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Fall 2015 / Vol. 18, No. 2

University of Toronto

Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education

in a new Light increasing opportunity for underserved kids

RETHINKING CANCER CARE

Dr. Daniel Santa Mina joins the Faculty

INVESTING IN HOCKEY FUTURES

New scholarship an homage to a late, great Blue

PAN AM WRAP-UP

Celebrating KPE contributions


We Have the gear. Do you have the drive?

Proud Sponsor of the Varsity BlueS • Ordering for your team? Ask in store for details Varsity Sports Store Athletic Centre • 55 Harbord St Toronto ON M5S 2W6 (416) 977-8220

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EDITOR Sarah Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR Valerie Iancovich CONTRIBUTORS Jill Clark, Lee Campbell, Jordon Hall, Valerie Iancovich, Rachel Keeling, Jeremy Knight, Elaine Smith PHOTOGRAPHY Tom Arban, Martin Bazyl, Johnny Guatto, Michael P. Hall, John Hryniuk, James Kachan, Joel Jackson, Jing-Ling Kao-Beserve, William Suarez ART DIRECTion and Design Joel Jackson Illustration Shaquilla Singh PURSUIT is published twice a year by U of T’s Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education. www.pursuit.utoronto.ca Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Pursuit 55 Harbord Street Toronto, ON M5S 2W6

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Editorial comments P: 416-978-1663 sarah.e.baker@utoronto.ca Address changes P: 416-946-5126 F: 416-978-4384 rachel.keeling@utoronto.ca The University of Toronto respects your privacy. We do not rent, trade or sell our mailing lists. If you do not wish to receive future editions of Pursuit, please call 416-946-5126 or email rachel.keeling@ utoronto.ca. Printed in Canada

Contents Faculty Notes Profile 4  26 Alumni New Master of Professional Kinesiology Alum advocates for LGBTQ equity program set to launch

Publication Agreement Number: 40065214 Pursuit is committed to preserving the environment. All paper used in Pursuit is FSC® certified, which ensures all paper comes from well managed forests and other responsible sources. www.fsc.org

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Blues News Behind-the-scenes stories

Donor Spotlight 28  Joan Addison creates hockey scholarship in late husband’s honour

Tips 18 Fit Strength has no age

Donor Listing 32  Celebrating our supporters

Kids’ Confidence 20 Building Pilot program makes big impact

Look Back at Pan Am 44 AKPE’s Pan Am contributions

COVER/ Seed9


Dean's Message Impact through integration This past summer was arguably one of the busiest and most exciting at the Faculty in recent years. Beyond the usual preparations for the coming academic term, there was the “small” matter of the University hosting some of the events for the Pan Am and Parapan Am Games! Virtually every aspect of our Faculty was involved with the Games, with faculty and staff participating in a range of important tasks, from preparing our facilities for competitions and training, to providing medical care to athletes. The University and Faculty took every opportunity to celebrate our athletes and volunteers. The Faculty was pleased to host several events during the Parapan Am Games, including the President’s Launch Party and U of T House at Goldring Centre. And, of course, we were all proud and excited to watch current and former KPE and U of T students compete – and to watch them take the podium for a combined 10 medals! (See A Look Back at Pan Am, page 44.) With the arrival of fall, we have now turned our attention to the priorities set out in our academic plan – priorities which, like the Games, represent the foundations of important future legacies. Over the coming year we’ll be exploring how we can create opportunities for greater integration of our curricular and co-curricular mandates. Our Faculty is uniquely positioned to create new, research-informed paradigms for sport and physical activity and to shape program development and policy, locally, provincially and nationally. In this issue of Pursuit we share a few of our success stories. Our cover story (page 20) features the Igniting Fitness Possibilities program, launched by Professor Kelly ArbourNicitopoulos in partnership with the Bloorview Research

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Institute. This important initiative delivers inclusive physical activity programs for underserved youth in conjunction with research into the psychological and social benefits of physical activity. The Change Room Project (page 6), which brings together research and education, policy and practice, student engagement and art, also illustrates the Faculty’s commitment to creating intersections for research and co-curricular programming. And we are pleased to announce the launch of the Faculty’s new Master of Professional Kinesiology program – the first of its kind in Ontario. This program draws on the strengths of our integrated Faculty, bringing together theory, research and practice with leading edge experiential education and community engagement opportunities (page 8). These and other achievements are the result of the combined efforts of everyone in the Faculty and our broader KPE community, including our funders and donors. The impact of our donors’ generosity is felt every day through the scholarships they enable, the programs they fund and the facilities they build. Three-quarters of our donations are gifts under $500, but they total more than $1 million annually, and the impact is monumental – as you will see in our campaign update (page 30). Thank you for your continued involvement with the Faculty. I hope you enjoy this issue of Pursuit. Gretchen Kerr, Acting Dean

Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education

PHOTO/ Seed9


ON YOUR MARK

RESEARCH TAKES OFF: Labs at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport are a hotbed of activity this term. The Dr. Terry Kavanagh Heart Health Lab is no exception. Learn more on page 12. PHOTO/ John Hryniuk

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Faculty Notes

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A lifetime of health starts with a walk to school


FACULTY NOTES

According to the 2015 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity of Children and Youth the vast majority of school-aged kids still aren’t getting enough physical activity – only 5 per cent of 5-to-19-year-olds in Canada reach the daily minimum of 12,000 steps. Adding a walk to and from school is a simple way to help reverse this trend. Doctoral candidate George Mammen has worked closely with Professor Guy Faulkner and conducted extensive analysis of active transportation–including his most recent publication, “Putting School Travel on the Map.” Below, Mammen dispels some myths and fears about the walk to school and explains the many advantages of taking the car out of the morning commute.

What are the biggest misconceptions about walking to school? To be more "protective," parents often think it is safer to drive their child(ren) to school rather than letting them walk. In reality, evidence shows that children are more likely to be harmed in a car accident compared to walking to school. How do you respond when parents say they are concerned about strangers and traffic?  Research shows that children are at a higher risk of injury when being driven compared to walking to school. I would suggest families get to know their neighbours with children attending the same school and create "walking groups" or "walking buddies." This would help limit parents’ fears around active school travel, create a stronger sense of community and ensure that everyone feels confident about the new routine. What are the mental health benefits of walking to school?  Children who walk to school have been found to have higher academic performance in terms of attention and alertness, verbal, numeric, and reasoning abilities; a higher degree of pleasantness and lower levels of stress during the school day; and higher levels of happiness, excitement and relaxation on the journey to school. Walking to school can further foster personal growth by developing a sense of independent decision making, emotional bonds with peers and the natural environment, and road and traffic safety skills. What about the physical benefits? Active travel is one source of physical activity, and with more physical activity comes increased metabolism, improved cardiorespiratory fitness, and lower weight and BMI.  

Is there an ideal distance children should walk to reap the benefits? Or is there a distance that is too far? Research has shown that living greater than 1.6 km from school was deemed "too far to walk." However, it’s important to remember that any minute you walk is contributing to the daily guidelines for physical activity in children (i.e., 60 minutes). When walking to and from school, you can accumulate between 15 and 45 minutes of your daily physical activity. How is the walk to school linked with other unstructured physical activity, for example bike riding or playing at the park?  Compared to children who are driven to school, children who walk are found to be more active overall through other physical activity sources such as organized sport and unstructured "active play."  You’ve reviewed research that analyzes the walk to school in various countries and cultures. What are some of the trends you’ve observed?   Over the last five decades, there has been a decline in the number of children walking to school in many countries, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Vietnam, Brazil, the UK and US. This is why this research topic is so important–to reverse these trends globally and help increase this very important source of physical activity. What are some of the real barriers to parents allowing their children to walk to school?  Among the families who live within a "walkable" distance from school, parents typically identify safety and time issues as main barriers. I would suggest that parents let their child(ren) walk with friends. I would also advise making small changes to their schedules like heading to bed and waking up a bit earlier than usual to make time for this very important part of their day. —Valerie Iancovich

For more information and research findings about active transportation, watch our public symposium “What Happened to Walking? Encouraging Active School Travel in Toronto,” featuring Professors Guy Faulkner, Caroline Fusco and Ron Buliung, and Toronto’s chief planner Jennifer Keesmaat at www.physical.utoronto.ca under Lecture Series + Events. PHOTO/ provided by Project BEAT

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FACULTY NOTES

These walls can talk: The Change Room Project Walking into a gym locker room can evoke a spectrum of emotions—for many users, it’s a get-in-and-get-out-fast type of experience. But few people talk about why they feel the way they do about these spaces. Professor Caroline Fusco’s Change Room Project provided a rare opportunity for U of T students to share how they feel about comfort levels in, and the safety and inclusivity of, locker rooms through an installation that was launched in U of T athletic facilities in time for the Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. Originally inspired by graffiti, the student voice and fusing the academic and co-curricular mandates, Fusco surveyed 54 students, including some from her “Geographies of Health” class and others from U of T more broadly, including the LGBTQ community. The questionnaire explored various topics related to the locker room experience and culture. “This sort of space involves intersections of cleanliness, hygiene, nudity, the body and the sense of looking at other people’s bodies,”

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Fusco says. “It’s an everyday, mundane space; but it’s a very contested space too.” The answers revealed themes of inclusion, gender, safety, the body, guilt, shame, homophobia and surveillance. Amanda De Liso, Fusco’s graduate student and research assistant on the project, selected excerpts from the questionnaires that represented these key themes. Working with Hart House’s program coordinator, Day Milman, the phrases were then passed along to a graphic designer who turned them into vinyl wall decals that are on display inside change rooms and common areas of athletics facilities on St. George and Mississauga campuses. The project aims to open up conversations about topics many consider taboo, while addressing critical issues that pertain in particular to lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgendered and queer students and athletes. “Visibility, voice, recognition and awareness are steps toward the creation of inclusive spaces,” says Michelle

Brownrigg, kinesiology and physical education’s director of physical activity and equity. “The Change Room Project provides a voice and recognition, especially for LGBTQ students, in a visible way to create awareness around the issues that can arise for members of those communities as they seek to participate in physical activity and sport.” Brownrigg says the project should help to foster dialogue and inform other important steps, including improved staff training and programming, to create more welcoming and inclusive spaces at U of T. Fusco is pleased with the final project. “As well as being an important intervention, I think that it’s a pretty creative way of disseminating and mobilizing knowledge beyond a publication. I’m happy that it is visible to the U of T community and the GTA public, more broadly.” —VI

PHOTO/ Seed9


FACULTY NOTES

Faculty welcomes new professor and pioneer in cancer care Professor Daniel Santa Mina’s commute to his new office at the Athletic Centre involves hopping on his bike and peacefully pedalling along the Lakeshore with the radio playing in his ears. “I feel like I set myself up to clear my mind on the ride,” he says. “I feel like I’ll be resilient throughout my day because of that time on my bike.” This passion for staying active runs parallel to the field of expertise – physical activity and cancer – that Santa Mina brings to the Faculty in his new role as an assistant professor. The former head of kinesiology at University of Guelph-Humber has done extensive research at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre on the impact that exercise has on treatment, in particular in patients with prostate cancer. At U of T, Santa Mina will concentrate on expanding his research, play a key role in developing the Faculty’s new Master of Professional Kinesiology program and, in 2016, teach a fourth-year course on exercise and cancer survivorship. Prior to coming to the University, Santa Mina launched a hospital-based exercise program that provides personalized fitness regimes for cancer patients, including “prehabilitation” that reflects patients’ overall health and fitness before they begin cancer therapies. “We know when they go through surgery or other treatments, patients will experience a decline in fitness, so this provides a bit of a buffer.” In its earliest days, Santa Mina delivered the entire Wellness and Exercise for

PHOTO/ Joel Jackson

Cancer Survivors (WE-Can) program on his own. Now, with the program well established at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, he provides more of a leadership and administrative role. Since its inception, WE-Can has garnered growing interest from patients hoping to fight their cancer in any and all ways possible. Late NDP leader Jack Layton was an early participant and proponent of the program. A copy of the 2010 Globe and Mail article about their work together is proudly displayed in Santa Mina’s office. “Jack played a huge role in everything I’ve done. It’s widely known that Jack had a battle with prostate cancer,” Santa Mina says reflectively. “When he was going through his treatments he was one of our very first participants and then the Globe got wind of the story. As soon as that went into the newspaper, then everyone wanted to know more and that was really the beginning of the survivorship exercise program.” This success then led to WE-Can being introduced into all cancer programs across the hospital.

