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ISSUE NO. 31

IGNITE


OUT OF OFFICE

WRITTEN BY ABBY FRIBUSH

HOW COCO CHANEL ALTERED FASHION FOREVER WRITTEN BY NINA SC H UMANN

WEARING YOUR HEART ON YOUR SLEEVE WRITTEN BY REGAN O 'B RI E N

AGE OF AQUARIUS WRITTEN BY GA B R I E L L A D O B S O N + CA M I C I C E RO

COLOR BLOCK PHOTOGRAPHED BY C H RI ST I NA VI T E L L AS

52 - 53

NATIONAL PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL

36-37

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANNI E DAVI D

4 6- 51

4 4 - 45

3 2 -3 5

INTRODUCING IGNITE

1 4 -1 7

8- 1 3

6-7

INTRODUCTION

FACING FORWARD WRITTEN BY SO PH I E T H OM PSON

IGNITE / FW20

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HOW THE QUARANTINE CHANGED FASHION WRITTEN BY A L I C E M O M A N Y

NET NORMALCY

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WRITTEN BY E M M A B O G G E S S

26-31

PSYCHOLOGY + PHOTOGRAPHY

56

54 -55

22-25

WRITTEN BY GRAC E CAL L AH AN

3 8- 41

19 -2 1

RBG

TREND TRANCE PHOTOGRAPHED BY RAC H E L MAC N EI LL

CONTACTLESS CONTENT WRITTEN BY M O L LY M O N S O N

LAST WORDS FROM T H E E D I TO RS

WRITTEN BY SA M A N T H A BA K E R

COVER PHOTOGRAPHED BY C H RI ST I NA V I TELLA S STYLED BY L I L LY L AND E NWI C H + M AD D I E ZI M P F ER MAKEUP BY SO PH I E MON E MODELED BY CAM WAN K E

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WR I TER S

EMMA BOGGESS GRACE CALLAHAN MOLLY MONSON NINA

SCHUMANN REGAN O'BRIEN SOPHIE THOMPSON ABBY FRIBUSH ALICE MOMANY GABRIELLA DOBSON SAMANTHA BAKER

BLO G G ER S

MOLLY

MONSON SHANNON KELLY SYDNEY NELSON ANAKA BRETZKE AVA SHAFFER LAUREN BALSTER RACHEL RINEHART SAMANTHA BAKER

P HOTO G R AP HER S

AMANDA PARMO AVERY SALOMON IVY RICHTER

LAUREN WALDROP RACHEL MACNEILL AMANDA SCHWEDER KATE HARTNER KELSEY LEWIS MONET CAVANAUGH

EVEN T PL AN N ER S

ABBEY KOVACEVICH LOUISE ALLISON MAKENZIE FIGHTMASTER ALEX WALKER MARISA SANDOVAL

STYLI ST S

DANI SPENSIERO HAILEY LOWE

KATIE MCILROY NINA GROTTO SARAH OLDFORD SOPHIA SPINELL MATT ZELDIN ALYSSA JONES AMANDA ZAGER ANASTASIA MCDANIEL HALLE MASKERY LILLY LANDENWICH LINDSAY RUSSO MADDIE ZIMPFER RACHEL JOHNSON

MAKEUP ARTI ST S

DANI SPENSIERO JULIANNA SPINA LIV

PANGRAZIO TORY NOBLE SOPHIE MONE CHEYENNE SHRIEVE LAUREN

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF COR A H ARTE R

PUBLISHER CA M I C I C E RO

CREATIVE DIRECTOR M AG G I E SME RDE L

DIRECTOR OF FASHION B E N K R AU THE IM

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY AN N I E DAVID + C HRISTINA VITE LLAS

COPY EDITORS E M M A NOLAN + CAROLYNE C ROY

DIRECTORS OF SOCIAL MEDIA A M AN DA ZAG E R + ANASTASIA MC DANIE L

DIRECTORS OF MARKETING E LI Z A B ET H PHE LPS + OLIVIA OWE NS

DIRECTORS OF EVENT PLANNING PA I G E B UC KING HAM + KALE NA PE NDANG

DIRECTORS OF COMMUNICATION N I N A S C HUMANN + KATE BUC KLE Y

SENIOR BLOG EDITOR CAC H É ROBE RTS

BLOG EDITOR JA M I E SANTARE LLA

ADVI S O R S AN N I E-LAURIE BLAIR + FRE D RE E DE R J R.

