressing myself and where I was from,” Shaikh said. “I didn’t have to break my culture and traditions and faith in order to express myself.” Although Shaikh initially struggled to find a balance between remaining modest while still having fun with fashion, she says she now chooses to explore this through prints, colors and funky pieces. “I realized fashion and modesty could come together in this really impressive, expressive way,” Shaikh said. “You can be modest and cute and fun and still express yourself, and that really helped with my self-identity.” As a designer, Shaikh thinks of her Pakistani heritage while completing looks for the organization’s annual fashion show and hopes to express her culture through her designs. “I want to show that clothes that are long and covered can be so much fun and by no means are they restricting. In fact, there’s so much more you can do and so much more to work with,” Shaikh said. Shaikh is hyper-aware of the impact style has on our understanding of ourselves and others, especially upon first impressions. “I think it says a lot about yourself...everybody has clothes that make them feel comfortable even if they’re not physically comfortable, just emotionally comfortable.” Another MUF&D fashion designer, Ellie Lemanowicz, also expresses gratitude toward fashion and how it’s allowed her to express her individuality. “Fashion helps me express myself in so many ways,” Lemanowicz said. “When designing, fashion helps me convey my ideas to the world, and it also lets me leave my imprint.” Lemanowicz also recognizes the importance of fashion in storytelling through both her style choices and designs. “I believe that fashion is the ultimate form of self-expression,” Lemanowicz said. “Fashion can convey one’s culture, a concept, or one’s beliefs. Fashion is an art form – it’s a statement and it’s more powerful than you may know.” From stained, hole-ridden sweatpants to a fitted Dolce & Gabbana dress, all clothing tells a story. The beauty of it is that you aren’t married to one story or another.

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Whether we choose it or not, fashion bridges the gap between our inner selves and outer appearance. It’s a way in which we take control over our physical presence. A way for us to tailor our naked forms, to design our existence. It is a vessel for our self-exploration.

WRIT TEN BY GRACE CALLAHAN

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMANDA SCHWEDER MODELED BY TESSA ROBINSON & GABRIELLA FINDLEY ST YLED BY KATIE MCILROY MAKEUP BY LIV PANGRAZIO

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V I NTAG E VOYAG E R PHOTOGRAPHED BY RACHEL MACNEILL

W R I T T E N BY A B BY F R I B U S H

MODELED BY DELAND MCCULLOUGH & SOPHIE MONE ST YLED BY RACHEL MACNEILL & MADDIE ZIMPFER

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While thrifting has been trendy since the ‘70s, it’s exploded in popularity the past year among younger generations. Sustainable fashion is becoming more important to shoppers and it’s no surprise that Cincinnati-based wholesale warehouse Pixel 19 Vintage/Sweet Dahlia Vintage had a viral TikTok showcasing its massive collection of authentic pieces this past year. Stu “Vintage King” Nizny started Pixel 19 Vintage as a teen in the late ‘80s, selling out of his apartment. While his shop and fashion trends have gone through many changes throughout the years, it’s since evolved into an eclectic, curated shopping experience that people all across the nation come to discover. “The warehouse is 10,000 square feet of hand-picked vintage,” said Nizny. “We have about 300,000 units at all times. I bring in a truckload of fresh inventory every other day.” Since the beginning, the store has operated on an appointmentonly basis, allowing customers to schedule a time to come in and hunt for specific pieces or just to explore the decades worth of retro items in-store. From ‘90s denim and ‘30s silk nightgowns, to ‘60s abstract paintings, the warehouse is nothing short of a time capsule with something for everyone. The ample space is shared by Nizny’s more recent business partner Amanda Hale, owner of Sweet Dahlia Vintage, which specializes in women’s vintage from the ‘30s to the ‘90s. Hale also began her journey as a teen and connected with Nizny after graduating college at Xavier University.

themselves, and while this can be exhausting, Nizny sees the benefits. “My advantage is that I lived through the eras that kids are enamored with, so I have a more discerning eye when picking vintage,” he said. Nizny is always on the hunt for quality pieces. Whether it is going to private homes or just buying from local sellers, Nizny is sure to keep the warehouse stocked with the best items in Cincinnati. Pixel 19 Vintage is coming up on their ninth year at their current Cincinnati warehouse location in Lower Price Hill, and Nizny is focused on keeping customers happy. “I think what’s next for Pixel 19 Vintage is just being consistent,” he said. “When I see someone find something from my shop that makes them smile and laugh, to me that’s the most important thing.” The warehouse with both Pixel 19 Vintage and Sweet Dahlia Vintage are currently open to the public. Call or text Stu “Vintage King” Nizny at 513-476-2333 to make an appointment, and check out the shops on Instagram at: @Pixel19VintageClothing and @SweetDahliaVintage.