“Jack was the guy who built the awareness. He was a major influence over a short period of time. He definitely had an impact on my career.” In this next phase of his career, Santa Mina wants to continue to explore implementation science. “I think that the gap between our important research findings and the utility of these findings is too wide. I’d like to figure out how we actualize our findings and make programs accessible to patients.” He would also like to see work in his field continue to develop and the awareness about exercise as treatment to become even more widespread. “There is absolutely a level of fear. We are about 30 years behind cardiac rehab,” he says. “There was a time when it was a ridiculous thought to take someone who had a heart condition, let alone heart surgery, and tell them to exercise soon after. The same attitudes apply to people with cancer. They can be very, very sick. How dare we expect them to exercise? The real question is, how dare we not?” —VI

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FACULTY NOTES

MPK Faculty launches new professional kinesiology master's program This October, the Faculty received approval from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities to introduce the Master of Professional Kinesiology (MPK) program, set to launch in August 2016. This is the first program of its kind in the province. The timely announcement came on the heels of Ontario becoming the first province in Canada to regulate kinesiology as a health profession. The MPK will appeal to new graduates as well as registered kinesiologists looking for advanced, professional development through the 16-month, course-based program. “MPK students will gain advanced knowledge and skills in the professional practice of kinesiology through exposure to diverse learning environments, interprofessional health care teams, and top scholars,” says Dr. Scott Thomas, one of the Faculty’s developers of the MPK program.

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“Through a mix of classroom, casebased, laboratory and experiential educational offerings, we will take full advantage of the networks of expertise and breadth of populations in the GTA.” Some of these settings include hospitals, clinics, sport institutes and community organizations working with elite athletes; children and youth of varying abilities; the aging and elderly; those living with chronic disease, concussion or musculoskeletal challenges. “This is a tremendous advancement for our Faculty” says Acting Dean Gretchen Kerr. “With the growing recognition of the value of physical activity for health and wellness across the lifespan, researchinformed practice in kinesiology is more important than ever. This new MPK programme uniquely integrates theory, research, and practice through leading-edge experiential education and community engagement opportunities. It is exciting to be a part of developing leaders in the field.” – VI

PHOTOS/ istock

Goldring Centre wins prestigious Toronto design award The Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport received an impressive accolade in September when it was awarded a 2015 Toronto Urban Design Award. “This award is recognition that the building has made a significant contribution to the city’s urban life,” said Ted Watson, the partner in charge at MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects, the Toronto firm that executed and managed the design led by Patkau Architects of Vancouver. The jury named the Goldring Centre a winner of an Award of Excellence in the Public Building in Context category, citing the elegant design solution that reduced the bulk of the building by “dropping the field house partly below ground and making each large space transparent to the street.” “This award is a wonderful acknowledgment of the creativity, diligence, and hard work of so many people who helped make this building a reality,” said Professor Gretchen Kerr, acting dean of the Faculty. The Toronto Urban Design Award isn’t the building’s first accolade. Earlier this year, it was the recipient of a Design Excellence Award from the Ontario Association of Architects. See www.physical.utoronto.ca News + Features for the full story. —Elaine Smith

PHOTO/ Tom Arban


FACULTY NOTES

PhD students share research on international stage While summer can mean a break from academics for many students, this July three Department of Exercise Sciences PhD students boarded a plane for Bern, Switzerland, to present their research at the 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology.

“The conference was a great opportunity to meet and interact with international graduate students, professors and practitioners and to receive feedback on my research and experiences in the field,” she explains.

Ellen MacPherson, Elaine Cook and Jenessa Banwell – all supervised by Professor Gretchen Kerr – reaped multiple benefits from the international excursion, from taking in the local sights and getting to know one another as colleagues, to ramping up their academic resumes through knowledge exchange with international peers. Cook, who lived in Europe for a decade, felt like she was "coming home" when she travelled to Switzerland to present her paper, "Athlete-Centred Coaching: A Solution-Focused Approach." “I am always inspired by the work of our international colleagues. I am challenged to think creatively, and learn more. I look for opportunities to collaborate and share,” Cook reflects. “I often see connections that might have remained unseen – both figuratively and literally. And I love listening to, and trying to speak, other languages, which enriches the vocabulary of my life and story!”

“It is also exciting to learn about the ways in which research, policies, and practice related to sport psychology are similar or different across various countries.”

MacPherson says presenting her two papers, "Safeguarding in Sport: Sport Psychologists as Reflective Practitioners," and "Bullying in Female Adolescent Sport Teams" to an international group was similarly inspiring.

Banwell presented her paper, "Pursuit of Athletic Excellence and Personal Development." The Varsity Blues soccer alumna and coach says that the exposure to a breadth of experts in an international forum provided “the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the international scope of research related to my areas – personal development in high performance sport and women in coaching.” Kerr is proud of her graduate students for seizing the opportunities to meet and interact with established and emerging scholars from around the world. “These opportunities facilitate the exchange of information with others that cannot be achieved as effectively through any other means,” Kerr explains. “They also broaden students’ perspectives on their areas of research, and contribute to the intellectual curiosity that is so important for advancing research and scholarship.” —VI

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FACULTY NOTES

Calm In the Storm

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Celebrating Anita Comella’s indelible impact at U of T

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FACULTY NOTES

torm

Stoic Humble Professional Understanding Caring Superb visionary Supportive Thoughtful Diplomatic

Funny Positive Prudent Best poker face at the University of Toronto Collegial Comedic

Willing to take on tough situations Strategic thinker Exudes energy Humble Professional Understanding Fun – A sample of phrases used by Comella’s colleagues to describe her style.

When Anita Comella arrived at the Faculty in 2009, she sat down with then-dean Bruce Kidd for lunch. He told her about his goals for the Faculty. “Bruce had a great vision, but I had never worked in a post-secondary institution before,” Comella recalls. “I thought, ‘“I thought, ‘wow, that’s all very nice, but how is that all going to happen?’ And now, six and a half years later, I look around and we did it. It’s all here, thanks to some incredible team work.” Over this short time, the Faculty has undergone what Comella perceives to be “its most substantial change in the shortest period of time.” Some of these milestones include: the completion of Varsity Centre; the creation of the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport; the Back Campus fields revitalization project; the launch of the MoveU campaign; an overhaul of the intercollegiate sport model; the establishment of a new academic plan, not to mention hosting a multi-sport international Games. After having played a pivotal role in making these – and so many other achievements – possible, on October 9, Comella worked her last day at the University of Toronto as assistant dean of co-curricular physical activity and sport. Comella’s work often positioned her as “the face” of the Faculty with U of T colleagues and partners beyond. For Dean Ira Jacobs, among the many “intangible challenges and accomplishments” under her belt, and one of Comella’s greatest contributions to the Faculty, was “the establishment of productive and very constructive relationships with various stakeholders around campus and the positive, prudent and calm manner with which she confronted and managed issues and conflicts.” The breadth of professionals with whom Comella has collaborated is diverse, but the opinion is unanimous: her leadership skills are impeccable.

PHOTO/ John Hryniuk

“Whether it’s in the field of sport, mentorship, capital projects or events, Anita can hone in on priorities and goals,” says Elizabeth Cragg, director of the Office of the Vice President, University Operations. The two have worked together on various projects. Most recently they played key roles in preparing for and executing several Pan Am and Parapan Am Games events on campus. “She was a cheerleader both for the University and for the Faculty and that made her a wonderful ambassador for both.” Lucy Fromowitz, assistant vice-president of Student Life, says of all of Comella’s many strengths, it was her commitment to students that made her so exceptional, in particular in her work with the Council of Student Services, the Hart House Board of Stewards and the Council of Athletics and Recreation. “Facing any challenge or any question, Anita’s approach is always one of respect, considered thought, and a genuine, authentic wish not to persuade, but to provide information to students.” When reflecting on her time at U of T, Comella says she will miss the students and her colleagues most. But always up for a challenge, Comella is inspired to begin the next phase of her career at Tennis Canada, working as the organization’s senior director. There, Comella will certainly make similarly big changes, including developing a national strategy for the organization. Yet, part of her will always be at U of T. “A terrific opportunity came to me. But I’m not ruling out coming back. I’ve said if U of T will have me and there’s a fit, I would love to be back at this institution one day.” When prompted to say which of her many achievements makes her most proud, Comella can’t decide; her focus isn’t on what’s already been done, but what is yet to come. “A lot of people say, ‘You’re leaving at a good time, everything’s done.’ But it’s not,” she asserts. “We’ve just laid the foundation. Now it’s time for KPE to really soar.” —VI

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FACULTY NOTES

Hands-on heart research: A new experience for a kinesiology major If Rebecca Tomasi decides to pursue a career in research, this past summer’s hands-on experience will undoubtedly have had an impact. Tomasi, a fourth-year kinesiology major with the Faculty, was one of five students selected for a summer program that offers upperyear students the chance to work in a laboratory while whetting their appetites for research. “I want to work in health care someday, but I’m not 100 per cent sure research is what I want,” says Tomasi, 21. “A master’s degree in exercise science is something I’m thinking about, but I’m also thinking about physiology or sports medicine.” Tomasi spent her summer in the Dr. Terry Kavanagh Heart Health Lab, working with Professor Jack Goodman on a large, long-term study of the cardiac consequences of endurance exercise, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The study has 150 subjects and has been underway for more than a year. “We are looking at factors that may predispose long-term endurance athletes to arrhythmias [irregular heartbeats],” Goodman says. “Research has found that people who have run marathons for 10 to 30 years have a five-to-eight times greater chance of atrial fibrillation.” Atrial fibrillation is defined as “an irregular and often rapid heart rate that may cause poor blood flow to the body.” Goodman’s

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study is examining blood pressure data and other cardiac measures taken from long-term endurance athletes with data gathered from recreational athletes. Tomasi was involved in two aspects of the study: a lab-based cardio-pulmonary exercise test that measures maximum oxygen consumption, electrocardiograms and blood pressure, in addition to echocardiograms (administered at Mt. Sinai Hospital) that assess heart function and structure. “Working with the subjects was a really good experience. I learned how to speak to them so that they were comfortable about the research and informed,” Tomasi said. “I also really enjoyed the cardio-pulmonary exercise test. It went from being something I was unsure I was able to do to running the protocol. That was really rewarding. ” It was Tomasi’s first hands-on research experience and the project offered an additional bonus: the opportunity to be a co-author on a research abstract that will be presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology in the fall. “It was exciting to be part of collecting, inputting and processing the data and now, to be part of the final product,” Tomasi said. “As a result of this experience I will challenge myself to be more analytical.” —ES

Dr. Goodman and colleagues in the Dr. Terry Kavanagh Heart Health Lab are recruiting participants for the “Athletes Heart Study.” Participants must live in the GTA, be 45-65 years old and have a regular exercise history of 10+ years. Learn more or register for the study at www.physical.utoronto.ca

PHOTO/ John Hryniuk


FACULTY NOTES

Research Highlights

Prof. Catherine Sabiston's project, “Improving physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour among breast cancer survivors: MOVING research to practice, has been awarded a Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation operating grant.”