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PINCIOTTI SOPHIE MONE

L AYOUT D E S I G N ER S

KATIE BUECKER

CAROLINE CILLEY GRACIE GLICKMAN MEGAN GOHEEN SARAH SORYAL

CO MMUN I CATI ON S

JULIA LAGINESS ABBY FRIBUSH ALEXA HOOVER

CAROLINE EVANS CHEYENNE SHRIEVE ERIN LARNER MAURA GOINS SYDNEY BERNARD

MAR KETI NG

EMILY AMBARGIS LAUREN BALSTER SARAH

DAYAN SOPHIE MCGAHAN ASHLEY KRAMER BROOKE SHEFFLER CATE FISTER KATE HORVATH SARA JAMESON SYDNEY BERNARD

M ED I A P H O T O G R A P H E R S

EMMA BOGGESS

S O CI AL JESSIE DOLBY

KELSEY LEWIS MAX RIONDA AMANDA SCHWEDER KAITLYN LUCENTE MARINA CAREY MONET CAVANAUGH SAM CHRISTIE

STYLISTS

SOCIAL MEDIA

HAILEY LOWE KELSEY LEWIS CAROLINE GOUDY HALLE

MASKERY LINDSAY RUSSO LUCY SOBEL


Fires clear forest floors of debris, removing low-growing underbrush and exposing the soil to nourishing sunlight. Igniting a flame can be a lot like igniting change. Under the right conditions, it’ll spread fast and leave behind fertile ground for something new and healthy to sprout. The year 2020 reminds me of this concept. Change came in quickly and unexpectedly, taking down much in its path. Though circumstances right now might not be as comparable to a newly revitalized forest, I think we’re in the process of getting there. IGNITE is inspired by trailblazers who’ve challenged norms and set paths for those similar to follow. It’s also about those adapting and developing innovative ways to find growth and prosperity. Through insightful articles highlighting the monumental shifts in the fashion industry and beyond—combined with captivating photography and artful design—IGNITE strives to fulfill UP’s mission of pushing our readers to embrace their passions despite the uncertainty. The photo editorial “Out of Office” on page 8, executed by Annie David, embodies the spirit and passion for creativity that exists in even the most unconventional times. The lively yet soft visuals portray the abstract concept of working outside the traditional place of business—something we’ve all become accustomed to in 2020. Our first feature article, written by Regan O’Brien titled “Wearing Your Heart On Your Sleeve” on page 14, focuses on a brand that’s in pursuit of more than just a profit. The lounge-wear company Madhappy is destigmatizing the conversation on mental health by using its platform to create products and experiences that uplift people. Grace Callahan celebrates the incredible work of Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her piece “RBG” on page 19. Callahan capitalizes on the notorious accomplishments of the former Supreme Court Justice and the avenue she paved for equity. Admire the stunning photo editorial, “Color Block” on page 46. Shot by Christina Vitellas, its vibrant palette and elevated styling embody our theme’s sophisticated yet bold aesthetic. It’s practical, professional and has a pop of color. I hope that IGNITE leaves you feeling inspired by its thoughtful writing and clever design. On behalf of UP’s entire staff, I invite you to think about what change and growth you can spark this year. M U C H U P LOV E ,

CO R A H A RT E R E D I TO R-I N- C H I E F

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IGNITE

IGNITE TO SPARK OR INTENSIFY / FINDING ENERGY AND INSPIRATION TO ELICIT GREATER CHANGE, BLAZING THROUGH BARRIERS.

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IT

ORIAL

01

OUT OF OFFICE


PHOTOGRAPHED BY A N N I E DAV I D

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Photographed by Logan Glennie | Styling by Olivia Belkin, Abby Malone, Meghna Santra & Maddie Zimpfer | Makeup by Tory Noble

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MODELED BY F E L I X J E N N + A H R I A N A M U M FO R D

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STYLED BY N I N A G ROT TO, A LYS SA J O N E S + DA N I S P E N S I E RO MAKEUP BY J U L I A N N A S P I N A

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MODELED BY U D UA K E R I K , E M I LY G E N T RY + TAT E R E N O

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WEARING YO U R H E A RT ON YO U R SLEEVE WRITTEN BY R EGA N O ' B R I E N

Fashion brands have begun to use their platforms for more than just a profit. From influencers promoting Blackowned businesses to companies advocating sustainable manufacturing, suddenly style and societal change go handin-hand. One brand making a particular impact is the L.A. based label, Madhappy. Though it’s known for trendy streetwear seen on celebrities, Madhappy is far more than just loungewear. It’s a movement. In 2017, Madhappy founded itself on positive thinking. Known as “The Local Optimist Group,” Madhappy is centered around mental health. Its goal is to create products and experiences that uplift people.

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For Miami University senior Grace Rothschild, Madhappy is a way to contribute to something greater. “When I first heard about Madhappy, I started looking at its Instagram. Not only did I like the designs, but I learned more about everything it was doing to aid mental health,” Rothschild said. “One of the sweatshirts I bought donated to the COVID-19 relief fund.” Rothschild has experienced the adverse effects of mental health firsthand, and Madhappy's stance against it inspires her. “Fashion brands have such a large platform and reach so many people under that realm," she said. "I think something like advocating for social change, for a customer, it makes you feel like you’re doing something more than just buying clothes.”

Sophomore marketing and fashion entrepreneurship major, Katie Ellsworth, said that more brands should follow Madhappy’s footsteps. “It is about creating a community and a relationship between brand and customer—letting the customer know that they are valued and have a community in the company,” Ellsworth said. It’s not uncommon for people to struggle with mental health; according to John Hopkins, about one in four Americans ages 18 and older suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. It’s brands like Madhappy that are making this less of a taboo. “Mental health is somewhat of a buzzword today, and I think it is safe to say that everyone struggles in some area or another,” Ellsworth said. “Through sharing stories about mental health and offering resources such as toolkits, playlists and a hotline, Madhappy is starting a conversation.” By talking openly and honestly about mental health, more people can become aware of its prevalence and importance. “Madhappy is saying that it is not simply a brand, but a social movement for de-stigmatization of mental health,” Ellsworth said. “If more brands started to see the opportunity to stand for something and to be something more for their customers, widespread and radical social change could happen.” Brands can offer ways to support those in need while also creating a community for young people. It’s easy to feel like others don’t understand you, but companies like Madhappy are making it clear you’re never alone.

“ I T I S A B O U T C R E AT I N G A CO M M U N I T Y A N D A R E L AT I ON S H I P B E T W E E N B R A N D A N D C U STO M E RL E T T I N G T H E C U STO M E R K N OW T H AT T H E Y A R E VA LU E D A N D H AV E A CO M M U N I T Y I N T H E CO M PA N Y.”

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY M O N E T CAVA N AU G H STYLED BY A M A N DA Z AG E R MAKEUP BY C H E Y E N N E S H R I E V E

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FINE AMERICAN CUISINE WITH SOME UNIQUE ADDITIONS, OVER THIRTY CRAFT BEERS TO CHOOSE FROM, AND SERVING FOOD NIGHTLY!