“I started selling on Etsy ten years ago as a sort of experiment to downsize some of my clothing collection,” she said. Hale joined Nizny in operating the warehouse because she saw a lack of accessibility in the vintage community. “Part of wanting to open our clothing warehouse was to have more affordable options,” she said. “While our local competitors are more on the retail side of things, over threefourths of our warehouse collection is $20 or less.” With such an extensive yet affordable collection, it’s pretty understandable that the warehouse is consistently ranked among the best vintage shops in Cincinnati. “We literally live and breathe vintage seven days a week,” Nizny said. Both he and Hale own and operate the warehouse by

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SWEET DREAMS

AN EDITORIAL

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAGGIE SMERDEL MODELED BY EMMA OAKS & JAYLEN WHITE ST YLED BY NINA GROT TO & RACHEL JOHNSON

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Photographed by Olivia Wilson Styling by Sarah Oldford Makeup by McKenna Meyers Modeled by Maddi Whissell


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THE SKY'S THE LIMIT:AN ODE TO ART DECO WRITTEN BY SOPHIE THOMPSON Sitting in the heart of New York City lies the crown jewel of the infamous skyline: the Empire State Building. At 1,454 feet high, the Empire State Building broke two world records when it first opened in 1931. As both the tallest building in the world and the first structure to have more than 100 stories, it’s since become an international landmark.

early ‘30s in newfound freedom and appreciation for the arts. As a sign of welcoming the future, architects took advantage of Art Deco to push the boundaries of what buildings could do, resulting in some of the most famous and beautiful skyscrapers we know today.

However, the charm and classic elegance of the Empire State Building would not be possible without the inspiration of Art Deco. It owes its sleek, stacked silhouette and brilliant, blazing lobby ornamentation to this style’s precepts. It’s influenced thousands of artists to create new innovative designs and embrace society's modernity and technology. “I think that it’s fascinating,” said Annie Dell’Aria, an assistant art professor at Miami University. “I think that the look of it is very appealing, and that’s one of the reasons it was so popular.” According to a 2016 article in Architectural Digest, Art Deco began in France, officially emerging as a new style during the 1925 World Fair in Paris. It’s usually characterized by sharp, smooth lines, bright colors and geometric patterns (such as zigzagging and triangles). It also takes influence from various other art styles, rejecting the curving, delicate forms of Art Nouveau and drawing on the fractured, abstract tenets of Cubism.

Many of them reside in New York City, like the Chrysler Building, completed in 1930. The Chrysler Building is one of the most recognizable examples of Art Deco, with its simple, linear shape and distinguishable tower culminating in rounded tiers with radiating triangles. It utilizes stainless steel as a sign of modernity in the forms of its spire and small eagle heads, which jut out over the ledge below the tower. It also showcases colorful artwork in the lobby that expresses a contemporary theme.

The movement debuted as a response to the end of World War I as society looked to forget the past and focus on new horizons. Art Deco was seen as a celebration of life, living in the present and seizing new opportunities for growth and change. “It’s using the embrace of the machine, but perhaps a little bit more open to the human element,” Dell’Aria said. “You saw Art Deco themes and motifs in a variety of contexts, not just within avant-garde circles or the uber-rich.” Art Deco flourished in the ‘20s. According to an article by Encyclopedia Britannica, the economy was booming, which merited expensive materials and lavish but graceful decoration. It dramatically affected the fashion industry, emphasizing bold colors and repeated patterns. No matter the industry, Art Deco found ways to filter through, blanketing the 1920s and

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Art Deco revitalized the decorative arts. According to Dell’Aria, decorative artists were highly sought after – sharing equal status to respected painters and sculptors of the time. To this day, American museums showcase these artists’ expert craftsmanship, featuring everything from tea sets to furniture design. “It’s really part of the art historical story that we tell, so that gives these things a certain preciousness,” Dell’Aria said. These relics of the past continue to stand the test of time and inspire us today. After years of worry and hardship from World War I, people looked to Art Deco for hope and positivity. They allowed these buildings to guide them into new and improved tomorrows. “There is this optimism that you associate with Art Deco,” Dell’Aria said. Art Deco works speak to the future, yet we now view them with nostalgia – forging a timeless connection between the past and present. Now, as we slowly start to navigate a world left altered by COVID-19, we follow in the footsteps of those from the Art Deco era, recognizing these time-honored artworks as pillars of strength and reassurance. Under the guiding hand and influence of Art Deco, we can embark on a voyage to new beginnings, adapting to whatever comes our way.