From April 2015 to August 2015, the Faculty was awarded more than $900K in research funding. Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos has been

awarded a SSHRC Partnership subgrant, via McMaster University for her project, “Enhancing community participation in Canadians with physical disabilities: Development, implementation and evaluation of a partnered strategy.” Postdoctoral fellow Katherine Currie, supervised by Jack Goodman, has been awarded a CIHR Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship for her project, “Vascularventricular coupling: Influences of age, sex, and fitness level.”

PhD student Nanci Guest, supervised by Greg Wells, has been awarded a MITACS & matching partner Nutrigenomix Inc. Accelerate Research Internship grant for her project, “Caffeine, genetic variation and athletic performance.”

Katherine Tamminen has been awarded

Michael Hutchison has been awarded

Hospital for Sick Children Centre for Healthy Active Kids “Eat, Play, Think” Catalyst Grant for his project, “The pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in children following hematopoetic stem cell transplant.”

a SSHRC Insight Development Grant for his project, “Sport for Life: A comprehensive investigation of longterm psychological, social, and physical health.”

Guy Faulkner has been awarded a

Hospital for Sick Children Centre for Healthy Active Kids “Eat, Play, Think” Catalyst Grant for his project, “Can the Moblees move Canadian kids?”

PhD student Debra Kriger, supervised by Margaret MacNeill, has been awarded a CIHR Doctoral Award for her project, “The fat body: Making sense of blame, shame & stigma in public health” and a CIHR Institute Community Support Travel Award, for her project, “The best burger I’ve ever had: Public health meets social justice.”

David Frost has been awarded a Centre

Catherine Sabiston has been awarded a

of Research Expertise for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders seed grant for his project, “Educationbased MSD prevention strategies: The influence of work motivation, perceived organizational support, and perception of training quality on learning outcomes.” Photo/ iStock

Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation operating grant for her project, “Improving physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour among breast cancer survivors: MOVING research to practice.”

a Province of Ontario Local Poverty Reduction Fund grant for her project, “Evaluation of the ActiveAssist fee assistance program for individuals in low income.”

Greg Wells has been awarded a

Postdoctoral fellow Daniel West, supervised by Dan Moore, has been awarded a Mitacs & matching partner Iovate Health Sciences International Inc. Accelerate Research Internship grant for his project, “Development of in vitro assays for identification of novel natural products that enhance muscle growth.” MSc student Emma Yoxon, supervised by Tim Welsh, has been awarded a MITACS & India Ministry of Human Resource Development Globalink Research Award for her project, “Effect of action-effect association on modulation of attentional capture in aiming movements.” —Jeremy Knight

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Blues News

Sister Act Team chemistry is a huge competitive advantage. Knowing exactly where your teammate will be can be crucial in setting up that deciding goal or making that last-second defensive stand. But this kind of connection among players can take years to build and in the world of varsity sport can be difficult to establish, since athletes have a limited amount of time to work together. But for the 2015 Varsity Blues women’s field hockey team, this advantage is already going strong. This season the Blues team includes three pairs of sisters, a rarity that comes with the immediate chemistry necessary to contend for both provincial and national championships.

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PHOTO/ Martin Bazyl


For Amanda and Nikki Woodcroft, Hilary and Emily Ziraldo, and Tegan and Emma Stairs there is no better advantage than having that almost-telepathic connection on the field. “We vibe really well,” said fifth-year Tegan Stairs about her sister Emma. “We have the same kind of give-and-go mentality and I know if she gives me the ball she’s working hard to get open to get it back.” This on-field connection between the Stairs sisters paid huge dividends last season when the sisters connected on a last-minute goal to secure an important CIS National Championship round robin victory over the University of Victoria, which propelled the team into the national finals.

Linda Kiefer named Swimming Canada Volunteer of the Year

This synchronicity exists among all the sisters on the team.

University of Toronto Varsity Blues associate coach Linda Kiefer was named Swimming Canada's Volunteer of the Year at this September’s awards ceremony in Ottawa.

“We have spent a lot of time together both in training and at home,” said freshman Emily Ziraldo of her twin sister Hilary. “I think that because of that we have learned to anticipate what the other person is about to do and often I realize that my intuition is already telling me where she is going to run before she even moves.”

The award is normally given to one volunteer to recognize important contributions over the previous 18-month period, but the extraordinary effort needed to organize the Pan Am Games meant that this year five volunteers were recognized.

Along with this innate connection between teammates there is an additional benefit to playing with a sibling that most can relate to: sibling rivalry. This competitiveness can help the sisters push each other even further.

Paul Corkum (Pan Am Games Swimming Sport Organizing Committee Lead), Nicole Normandin (Pan Am Games Open Water Swimming SOC Co-Lead), Jocelyne McLean (Parapan Am Games SOC Lead) and Jeff Holmes (Parapan Am Games Meet Manager) were also honoured with the award.

“Having three pairs of sisters on the team this year will be amazing because it will add to our team’s chemistry but it will also increase our team’s competitiveness at practices,” said second-year Nikki Woodcroft. “I know that Amanda and I have always been competitive and it helps us push each other to be better and perform at our best.” Fifth-year Amanda Woodcroft shared the same sentiment. “It is not common for teams to have this many sets of siblings and I believe we can use this to our advantage. As a team we push those around us to be better, but having someone who you have grown up with for so long, you push them even harder, which grows them as a player and helps the team perform to our best.” As Pursuit goes to press, the Blues women's field hockey team are on track for another outstanding season, with a record of nine wins and one loss. Follow their progress at www.varsityblues.ca. —Adapted from a story by Jordon Hall

Amanda Woodcroft won a medal for her outstanding performance at the Pan Am Games. See Podium Pride, page 47

“In an exceptional year of Canada hosting world-class events, these volunteers had to put their best foot forward on behalf of our country and our sport,” said James Hood, chairman of Swimming Canada’s awards committee. “These are the unsung heroes working tirelessly behind the scenes. Without them these events could not have happened so successfully.” Kiefer volunteered as the Pan Am Games Open Water Swimming Sport Organizing Committee Lead this summer in Toronto. Kiefer is Canada’s highest-ranked female coach and has been head coach of Canada’s FISU games team, an assistant coach for the Commonwealth Games and World Championship teams, and most recently coached 2012 open water Canadian champion Zsofi Balazs at the 2012 Olympic Games. —Jill Clark, with files from Swimming Canada

PHOTO/ Swimming Canada

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BLUES NEWS

Play by play: Living with diabetes Imagine being at a crucial point of the game. Your team needs you. Your heart is in it – but you can’t go on the field because your body won’t cooperate. Third-year Varsity Blues wide receiver Kevin Collins knows this feeling. He has experienced first-hand how painful it is to watch his teammates from the sidelines, unable to contribute. In one instance, Collins had gone to test his blood – a routine check as a Type 1 diabetic – and it indicated his blood sugar levels were too low to continue playing. When this happens he must rest and ingest sugar until his blood glucose levels return to an appropriate number before getting back on the field. Usually the recovery is quick, but this time it seemed excruciatingly slow. Still, at no point did quitting become an option. Collins was first diagnosed as a Type 1 diabetic at the age of 13. “One of the first memories that I have from the day that I was declared diabetic was thinking that I had done something wrong,” said Collins. “That thought is shared by many younger children when first diagnosed and it took a while for me to realize that the condition was nowhere close to my fault.”

“Instead of eight plus needles a day, I now have a semi-permanent needle that is connected by a tube to an external pump that acts as an external man-made pancreas,” explains Collins. “It is consistently pumping insulin into me throughout the day, I just have to count the sugars in the food I eat and it aids in figuring out the rest.” With the advanced technology, an intense schedule of classes, practices, training, and serving as a residence don becomes even more manageable. Add years of experience, support from family and some of the best diabetes doctors in the world, and he now has living with his condition down to a science. Yet, even with all the progress he has made, Collins lives with an understanding that he could easily be sidelined again by his condition, unable to play. “Diabetes, even when properly controlled, as I have it, can still be a very unstable condition,” says Collins. “And that instance was just a little reminder that no game is ever bigger than life.”

—Adapted from a story by Jordon Hall

Type 1 diabetes is a genetic condition that causes the pancreas to produce either too little or no insulin at all. Insulin is needed as a hormone which allows sugar (glucose) to enter cells and produce energy. When he was younger, Collins needed to take eight or more needles a day. Now, he uses an insulin pump.

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PHOTOS/ Michael P. Hall


BLUES NEWS

Blues on the Pan Am Podium

Look who’s trending: Zain Manji back as a Blue A once-in-a-lifetime learning experience, an opportunity to meet true innovators and a chance to help build the ground floor of the future – Varsity Blues senior tennis player and OUA all-star Zain Manji got to experience all of this and more this past summer as a software engineer intern with social media juggernaut Instagram.

Eight U of T student athletes, including four Varsity Blues, took home a total of ten medals from the Pan Am Games. For a summary see "Podium Pride" on page 47.

UPCOMING ACTION U of T to Host OUA Figure Skating Championships

Manji joined the Instagram “search and explore” and data engineering teams. Working alongside some of the best engineers, product managers and designers, he contributed to the planning and development of Instagram’s “trending” feature.

For the first time since 2009, U of T will host the OUA Figure Skating Championship on February 22 and 23, 2016. There will be nine OUA schools participating in the championship.

“After our development meetings, my day would consist of programming for the feature, performing user experience studies and gathering data to measure success,” said Manji. “I now have a deeper understanding of the technology and that will be tremendous to have in the future.”

Think Pink The Varsity Blues are proud to celebrate their ninth annual Think Pink #BleedBlue campaign in support of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (January 22-30, 2016). Women’s Basketball will kick things off, hosting the Ottawa Gee-Gees at 6 p.m. on January 22 at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport. Women’s Volleyball continues to Think Pink the following Friday, (January 29) when they take on the Queen’s Gaels at 6 p.m. at the Goldring Centre. Women’s hockey will cap off the seris of events at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 30, facing off against the Windsor Lancers. To find out how to get involved, and for a full list of programming, visit www.varsityblues.ca.