12 E PARK PL OXFORD, OH 45056

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CORNEROXFORD.COM

513.523.4200


RBG SHIFTING THE NARRATIVE FOR THE MODERN WOMAN

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WRITTEN BY G R AC E CA L L A H A N Nine students out of 561. Equivalent to 1.6 percent. That’s the ratio representing the disparity between female and male students in the Harvard Law school class of 1956. From their initial step into the esteemed institution, these female students had the odds stacked against them. However, one of the nine females, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, changed the narrative for all American women. Through her unending dedication in the battle for equity, Ginsburg, again, served as one of nine. This time on the United States Supreme Court. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Ginsburg was a firstgeneration American on her father’s side and second on her mother’s. Ginsburg’s childhood friends said she had a quiet magnetism to her. She was never drawn to small talk or gossip like her peers; instead, she preferred intellectually stimulating conversations. After Ginsburg graduated from Cornell University in 1954, she began at Harvard Law. In her time at Harvard, the school’s dean berated the female students, asking them why they were taking qualified men's seats. Undoubtedly, Ginsburg persevered and was one of the first women to serve on the school’s esteemed journal, the Harvard Law Review. Clara Spera, Ginsburg’s granddaughter, was a student in Harvard’s first-ever law school class that was evenly split male/female. Spera began law at Harvard in 2014. She said her grandmother was an incredible role model and mentor for her. “She taught me that the way to win an argument is not to yell because often that will turn people away more so than bringing them to your table,” Spera said in the 2018 documentary, RBG. Ginsburg stood as a role model for working moms in some of her most trying years. In addition to caring for her own children, she attended class and took notes for her newly ill husband. Ginsburg tells us what we’ve known all along—no one gets it done like a mother can.

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"RBG blurred the gender lines, opened the discourse on equal rights and sparked a movement for women of all backgrounds and ages. She left a legacy of accomplishments for gender equality."


Although Ginsburg was irrefutably successful in her undergraduate and graduate endeavors, she struggled to find a job post-graduation. Applying as a woman was an impediment. Today, women across the nation can thank Ginsburg for her ceaseless efforts to ensure that gender is never again a burden. From courtrooms to hospitals, areas previously known only to men, women are staking their claim. Ginsburg took a monumental step on the long journey for enduring change when she founded the Women's Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. The Women's Rights Project worked on over 300 gender discrimination cases by 1974. Ginsburg, herself, argued six of these cases before the Supreme Court and won five. Ginsburg developed a strategic plan to end gender discrimination, one case at a time. She built her strategy on the clause of the constitution that guarantees equal protection for all American citizens. Ginsburg triumphantly captured what it was like to be a second-class citizen not receiving the same benefits of the law as others, or in this case, men. Gloria Steinem, a renowned writer and activist of women’s rights, said Ginsburg validated women’s frustrations, desires and dreams. “There came to be such a mass and a majority of women, really, who understood that they were not crazy. The system was crazy,” said Steinem in RBG. Ginsburg not only amended many discriminatory elements of legislation, but she also shifted the perspective on a woman’s societal status. In the mid-20th century, a woman’s

role conjured ideas of homemaking, child-rearing, passivity and subordination. Now American women live robust lives, brimming with personal and professional successes. “I think it’s easy to take for granted the position that young women can have in today’s society and that’s a lot in thanks to Justice Ginsburg’s work,” said Shanah Knizhnik, co-author of Notorious RBG. In 1993, President Bill Clinton nominated Ginsburg for a seat on the United States Supreme Court. She was confirmed in the same year with a 96-3 vote. Ginsburg blurred the gender lines, opened the discourse on equal rights and sparked a movement for women of all backgrounds and ages. She left a legacy of accomplishments for gender equality. After her passing on Sept. 18, 2020, individuals across the nation were hit with devastation but also deep appreciation for the loss of their freedom fighter. Without the unending dedication of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, American women would be facing a much different reality. Ginsburg’s work speaking truth through power has opened doors and sparked a sense of social responsibility in people of all identities. Dr. Kimberly Hamlin hopes to carry Ginsburg’s tenacity through generations to come. “I would say to my students, WWRBGD? What-would-RBGdo?” she said. “Think of the obstacles she faced in her life, and the obstacles she stared down and removed for the rest of us. There is no better or more important time to be involved in politics and public debates than right now.”

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PSYCH OLOGY & PHOTO GRAPHY

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When you hear the word photography, what comes to mind? Portraits? Fashion editorials? Maybe photojournalism, or even black-and-white film? There’s no one-size-fits-all definition. The field of photography is all-encompassing and can be used for everything, from science to abstract art. Jon Yamashiro, a photography professor at Miami University, said, “It being real and authentic is kind of amazing. There’s photography in everything.” The authenticity that Yamashiro describes is because the camera, in essence, started as a recording device. When it was first created, it was primarily used as a tool to document evidence. It wasn’t until the early 1900s that photography became more widespread and accepted as an art form. Various groups such as the “Photo-Secession,” started to use photography to achieve artistic vision. Many would likely argue that today, photography is viewed as more of a creative field. In an article from Outdoor Photographer Magazine, the author states, “Photography is said to be a right-brain field, but ironically, as cameras have become very complex and continue to grow even more sophisticated, photographers need to be both right and left-brained.” The terms “right and left-brained” are associated with different ways of approaching tasks. People who are dominantly rightbrained are said to be more artistic, while more left-brained people are seen as logical and analytical. Photographers must produce creative vision through technological means, two elements that seem, at face value, antithetical to each other. Yet, photography is both right and left-brained. It’s used in so many different areas; even in the most unreal seeming photos, there is still a truthful and factual element because a camera created it. Yamashiro elaborates on the idea that there is an element of reality at the core of every photo. No matter how edited an image may appear, humans always tend to look for that one bit of truth. “I think psychologically, even though we know how digital imaging works, and we can manipulate things pretty easily, isn’t your first instinct when you see a photograph to believe it?” Yamashiro said.