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HOW CLOTHES MAKE THE

VOYA G E

FROM PRODUCTION TO YOUR CLOSET 4 4 | S S 21


written by nina schumann

Where have clothing garments truly been before they meet the consumer, and how does this journey differ from brand to brand? 4 5 | S S 21


It’s a voyage characterized by hundreds of countries, languages and cultures – strung together across thousands of miles and people. It’s the global journey demanded of any one garment manufactured and produced by leading fashion retailers of today. Made in China, India, Vietnam and more, these foreign lands mark the tags of so much of our American merchandise that we rarely pause to wonder: Where has our garment been before it reaches our closet? How many pit stops did it take along the way?

get that cheap price,” Stoel said. “In the last couple of decades when fast fashion first came onto the scene, we saw a pretty significant decrease in the quality and price of apparel that is available to shoppers.”

We frequently acknowledge these labels that link our blouses and jeans to their origins, but it’s unclear to consumers just how complicated a product’s voyage might have been before reaching their wardrobes.

Enter Yannah Jones, a 21-year-old aspiring designer and student at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, whose fashion brand oppositely rests upon ideals of quality artisanship and client personalization – no matter how tedious the production process.

According to Dr. Monique Murfield, Miami University Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management, the production journey that our “American” clothing garments endure is almost always a complex and far-reaching one. “If you think about large fashion brands with supply chains spread out all over the globe, they have thousands of suppliers with manufacturing in many countries around the world,” Murfield said. “Then, the companies are shipping that product in bulk to their different distribution locations, which then goes to stores and directly out to customers.” Thus, the mere fabric that shapes an “American” garment can travel around several countries all before ever meeting its wearer. In essence, the most sedentary phase of a garment’s life is likely to be only after final purchase. According to Murfield, the production processes of these large retailers become even more Herculean when you add speed into the garment’s journey. “Think about how they’re turning that process around to get new products through that entire supply chain very quickly, every time they’re introducing new merchandise,” Murfield said. Leslie Stoel, Miami University Marketing and Fashion Professor, said that mass-retailer business models are forced to account for this level of speed, both to meet the rapid demand of their consumers and to churn out new collections on a regular basis. “They’re trading off quality versus price, as it’s a low quality to

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For some modern fashion designers, though, the name of the game isn’t about producing the cheapest possible garment, low-quality pieces or collections at incredible speeds. Even in 2021, a year and fashion era that may appear to be dominated by these retailer giants, some fashion creatives still wish to slow the creative journey down.

According to Jones, the brand she is building, Bernelli Designs, affords a garment journey that incorporates both the consumer and her own design style into every phase of creation. “I want the client to be very involved in the garment’s production so that they get exactly what they’re imagining,” Jones said. “It’s kind of like they’re designing through me.” Born in the Dominican Republic but raised in The Hamptons, Jones has undergone a number of life voyages of her own. She attributes her strong, innate brand aesthetic to her heritage and worldly upbringing. “Being from these very nautical and tropical areas, I have a very strong idea of resort wear,” Jones said. “I like to describe my brand aesthetic as a very soft, feminine, romantic look – something modern and sophisticated, but still very playful.” The Bernelli Designs Instagram account depicts Jones’ collection of feminine garments, romantic shapes, bold sleeves, refined embellishments, neutral and pastel fabrics and effortless movement. The rest of Jones’ online brand and social media presence has not gone unnoticed either. After earning her AAS degree in Fashion Design in December 2020 and at the suggestion of her 14-year-old sister, Jones joined TikTok during the height of quarantine. She made a page for her brand that has since amassed an audience of over 26.7 thousand followers and 512 thousand likes.