Manji soaked up as much as he could during his time at Instagram, which was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion back in 2012. This corporate connection provided the opportunity to hear and learn directly from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg who, alongside Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom, would hold a weekly Q&A session for staff. “It was great to hear how they think about the future of their products and where they see areas for improvement,” said Manji of this unique experience. “It was also great to hear what they think about things going on in the world, such as diversity in the workplace, future of technology, economic opportunities and so much more.” Manji took his experience and condensed everything he could into an insightful online article,“8 Lessons from My Silicon Valley Internships” which was featured on LinkedIn and in Business Insider. Now back at U of T, Manji has led the Varsity Blues men's tennis team to the OUA provincial title, going undefeated in the October 16-18 tournament. Manji went 3-0 at the No. 1 singles position, while also winning one match in the No. 1 doubles spot and two matches in the No. 2 doubles category. —Adapted from a story by Jordon Hall

Get the Score! For the latest scores, schedules and highlights of your favourite Varsity Blues sports, check out www.varsityblues.ca. PURSUIT | FALL 2015

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FIT TIPS

Fit for life:

Maintaining your fitness through the decades By Elaine Smith

Fitness is a long-term investment in your health, says Ivan Miskiv, a personal trainer at at U of T's Athletic Centre. “People come in expecting a quick fix, but end up realizing there is no magic pill,” says Miskiv, now in his fourth year at the AC, where he also teaches the practical portion of undergraduate kinesiology and physical education courses. “The result you obtain is from the hard work you put in.” Staying healthy over the course of a lifetime requires different approaches for each decade of life as our bodies change with age and our motivations for fitness change along with them. We also experience new constraints with each passing decade. Here are Miskiv’s suggestions for staying fit through each decade from the 30s to the 60s and beyond.

Fitness Keys for All Ages • Find your motivation, whether it’s internal or external, for fitness and health. • Incorporate strength training and body weight movements. • Choose a cardiovascular tool that you enjoy. Something that makes you feel good. • Discover and eliminate limiting factors. What is keeping you from exercising? When you find them, try your best to remove them. • Find the right environment for exercise. What keeps bringing you back? Social interaction? Programs/classes? Convenience/affordability? Good, positive feelings? Appointments with the Faculty's personal trainers can be booked by calling 416-978-4456

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30s The 30s is what Miskiv calls the “I’ve still got it” decade. “You’re at the tail end of your peak years,” he says. “Your metabolism begins decreasing, along with your oxygen consumption, but you believe you still have what it takes to push yourself.” In fact, VO2 Max, the maximum volume of oxygen that the body can utilize during a minute of exhaustive exercise, begins to decline by 10 per cent each decade, beginning at age 25. Miskiv suggests getting into a routine by planning your week and determining where exercise can fit in. Strength training in your 30s should be high volume and high intensity, with short recovery times. Focus on compound movements, such as squats, push-ups and dead lifts, which work more muscles at one time and require less time overall. Aim to exercise four to five times per week, doing strength training three times per week and high-intensity cardiovascular exercise twice per week. If you do interval training, it should be done at 90 per cent of maximum capacity, with rest cycles at 20 per cent. It may become more difficult to fit workouts in as you focus on building your career and social relationships, but maintaining your health and strength in your 30s will “set you up for later years,” Miskiv says. PHOTOS/ James Kachan/ istock


40s

50s

60 +

As you enter your 40s, nagging injuries begin to bother you and “aches and pains are creeping up,” Miskiv says. “Working out seems a little slower or harder. Your metabolism slows down a lot more and you don’t burn off pizza calories as well, so you need to be more conscious of what you’re taking in.”

The 50s are a time of significant change for both your body and your lifestyle, Miskiv says. You may become an emptynester, giving you more free time, and you probably have more of a budget than you did earlier in life to invest in exercising. Physically, your body may be gaining weight, and your lean muscle mass and VO2 Max are decreasing further.

During the later decades of life, perception and balance are changing and reaction times slow down, notes Miskiv. Muscles are stiffer and you don’t move as easily as you once did. You may not have the co-ordination to learn new exercises, and your range of motion may decrease if you haven’t used your body regularly. Breathing exercises remain important as your VO2 max continues to fall.

You still need to do your strength training, although the volume and intensity may decrease and you may choose to do fewer sets while keeping repetitions the same, or take a longer rest between sets. Working out three to four times a week is ideal, because it gives your body enough of a stimulus and time to recover. If you do interval training, aim for 75 to 80 per cent intensity, with your recovery phase at 15 per cent of your maximum speed. Consider a move from team sports to individual sports as time becomes scarcer. “You need to find a cardio tool that works for you,” Miskiv says, “whether it’s swimming, running, the elliptical trainer or biking.” If you absolutely have no extra time, he adds, try adding exercise into your daily commute to work.

“Re-learn how breathing works and build that endurance,” he says. Breathing exercises, yoga and meditation are all good tools “for managing stress and gaining control back in your life.” This is an age when you cut back on the intensity and volume of your strength workouts (perhaps less weight or fewer sets), and exercise two to three times each week to allow for recovery, Miskiv says. “Focus on transferring gym skills to active daily living.” Intervals should be done at 55 to 65 per cent of maximum effort, with a 10 to 15 per cent effort during recovery. It’s also a good time to find an individual sport you enjoy, since team participation can be harder to organize at this stage: zumba, spinning or yoga, for example. These activities provide both a social outlet and cardiovascular health advantages.

“Get out of your seated position and get moving. Range of motion exercises for your shoulders and hips are important, because they are the most complex joints and most prone to injury.” At this age, interval training could mean challenging your system with a brisk walk at 30 to 40 per cent of maximum intensity, then slowing to 5 per cent for recovery, then repeating the process. You may want to make the transition from weights and bodyweight exercises to exercise machines. They provide support for people who may not be able to stand for long periods. Working out twice to three times each week is probably as much as the body can handle at this stage. Miskiv emphasizes that proper nutrition is also vital at this age. “This is an age when what you’ve invested in your body earlier becomes very important,” Miskiv says, “but it’s never too late to begin exercising.”

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Sport in a new Light Increasing opportunity for underserved kids By Valerie IANCOVICH Photography By Seed9

Ryan Vieira bursts through the doors of Whitby’s Abilities Centre like he owns the place and makes a beeline for the gym. Ryan is a dynamic child – bright, curious and very gracious. But this confidence in a sport setting is a relatively new development. Like other children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, Ryan has struggled with discovering his social self. According to a 2012 study out of the University of Windsor, 53 per cent of children with a disability have no friends. “Ryan was doing absolutely fantastic in school and just being out and about in the community. But I noticed that he was playing a lot by himself and while that’s okay when you’re little, as you get older, socializing becomes much more important,” his mother Lisa says of her now 12-year-old son. So when she heard about the Igniting Fitness Possibilities (IFP) pilot project, launched by KPE researcher Professor Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos and Bloorview Research Institute senior scientist Dr. Virginia Wright, Lisa was immediately compelled to enrol Ryan.

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PHOTO/ Joel Jackson


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The first IFP pilot was launched in 2013 when Arbour-Nicitopoulos, who has extensive experience working with adults with physical disabilities, found that there was a void in programs available for children and youth with disabilities. Keen to collaborate with colleagues at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, ArbourNicitopoulos partnered with Professor Wright, a leader in the field of pediatric rehabilitation. Working with Wright and programming specialists at U of T and Holland Bloorview, the team created an initiative that they believe will fill this gap and provide underserved children and youth with opportunities to discover their love of movement and develop their social skills. “When I joined the Faculty in January 2013 I decided to expand my research program to include children and youth with physical disabilities,” ArbourNicitopoulos explains. “Gradually through the IFP program, my research has gone well beyond physical disabilities, and I attribute much of this shift to my experience with IFP and working with kids with other types of abilities, like Ryan, who has autism. We never wanted IFP to be a program only for kids with physical disabilities,” she explains. “That’s what makes IFP different; it is not another program exclusively for children with disabilities – it’s inclusive.” So far, pilots have been run at Variety Village and at Ryan’s stomping grounds, Abilities Centre. The IFP program is designed for children and youth in grades 4 to 12 from across a full spectrum of abilities. What they all share is little to no experience in sport and physical activity. IFP kids are taught the fundamentals of movement, eventually gaining the skills they need to participate in programs they want to join in the broader community. Researchers predict this will lead to a significant confidence boost, an improved social life and a healthy and lifelong love of being active.

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“When I watched Ryan participate in the curriculum, I could see the organizers were so creative.” The IFP program begins with a 16-week "QuickStart" segment that teaches kids about fitness and assesses their physical strengths and limitations. They get a chance to learn the foundational skills required for various types of sports and are exposed to collaborative games. “We’ve worked with an instructor, Tricia Finlay, here at KPE, using an approach called ‘teaching games for understanding,’” ArbourNicitopoulos explains. This philosophy groups sports and activities into categories. Kids learn about territory games, target games, net/wall games and movement pursuits which allows them to make connections they might otherwise miss. For example, a child may discover that she loves archery and that could inspire her to try other activities in that same category, like golf or bowling. Children and youth make these discoveries while also establishing social connections and bonds with peers in the program, and youth leaders especially. Ryan really hit it off with his mentor Chad who, like others in his role, works with youth in the program to identify activities they enjoy and helps them develop the related skills. Many of these coaches are KIN students or other aspiring leaders in the sport and

recreation community. “It’s a very safe place to be,” explains Arbour-Nicitopoulos. “When I watched Ryan participate in the curriculum, I could see the organizers were so creative,” Lisa says, pointing to their method of teaching Frisbeegolf as an example of their innovative approach. “Before they taught the kids how to play the game, they started by teaching them how to throw a Frisbee. I tried several times to show him that. But the way they did it, these young girls and guys, they were just at Ryan’s level. They were having a social, fun time; it didn’t feel like that typical ‘instruction’ time.” Lisa and her husband have had ample exposure to other more conventional sport and physical activity programs for youth with autism. “In our previous experiences, the organizers would say, ‘We are meeting at this gym or this park at this time and we’re going to play soccer.’ And they’d throw a ball out into the field and it would go nowhere. It wasn’t simply that the kids don’t know how to play soccer, but they don’t know how to kick a ball, period. It’s very difficult for others who are outside of it to understand that. It’s not that these kids don’t understand the game; they just don’t have these fundamental skills.”

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"Chad would be in eyesight, but he wasn’t playing directly with Ryan. It was about building that confidence and then taking a backseat to let Ryan thrive.�

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Once children and youth in the IFP program develop these basic skills and begin to discover their preferences and strengths in the "QuickStart" stage of the program, they move into the "Give it a Try" phase. Coaches, like Chad, help participants to transition into activity and sport programs of their choice in their local recreation and community centres. This was a seamless transition for Ryan. While he still enjoys going to the centre when Chad is working, he’s become more independent in sport and at play. During the "Give it a Try" stage, Chad quietly phased himself out of activities when he saw that Ryan was doing well with kids his own age. “Chad would be in eyesight,” Lisa recounts. “But he wasn’t playing directly with Ryan. It was about building that confidence and then taking a backseat to let Ryan thrive.” In fact, Ryan took so well to the Abilities Centre’s environment and their programs that Lisa was inspired to invest in a membership for the whole family. And Chad still makes an effort to pop by the gym when Ryan and his family are around to share tips on shooting and dribbling. A new IFP pilot launched this fall through U of T’s Junior Blues program. “We were inspired to add IFP to the Junior Blues program as part of our commitment to physical activity and health for all children,” says Jen Leake, director of children and youth programming at U of T. “Children with disabilities have far fewer opportunities to learn how to be physically active; if you don’t learn these skills as a child or youth, you’re

less likely to enjoy physical activity as an adult.” And while starting children young is valuable, Leake points out that youth of high school age can also be underserved, especially if they aren’t already involved in the world of sport and recreation. “Being active helps youth to manage their stress, builds new friendships and increases academic success. When Kelly [Arbour-Nicitopoulos] proposed Junior Blues as a pilot site for the IFP, I was really excited to partner with her. Being able to participate actively in an ongoing research program and apply that research to IFP and across the Junior Blues program is hugely valuable.” On top of the countless benefits to the children and youth are the rich opportunities the program provides to the university students who are implementing the curriculum. “KPE students are excited about the opportunity to teach children with a spectrum of abilities and to put their academic courses into action.” Long term, Arbour-Nicitopoulos and Wright would like to see the IFP curricula continue to expand and improve. “We are hoping to do 10 pilots by the end of two years,” she explains. “The team would like to create a manual and staff training guidelines and package this all in a way that we can share with organizations outside of the University and Holland Bloorview.” Arbour-Nicitopoulos will be happy when the program is self-sustaining. “I want to make sure we are providing a tool kit to our peers and know with confidence that it works. Then we can say that we have really, truly made an impact when IFP can be run out of schools or recreation centres all over the province and the country.”