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Amanda Parmo, a Miami photography student and UP photographer, described her methodology for the practice. “Every step of the process is important in its own way to the end result,” she said. “I may enjoy shooting digitally more than culling through the photos in post-production, but both are vital to producing great photographs.” Parmo also acknowledges how the mechanical and artful aspects of photography go hand-in-hand. “I feel that as you learn and grow, the technical part doesn't seem to feel so technical anymore. It becomes second nature. I think that once you understand the technical side of it, you can really let your creative side run wild,” said Parmo. The thought processes behind making photographs are still similar to decades ago, and the fields of photography and psychology are intricately intertwined. Photography is an individual experience, and each individual’s practice is unique. Creativity is the root of photography, and with creativity comes interpretation. As Parmo eloquently summarizes, “The artistry, creativity and passion behind photographs are what makes them special; it is what makes people stop, look, and connect to your work.”

WRITTEN BY EMMA BOG G E SS

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M A N DA PA R M O STYLED BY H A L L E M A S K E RY MAKEUP BY L AU R E N P I N C I OT T I

MODELED BY RYA N N E E L SA S S + Y U R I K L I N K E N B E RG H

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AN EDI

03

RIAL O T


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MAKEUP BY C H E Y E N N E S H R I E V E PHOTOGRAPHED BY R AC H E L M AC N E I L L MODELED BY M I YA H G R E E N WO O D + E M E R SY N N E WS O M E STYLED BY A M A N DA Z AG E R , N I N A G ROT TO + K AT I E M C I L ROY

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Photographed by Rachel MacNeill Styling by Cami Cicero Modeled by Lucy Pennell & Adam Velasco

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY A M A N DA S C H W E D E R STYLED BY A N A STA S I A M C DA N I E L + S O P H I A S P I N E L L 32 | FW20


MIAMI'S N P H C

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Of these nine, seven are present on Miami’s campus. Miami’s chapters consist of four fraternities (Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, and Phi Beta Sigma) and three sororities (Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, and Zeta Phi Beta). Each chapter in the NPHC developed at a time when Black people were denied basic rights and services. Racial isolation on primarily white campuses created a need for African Americans to align themselves with other alike individuals’ shared goals and ideals. “A lot of our programming is catered to the Black community because the Black community at Miami needs it,” said Ahriana Mumford, president of Zeta Phi Beta and vice president of the NPHC. In 2019, about 72 percent of undergraduate students at Miami were white, with Black students making up about 3.6 percent of the demographic. With such a small population on campus, the NPHC creates a space for them to share their experiences and culture. “Coming to Miami, I never really had a set of Black friends. I was so afraid to immerse myself in my culture,” Mumford said. “Being a part of the NPHC made me feel important and seen.”

WRITTEN BY AB BY F R I B U S H

The Greek scene at Miami University is an undoubtedly prominent part of campus culture. Roughly 30 percent of undergraduates at Miami are involved in a Greek organization. While most students in Greek life associate with the Interfraternity Council (IFC) or the Panhellenic Association, there’s another council presiding over the Greek community that significantly contributes to the rich history of Miami’s fraternities and sororities: the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC). The NPHC is the governing body of Miami’s traditionally African American fraternities and sororities. Founded in 1930 at Howard University in Washington, DC, it currently comprises nine international Greek-letter organizations known as the “Divine Nine.”

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Becoming a member of an NPHC chapter is a selective and informal process. The recruitment system is called membership intake, and the procedures differ from chapter to chapter. According to vice president of Phi Beta Sigma, Alexander Igwebuike, the entire intake experience took over a month to complete. “I, along with my fraternity brothers, went through a five-week process where we learned the basic information and history of the frat and the NPHC,” Igwebuike said. When a potential member chooses to pledge a fraternity or sorority, they’re committed to more than just parties and formals. The NPHC recognizes the importance of Greek life’s social aspect while upholding a greater purpose of scholarship, professionalism and community service.


From the start, Igwebuike connected with his chapter’s emphasis on scholarship. “I really resonated with the guys in my chapter because they prioritized school work,” Igwebuike said. As an organization, the NPHC places great emphasis on maintaining good academic standing. According to the Council, “continued promotion of academic excellence” is the first standard of all NPHC chapters. Professionalism is another component that the NPHC values, something that Mumford has experienced firsthand throughout her time as a member. “Being a part of the NPHC forced me to mature 10 times faster than I would have. It has molded me into a true professional,” she said. Developing leadership skills is a standard for the NPHC. It hosts various events to help members become successful young professionals, including resume workshops, financial literacy programs and networking seminars with Miami Alumni. With all of this in mind, Mumford concluded that the most defining trait of the NPHC is its devotion to community service and philanthropy—one of the initial reasons she was interested in joining. “In high school, I was so committed to community service, and I didn’t know how to continue doing it on a bigger scale until I found this organization,” she said. NPHC organizations are unique with respect to some other Greek-letter organizations. They have a continuous commitment to providing community service and promoting the general public’s welfare. Some chapters even require 10 service hours before actually joining the pledge class.

But, despite their contributions on and off-campus, many members believe they are under-recognized at Miami. “When I came to Miami, I didn’t see our organizations represented anywhere. You don’t see our letters on benches, plaques or bell towers,” Mumford said. She said that much of this could be attributed to a general lack of knowledge about the organization. For example, many NPHC traditions differ from Panhellenic and IFC traditions, including the act of strolling. Strolling is a cultural expression of strength and solidarity performed by the sororities and fraternities through dancing. It represents each chapter’s values and links to their African roots, though non-NPHC members aren’t aware of this practice. “There is just a lot of miseducation and ignorance when it comes to the NPHC,” Mumford said. Despite this, she and the rest of the NPHC family are eager to spread the word and encourage more students to get involved and get informed. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Show up to our chapter informational sessions, Greek 101s and NPHC seminars,” Mumford said. “Our seminars are open to the entire community, so if anyone wants to learn about the NPHC, they’re more than welcome to come.” If you are interested in learning more about the NPHC, contact Dasha Harris in the Cliff Alexander Office at harrisd8@ miamioh.edu, find each chapter on the Hub, or follow the NPHC Instagram at @miami.nphc for updates.

The NPHC embraces the continuance of social action, political empowerment and economic development in the Oxford, Ohio, community and beyond.