“So, I just started sewing and sewing and sewing,” Jones said, of her response to the initial TikTok success. Jones said that her audience seems to resonate most with her TikTok content that documents a behind-the-scenes glimpse into how her garments are delicately designed and custommade. She believes this is because the production journey at the mainstream mass-retailer level is so foreign and obscure to the average American consumer. “I am trying to be as transparent as I can,” Jones said. “With this whole concept of fast fashion at hand, it brings up another question of, ‘who really is the designer and who is creating the pieces?’” Jones said she does not aim for this kind of exclusivity or ambiguity in her brand design process. In fact, she values actively communicating with the client to reach a personalized approach to every product’s aesthetic, sizing and price.

consumer. “The owner gets a much stronger feel for what the customer wants and can then truly serve a smaller group of people.” The expedited voyage that clothing garments venture on within large fashion retailers is one of great connectivity and mass-production – an immense task of human collaboration, zipping between countries, across oceans and over laboring hands. Conversely, a Bernelli Designs garment voyage looks much different: an abundantly personal process, a labor of love, artfully stitched together by the same knowing fingers. Two extraordinary expeditions whose routes look massively different – though neither feat any more or less of a journey than the other.

Contrasting the production process of relevant American fast fashion companies, Jones’ brand represents the antithesis of the utter speed and global complex nature of mass-retailer production. Instead, Bernelli Designs romanticizes the creative voyage that delicate garment production can be – slowing down to savor quality craftsmanship and design. Jones savors her frequent treks to the Manhattan Garment District where she hand-selects her stunning fabrics and prints for her upcoming designs – a sort of smaller journey within each garment’s greater expedition. “I’m trying to veer away from what those mass-retailer companies are doing because of this instant gratification factor that they inherently afford, ” Jones said. “Most people who buy in bulk from those companies don’t put much value into it, it’s just about receiving the package. Whereas, when you’ll wear a piece of mine, you’ll know that not only I put work into it, but you did as well – it’s something unique to you and it's one-of-a-kind.” According to Leslie Stoel, she hopes that there is a nearing rebirth for this more intimate art form and approach to garment production as practiced by Bernelli Designs. “There really is that personal touch and that bond,” Stoel said, of the unique relationship between smaller brands and the

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY IVY RICHTER MODELED BY MORGAN LANTZ ST YLED BY SOPHIA SPINELL MAKEUP BY TORY NOBLE

MAKING WAVES IN WAIKIKI WRITTEN B Y GAB R I EL L A D OB S ON

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Imagine traveling on a whim and waking up to a new adventure each morning. Imagine reinventing yourself in a new place, doing things you’ve never done before. Morgan Lantz did more than imagine – she did it. Lantz, a junior at Miami University, took a brave leap of faith one bitterly cold December morning and left for the island of Oahu. For the next two months, she stayed primarily in the neighborhood of Waikiki. After living in Ohio for 21 years, Hawaii called out to her. Lantz found herself always looking forward to beach trips growing up. Imagining herself steps away from the gorgeous white sand and clear blue water motivated her voyage. Even some of Lantz’s closest friends chose to tag along. However, while they pursued their creative careers in writing and art – Lantz decided to pursue herself. She came back at the end of January a more mature and emotionally aware version of herself. “I was able to take this time away from people I’m constantly around,” said Lantz. “Through reflection, I gained a better realization of the priorities in my life and took action to cut out anything negative.” During her time on the island, she encountered new things around every corner. Not a day went by where she didn’t discover something unique.

saying, “let’s hang out,” she said, “let’s cruise later.” One of her most memorable experiences was a 5 a.m. trip to a hidden natural pool in Diamond Head, south of Waikiki. Lantz and her friends woke up feeling adventurous, so they rented a car and traveled to watch the sunrise. They didn’t imagine they’d have crabs chasing them from all angles while climbing the wall past where the waves broke. But once they overcame the barrier, they felt the sweet reward of dipping into the water while watching the colors of the morning. On those special days when she would rent a car, she traveled to different parts of the island looking for new adventures. She was visiting all ends of the island’s beaches, eating out of local food trucks, hiking up mountain ridges and jumping off waterfalls. Sometimes it can be hard to explain how a trip can change someone’s life, but she found herself living a much healthier lifestyle in Hawaii and she brought that back with her to Ohio. Lantz was fortunate enough to experience this once-in-alifetime journey. Of course, she can always go again, but it will never compare to her first experience. She left Hawaii a better version of herself, and she’s eager to go back. “I love my friends and family that are here in Ohio, but at this point in my life Hawaii is where I need to be.”