For Ryan and his family, the impact of the IFP program has already been positive and very real. It’s been over six months since Ryan started the program, but his mother says his transformation has been astounding and far-reaching. Ryan is no longer the boy who tries to connect with his friends using formal handshakes, nor is he wary about picking up a basketball at school. “Now, I see him with his peers and he is interacting in a way that’s just much more age appropriate. He can respond to the ‘Hey man! What’s ups’ with fist pumps and everything. And that’s new since the IFP program.” Ryan’s overall anxiety about school has virtually disappeared. As the summer of 2015 drew to a close, Lisa asked Ryan how he felt about going back. “He usually dreads it. This year he can’t wait to go back because the teacher is male and a sports enthusiast and Ryan associates that with the IFP program and how much fun it was. I also asked him what his favourite subject is. I thought he’d say art because he’s a very good artist, but this time he said, ‘Gym!’ “I really can’t say enough about the inclusiveness and the quality of this [IFP] program! It’s been a real game-changer for us.” This program is currently funded through the Chillin’ for Kids Charity, Goodlife Kids Foundation, the Milos Raonic Foundation, National Bank of Canada and a Connaught New Researcher Award given to Professor Arbour-Nicitopoulos. To learn more about the IFP program, contact kelly.arbour@utoronto.ca or visit www.hollandbloorview.ca/IFP

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ALUMNA ADVOCATES TO MAKE SPORT MORE INCLUSIVE By Valerie Iancovich Photography Seed9

The Pan Am Games were less than two weeks away, and Barb Besharat’s (BPHE 0T5) home base – The 519 on Church Street – was a flurry of activity as staff and volunteers logged extra hours putting together the final pieces needed to transform the community space into Pride House Toronto. “We’ve been doing a lot of work with Toronto2015 to try to make these the most LGBTQ-friendly and inclusive Games in history,” Besharat said of the team’s efforts. The former Blues field hockey player has been working at The 519 for five years as a senior specialist in sport and recreation with a focus on increasing accessibility for LGBTQ communities. Besharat has ample experience in staff training, outreach and awarenessbuilding which came in handy when helping to turn The 519’s vision of a Games that made history into a reality. “We had a really great relationship with the organizing committee. We did workshops with their senior leadership and staff teams and provided feedback on things like volunteer training.” Besharat and the crew at Pride House Toronto had a goal of putting a new lens on the Games, offering unique perspectives on what international multi-sport games mean and how they can mobilize change. Throughout the Games, Pride House was open to the public with a gamut of offerings: streamed, live coverage of events; various arts and cultures exhibits; Pan American-themed food; and plenty of opportunities for free dance, yoga and drop-in sports. Organizers closed down Church Street on weekends in July, creating a Pride-like environment with extended patios, live music and lots of ways to get active.

Pride House Toronto’s contribution to Pan Am extended beyond the reaching out to the Church Street community. Leading up to the Games, Besharat helped to launch an ambassador program that saw 25 representatives from across the province come to the centre for a one-week training session on LGBTQ athlete inclusion and awareness. These representatives then returned home with new knowledge, messaging and awareness that were passed along to several regions, reaching people from London to Sudbury. The team also worked to raise awareness about LGBTQ issues in Pan American countries. “It’s not really going to be talked about otherwise,” Besharat noted. The team commissioned an educational installation that used a map to highlight rights issues in various Pan Am regions and shone a spotlight on over 600 LGBTQ-friendly sports organizations in various countries. Over the years, Besharat has maintained a relationship with the University, regularly contributing to Camp U of T staff training and staying up-to-date on campus equity issues. “It’s pretty amazing to see things change. It has been only a decade [since graduation], but there is such a difference,” Besharat reflected. “U of T has picked up on the Athlete-Ally campaign; Michelle Brownrigg’s position [director of physical activity and equity] wasn’t even at U of T when I was there. When I was at the University and in my later years of undergrad, I joined the positive space committee and there were four of us, including faculty.” Besharat says that many community leaders are slowly starting to recognize the importance of creating physical activity and sports environments that are welcoming to all. “If you make something inclusive for LGBTQ communities, you’re making them more inclusive for everybody.”

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Family Legacy Creates Bright Hockey Futures By Elaine Smith

John Addison’s experiences as a Varsity Blues hockey player brought him into contact with one of the renowned hockey greats of his time, and there’s every chance that the hockey scholarship being created in his memory will offer support to a future U of T hockey legend. Addison, who graduated from U of T in 1953 with a Bachelor of Applied Science, played hockey and football for the Varsity Blues from 1951 until he graduated. Addison was a member of the 1951 Queen’s Cup championship team. When he enrolled at U of T, he already had experience playing for his Upper Canada College teams. It was the era before Canadian Interuniversity Sport, and the U of T team often travelled to the United States to compete, his wife, Joan, said. “John was invited to go to Michigan State on a hockey scholarship, and the school was basically a farm team for the Detroit Red Wings,” she said. “The Toronto Maple Leafs knew all the young Toronto players, and John had been scouted. He went to Conn Smythe [legendary owner of the Leafs and former Blues coach] to tell him about the offer. I think he hoped Smythe would ask him to play for the Leafs. “Of course, in those days the pros played for $20,000. It’s not like today. Smythe told him he’d make more money if he went to school, so John decided to make money with his brain, not his brawn.” Joan Addison’s generous gift to the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education to create the John Addison Hockey Scholarship was made by transferring appreciated securities directly to U of T. In doing so, she avoided paying capital gains tax on the stock’s increased value and also received a tax receipt for the full value of the gift. “If she had sold the stock and given us the comparable amount of cash, she would have paid capital gains tax on her profits,” said Michelle Osborne, U of T’s executive director of gift planning. “If you plan this, you can enjoy the tax advantages, and it’s straightforward and easy to do. “It has become an easy way to give that provides additional advantages to the donor.” Joan Addison said that creating a hockey scholarship seemed to be the appropriate way to honour her husband’s memory. “He loved the game,” she said of her late husband. “I think he and his hockey friends all liked the sport better than school. “By creating a hockey scholarship, I’m doing something lasting in his memory.”

PHOTO/ John Hryniuk

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Thank you to our donors! Your generous gifts impact our students every day By Rachel Keeling

Your gifts from 2014-15

1021 donors C

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0 %

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Total raised from all sources

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237 to academic projects

784 to athletic projects

$2,631,369

64 sponsors $516,501

The Goldring Centre mezzanine Seat Sale raised $164,750 from 137 of 190 seats

raised from sponsorships

12 donors added the Faculty to their wills $974,379

is the value of those future gifts 30

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Illustration/ Shaquilla singh


47

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undergraduate academic scholarships

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Athletes from Faculties received scholarships

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$552,039 pledged to Goldring Centre campaign

163 athletic scholarships PURSUIT | FALL 2015

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DONor Listing

CELEBRATING OUR SUPPORTERS The Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education would like to thank the donors listed* for their contributions during the 2014-15 academic year. Each of these donors has supported our programs and students in varying ways. As you can see from our campaign summary (page 30), each gift makes a difference. Thank you for your generosity. This past year was a milestone year with the opening of the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport. It also saw great strides made in scholarships and planned giving. Six new scholarships were established to support our student-athletes: the John Logan Memorial Scholarship on the academic side; the Phyllis Berck Scholarships; the

Katie Taylor Women’s Volleyball Scholarship; the Provost’s Undergraduate Scholar-Athlete Award of Excellence; the Provost’s Graduate Scholar-Athlete Award of Excellence; and the 6T5 Vanier Cup Coach’s Scholarships. Twelve new donors have included the Faculty in their wills through a planned gift or future gift intention – a tremendous gesture of leadership and support that will ensure the sustainability of our programs. These milestones were made possible by you – our donors. We could not be more grateful to you for your continued support. Thank you for an exciting year. Please join us as we continue to strive for excellence in kinesiology, physical education and sport!

*This listing is reflective of donors who gave $200 or more between May 1, 2014 and April 30, 2015. Please see page 30 for a graphic representation of your gifts. 32

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Individuals Steve Adams Susan M. Addario Carol Anderson Ian MacLeod Anderson Julie Andruchiw David A. Angelo Emmanuel E. Ankrah Rudy Arci Bob and Mary Pat Armstrong Brad Asher and Sue Coventry Mojgan Aslani William L. Bailey Jelena Balic Amelia Ballak Edward Banman Jane Barbeau Samuel Barnett Brian Barr Barry Wallace Bartlett Lawrence Bell Carl Benn Barb Bentley Jim Beqaj Carolyn L. Berardino

Fiona J. Berry Monica Biringer and David Moritsugu James A. Blakelock Dr. Edward and Nancy Bogle Rod Boivin Harvey Botting Sheila Bowyer Harold H. Braaksma Sharon and Jim Bradley Donna Brander James D. B. Bromley Anne and Dan Brown Simon Bruce-Lockhart Dr. Terry Bryon Sam S. Bucci Roberto Bucciarelli Adele M. Buda Brigid Ellen Kealey Burke Mary Anne Burke Lucy P. Burston R. W. Butt George and Martha Butterfield Jennifer Button John Buwalda Joe Cacchione Bill Calhoun

Thoby A. T. Cameron Edward Campbell Robin Campbell Paul H. Carson Veronica Castonguay Christine Caveen Wendy M. Cecil Mark Cervantes So-Jeong Chae Andrew Chan George Chan Chao Lin Chang Tsai Chang Sandipan Chatterjee Thomas Chau Tanya Punita Chawla Allen Chee Hangzhou Chen Shu Chen Jim Cheung Suzie Y. Cho Nicholas Andrew Clark Chris Cleverley Chris Cockle Robert Colelli Christina Connell

Jane P. Connolly Connors Family Tamara Conroy Erica Cooke David Cooper Margaret Correia Scott David Craig Ksenia Crane C. Douglas Crawford Joe Crofts Nirosha Damboragama Mia and Juri Daniel Juri V. Daniel Omar Daniel Peter Daniel Andrea Davis McNeil Frank Davis Dagmar de Liberato Stephen G. and Chris DeHaas Bijan Dehghan Perry N. Dellelce Cheryl Denton Hung Der Marianne Deutschendorf Myriam Donaldson M. Florence Donelly