MODELED BY A H R I A N A M U M FO R D, A L E I G H A M A S O N , L AYA H B U S B E E , A N D R E W O PA R E , C L I F F W R I G H T E R , T H I E R N O BA H + A L E X A N D E R I GW E B U I K E

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AGE OF

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WRITTEN BY GA B R I E L L A D O B S O N + CA M I C I C E RO Everyone knows their birthdate. Each year people celebrate with parties and cakes, rejoicing over making another successful trip around the sun. The few weeks leading up to and preceding the special day are spent in what astrology calls: zodiac season. The zodiac is made up of the divisions of Earth’s orbit, matching up fairly well with the months of the year. The 12 different zodiac signs include Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces. Each sign comes with its corresponding constellation, planets and personality traits assumed by those born within it. These 12 signs experience a total shift every 26,000 years, with one zodiac being dominant at a time. The world has been transitioning from the Piscean Age to the Aquarian Age for roughly 50 years, and throughout this transition, we have seen extraordinary changes in our society. From technological advancements to civil rights, every aspect of life has shifted along with the stars. The Aquarian age will last thousands of years and will not reappear until after all the other zodiacs have too had their turn. The typical traits associated with being an Aquarius include independence, originality and assertiveness. We will likely see these traits present themselves throughout this new era. Independence may influence politics. Originality could take form in new art. Assertiveness may inspire growth and advancement in societal gaps. Overall, astrologers expect to see advancement in intellectual growth throughout the Aquarian Age, stemming from these associated characteristics.

The astronomical age affects everyone worldwide, not just those born during the month of the particular sign. The shifts between ages have brought about significant change before, and it seems more is on the horizon. When it first began in the ‘60s, political and social movements were at their peak. From the Civil Rights Movement to protests striving for women’s rights, people began to fight for what they believed in. That same strength and determination is mirrored today as people work tirelessly toward creating a better world where their voices are heard. Aquarius represents an era of self-care and self-love. These ideals revolve around embracing all, despite differences. With the strength and determination the Aquarian Age holds, it’s inspiring to think about how this power could break down barriers and bring people together. You may or may not believe in astrology and zodiacs, but it’s hard to deny that much like the ever-changing night sky, the world is evolving; and we can only hope the Age of Aquarius brings good fortune.

We can only hope the Age of Aquarius brings good fortune.

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Photographed by Annie David | Styling by Nina Grotto & Maddie Zimpfer | Makeup by McKenna Meyers & Tory Noble

MODELED BY B R E N N E N M CG I L L , A L E X I S M AT E L L A + M A D I P O RT E R

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HOW FASHION ADAPTED TO KEEPING UP WITH QUARANTINE :

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As the world entered into the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the fashion industry tailored itself to fit a consumer-base atmosphere that went remote. Even with retailers promoting online shopping like never before, they were still accumulating only a portion of the revenue. For example, the brand known for its business-based attire, H&M, took major hits with there no longer being the same need for formal wear. According to a BBC report, H&M reported losing five percent of sales in just one month and announced the closure of 250 stores shortly after. H&M wasn’t the only company experiencing this dilemma either. However, there was a solution on the horizon. As most of the working class became stuck at home, the concept of “quarantine fashion” was introduced. Quarantine changed the industry from high-profile to comfort-focused. It’s been an unexpected

yet defining moment for the fashion industry. One of the most prominent trends that have emerged from quarantine is athleisure. Old Navy, a partner under GAP Inc., began mass-producing more lounge-based pieces during coronavirus' height. They produced so much apparel that stores were required to have two departments to house the new stock. The appeal of comfortable and minimalist sets caught on instantly throughout social media. Edited, an online retailer, reported that tracksuits and matching sweatsuits were up 70 percent in April. Krista Corrigan, an analyst at Edited, said, “Retailers are pushing communication on Instagram and in emails. We are just seeing massive, massive spikes from brands in loungewear right now.”

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However, this laid-back style wasn’t always work-appropriate, even if company meetings once held in conference rooms have converted to an online format. The California-based company Who What Wear asked eight of their editors their go-to's to keep their outfits professional yet relaxed. Managing editor Kristen Nichols said good-bye to her tailored, constricting blazers and hopped on the new trend of the oversized, looser version. Ditching her usual form-fitting gowns, senior editor Allyson Payer said, “There are plenty of pretty dresses out there that you can actually breathe in, so why bother with anything else?” The lasting themes that have emerged from staying at home are minimalistic and comfortable. Though the traditional look of professionalism isn’t gone yet, it’s merely taking a new form. For Vogue editor Zoe Ruffner, a big sweater, baggy sweats and fun strappy sandals are now the appropriate pieces for a meeting. When highlighting her work attire for a rainy April week, Ruffner wrote, “Think a super-soft cashmere sweater, the perfect pair of high-waisted pants, and an oversized silk button-down practically made for Zoom.”

PHOTOGRAPHED BY K AT E H A RT N E R STYLED BY SA R A H O L D FO R D, H A I L E Y LOW E + K AT I E E L L SWO RT H

MAKEUP BY S O P H I E M O N E

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY L AU R E N WA L D RO P / STYLED BY R AC H E L J O H N S O N

MODELED BY O L I V I A M E RC I O

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YO U R I N F LU E N C I N G

FAVO R I T E

C R E AT O R S FROM

HOME


WRITTEN BY MOL LY MON S ON

Forbes Magazine reported a drastic upward trend in the consumption of social media over the last six months. As people have begun to spend more time at home, they also are spending more time on their phones—leaving them looking to influencers for a distraction from the repetitiveness of their daily lives.

Coyne plans on continuing this strategy for the foreseeable future. “Consistency is a content strategy I practiced during quarantine and still maintain. My statistics show that the more content I post, the better response I receive from viewers,” Coyne said. “My viewers now know my schedule of posting two to three times a week and my engagement has remained high and my subscribers keep growing.”