“It’s easy to say that, at first, my life in Hawaii was somewhat surreal,” said Lantz. She spent her time indulging herself in a different culture from the one she grew up in. She ate new and exciting foods such as poke, a native Hawaiian dish consisting of chopped raw fish. Much Hawaiian cooking is Japanese influenced, such as udon – a thick noodle popularly used as comfort food. Locals of Hawaii tend to eat plant-based foods to preserve the environment, so Lantz ate a lot of banana-made ice cream too. She learned about the fashion trends and what people typically wear on a day-to-day basis. Everyone lives in their swimsuit, and when they aren’t, they favor clothing at local boutiques. One of her favorite boutiques on the island, Mahina, sells silky maxi dresses, beach pullovers and a variety of tank tops. She learned lingo from her newfound local friends and saw how it differed from her home in the Midwest. Instead of

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PO OL side

AN EDITORIAL

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY AVERY SALOMON MODELED BY AUDRA VANROBOYS, NAOMI FRITZ & MAT T ZELDIN ST YLED BY SARAH OLDFORD, BEN KRAUTHEIM & MAT T ZELDIN MAKEUP BY JULIANNA SPINA

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La Femme AN EDITORIAL

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'Feminine power is

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANNIE DAVID MODELED BY VANLANDRIA SMITH-LASH & KATIE ELLSWORTH ST YLED BY LINDSAY RUSSO MAKEUP BY SOPHIE MONE

a force to be reckoned with'

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L A FEMME

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THE ART OF GOOD CRAFTSMANSHIP W RITTEN BY REGAN O’BRIEN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MONET CAVANAUGH / MODELED BY SAMPADA TRIVEDI / STYLED BY ANASTASIA MCDANIEL / MAKEUP BY SOPHIE MONE

Sitting at my grandmother’s dining room table, I had a hard time taking my eyes off of the beads in front of me. All of the different colors, textures and shapes, I could never choose which one’s I liked best. I’d run my fingers along the glass spheres laid out on the table, as she strung them onto a thin wire that would soon become a necklace. When I was little, my grandmother, who I call Omi, would make jewelry for all of the women in our family. Omi would give them to us for holidays and birthdays, becoming some of the most cherished gifts I received. Jewelry is a funny thing. Something so simple and delicate can hold so much meaning to someone, yet there’s a whole other side of it behind the scenes we don’t get to see. Even over the phone, Miami University psychology student Kaxi Novales’ excitement and passion for her business was contagious. Ever since she was a child, Novales has always had an entrepreneurial spirit.

is no longer a simple chain and charm – it’s something that tells a story. “I always start with this 3-D sculptural idea in my head of what I want something to look like, and then ask myself ‘How can I make that into a pair of earrings?’” Novales said. “Looking at it from that perspective allows me to create something that is incredibly different.” Looking beyond Oxford, Novales is hoping to continue her business after she graduates in May. Never expecting it to take off like this, Novales is excited for the opportunity to grow Oxford Made into something bigger. Women like Novales and Omi are the essence of good craftsmanship. They go beyond simply making a product but creating something beautiful that people have a connection to. They put their heart and soul into a piece so it can be more than a material object, but something that you hold on a little tighter to.

Combining her passion for making jewelry and wanting to own her own business, Oxford Made was born. You might recognize the name from seeing Novales at the Oxford Farmer’s Market, selling her pieces while creating a brand for herself at the same time. “[Oxford Made] started out as a social media page, where I could sell things I was making. At the time it wasn’t only jewelry,” Novales said. “Once it started to really take off, I became really invested in it and dove into focusing on making jewelry and growing my business.” When it comes to making her jewelry and the art form, Novales has found social media to be an essential tool. Connecting with other small jewelry business owners on Instagram and growing her brand beyond jewelry making has made her stand out. “If you’re in the jewelry or creative realm on Instagram, it’s so crazy to see everyone doing their own take on new styles, concepts and current trends,” Novales said. “It’s so unique to see everyone’s own interpretations – it’s inspiring to watch.” Novales noted how similar to apparel and fashion, jewelry is becoming more bold. Unique shapes, patterns and bright colors can be seen in Novales’ own pieces. For her, jewelry