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Donor Listing

Janice Drakich Kristine Drakich Mary Drakich Matthew R. Duffin Kenneth and Marianne Duggan Shelley E. Dunning Delio Duque Richard Dysselhof Todd Emmerson Nana, A. Ruthie, Julie, Don and Jen J. Trevor Eyton Anita and Mark Fackoury Margaret Faulkner Peter E. Ferguson Paul D. Ferris Kyle M. Fick Randy and Janet Filinski J. Chris Fisher Joyce Flanagan Taylor Fleck Rivi M. Frankle The Furlani Family Carl Georgevski Stephen H. Gerring Beulah M. Gibson Hoot Gibson Robert Gibson Sean Edward Gibson Greg Gilhooly Sarah Gillett

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Stephena Glasgow Paul J.Godin Giuliano Golin Albert Goodman Jack Goodman The Gordon Family Ron Gordon Andrew C. Goupil David P. Grant Barbara Grantham Mark Gray Ed Greco The Mike Green Family Morton Greenberg Mike Guinness Ping Guo Helen Gurney Robert M. Hamilton Janet L. Hanna The David Harquail Family Jerry Hartman Thomas Haslett Ljerka Haughn Debra J. Hayes Karlene J. Headley-Cooper J. B. Healy Paul and Janice Heide Hailey Henriques L. Milton Hess Cheryl Hicken

Andre Hidi Ronald Ho Chris J. Hobbs James Hotti Ernest Howard Marion J. Howell Richard V. Howson Ashley Pui-yee Hui Nancy Y Y Hui Gregory S. Hulse Silvana Iaconis Maria Iafrate Laura S. Inward Sabina Iqbal Predrag Isakov Ronald G. Iwasa E. N. Jackes-Hughson Kimberley Jacobs Paulette E. Jervis Yan Wen Jing Megan Johansen Chuck M. Jung Humphrey Kadaner John Kaites Wendy A. Kane Terry Kavanagh Nola Keenan L. Kelcher Wilfred P. Kenemy Bruce Kidd

Michael Kimming Nicole Kinney Lucy Kletke Susan Klomp Casey R. Knight Paul Knudsen Larry Kozachuk Vangel Krkachovski Victor and Brenda Kruklis May Kumoi Eric Dryden Kyler Gisele Kyne Anne Marie La Traverse Andrew Lam Alumnus Liem T. Lam Percy Lam Ainslee Press-Lamb Dave P. Langley Cara Lato Paul R. Laurent Scott Lawrence Nicole Le Saux Robert M. Lean Alison Lee Nancy C. Lee Demetrios Lefkos Donna Y. Leung Evan M. Leuty France Leveille


Donor Listing

Dayle Ann Levine Janet and Bill L’Heureux Danhe Li Bruno Ligier Robert and Elsie Lindsay Ian Liu Roy Liukkonen Judith Logan and Family Robert Logan Giuseppe Lombardi Art Lowe Emily Lu Fang Yan Lu Ken Lusk Jessie MacAlpine Catherine M. MacDonald John W. Macdonald Doug MacIntosh G. Alexander Macklin Nolan Macmillan Ashok K. Madan Richard Madge John A. Maitland Dan Malamet Peter T. Malinas Ann M. Malowany Susan Manning Richard Marsh Djoko Marusic Nebojsa Marusic

Andrew Mason Louie Masse Cathy Masson Elspeth Mathau Livia Mattacchione Benjamin Mayers Shujon Mazumder Angelo Mazzuca David McCarthy and Kathleen Murphy Robert B. Mcclure Jean McFall Matt McInnes David McKegney Karen McLeister Roy McMurtry McRoberts Family Scott Medhurst Paul Merritt Tyler M. Miehe James Miles Angela F. Millard Alan Milnes Liam Mitchell John Moorhouse Patrick J. Morris Paul Michael Morrison Wayne Morrissey Warren Moysey Tom P. Muir Gerardo Murillo

E. Fred Murrell Hannah Musgrove Anna and Joe Naccarato Fias R. Nanji Loan T. Nguyen Richard Nielsen Edward Nishi Thomas Noble Mason Nowak A. J. Nuttall Yoko Ode Kylie O’Donnell Kelly Marie O’Hanlon Patrick O’Hanlon Marilyn Oneschuk David M. Oswald Ernst Ounpuu Jocelyn Palm Shaune B. Palmer Nick Pantaleo Edward John Parker Joan W. (Dixon) Parkes Mary E. Patterson Linda E. Pella Leanne Pepper Gabriella Permell Michelle Perrier William M. Pigott Julie Pingree Susan C. Smith Priest

John Priestner Andrea Prieur John Purcell Alan Pyle Maxwell E. Quackenbush Joey Rampton Diana F. Ranken Donald Redelmeier Tim and Julyan Reid Paul Richards Scott Richardson Gary Ridout Edward G. Riley Mark and Bev Riseley Athanasios Rizos Mavro Rizzardo Soo-Young Ro Elizabeth M. Roberts Darlene A. Robertson Christopher J. Rockingham Phillip Rodrigues Donald H. Rogers Emma Romano Tiit T. Romet John and Anita Rossall June and Jack Rossall J. Rothwell Ronald N. Rudan Marilyn Y. Rudd Maria Rudyk

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Donor Listing

David Safran Antonio M. Santos Antonio Sardella William and Meredith Saunderson Olga Savelieva Mark R. Sazio Perla Scala Clancy Schell Richard M.Schollen Michael J. Searle Eric Sereda Raymond James Seto John Sharp Geoffrey B. Shaw Patti-Jo McLellan and Jim Shaw Loree Sheehan C. Hugh Sibbald Nancy Simpson Jason D. Singer Gurjant Singh Kuha Sivananthan James M. Sleeth Miriam Sobrino Maria Soos Gonczol Edward B. Sousa Frank J. Spaziani J. Spicer and P. Trott Carey Squires Blake A. Stairs Frank Stanschus Elizabeth Stanton David Stephen Marian W. Sterk 36

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Merrily Stratten John G. Stulac Jake Sudac Tong Sun Carl Swantee Andras Z. G. Szandtner Daniel Tabet Nabil Tadros Kenneth Tai Douglas A. Taylor Louise Simone Tetreault Anne G. Thicke Steve and Loir Thomas Dan Thompson W. Kirkwood Thompson Chloe Tilp Ping Tong David W Tozios Lieu Tran Ryan Tsang David Urness Ernesto Valente Paul Van De Velde Paul Ventresca John Vidovich Paula M. Vine Vlahiotis and Reynolds Families Eugenia Vovk Mark Wadey Margaret C. Walker Nicholas E. Walker James Ware Alan R. Watt

David J. Watt James W. Webster David E. West Dana White and Carmen White Jacqueline Williams Nancy Williams Michelle Willows Deborah Wilson The Honourable Michael H. Wilson Jo Ann Wilton Cameron Windross Fiona Wingrave Eugene J. Wolski Chris Woodcroft Jillian Woolley Cara Worthington Neil Wright Po-Han Wu Elvis Xhameni Pablo A. Yepez Alexander Yolevski Kate Zeidler Eddie Zervoudakis Michael Zuberec Stelio Zupancich Thomas J. Zwimpfer

Corporations & Foundations 1011142 Ontario Limited O/A Mike Demore Drywall 1954 Varsity Blue Football Alumni 1st Step Carpentry Alexandra Rodney Adriatic Homes Advance Tile and Floor Covering (Toronto) Ltd. Air Conditioning Experts Ark Industries Ltd. Bell Canada Beacon Environmental Betty and Chris Wansbrough Family Foundation at the Toronto Community Foundation The Brand Factory Inc. Bright Pics Inc. Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada Carlisle Goldfields Limited Cassels Brock and Blackwell LLP Centre Ice Training Academy Inc. Cisco Systems Canada Co. Clintar Landscape Management C. M. Harding Foundation Deloitte & Touche Foundation Canada DJK Contracting The Donut Factory Downsview Kitchens Dr. Hartley Garfield Medicine Professional Corporation


Donor Listing

Dr. Justine Blainey Chiropractic Professional Corporation F C Custom Finishes and Contruction Ltd. Fitness Inst. Foundation Fund in Memory of Lloyd Percival at the Toronto FoundationFlexity Solutions inc. Foremont Drywall Contracting Fort Garry Hotel Fox Excavating and Grading Ltd. Georgetown Raiders Junior "A" Hockey Club Giancola Aluminum Contractors Inc. Golden Gate Travel Agency Ltd. Golf Canada Foundation High Point Investments Limited Hydro One Networks Inc. Inland Audio Visual Jane Lockhart Design Communications Inc. John Deere Foundation of Canada Kinesiology & Physical Education Undergraduate Association Kylemore Homes L’Espresso Bar Mercurio M.S. Lamont and Associates Ltd. Masters Insurance Limited Medi Group Incorporated Meridian Credit Union Limited Miller Paving Limited Nick and Lynn Ross Charitable Foundation North York Tile Contractors Limited

Ontario Association of College & University (O.A.C.U.H.O.) Ontario Society of Paediatric Dentists (O.S.P.D.) Paterson Smith Family Foundation PHE '72 Ladies Group Powers Property Group Q Residential R. I. Algie Medicine Professional Corporation Rapid Steel Inc. RBC Foundation RMP Athletic Locker Ltd. RN Design Limited Sabourin Kimble & Associates Limited Safety First Consulting Ltd. Sandpiper Restaurant Management Group Scotiabank Group Shabby Lane Interiors Soil Engineers Ltd. Suhail Mirza Giving Fund Summit Forming Ltd Sun Life Financial Symtech TD Bank Group The Consilium Group - 979410 Ontario Inc. The Lawrence & Judith Tanenbaum Family Foundation The Tatham Group Tillsonburg Glass & Mirror Ltd.

Toronto Central Dental Hygienists Society Torque Builders Town + Country BMW Tradeworld Realty Inc. Trojanone Ltd. Varsity Grads Foundation Varsity Leadership Foundation Vision Network Real Estate Ltd. Y.M. Inc.

King’s College Circle Heritage Society* Justine Blainey-Broker & Blake Broker Bruce Alexander Boyd Sharon and Jim Bradley Robin Campbell Paul H. Carson George Cass Anne K. Chun Ron Crawford Colin Patrick Doyle David Lloyd Drew Debbie Dykes Elizabeth Earle Aleksander Andrew Fedko Kim Fowler Carl Georgevski David N. Greey George Gross

Helen Gurney Victor Harding J. Barrett Healy Andrew J. Higgins Bill Huycke Bruce Kidd Peter Klavora Terry Knight Richard S. Kollins Byron MacDonald Peter Maik Chris McNaught David Ouchterlony Sheryn Posen M. Stratten Paula Vainio-Paunic Sheila Vierin Paula M. Vine Gary and Pat Vipond Ron Wakelin Ron Walbank James W. Webster Gail E. Wilson Ron Wilson Wayne Douglas Yetman Adam Zimmerman Wendy Zufelt-Baxter The Faculty would also like to thank 6 anonymous donors.

*T he King’s College Circle Heritage Society recognizes donors who have remembered the Faculty through a provision in a will or other form of future gift commitment. PURSUIT | FALL 2015

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Getting together

(Top left) The new Hall of Fame digital display at the Goldring Centre, (Bottom left) Thomas R. Loudon Award recipient Liz Hoffman and (Right) Paralympian Joanne Berdan.