While this high demand has been strenuous for creators, some have found success in strengthening connections with their viewers. Especially for influencers with a smaller following, quarantine presented them an opportunity to polish their Margot Lee, like Coyne, is a lifestyle YouTuber. Her brand, brands and fine-tune their content which began during her freshman year while developing a more personal at Syracuse University, has risen to 444k relationship with their audiences. subscribers. “CONSISTENCY IS A Miami University junior Emily Coyne, known as “emilyoandbows” on social media, is a Cleveland-based lifestyle blogger. She said quarantine positively influenced her YouTube channel.

CONTENT STRATEGY I PRACTICED DURING QUARANTINE AND STILL MAINTAIN. MY STATISTICS SHOW THAT THE MORE CONTENT I POST, THE

Lee is an excellent example of manipulating her platform to fit the style and interests that began trending in quarantine. She capitalized on TikTok's rising popularity to diversify content. If you visit her pages, you’ll see her promote her journaling series “Quarantine Journal,” which sparked amid the stay-at-home orders.

BETTER RESPONSE I RECEIVE FROM “The pandemic was overall great for my brand,” Coyne said. “The quarantined VIEWERS,” time gave me an opportunity to share my family and home with my audience, which allowed me to open up more to my viewers and connect on a more personal level.” “Since we’re all bored in quarantine...I decided to come up with a little project we can all do together,” she wrote in her Coyne also touched on how she strategized the timing of her first TikTok introducing the series. posts to keep up with the increase in demand she felt. Her “little project” proved to be a big hit. Prompting her to “I used the time during the pandemic to focus on posting as come out with a second journaling series on TikTok titled, frequently as possible because engagement across the board “Pen to Paper.” for YouTube was very high with everyone at home and on social media much more,” she said. “There was more demand The role of an influencer will evolve along with the COVID-19 for my videos and I made the most of this opportunity and pandemic, and social media consumption will likely continue, posted a YouTube video every single day for thirty days creating higher demand for influencer content. Constant straight. I worked hard to find interesting content to entertain content is constant engagement, and engagement is everything my viewers.” in the world of likes and comments.

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THE ULTIMATE TRAILBLAZER H OW COCO CHANEL A LT E R E D FA S H I O N FO R E V E R WRITTEN BY N I N A S C H U M A N N

The art form of getting ready: a ritual as old as time, a sacred practice, a refined experience customized to every individual.

These humble beginnings proved to be the complete antithesis to the luxury brand she would eventually build.

For some, readying themselves for a day of errands or getting dolled up for a night out is a dreaded chore. Yet, for others, it’s a dynamic experience of femininity and expression.

In boldly prioritizing function over form, Chanel diverged from the standard styles of centuries that preceded her—those ruled by excess, impracticality, and discomfort—and instead cultivated major building blocks of the modern woman’s wardrobe.

However, we rarely pause to consider how lost this art form would be without the lifelong work of the legendary French designer Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel. Without the liberating designs and true innovation of Chanel, a swipe of bronzer or a spritz of perfume may have never found their way into the modern beauty routine. A black dress may have never become the ideal date night solution. Even trousers may have never become a workday staple for females. “Coco Chanel is a name I’ve obviously heard since I was little,” Kyla Snodgrass, executive design director for Miami University Fashion & Design, said. “I mean, she’s iconic.” Chanel’s childhood, however, was anything but glamorous. She was born in 1883 in Saumur, France, as Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel. After her mother’s death at the mere age of 12, Chanel was sent to a Catholic orphanage. It was here that Chanel was first taught how to sew by nuns: the initial spark that would ignite her lifelong passion for designing garments. In 1910, Chanel launched her empire by selling hats in a shop on Paris’ Rue Cambon. Later, she added stores nearby and began making clothes.

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“She was the right person at the right time,” Rebecca Robinson, Miami University fashion history professor, said of Chanel. “Quite frankly, the world had to be ready for her.”

T HE L EGE N DARY L B D The little black dress: a true symbol of versatility and timelessness. Before Chanel developed the LBD in the ’20s, the color black was regarded as a mourning color or associated with the lower classes as it was often the color of maid uniforms. “She established black as a color that was more acceptable for other times of day and for other garments,” Robinson said. “Men had worn black for quite some time during the daytime, but now, women were able to wear black during the day.” Though modern adaptations of the classic LBD vary widely from Chanel’s original 1926 design—complete with an eraappropriate drop waist and below the knee length—its versatility has not diminished.


“The little black dress is so iconic because of how well you can either dress the look up or dress it down,” Snodgrass said. “Whether it’s a date night, going out with the ladies, maybe a concert—you can wear it to almost any event.”

PAN TS FOR WOMEN Despite the arrival of WWI prompting many women to wear pants into factories to occupy traditionally male jobs, trousers were not popularized until Chanel’s later influence. The once unheard-of idea of trousers for women spread like wildfire, as droves of people wanted to emulate Chanel’s personal style and designs.

“Coco was a woman who wanted to make clothes that she actually wanted to wear. It’s not just about the appearance,” Robinson said. “Male designers design for women the way they want women to look, while female designers will create what they want to wear.”

A L AST ING L EGAC Y Chanel was the ultimate trailblazer. She marched through societal norms in her commitment to the accessibility and lasting liberation of fashion. From popularizing costume jewelry to pioneering the first branded perfume with her legendary 1921 Chanel No. 5, the list of moments in which Chanel forever altered fashion blazes on.

“She borrowed a lot of inspiration from men,” said Robinson. Contrary to many designers of her time, Chanel appeared unbothered by gender constructs and their effect on the era's popularized fashions. During a decade in which glamorous dresses and formality prevailed, Chanel shook the fashion world with such an unexpected, masculine concept for women. According to Harper’s Bazaar, Chanel once said: “Elegance does not consist in putting on a new dress.”