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c o r a ha r t e r E D I TO R - I N - C H I E F I WANT TO THANK ALL THE AMAZING PEOPLE I’VE MET THROUGHOUT THE PAST FOUR YEARS IN THIS ORGANIZATION. THEY’VE IMPACTED ME, WHETHER THEY REALIZED IT OR NOT, AND INFLUENCED MY DRIVE AND CONFIDENCE TO PURSUE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. I CAN’T THINK OF A BETTER END-CAP TO PUT ON MY COLLEGE CAREER THAN CONTRIBUTING TO THIS BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED MAGAZINE. NOT TO MENTION IT’S THE MOST APPROPRIATE THEME TO SET ME ON MY WAY FOR MY POST-GRAD VOYAGE. DRAFTING THE CONCEPT FOR VOYAGE TRULY FELT LIKE A SEPARATE JOURNEY IN ITSELF. THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS I THOUGHT IT NEEDED TO REPRESENT – AND FEW WORDS THAT FIT IT PERFECTLY. BUT SOMETIMES THINGS ARE BEST SPEAKING FOR THEMSELVES, AND I HOPE THIS ISSUE DID THAT FOR YOU.

c a m i c ic e r o PUBLISHER

last words

IT’S CRAZY TO THINK THAT ONLY 20% OF THE EARTH’S OCEANS HAVE BEEN EXPLORED. IN THE GRAND SCHEME OF THINGS, THAT’S PRACTICALLY NOTHING. HERE AT MIAMI I’VE LEARNED, GROWN, AND DISCOVERED SO MUCH ABOUT MYSELF AND THE WORLD AROUND ME. AND YET, MUCH LIKE THE OCEANS, THERE'S STILL SO MUCH THAT LIES AHEAD OF ME – UNDISCOVERED. DURING MY TIME WITH UP, AND SPECIFICALLY AS PUBLISHER, I’VE HAD THE PRIVILEGE OF WORKING WITH SUCH TALENTED AND INSPIRING INDIVIDUALS. THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BEEN MY FAMILY. AMIDST THE CHALLENGES THE PAST YEAR HAS BROUGHT, EVERYONE HAS WORKED SO HARD AND PASSIONATELY TO PRODUCE THE BEST PUBLICATIONS POSSIBLE. I’LL BE SURE TO KEEP THE MEMORIES AND EXPERIENCES UP HAS GIVEN ME CLOSE TO MY HEART AS I VENTURE FORTH. IT’S EASY TO STAY DOCKED IN FAMILIAR WATERS WHEN THE WAVES GET ROUGH, BUT VOYAGE IS ABOUT FINDING THE COURAGE TO RAISE THE ANCHOR IN SPITE OF THE STORM. TO CHASE THE RAINBOW AFTER THE RAIN. IT’S A BITTERSWEET CONCLUSION TO THIS ADVENTURE, BUT I’M EAGER AND EXCITED TO EMBARK ON THE ONE THAT STILL LIES AHEAD.

m a g g ie s m e r d e l C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R VOYAGE COULDN’T BE MORE APROPOS FOR THIS ISSUE AS WE EMBARK ON NEW CHAPTERS IN OUR LIVES. IT IS ROOTED IN SENTIMENTS AND STORIES THAT SPARK CURIOSITY, CREATIVITY AND CRAFT. JUST AS PEOPLE CONTINUE TO EMBARK ON NEW JOURNEYS, TRAVEL SERVES AS A VOYAGE FOR EXPLORING OURSELVES AND THE UNIQUE WORLD THAT SURROUNDS US. BOTH VISUALLY AND AESTHETICALLY, VOYAGE’S IDENTITY DERIVES FROM A RICH HISTORY OF CULTURE, TRAVEL AND TRAJECTORIES — MANY OF WHICH TELL THE STORIES OF ARTISAN FASHION & REFINED CRAFTSMANSHIP. DRAWING INSPIRATION FROM THE TIMELESS ART FORM OF ART DECO, VOYAGE PAYS TRIBUTE TO A CLASSIC ART REFINED TO A NEW FORM.

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AS I EMBARK ON A NEW VOYAGE OF MY OWN, I FEEL GRATEFUL THAT UP WAS A PART OF MY JOURNEY IN COLLEGE. THANK YOU TO THE ENTIRETY OF THE STAFF FOR EMBRACING INNOVATION AND ENDLESS CREATIVITY ALWAYS.


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U P M AG A Z I N E SS 21

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Profile for UP Magazine

Spring/Summer Issue 2021: VOYAGE  

Spring/Summer Issue 2021: VOYAGE  

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