Hall of Fame ceremony a ‘night of firsts’ The Kimel Family Field House at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport was abuzz on May 28 as guests mingled, mixed and reminisced at the 2015 U of T Sports Hall of Fame ceremony. The night opened with Dean Ira Jacobs presenting the prestigious Thomas R. Loudon Award to former athletic director, coach and KPE leader Liz Hoffman. Jacobs saluted Hoffman’s decades of service and the lasting impact her initiatives made on sport at U of T. “Under Liz’s watch, University of Toronto developed gender and sport equity policies that were firsts in interuniversity sport in Canada,” Jacobs told the crowd. “Her initiatives shaped the co-curricular athletics and recreation experiences of countless U of T students on all three campuses.” Hoffman received a standing ovation from the crowd as she came to the mic. For Hoffman, the honour was very much a family affair – literally, with her husband Rick and sons Mark and Matt at her side – and metaphorically, returning “home” to her Blues stomping grounds. “We will always be part of the Varsity Blues family. I thank you for this honour; I will always treasure it; we will always treasure it.”

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The emotional reflections and humble acceptance speeches continued as 10 athletes, three teams and four builders were welcomed into the U of T Sports Hall of Fame. While a decades-old tradition, this particular induction represented a new era with a series of firsts. This was the first time celebrating inductions at the Golding Centre for High Performance Sport. The Faculty also unveiled its interactive digital display, honouring the 281 individuals, teams and builders inducted into the U of T Sports Hall of Fame over the last 28 years. The ceremony also included the first induction of a para athlete: track athlete Joanne Berdan. Volleyball was well represented throughout the night (Paul Cox, Edgar Leug, the 1990-91 men’s team) with more than one inductee giving a nod to veteran former coaches Orest Stanko and Eli Drakich (inducted in 2003).  Master of Ceremonies Byron MacDonald, head coach of the Blues swimming team, shared in many trips down memory lane as former Blues aquatics standouts were inducted (Saul Marks, Michael Guinness and Liz Warden). Warden delivered a

particularly heartfelt acceptance speech about her days as a Blue being her best, leaving guests visibly moved. The Faculty honoured greats of yesteryear posthumously: archer Jean Strangway (Hayward); swimmers Phyllis Haslam and Mary Casson; fencer Alvin Ma; builders Sir Arthur Chetwynd and Rev. Bruce Macdonald. Alumna and broadcaster Nancy Lee was also honoured as a builder and, ever the leader, directed the spotlight on to KPE senior staff past and present: Bruce Kidd, Hoffman, Beth Ali and Ira Jacobs, among others. Lee joined the 1978-79 women’s swimming and diving team which was also inducted alongside coaches Merrily Stratten and Skip Phoenix. The night closed with the induction of the 1954 Yates Cup championship football team. For Beth Ali, director of intercollegiate and high performance sport, the evening was an inspiration. “I’m so proud of all of this year’s inductees – it takes a remarkable amount of dedication and tenacity to reach this level of excellence in sport.” —VI

PHOTOS/ Jing-Ling Kao-Beserve


Getting together

Spring Reunion 6T5 This class celebrated its 50th anniversary with great excitement and pride. Several graduates returned to campus for a May 30 tour of the current facilities and a luncheon the following day at the home of classmate Sue Somerset. Thank you to Margo van Zeyl for her efforts in organizing this enthusiastic group.

7T0 Bob and Peggy Belcher, Sharon Bradley and Mabel-Anne Waters joined forces to organize a very successful gathering for their 45th reunion. On May 31, a group of 40 classmates enjoyed dinner and games – despite a last-minute downpour! Congratulations on a great event.

8T0 The class of 1980 (along with good friends from 8T1 and 8T2) returned to their old stomping grounds for a reunion in the Benson Student Lounge on May 30. Thanks go to Nabil Tadros for reaching out to the alumni of his era to celebrate their 35th anniversary!

7T5

0T5

Keith Bagg and Syd Cappe took the lead in bringing their classmates together for a 40th reunion on May 29. The group enjoyed a tour of the Goldring Centre with Dean Ira Jacobs, followed by dinner close to campus. Members of the class of 7T5 are particularly grateful that they were able to celebrate this milestone together before the death of cherished classmate Neil Sorbie. Please see the In Memory section on page 43 and Time Out on page 48 for more about Neil's contributions.

The class of 2005 celebrated their 10-year reunion with a tour of the Goldring Centre, followed by a gathering at the Duke of York pub on May 30. Thank you to Natalie Slomka for bringing her classmates back together for this milestone.

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Getting together

Baseball Alumni Classic On August 23, former Blues baseball players joined the current team for a full day of food, fun and baseball. The day featured a home run derby (congratulations to the winner, Steve Correia!) and a game that pitted alumni against this year’s Blues at the Dan Lang Field at University of Toronto Scarborough. Congratulations to alumnus pitcher Tyler Wilson who was named Player of the Game, and special thanks to former coach Dan Lang and Hall of Famer Mike Didier for coming out to join the fun.

Backyard Volleyball Classic The women’s volleyball program partnered with the City of Stratford to host an all-weekend beach and grass volleyball tournament and youth clinic on August 15 and 16 on the new courts in Stratford. Proceeds supported the Varsity team and the facilities in Stratford and it was a great opportunity for community outreach for our coaches and players! A special thanks to Brad Hernden, U of T alum and Manager of Recreation & Marketing, City of Stratford, for his leadership and efforts in making this event a success!

Varsity Leadership Foundation

Golf Tournament Football alumni and friends gathered for a sold-out event on August 10 at King Valley Golf Club in King City, Ontario. Despite rain, the Foundation enjoyed its most successful tournament to date. Thank you to Wendy Kane for her organizing expertise and to the support of the Blues Football Alumni Network for making this event such a success, and to the generous support of everyone who attended the event. From left to right: Andy Szandtner, John Ginou, Terry Stutz, Mike King

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Class of 6T8 Golf Reunion Ron Wilson faithfully initiated the annual gathering for his class, bringing together 21 grads for an enjoyable day of golf on June 6.


Getting together

Field Hockey and Men’s Rugby Alumni Golf Tournament After a successful first-time golf tournament last year, the Varsity field hockey program teamed up with men’s rugby to co-host the event this year at Caledon Woods Golf Club in Bolton, Ontario, on August 29. The skies cleared and 56 golfers hit the greens while raising funds for both teams. Thank you to all of the sponsors who supported this event! Field Hockey alumnae Penny Reilly, Lou-Ann Westlake and Cathy Coffin

Women’s Hockey Alumni Golf Tournament Players, friends and alumni of the women’s hockey program once again came together for a successful golf tournament fundraiser on September 19. The team has worked tirelessly to make this event an integral part of their program funding, and their passionate supporters answered the call again this year. A big thank-you goes to all of the sponsors, donors and volunteers who made this event possible. From left to right: Joe Shearer, Kelly O’Hanlon (alumna), Patrick O’Hanlon (Gold Sponsor) and Marlie McLaughlin

Goodwood Golf Day Supporters of the Goldring Centre Capital Campaign were invited to a day of golf at the exclusive Goodwood Golf Club, hosted by Patrick O’Hanlon, the campaign chair, on September 21. Special guests and donors to the campaign came out to enjoy one of the most spectacular courses in Ontario. The Faculty was grateful for the opportunity to thank our donors and Campaign Advisory volunteers for their ongoing support of this pivotal project that has benefited our students, professors and the University of Toronto as a whole. For more information on the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport’s campaign, please call 416-677-5357.

6T5 Vanier Cup Champions Team Anniversary This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1965 Vanier Cup champion football team. In honour of this milestone, team members Andy Szandtner and Ray Reynolds helped organize a reunion dinner at the Faculty Club on September 25. The following day, 30 of the original team members were honoured on the field at half time during the Blues game against Queen’s University and enjoyed a reception in the Adam Zimmerman Room overlooking the field. This group has been instrumental in fundraising for the 6T5 Vanier Cup Coaches Scholarship, which will support current Varsity football players annually. Thank you to the 6T5 team!

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ALUMNI UPDATES Class Notes 1950s

1970s

1980s

Mary Macdonald

Mike Katz

Peter Baxter

BPHE 5T3, Basketball

New College 7T2, OISE 7T6, Basketball

BPHE 8T2

Mary had the thrill of participating in the Pan Am Torch Relay this July. At 83 years young, Mary received the torch from boxer Lennox Lewis, an Olympic gold medallist, in Newmarket, Ontario. It was fitting recognition for her lifelong dedication to and participation in sport, including her membership on three Pan Am women’s basketball teams: 1959, 1963 and 1967.

Alumnus and former head coach of the Varsity Blues men’s basketball team (2004-11), Mike was inducted to the Ontario Basketball Hall of Fame in honour of his contributions to the sport provincially, nationally and internationally. In addition to being named Coach of the Year in 2007-08, Canadian teams under his leadership earned many accolades, including silver at the 1997 World University Games. We are proud to have been part of Mike’s illustrious career.

Peter has been named the next president of Ontario University Athletics (OUA). Peter has been the director of athletics at Wilfrid Laurier University since 1998. During his tenure the school has won 31 provincial and nine national championships. The Faculty congratulates him on this great honour and recognition for years of good service to university sport.

2000s

1960s Peter Burwash

Barbara Kennedy

Ron Castro

BPHE 6T7, Tennis, Hockey

BPHE 7T6

BPHE 0T5

Peter has been honoured by the Tennis Industry Association as the sole inductee to their Hall of Fame in 2015. Peter, the founder of the largest tennis management company in the world (Peter Burwash International), is known throughout the tennis community for promoting good service and positive impact through his sport. He has used his knowledge as a sport physiologist and nutritionist to write several books, he is a sought-after speaker for corporate events and in 1995 received the International Tennis Hall of Fame’s Educational Merit Award. Congratulations on this wellearned recognition, Peter.

The Faculty partnered last fall with the Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada and, by coincidence, the alumna who leads it, Barbara Kennedy, executive director. Barbara has been instrumental in raising funds to honour Dr. Terry Kavanagh, renowned for his research in the field of cardiac rehabilitation. With Barb’s help and the generosity of the Foundation, one of the eight new research labs in the Goldring Centre bears Dr. Kavanagh’s name.

A Registered Massage Therapist, U of T staff member and alumnus, Ron Castro continued to make waves on the international sport scene with his role in the 2015 Pan Am Games in Toronto. Ron worked with the Integrated Support Team for Swimming Canada during the Games. He lived in the Athletes Village and provided poolside treatment to Canada’s strongest swimmers.

Alumni Survey – Coming Soon! The Faculty is eager to keep in touch with our grads in order to include your updates in Pursuit and get your feedback on how your experience as a student affected your success after graduation. Keep an eye on your inbox for our e-survey. Not receiving e-mails from the Faculty or have an update for Class Notes? Contact rachel.keeling@utoronto.ca

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Alumni Updates

In Memory Clarence “Baz” Mackie BPHE 5T5, Football

Baz was a proud former Blues and professional football athlete; he played three years with the Toronto Argonauts. In May, he celebrated with his 1954 Yates Cup champion teammates at their induction to the U of T Sports Hall of Fame. Baz was also selected to the All-Century Team – recognition as one of the standout players during 100 years of football at U of T. In addition to his passion for sport, he dedicated 32 years of his life to teaching with the North York Board of Education, rising to the rank of principal and leading anti-drug workshops in schools after his retirement.