T HE T WEE D CHANEL SUI T Chanel’s fearless attitude and inspiration from male designs became the introduction for the two-piece Chanel suit in the ’20s. The original Chanel suit consisted of a boxy, trimmed jacket and simple a-line skirt, all crafted in the legendary tweed fabric: a foundation for the inspiring female pantsuits that still command today. “It was a really pivotal time for her to come out with the suits,” Snodgrass said. “It helped men see women in a new light.” A post-WWI woman trying to make a name for herself in a male-dominated workplace suddenly had a garment that enabled her to do so. The ease and practicality of the Chanel suit could not have been a further cry from the restrictive nature of the once-dominating corset.

FASHION FADES, ONLY STYLE REMAINS THE SAME. -COCO CHANEL 45 | FW20


Photograph Courtesy of Kyle Denman

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W R I T T E N BY ABIGAIL PADGETT

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY C H R I ST I N A V I T E L L A S STYLED BY M A D D I E Z I M P F E R + L I L LY L A N D E N W I C H MAKEUP BY S O P H I E M O N E

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MODELED BY G R AC E CA R LO S , J U L I A N BA L Z + CA M WA N K E

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Photographed by Lauren Waldrop Styling & Makeup by P.H. Dee (Pictured)

FACING FORWARD RWA R D

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FO

The Development of Masks in the Fashion Industry


In the early months of 2020, COVID-19 appeared as a distant blip on the horizon. It hadn’t yet spread across the nation in waves, radiating across state lines and reaching into the farthest city corners.

stunning face masks to match. Matoshi’s mask collection often features memorable designs like glitter stars and embroidered daisies. She uses fancy and comfortable combinations of materials like tulle and cotton.

The prospect of ever wearing a mask seemed unlikely, and a full quarantine lockdown was unfathomable.

Akese Stylelines is another company producing protective yet fashionable face masks. Designer Jennifer Akese-Burney set out to make face masks in traditional Africa Ankara patterns from three layers of 100 percent reusable cotton fabric. Akese-Burney draws from her Ghana roots to form masks with beautiful, striking prints in bold and vivid colors. Her fashionable ensembles allow the wearer to be protected while representing classical African styles.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY I V Y R I C H T E R / MODELED BY M EGA N H E T Z L E R + JAC K W H I T E

In March, citizens were forced to reconcile with reality: The virus was here, and masks became required to stop the spread. Everyone was asked to reserve N95 masks strictly for medical professionals, but that only created another problem. Americans had no idea where to find other masks besides the N95, and if they couldn’t wear the N95, what were they supposed to wear? Within weeks, several fashion brands stepped up to the challenge of solving the mask shortage. They took on the challenge of creating masks that would comply with CDC guidelines and support their brand’s image. The fashion industry began to develop masks that could be worn for every occasion—to account for essential workers, people stuck at home and those who had important events still to attend. Even as our world begins to open back up, there's a need for masks that offer protection while still allowing people to look their best. Christian Siriano, the esteemed fashion designer of “Project Runway,” was one of the fashion industry leaders who, at the onset of COVID-19, offered to turn his fashion house into a mask factory. He and his assistants worked tirelessly to create masks made of pleated cloth, equipped with elastic ear bands and tiny metal strips on the front that adjust to the wearer’s nose.

Other retailers like Revolve, Reformation and Nordstrom have also seized on the booming mask industry. They now sell masks in a multitude of designs at affordable prices for customers to wear on a day-to-day basis. Masks have been a great business opportunity for companies outside the fashion industry too. You can find a face mask with your local coffee shop or restaurant logo, and nearly every store has masks arranged in neat piles or displays in their windows. Wherever you go, brands are recognizing that face masks are great opportunities to spread their image. The fashion industry has evolved to allow masks to be thought of as fun accessories instead of simple safety measures. People worldwide are now coordinating masks with their outfits and letting their masks be a fashion statement. It’s progressed from an initial precaution to a mandated wardrobe staple.

WRITTEN BY S O P H I E T H O M P S O N

Within the first week of his mask-making endeavors, Siriano and his team created around 2,000 masks. Gradually, his business grew to include masks of all kinds, particularly luxurious masks, fit for grand occasions. They feature pearl and crystal-encrusted fabrics with soft ear bands in a range of neutral and bright colors, as well as fun patterns and prints that match his recently released runway collection. Another designer creating high-fashion masks is Lirika Matoshi. Remember the coveted strawberry dress floating around your Instagram feed? Matoshi is its creator and now has

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NET NORMALCY

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SOCIALLY DISTANCED COMMUNICATION

If we have to live through a global pandemic, at least we get to do it in the digital age. Thanks to cell phones, computers and gaming consoles, we have been able to stay close even while being apart. From the rise of Zoom to virtual concerts, everyone has found different methods to keep their sense of normalcy. One of the most popular tools during this time has proved to be the video call. Many of us probably never heard of Zoom before 2020, but when education and careers suddenly transferred online, it rose to the forefront of all other video conferencing services. The software allows for large group meetings, private messaging, screen sharing and more. Zoom developed into a social meeting place when people could no longer go to restaurants, bars and clubs. Online outlets like Bustle and Entrepreneur started posting listicles of games and other things to do during virtual happy hours, such as step-by-step paintings. Game nights became a popular choice amongst separated friends and families. Charades, bingo and trivia easily lend themselves to online setups, as pictures of physical game boards can be shown with screen sharing. Another thing we had to say a brief goodbye to was movie theaters. But the biggest con of movie theatres became the best pro during quarantine: you can now talk as much as you want.

With the program Netflix Party, multiple users can watch the same show or movie simultaneously and everyone in the group can talk about it in the live chat. Along with game and movie nights, physical activities also had to transition as gyms and fitness studios all shutdown. However, this did not stop people from being active. Dance and yoga classes met online, and workouts like Zumba became Zoom-ba. Not only is it a good workout, but it’s fun to watch your friends try and get the moves. Although not together, it felt one step closer to that desired normalcy. At the end of the day, that's what everyone is trying to achieve with virtual communication: something that feels slightly normal. It’s been said that we’ll likely never return to normal as we once knew it, but virtual communication helps us take steps toward something that resembles what life used to be like. One of the many upsides is the freedom and availability we have with it. Talking with friends and family no longer needs to be a big commitment. Effective communication can be something as small as sending someone a post you think they’ll like. These connections should continue to be fostered, virtually or not.