Neil Sorbie BPHE 7T5, Rugby

Donald Cheeseman Engineering 5T6, Football

Neil passed away on May 30, just one day after his 40th class reunion. He was an active member of the rugby community at U of T and in Ontario, advocating for the Blues and providing years of leadership as the executive director of the Ontario Rugby Union. Neil also had a successful teaching career with the Toronto District School Board. He will be remembered by his classmates for leading the charge to establish a full outdoor education program (a legacy that is alive and well in the Faculty’s undergraduate curriculum today) and for honouring Professor Kirk Wipper after his death by portaging a specially built canoe from U of T’s Hart House to the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough.

A former Blues and CFL athlete, Don passed away in July at age 82. Before settling his family in Australia, Don played from 1953 to 1955 with the Blues while pursuing a Bachelor in Applied Science and Engineering. He was drafted by the Hamilton Tiger Cats in 1956.

James Holowachuk BPHE 6T6, Basketball, Football A standout athlete in two Varsity Blues sports, James went on to teacher’s college after graduation. This led him to a satisfying 33-year career at Sir Sandford Fleming Academy as a teacher and coach. He maintained his enthusiasm for sport and education throughout his career, and was also involved with North York Parks and Recreation for 20 years. PHOTO/ Torontonensis

Albert Gary Gorelle BPHE 5T5, Football Albert Gary Gorelle passed away in July. Albert, or Gary, as most people called him, enjoyed a fulfilling career as a history and physical education teacher. Gary also led several football teams in Peel County to great success as a coach—a prime example of his lifelong commitment to sport and education.

Our condolences to family and friends. PURSUIT | FALL 2015

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A Look Back at Pan AM

Repair, care and sideline support

U of T medical staff was well represented at Pan Am By Valerie Iancovich

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PHOTOS/ provided by clinic staff.


A Look Back At PAN AM

“We were proud to have our staff involved in multiple capacities, sharing their expertise with Toronto2015.” When you see photos or watch footage from Roseline Filion and Meaghan Benfeito’s final Pan Am dive you’ll notice that Filion’s left ankle is snugly wrapped in athletic tape – a subtle, yet key, detail that ensured the Canadian duo made it to the top of the podium on July 13. “We were working feverishly to decrease inflammation,” athletic therapist Andrea Prieur recalled. Prieur works full time at U of T’s David L. MacIntosh Sport Medicine Clinic, but shared her skills with Canada’s diving and taekwondo teams during the Pan Am Games. “We were able to support the ankle and she didn’t have any issues. But that kind of detail can make or break a performance.” Fellow Canadian diver Vincent Riendeau also earned a medal thanks to Prieur’s behind-the-scenes treatments. “Vince took silver in the 10 metre. The first thing he did after his dive was come over to me and say ‘I couldn’t have done it without you.’” The young diver had a massive wrist injury which was so serious that he hadn’t practised more than a handful of arm stands – a vital manoeuvre in his dives in the week leading up to competition. Prieur is one of a dozen staff members from the clinic who volunteered their time to tend to Canadian and visiting athletes. These roles are highly coveted in the field of sport medicine, but between

the shifts at competition venues and the hours of care at the athletes’ village, 12-to-14-hour days were not outside the norm. The clinic reduced operations to accommodate for the fact that 60 per cent of its physicians and therapists were working at the Games. “We were proud to have our staff involved in multiple capacities, sharing their expertise with Toronto2015,” says Dr. Doug Richards, medical director of the clinic. Richards was also on the ground at the Games, operating as part of the host medical team on campus, covering field hockey (on the Back Campus fields), volleyball (at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport) and working as a member of the Canadian medical team, mostly dedicated to open water swimming. “It was partly a choice to cover the home territory. I’ve worked here since 1981, so I’m a Varsity Blue. Plus, I know my way around.” Prieur felt a similar sense of confidence working in a familiar environment. “From a medical perspective, it provides peace of mind to be on home turf. We know that the ambulance system works. We are working with a lot of our colleagues and know that together we are able to give the best care possible.” Prieur is proud of what the core (serving Canadian athletes) and host (tending to visiting athletes) medical teams were able to provide. The Canadian village

residence offered an arsenal of resources for athletes. An entire floor was set up for medical care and therapy, including a meditation and rest room complete with a small waterfall; there was also a full-time nutritionist on hand and kitchenettes to keep athletes healthy, rested and well-fuelled . Dr. Ian Cohen was part of the core medical team working at the athletes’ village. But he also spent several hours on Lake Ontario as a first responder for sailing athletes in 10 fleets of boats on three race courses. He says that his regular work at U of T, including tending to the Varsity Blues football and hockey teams, helped prepare him for working at a major games like Toronto2015. For him, the most exciting part was “seeing the fierce competition up close, getting to care for some of the best athletes in the world and working with sport medicine physicians and therapists from across the country.”

Other KPE and clinic staff who contributed their efforts to the Games include: Valentina Alonzi, Erin Brooks, Ivan Canete, Marcel Charland; Charles Cohen, Dr. Neil Dilworth, Kristine Drakich, Lily Fan, Sandy Heming, Linda Kiefer, Susan Lee, Dr. Mark Leung, Rose Lin, Mariah Mitsilios, Jason Meehan, Steve Manchur, Byron Macdonald and Dr. Lee Schofield. In total, more than 60 staff, instructors and faculty members from across the Faculty were volunteers for the Games.

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A Look Back At PAN AM

Viva Pan Am!

The University of Toronto opened its doors to athletes, staff, volunteers and sports fans to have some fun and to toast the spirit of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games.

1 2

3

1. P  resident’s launch party at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport 2. R  obin A. Campbell, Carl Georgevski, Scott Thomas, Sasha Gollish 3. Robin Campbell, Zack Chetrat and swimming alumnus Donald Carr 46

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4

5

4. Jo Kenemy, Robin Campbell and Judy Goldring

7. Camp U of T counsellors and kids with the Honourable David Onley

5. B  lues Cheerleaders at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport

8. Mascot friends: Pan Am’s Pachi and U of T’s True Blue

6. S  aad Rafi, CEO of Toronto2015, Scott Mabury and Ira Jacobs

9. S  asha Gollish speaking at the President’s Launch Party

PHOTOS/ Johnny Guatto / William Suarez


A Look Back At PAN AM

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Podium Pride The Faculty was proud to cheer on 15 Blues and KPE athletes at TORONTO2015. Below is a list of those whose outstanding athleticism delivered podium performances. Zack Chetrat, Swimming Bronze, Men’s – 200m Butterfly Sasha Gollish, Track Bronze, Women’s – 1500m

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12

13

Michelle Li, Badminton Gold, Women’s Singles Bronze, Women’s Doubles Rosie MacLennan, Gymnastics Gold, Women’s Trampoline Kate Sauks, Rowing Gold, Lightweight Double Sculls Alex Thicke, Field Hockey Bronze

14 10. Zack Chetrat with Judy Goldring, Robert Smuk, and Rianna and Raddyn Smuk

12. The U of T fencing team at Hart House reception for athletes

11. Reception for Athletes at Hart House

14. Bruce Kidd and Zack Chetrat with Camp U of T counsellors and kids

13. T  he Honourable David Onley

Sarah Wells, Track and Field Silver, 400m Hurdles Bronze, 4x400m Relay Amanda Woodcroft, Field Hockey Bronze PURSUIT | FALL 2015

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TIME OUT Carving out life lessons By Valerie Iancovich

A cozy reprieve from winter’s sub-zero temperatures, an igloo is one of the simplest examples of engineering intelligence. Knowing how to carve out perfectly squared bricks of snow and ice to build such a dwelling, however, isn’t a talent you’d expect of urban U of T students. But today’s third- and fourth-years at KPE have the unique opportunity to learn this skill thanks in part to the efforts of their predecessors, in particular, the late Neil Sorbie (see page 43). Together with a handful of his peers, including Syd Cappe (BPHE, 7T5), Sorbie spearheaded some of the Faculty’s first winter camping trips, eventually leading administrators to make cold-weather excursions an academic option for undergrads.

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These first frigid adventures – led by the beloved Kirk Wipper – involved battling stubborn campfires, dodging exploding cans of food and getting that first bittersweet taste of solo trekking. A number of grads from that PHE 7T5 group grew into lifelong, all-season outdoor enthusiasts, but Cappe is quick to point out that they learned more than survival skills on those early outings. “I learned a good rule of life,” he reflects. “A simple one: If you know you can get a great night’s sleep, you can handle any number of the day’s indignities.” Surely, there is a lesson in that for all of us.

PHOTO Illustration/ Joel Jackson


Get an edge on your winter workout. Get the gold standard in body composition assessment – visit us for a BOD POD® session.

Precise, accurate, reliable and comfortable, the BOD POD® uses non-invasive whole-body densitometry to determine your body composition (fat and lean mass), giving you the knowledge you need to define your fitness goals. Combine your BOD POD® session with Fitness Testing or Nutritional Analysis to create a custom fitness plan, or check out our wide range of personal training options. Few institutions in Ontario offer this service, so take advantage of your U of T affiliation now! Sessions start at $77 and take 20 minutes or less. Visit uoft.me/bodpod for details. See Fit Tips (page 18) for research-driven insights on how to stay fit at any age.


Sit Courtside We’re adding new courtside seats to get fans closer to the action! Donors who contribute $2,000 or more will have their names prominently displayed on the back of these prime, courtside seats in the Kimel Family Field House at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport! We will honour these esteemed donors with an exclusive invitation to a special game reception.

Donation Form

I would like to purchase ______ seat(s) for a total of: ______

Method of Payment:  My cheque made payable to the University of Toronto is enclosed  Visa

 Yes I /We would like my/our name(s) to appear on donor recognition lists. Additionally, I would like my name(s) permanently displayed on the back of a seat at the Goldring Centre, as indicated:

 MasterCard

 AMEX

Card number _______________________________ Expiry Date_____ __________ __________________________________ Name of Cardholder (please print)

_________________________________ Signature

Full Name______________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________ (please print)

For additional information, please contact Jessica Kovacs by phone at 416-978-6944 or at jessica.kovacs@utoronto.ca

Address________________________________________________________________ City___________________Prov./State_______Postal/Zip Code____________ Telephone (_____)____________Telephone – Business (_____)_______________ Email____________________________________________________________________________________

Thank you for investing in the University of Toronto. Please send your donation to: Alumni Office, 55 Harbord St., Toronto, ON M5S 2W6. The University of Toronto will acknowledge donors by displaying their names on front row, courtside seats in the Goldring Centre. All donations will be acknowledged with a charitable tax receipt. Project: 0560012958 Fund: 431071 Solicitation: 0570052688 Charitable Registration Number: BN 108162330-RR0001

Publication Mailing Agreement #40065214 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:

Pursuit

55 Harbord Street Toronto, Ontario M5S 2W6

Profile for U of T Kinesiology & Physical Education

Pursuit - Fall 2015  

This is the Fall 2015 issue of Pursuit magazine, the official alumni publication for U of T's Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Pursuit - Fall 2015  

This is the Fall 2015 issue of Pursuit magazine, the official alumni publication for U of T's Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Profile for uoftkpe