WRITTEN BY SA M A N T H A BA K E R

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A

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CAMI CICERO

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LAST WORDS M

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N E W Y E A R’ S R E S O LU T I O N S A R E RO OT E D I N T H E

IGNITE MARKS SUCH A UNIQUE TIME IN OUR LIVES

MY E X P E R I E N C E I N U P H A S B ECO M E . I J O I N E D A S

I D E A O F C H A N G E . W H E T H E R I T ’ S C H A N G I N G H A B-

A N D FO R T H AT V E RY R E A S O N , I T ’ S S U C H A S P EC I A L

A N E V E N T P L A N N I N G T E A M M E M B E R I N 2017, A RO L E

I TS , C H A N G I N G G OA L S O R C H A N G I N G P E R S P EC-

I S S U E TO M E .

E N T I R E LY D I F F E R E N T F RO M W H AT I H O L D TO DAY.

T I V E S . AT T H E STA RT O F T H I S Y E A R , I T H I N K I T ’ S SA F E TO SAY T H AT N O O N E E X P ECT E D J U ST H OW M U C H

I N CO N C E PT UA L I Z I N G I G N I T E ' S T H E M E , I WA N T E D

A S I ’ V E H A D T H E O P P O RT U N I T Y TO G ROW W I T H I N

C H A N G E W E WO U L D B E W I T N E S S I N G I N T H E CO M-

T H E I S S U E TO S H I N E A L I G H T O N T H E C R E AT I V E

U P A N D O B S E RV E PA ST E I C S , I ’ V E O N LY WA N T E D

ING MONTHS.

WAYS W E ' V E OV E RCO M E T H E C H A N G E S W E ' V E

TO CO M M I T MYS E L F M O R E , B U T N E V E R Q U I T E K N E W H OW.

E N CO U N T E R E D T H I S Y E A R , A N D H OW T H AT W I L L A S T H E WO R L D A RO U N D U S E VO LV E S , I T H I N K I T I S

FO R E V E R I M PACT U S M OV I N G FO RWA R D.

I M P O RTA N T TO LO O K TO T H E U N K N OW N N OT W I T H I F I T WA S N ’ T FO R B E L L A D O U G L A S , U P ’ S M O ST

F E A R , B U T W I T H F I R E . TO M E , I G N I T E I S A B O U T F I N D -

I G N I T E C E L E B R AT E S T H E S P I R I T O F C R E AT I V I T Y

R EC E N T LY G R A D UAT E D E I C , I WO U L D N ’ T H AV E

I N G T H E PA S S I O N TO F U E L T H AT F I R E . W E A L L H AV E

A N D T H E A B I L I T Y TO OV E RCO M E A DV E R S I T Y; H AV-

E V E R T H O U G H T I ’ D B E I N T H I S P O S I T I O N TO DAY.

T H AT K I N D L I N G I N S I D E O F U S , T H AT S M A L L S PA R K

I N G T H E U N I Q U E CA PA B I L I T Y TO B R I N G STO R I E S ,

T H O U G H S H E L E F T B I G S H O E S TO F I L L , B E L L A

T H AT K E E P S U S WA R M W H E N T H E W E AT H E R G E TS

M O M E N TS A N D I D E A S TO L I F E I N S O M E O F T H E

H A S P ROV I D E D M E W I T H T H E U TM O ST G U I DA N C E

U N E X P ECT E D LY CO L D. FO L LOW T H E T H I N G S T H AT

M O ST T RO U B L I N G O F T I M E S .

A N D S U P P O RT D U R I N G A L L T H E C H A N G E S T H I S

M OV E YO U, B ECAU S E T H AT I S H OW T R A I L B L A Z E R S

S E M E ST E R .

ARE BORN.

C R E AT I N G A M AGA Z I N E W H I L E CO N FO R M I N G TO

U P H A S B E E N MY FA M I LY H E R E AT M I A M I FO R T H E

R E F L ECT I N G O N T H E U N WAV E R I N G D E D I CAT I O N

COV I D -1 9 R E ST R I CT I O N S WA S J U ST A S D I F F I C U LT A S

PA ST T H R E E Y E A R S , A N D I A M B E YO N D G R AT E F U L

A N D PA S S I O N T H E E N T I R E O RGA N I Z AT I O N

I T S O U N D S . I ’ M S O I N C R E D I B LY P RO U D O F A L L T H E

A N D LU C K Y TO B E A B L E TO WO R K A LO N G S I D E S U C H

CO N T I N U O U S LY P U TS FO RT H I N C R A F T I N G E AC H

P H OTO G R A P H E R S , W R I T E R S , ST Y L I STS A N D M O R E

S U P P O RT I V E , C R E AT I V E A N D TA L E N T E D I N D I V I D U-

I S S U E . T H I S I S S U E I S N O E XC E PT I O N , A S W E ' V E

FO R CO N T R I B U T I N G S U C H I N C R E D I B L E CO N T E N T

A L S . C H A N G E I S S I G N I F I CA N T LY L E S S S CA RY W I T H

B L A Z E D T H RO U G H BA R R I E R S TO M A K E I G N I T E

FO R T H I S B E AU T I F U L I S S U E . C H E E R S TO U P !

S O M EO N E BY YO U R S I D E , A N D U P H A S E N S U R E D M E

CO M E TO L I F E .

I K N OW I W I L L FO R E V E R LO O K BAC K AT T H I S T I M E W I T H S O M U C H A F F ECT I O N , E S P EC I A L LY W H E N

I ’ L L N E V E R H AV E TO FAC E I T A LO N E .

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